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March 2021

Parking spaces

How cities are reclaiming street parking spaces for public use

Cornelius Vanderbilt, one of the richest men in American history, has said the best possible investment is real estate in New York City. More than 150 years after his death, his words turned out to be premonitory: real estate prices in the Big Apple have reached astronomical levels that even the Commodore himself could never have imagined. It’s easy to see why. Manhattan is an island, space is limited and demand will always exceed supply. Buildings may get taller and taller to accommodate a growing population, but they no longer make ground on them. But what if we all wake up one day and find that New York actually has over 20 square miles of land that no one has noticed before?

Today is that day.

Most people don’t think about parking spaces on the street. They are just a fact of life that we all grew up with and that we all accept as normal. People get into their cars, pull over to a sidewalk, enter a store or office, then get back into their car. Pretty simple, right? It’s also incredibly inefficient, it contributes to pollution and ultimately benefits a few people while bothering millions of others. The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed just about every aspect of our lives, and it has also given us the opportunity to take a step back and really reassess where we want our urban areas to go. And one of the main achievements is that street parking is detrimental to the life of a city.

There is nothing good about the pandemic, and I certainly don’t want to downplay the catastrophic effect it has had on so many families and businesses in the United States. It is nothing less than a national tragedy. But the massive changes caused by the virus have given us a unique opportunity to see how cities can be improved. In the end, none of us were prepared for the pandemic and our infrastructure was not up to par. The only reason we made it through last year was the heroic efforts of millions of people, including city and county officials who burned midnight oil to find solutions to a consuming problem. that no one had ever considered. event.

The Smart Cities Collaborative recently published a special report titled Covid and the sidewalk which explores how cities are making radical changes to street parking. Some jurisdictions actually create curbside parks that turn streets into bustling areas where people can meet and connect. Others are creating transit and bicycle lanes to reduce congestion. There isn’t just one right way to do it, but what is increasingly evident is that now is the time for innovative thinking.

The pandemic may have accelerated this conversation, but it has been going on for some time. Two years ago, the City Journal made a strong case to replace street parking with better options, and Bloomberg find that street space in Manhattan (most of which is free) had a real value of over $ 6,000 (per year?). It’s a lose-lose for everyone except someone from Westchester who wants to hit town for a night out, and that’s not a compelling enough reason to make 44% of Manhattan’s streets unusable. Most of New York’s two-lane streets are actually 50 percent blocked four-lane roads. If you’ve ever spent 45 minutes trying to walk six blocks during rush hour, you know how maddening it is.

The problem, of course, is people are still driving, and that won’t change next year. Thanks to the pandemic, fewer people are using public transportation in most U.S. cities, even as work-from-home policies have become the norm. How to reconcile the desire to reclaim parking lanes with the increase in the number of drivers? The good news is that this is not an insurmountable problem because it is not a situation of choice. This is where parking garages can alleviate just about any problem caused by street spaces without sacrificing drivers’ ability to safely access their workplaces.

At a basic level, this may sound a little optimistic. After all, as anyone who has walked in circles to park in a densely populated city like San Francisco knows, there never seems to be enough garages. But the reality is much more complicated: there are actually a lot of garages in just about every city, but in many cases these are not the “right kind” of garages. So while there may be waiting lists to get a coveted spot in a downtown office tower, it’s likely that a hotel three blocks away or an apartment building from the across the street has additional underutilized spaces. It is not a problem of supply and demand: it is a problem of information exchange. And cities that can figure out how to use empty parking spaces will have a lot more flexibility in their ability to reduce or eliminate on-street parking and reclaim thousands of square kilometers of prime urban properties for everyone to enjoy. can use and enjoy them.

Jeremy Zuker is the co-founder of WhereiPark, a technology company that enables owners of multi-family residential and commercial buildings to discover new sources of revenue through innovative solutions that exploit unused parking spaces.

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Uncategorized

Latest e-book takes a look at waterproofing concrete parking structures

The magazine’s sponsored e-book series continues with an overview of waterproofing concrete parking structures.
Photo courtesy of RJC engineers

Owners, engineers and contractors involved in the design, operation, maintenance and restoration of parking garages and building podium decks should understand the role and importance of waterproofing systems in protecting these facilities. When there is a lack of attention to these systems, repair and maintenance costs increase and the expected life suffers.

The methods of protecting parking garages and catwalks have evolved and changed dramatically over the past 30 years. Old ways of thinking and designing have given way to new understandings of deterioration mechanisms and protection needs, some of which are reflected in the new requirements of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) S413, Parking structures. The better understanding of how moisture and de-icing salts accelerate the deterioration of concrete and steel structures has encouraged growth in this sector. The long-term performance of these buildings is directly related to the effectiveness of the watertight barriers used to prevent contamination by moisture and de-icing salts, as well as the management of salt-laden water entering the building. installation. An article in our latest sponsored eBook looks at waterproofing concrete parking structures.

This waterproofing article, along with two others, can be found in our latest eBook “How to Waterproof Concrete”, a free downloadable resource. To get your copy in pdf or digital format, visit www.constructioncanada.net/ebook/kryton-how-best-to-waterproof-concrete-e-book.

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Parking spaces

City of Boston expands carpool program to 250 parking spaces – Boston 25 News

BOSTON — Before stepping down for a cabinet post in Washington, incumbent Mayor Marty Walsh announced that Boston would expand its Car Share Boston Pilot Program from 40 reserved parking spaces to 250 on local streets and municipal parking lots.

“I am pleased to expand the availability of Car Share Boston, which provides residents with access to vehicles that are conveniently parked in their neighborhood and available for personal use,” Walsh said. in a statement Monday.

The expansion of carpooling places involves businesses Zipcar and Moveand is one of the goals of Go Boston 2030, according to the release.

“Carsharing members often sell or choose not to buy a car, and for every carsharing vehicle added to a neighborhood, there are up to thirteen vehicles removed or not added to the streets,” the statement said.

However, the expansion is not suitable for some longtime residents who have spent years fighting for parking spaces.

“Oh, I thought that was stupid,” said Marcos Palmarin.

Palmarin lives on Dexter Street in South Boston. Last week, he said he noticed a few parking spaces outside his home reserved for Getaround vehicles.

“The concept is nice, but it’s something I don’t use and what it does is just take away my parking space,” Palmarin said.

John Devine has lived on Dexter Street for over 50 years.

“I don’t like it because parking is a priority now anyway, I don’t like the idea,” Devine said.

But Southie resident Connor Frauendorf loves the idea of ​​carpooling. He said he relied on it while a student at Bryant University.

“For me, I think it’s great,” Frauendorf said. “It was very simple and quick. The app was easy to use and for me I didn’t have a car on campus… so I could just use the app, get in the car and go wherever I wanted, I figured it ‘was great.

A Getaround spokesperson said the program reduces traffic congestion and accidents.

“Cars are parked for an average of 22 hours a day. Studies show that sharing a car can take up to 10 cars off the road, which means fewer accidents, less traffic and less space needed to park,” the spokesperson said in an email to Boston 25.

A Zipcar spokesperson said 80% of its members do not own or lease a car, and nearly 50% have put off buying a car because of Zipcar’s services.

“A UC Berkeley study found that each Zipcar eliminates the need for up to 13 personal vehicles, reducing congestion and increasing available sidewalk space,” a Zipcar spokesperson said in an email. mail to Boston 25.

According to the press release, the city has placed a cap of 30 parking spaces dedicated to car sharing in the city center and the seaport.

“The City believes that supporting greater availability and awareness of car sharing as an alternative to personal vehicles will reduce the number of single car owners, reduce vehicle miles traveled, make more space available for a range of uses and will reduce the rate of carbon emissions,” a city spokesperson said in an email to Boston 25.

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Parking spaces

Monaco and its coveted car parks

Car parks and parking spaces have long been a hot topic of discussion in Monaco. Waiting lists are long and some residents have to wait years to finally get one of the coveted spots. At the same time, the Prince’s Government encourages the use of public transport and other modes of transport that respect the environment.

In Monaco, there are 17,000 public parking spaces, but with the increase in demand for spaces from residents, the authorities are finding it increasingly difficult to meet everyone’s needs. Indeed, the Public Parkings Office currently has 6,000 requests from residents on its waiting list.

“Every month, I write to the parking department to inquire about my request and they tell me that they are currently processing requests for 2016”, explains Corinne, a 60-year-old resident who desperately needs a place to park her. . auto. “I managed to get a card that I top up as I go, but the daily parking fee is costing me so much money with the current parking rates.”

Parking somewhere for several days is still very delicate in Monaco and it is practically illegal in France

More than 6,000 requests put on the waiting list

“I think Monaco Car Parks or the town hall should make sure that each apartment has at least one parking space, if they are in a building that does not have a garage or private parking”, explains Riccardo , 40 years. -olders with heart failure. “I am in no way a priority because of my health problems,” explains the local who always tries to obtain his own parking space. For now, he has decided to rent a box in France, more than four kilometers from his home, as well as to sell one of his three cars. “Parking somewhere for several days is still very delicate in Monaco and it is practically illegal in France… my car was impounded even though I had only parked it for a few days in a car park in Cap d’Ail.

It is important to find the balance between equity and the general interest

The issue of cars left in public parking lots for long periods of time

In Monaco, some vehicles are parked for long periods and others cannot use these spaces. The Principality is currently trying to solve the problem of vehicles, whose owners seem to have permanently “reserved” a few parking spaces. At present, almost 400 vehicles fall into this category.

Earlier this year, the Prince’s Government wanted to make this case an offense punishable by a fine of 60 euros, but finally decided that such a measure would not be applied. “I hope that a constructive dialogue can be established”, declares Marie-Pierre Gramaglia, Minister of Equipment, Environment and Town Planning, explaining her desire to reassess the measure. “It is important to find the balance between equity and the general interest.

>> READ ALSO: The Citymapper application officially covers all of Monaco

Use your car, but no more than 15 times!

In Monaco, people who do not use their car more than 15 times a month benefit from a reduction of 10 euros on their monthly bill. However, with reward programs and sanctions being used at the same time, sometimes drivers got a bit lost and took to social media with their reviews. “I have seen these comments and received letters from drivers expressing their incomprehension”, says Marie-Pierre Gramaglia, before recalling that “using your car all the time cannot be the only option for getting around: Government policies continue to strongly favor the use of public transport and promote soft mobility, in particular walking, which is facilitated by a large network of mechanical installations and the development of the Monabike bicycle service.

>> READ ALSO: Sustainable travel in Monaco: welcoming the new Monabike

“Living in Monaco without a car is very easy, but in my opinion it is essential to have one for shopping, going to appointments outside the Principality, as well as for all other emergencies”, explains a man from 49 years. elderly resident, who has a gasoline-powered car and is patiently waiting for her own parking space. She has been on the waiting list as an employee in Monaco for seven years, and for three years as a resident. “I thought that the government’s desire to make people pay more for a place, if they did not use their vehicle at least once a month, was very fair, but after negative responses from certain selfish people, the measure no has never been introduced, which is a great shame.

Some residents, like Gianfranco, are investing in hybrid vehicles, which are more respectful of the environment. “I asked the Monaco Public Parking if it was possible for me to have a place, because I could not charge my electric car at home and the other charging points were far from my home. Grianfranco had no choice but to fill his car with gasoline: “it’s a shame that the Principality supports eco-responsible initiatives, but the inhabitants of here cannot always take advantage of them.

>> READ ALSO: Monaco launches purchasing aid for electric and hybrid vehicles

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces to be determined according to the distance from the metro stations: DDA | Latest Delhi News

The Delhi Development Authority (DDA) has proposed that all new buildings, except residential projects, near metro stations and multi-storey car parks have 10% to 30% less parking space, a measure aimed at ending congestion by preventing on-street parking and encouraging the use of public transport.

According to the dynamic parking rules, approved by the DDA at a meeting last Thursday, parking space for new buildings will be defined not only by the use of the premises but also by access to public transport and parkings.

“Currently, parking standards are based on the designated use of the premises. It has been observed that the excess parking in apartment buildings overflows onto the roads and leads to congestion in public spaces. The new parking standards have been developed based on the availability of the metro system, other modes of public transport (including taxi aggregators) and multi-level car parks,” said a senior DDA official, on condition of anonymity.

The new rules, drafted by the Delhi Urban Art Commission (DUAC), streamline parking space for 35 categories of buildings such as malls, colleges, community halls, hospitals, etc., the official said.

A second DDA official said the Union Department of Housing and Urban Affairs last year asked DUAC to review existing parking standards and come up with appropriate measures. The new standards will now be put in the public domain for comment before being notified by the ministry.

Once notified, the new rules will apply to all properties where construction has not started, even if plans have been approved by the relevant local civic agency, a third DDA official said. “In all cases where the plans have already been approved, the properties can be developed according to the revised standards and the local body concerned can be informed in writing. No separate permission will be needed,” the official said.

Proximity to the metro, parking lots

According to the new standards, for a property (except residential) located less than 500 meters from a metro station, there will be a 30% deduction on the authorized parking space. For properties located more than 500 meters and less than 800 meters from a metro station, there will be a 15% discount. For properties within one kilometer of a multi-level car park, 10% of the permitted parking space will be deducted.

Currently, a new shopping complex located less than 500 meters from a metro station must provide three equivalent parking spaces (ECS) per 100 m² of built-up area.

An ECS is the parking space that must be provided in a building, based on its built-up space (floor area), for the parking of vehicles, including cars, scooters, light vehicles, etc.

Transport experts hailed the move, saying it’s the “way forward” for the planned development. They also wanted a cap on the maximum parking that can be provided for a local. Amit Bhatt, Transport Manager, WRI India, said: “It is a good thing that they have reduced parking in areas where metro or multi-level car parks are nearby. Many cities around the world are moving towards maximum parking. This means that they cap the maximum parking space. This should also be done in Delhi.

Banquet halls, shopping malls

The new standards also reworked existing parking standards for various “use categories” such as shopping complexes, hospitals (mainly public hospitals), education and training centers, community halls, social centers and cultural institutions, district courts, government offices, etc.

For banquet halls, the authorized parking limit has been doubled from three ECS per 100 m² to 6 ECS, without any deduction for proximity to a metro station. Officials said this was done to ease congestion on the roads around the city’s banquet halls, where roadside parking is a major problem, especially during wedding season. For hotels, however, the limit has been reduced from 3 ECS per 100 m² of built-up area to 2 ECS, plus the applicable deduction for proximity to a metro station.

For malls like Connaught Place, the current limit of 3 ECS has remained unchanged. But, deductions for proximity to the metro and parking lots will apply. (For more categories, see box)

Residential projects

Authorized parking limits have only partially changed for residential areas. While the standards for plotted residential areas remain the same, the rules for group housing companies have changed. However, the subway and parking deductions will not apply to buildings or residential areas.

For residential areas, the DDA proposed to take the number of housing units as a reference instead of the current built-up area.

Currently, 2 ECS per 100 m² of built-up area is the standard for collective housing. It will now increase to 0.5 ECS per dwelling for companies whose each house/apartment has an area of ​​less than 40 m². If the accommodation is between 40 m² and 100 m², 1 ECS parking space per house/apartment must be provided.

Anumita Roy Chowdhury, Executive Director (Research and Advocacy) at the Center for Science and the Environment, said: “The provision of parking in housing projects should also have the proposed deductions in other categories if they fall into the zone of influence of metro stations or transit-oriented. development. After the entire metro network in Delhi is built, almost 70% of the city will be in transit-oriented development areas (close to metro stations). Therefore, if we do not apply the deduction for subways and multi-level parking lots in residential settlements, it would negate the benefit of this policy.

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Parking facilities

SpotHero IQ now offers dynamic pricing in more than 1,000 car parks

CHICAGO–(COMMERCIAL THREAD) –SpotHero, the leader in digital parking in North America, today achieved a first in the parking industry by launching dynamic pricing capabilities in more than 1,000 parking lots. SpotHero IQ delivers the most comprehensive North American parking industry demand dataset, valued at $ 36 billion, integrating real-time demand data for the most comprehensive view of behavior of consumers.

Now living in over 65 cities with 100 operators in over 1,000 parking lots, SpotHero IQ provides parking operators with automated rate recommendations and inventory management solutions. SpotHero IQ automates the once-manual task of adjusting parking rates online by providing parking operators with dynamic, data-driven rates. This allows operators to determine the optimal pricing in high and low demand environments using real-time data. For drivers, this responds to the SpotHero mission to facilitate travel everywhere at the right price.

“As we approach recovery from COVID, it has never been more important to make data-informed decisions about how to price inventory,” said Mark Lawrence, co-founder and CEO of SpotHero. “SpotHero IQ allows operators to proactively manage demand volatility, whether it’s a lull due to foreclosure or a spike once cities are back on the boom again. In doing so, we help optimize online sales for maximum income for our partners.

Partner operators leveraging the platform see an average increase in revenue of over 40%. One Parking, a national parking operator with more than 80,000 spaces under management, saw its revenues increase by 44% at 19 sites through SpotHero IQ.

“By having real-time data on where and when parking is needed, all the inventory and pricing decisions we make are supported by valuable numbers,” said Rosario Palella, vice president of One Car park. “It has been a game-changer, allowing us to capture parkers in timescales that we wouldn’t have previously. We are thrilled to join SpotHero at the forefront of the parking industry’s evolution towards digital pricing. and dynamic.

SpotHero IQ consists of a larger family of products for the unique needs of each partner. The suite’s namesake product, SpotHero IQ, offers demand-based pricing for online inventory at all parking lots at no cost to operators. SpotHero IQ + integrates with PARCS to overlay parking occupancy data on demand online and provides robust business intelligence tools. Future developments will provide full yield management for all parking inventory.

To learn more about SpotHero IQ and to sign up for exclusive video content, visit spothero.com/sell-parking/iq.

About SpotHero

SpotHero is the leader in digital parking and the only independent off-street parking market in North America. Millions of drivers use SpotHero’s mobile apps and website to find, reserve and access off-street parking at more than 7,500 locations in 300 cities across the United States and Canada. Major carrier partners leverage SpotHero IQ, SpotHero’s AI-powered dynamic pricing platform to make data-driven decisions. For more information visit SpotHero.com.

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Parking spaces

Amherst Town Hall Renovation Will Impact Parking Spaces

Posted: 03/14/2021 20:07:58 PM

AMHERST – Premier parking in downtown Amherst will either be removed entirely or reduced when the North Common in front of City Hall is renovated.

After several years of planning, presentations and discussions, city council will likely vote later this month on the project which CEO Paul Bockelman says could leave more than half of the 32 parking spaces, according to one scenario. , or eliminate vehicles from the site. entirely.

Bockelman said the vote at the March 22 meeting will be for plans that include a landscaped plaza and a lot more green space, even though there are 22 parking spaces left. The project could cost between $ 1.5 million and $ 1.9 million and depends on the injection of $ 500,000 from the Community Preservation Act account.

According to the proposals, there would also be changes to Boltwood Avenue in front of City Hall and Grace Episcopal Church that would make the street one-way south of Main Street. There are also various ways to add more parking if the spaces in the Main Street parking lot disappear.

The council’s municipal services and outreach committee, which in January reviewed plans made by Weston & Sampson of Rocky Hill, Connecticut and the city’s Department of Public Works, is not making a recommendation on the exact plan to follow because he could not reach a consensus. .

Ahead of the vote, the Amherst Business Improvement District surveyed businesses near the Main Street, Amity and South Pleasant parking lot, gathering their thoughts on catering. Amherst Business Improvement District Executive Director Gabrielle Gould wrote in a letter that restoration is important “to the health of our community and to the post COVID-19 economic success of our small businesses.” The deterioration over the years has resulted in what we consider to be a dangerous horror in the heart of our downtown core. ”

But for 63% of the 27 companies that responded to the survey, parking should stay, with the rest preferring not to park on the North Common, but also explaining that the city should do something to encourage space for art. and music and add tables for outside dining.

“The parking ban looks better, but the lack of parking worries me as a business owner,” wrote Rachael Moran, owner of Pasta e Basta restaurant at 26 Main Street.

A similar sentiment came from Lindsey Matarazzo, owner of Russell’s Liquors at 18 Main Street.

“People don’t want to fight to find parking and I don’t think they’re going to park in a garage and come to Russell,” Matarazzo wrote.

Joyce Austin of J. Austin Jewelers, 31 South Pleasant Street, wanted the parking lot removed. “It’s welcoming and much more appealing without the automobiles taking up space,” Austin wrote.

The plans also gained support from the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce. John Page, its Director of Marketing and Membership, wrote last fall that “the revitalization of the North Common and Main Street lot will contribute to a vibrant downtown, attracting visitors, customers and permanent residents.”

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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Parking spaces

New Love’s brings 115 truck parking spaces to Kansas City, Missouri

The new Love’s in Kansas City, Missouri is located off State Highway 210 and offers 115 truck parking spaces. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY — With the March 11 opening of a new travel center, Love’s is serving customers in Kansas City, Missouri. The new location, located off State Highway 210, creates 38 new jobs and adds 115 truck parking spaces in Clay County.

“We are thrilled to open our 18th location in Missouri,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “This location, along with the food and drink options available – such as the new range of chickens introduced this week – gets professional drivers and four-wheeled customers back on the road quickly and safely.”

The new location is open 24/7 and offers a variety of amenities including:

  • Over 12,000 square feet;
  • McDonalds;
  • 115 truck parking spaces;
  • 86 parking spaces;
  • Seven RV parking spaces;
  • Eight diesel bays;
  • Seven showers;
  • laundry room;
  • Speedco;
  • Gourmet coffee beans;
  • branded snacks;
  • Fresh cooking concept;
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest electronic devices;
  • CAT scale; and
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand opening, Love’s will donate $2,000 to Winnetonka High School in Kansas City.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Boston planners approved over 11,000 new parking spots in 2020 – StreetsblogMASS

According to year-end statistics compiled by the Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA), Boston planners have approved 55 development projects in 2020 that will build more than 12,000 new homes, 6.5 million square feet of new commercial spaces and enough parking to store up to 11,162 additional cars – and almost all of that new parking lot would be built in transit-accessible neighborhoods within a quarter-mile of an MBTA station.

BPDA 2020 project approvals for mixed-use and residential developments

“TOD” denotes “transit-oriented development” – projects located within a quarter of a mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter train station. Source: BPDA

Purely residential projects Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 20 12 60%
Housing units 1,403 734 52%
Residential SF 1,437,173 714,254 50%
Other SF 112,450 34,587 31%
Parking spaces 660 113 17%
Mixed-use projects (excluding Suffolk Downs) Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 25 19 76%
Housing units 3 794 3 125 82%
Residential SF 3,809,345 3,218,896 84%
Commercial SF 1,831,079 1,819,753 99%
Other SF 739,548 653,732 88%
Parking spaces 3,542 3 267 92%
Suffolk Downs Project (Boston part only)
Total % NEVER
Housing units 7,150 100%
Residential SF 7,310,000 100%
Commercial SF 3,210.00 100%
Other SF 470,000 100%
Parking spaces 6,760 100%

About three-fifths of this new parking lot (up to 6,760 spaces) and nearly two-thirds of the housing (7,150 apartments) would be concentrated in East Boston as part of the Suffolk Downs development, which offers direct access to two stations MBTA Blue Line. . This project is expected to be built in phases over the next decade.

Outside of the Suffolk Downs project, the BPDA has approved 4,402 parking spaces, 5,197 new housing units and 5 million square feet of space for commercial, institutional and other non-residential uses (for context, the huge Partners Health headquarters building adjacent to the Assembly Orange Line station in Somerville contains approximately 825,000 square feet of office space).

Although the BPDA is allowing massive amounts of new parking throughout the city, the parking-to-housing ratio has declined this year from 2019, when the agency approved 4,762 new homes and enough parking for 5,080 cars. .

Related:


Development data from 2019 shows almost all new housing in Boston is built for car owners

Among the 20 purely residential projects approved in 2020, developers would build 1,403 new apartments and 660 new parking spaces, or approximately one parking space for 2 apartments.

But among the subset of 12 apartment projects that would be located within a quarter of a mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter train station, the parking ratio was significantly lower: a total of 113 new parking spaces for 734 apartments (0.15 spaces per housing unit).

The vast majority of new developments in Boston are mixed-use, with a mix of residential and commercial space. These projects had higher ratios of parking spaces per apartment, but their garages could also be shared with commercial tenants.

In addition to the Suffolk Downs Master Plan, the BPDA approved 25 other mixed-use projects in 2020, of which residential uses were the main overall component.

These projects (excluding Suffolk Downs) would build approximately 3,023 new homes, 2.6 million square feet of office, retail and other non-residential space, and 3,542 parking spaces.

Boston’s modest drop in parking-to-apartment ratio this year can be attributed to the Metro Planning Commission 2019 “Perfect fit” report, who investigated parking usage in new residential developments in Boston and its suburbs, and found ample evidence that developers built an excessive amount of parking in new residential developments, at the expense of traffic and the affordability of public transportation.

Related:


StreetsblogUSA: apartments with free parking reduce public transport ridership

A handful of projects that the BPDA approved in 2020 avoid all on-site parking, whatever it is: a new mixed-use building proposed for Boylston Street in the Fenway neighborhood, for example, would add 477 new apartments with retail and theater space on the ground floor, without a parking garage.

And in Roxbury, the project Northampton Street Residences (pictured at the top of this article), will replace an above-ground parking lot with a new 6-story building containing 47 affordable homes adjacent to Southwest Corridor Park, just one block from the Massachusetts Ave station. Orange Line.

Most of the BPDA-approved commercial and institutional construction projects that were approved in 2020 will also not build new parking garages.

Last year, the BPDA approved 2.3 million square feet of new construction among 9 non-residential projects, including hotels, offices and laboratory buildings.

According to the BPDA, only two of these projects will include on-site parking: a new television studio WBZ-TV on Soldiers Field Road in Allston, which will include a 140-space parking lot, and a multi-building project in Kenmore Square, which will include a 60-space parking garage.

BPDA 2020 project approvals for commercial and institutional developments

“TOD” designates projects located in neighborhoods oriented towards public transport. Source: BPDA

Purely commercial projects
Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 7 5 71%
Total area 1,610,458 1 445 385 90%
Parking spaces 200 60 30%
Purely institutional projects
Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 2 2 100%
Total area 688,750 688,750 100%
Parking spaces 0 0 0%
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Parking garage

Parking garage roof could become a gathering place in downtown San Jose

Site plan for the conversion of the roof terrace of the San Pedro Square garage to a people terrace with assembly areas and performance venues, concept. An “immersive community” of gathering areas, performance venues and food centers could sprout atop a parking lot in downtown San Jose, according to a concept sketched out by a major architecture and design firm. Gensler

SAN JOSE – An “immersive community” of gathering areas, performance venues and food centers could sprout atop a parking lot in downtown San Jose, according to a concept sketched out by a major architectural firm and of design.

The San Pedro Square Garage rooftop terrace could become a “people’s land” and create new hubs of activity in downtown San Jose, said executives from Gensler, the design company that designed the idea.

Activities and gathering areas on the roof of the downtown San José garage in San Pedro Square. // Gensler

“This is a large underutilized parking lot and the idea is to turn it into a parking lot for people,” said Peter Weingarten, director and general manager of Gensler’s San Jose office.

The multi-level parking garage overlooks North San Pedro Street, West St. John Street and North Market Street and is adjacent to the restaurant, bar, entertainment and nightlife of San Pedro Square.

“It’s potentially a really fun place to activate,” said Scott Knies, executive director of the San Jose Downtown Association. “It’s great because it’s open from all sides. But you have buildings nearby that help frame the site.

The garage serves a useful function as a parking space for the busy parts of downtown San José. Yet on three of its sides, the garage simply features concrete walls that also separate San Pedro Square from the main thoroughfare of Market Street.

“We want to change that from being an obstacle to a bridge between Market Street and San Pedro Square,” Weingarten said. “The idea is to transform this space and give it a bigger purpose and create greater connectivity.”

The garage could serve as a new “urban bridge” in downtown San Jose, Gensler said in a 32-page presentation that details his concepts and ideas for a reinvented rooftop terrace.

Street level view of San Pedro Square in downtown San Jose looking south with the garage on the left side, concept. // Gensler

At present, the rooftop terrace is already being used for an array of activities, particularly with the lack of trips to park in the Bay Area and South Bay as one of the side effects of the closures. companies linked to the coronavirus.

According to Gensler, photoshoots, meetings, shoots, dancing, exercising, biking and going out are some of the most popular common activities for the garage roof terrace.

A section of the ground floor of the parking lot in Piazza San Pedro has already been brought to life thanks to a project designed by Gensler.

About two years ago, Gensler was the driving force behind “Moment,” an effort that created four pop-up retailers in parking spaces on the San Pedro Square side of the garage.

Social and gathering space at the top of the parking garage in San Pedro Square in downtown San Jose, aerial view, concept. // Gensler

The effort on the roof is nicknamed “Moment 2.0” by Gensler.

People could create, socialize, shelter, relax, walk, interact, picnic, walk their dogs, play and exercise on the roof.

“There has to be a reward for people when they get to the rooftop, so we could introduce a lot of meaningful and diverse programs, we could have food trucks that would create an elevated food court,” Weingarten said. “You could have a little theater up there. “

The activated roof would also feature varying elevations in the form of tiny hills or hollows.

“Changes in topography can bring excitement and more interest,” Weingarten said. “It also allows us to create exterior pieces that range from the quiet to the rowdy. “

Bringing together spaces and activities atop San Pedro Square Garage in downtown San Jose, concept. // Gensler

It will cost money to achieve it, so Gensler hopes to generate interest from companies to help fund the development of the new rooftop terrace as well as to fund ongoing and ongoing activities.

This concept is also part of the expansion effort to gradually activate blocks and sections of downtown San Jose.

“We totally believe in the future of downtown San Jose,” Weingarten said. “There are some incredible destinations that already exist that are being projected into the city center. But there are also uncomfortable gaps between fields of activity. The site of this garage fills one of these gaps very well. A revitalized roof can be really exciting.

As San José and the rest of the Bay Area begin to emerge from the government-ordered business closures that have crippled the economy, these types of hotspots won’t only be useful, they can be essential.

“It will take a parking lot and make it a gathering space,” Knies said. “We need to bring people back to populate downtown businesses. We can’t wait to redo events. We’re finally going back to the Roaring Twenties. “

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Parking garage

State College: Parking Garage Repair and Construction Overview

State College Borough has been asked to spend around $ 4 million over the next three years – and $ 7.3 million on a 10-year plan – to keep its four parking lots in working order, based on a report examined Monday by the borough council.

According to the condition assessment report, which is carried out by an external consultant approximately every seven years, repairs should be made to correct structural problems, improve waterproofing, stabilize cracked facades and other fixtures, in order to ‘Ensure the garages and their 1,563 combined parking spaces last.

The projected cost this year alone is $ 1.48 million, nearly half of which is for the Beaver Avenue garage.

“These are expenses that are going to be necessary to maintain these vital parking assets,” added Ed Holmes, interim parking director for the borough.

Due to the impact of COVID-19 on the borough’s parking fund – on-street parking and garages remained free for long periods of 2020 – the borough will have to borrow money for the three-year plan short term and refinance the old debt. The Board will have to approve everything and it is expected to vote on the borrowing authorization at the next regular meeting on March 15th.

Here’s a closer look at each parking garage, recommended repairs / issues and associated costs, by Walker Consultants at Monday’s Borough Council meeting:

Garage on avenue des Castors

Built: 2005 (Precast concrete of normal weight)

Parking spaces: 529 (195,000 square feet)

Estimated costs over 3 years: $ 1.21 million

Estimated costs over 10 years: $ 3.28 million

beaveravenue_brick.jpg
Walker Consultants Condition Assessment Report

Yes, this is the “new” – or at least the “newest” – garage. But, at 16, it’s time to invest more in repairs so it can last another 40 years, officials said. This is why the projected costs of this garage over the next decade are over $ 1 million more than the next most expensive garage.

One of the main concerns here, at least in the short term, is the loose, cracked and bulging thin brick facade. Most of the loose areas were removed in January, but Walker Consultants said the extent of the damage was more severe than initially thought – and recommended removing the brick facade entirely and replacing it with a textured coating to prevent the brick from potentially falling on pedestrians. .

Repairing this brick facade is expected to cost about two-thirds of the estimated $ 741,000 in repairs to the Beaver Avenue garage for 2021. This ($ 485,000) is more than double the facade repair costs for the other three garages – combined – over the next 10 years.

“This brick is starting to present security problems”, admitted the director of the borough, Tom Fountaine. “So we’re going to have to sort this out. “

Overall, however, the garage is still considered to be in “good” condition. Other problems include chips and cracks in the stairs, occasional deterioration at the base of some handrails, loose support rods, sealant issues, window seals in fairly poor condition, broken light fixtures or aging, door rust, damaged / missing signage, etc.

Fraser Street Garage

Built: 1985 (CIP P / T Normal weight concrete)

Parking spaces: 335 (154,000 square feet)

Estimated costs over 3 years: $ 564,000

Estimated costs over 10 years: $ 929,000

fraserstreet_beams.jpg
Walker Consultants Condition Assessment Report

Although it is the second oldest parking garage in the borough and the third largest, its projected costs remain the cheapest.

“Very minimal work must be done with the Fraser Street garage over the next few years,” said Borough Facilities Director Thomas Brown.

Walker Consultants has labeled the garage as in “fair” condition with the garage having at least 10 years in its lifespan. However, in order for it to last a little longer, the garage will need to modernize and maintain its waterproofing system due to corrosion and deterioration.

The maintenance cost in 2021 here will be around $ 124,000. The most expensive repair will be the injection of epoxy into the concrete slabs, with an expected price of $ 34,500. Other issues to be addressed include deterioration / cracking of beams, separation near vertical joints, unpainted edges, changes in elevation (slopes) that need to be painted, leaching, sealant of perimeter windows, corrosion of balustrade bases, etc.

McAllister Street Garage

Built: 1991 (Precast concrete of normal weight)

Parking spaces: 218 (66,000 square feet)

Estimated costs over 3 years: $ 645,000

Estimated costs over 10 years: $ 1.1 million

mcallisterstreet_flange.jpg
Walker Consultants Condition Assessment Report

The smallest car park in the city center of the district has no particular problems. In fact, the problems here are recurring.

The McAllister Street garage has a number of chips and cracks in the concrete at the roof, in addition to broken shear connections. “We’ve been doing it for years in this parking lot,” Brown said.

That garage shouldn’t be a priority this year, with just $ 20,000 in costs planned – and $ 625,000 in costs planned for next year.

According to Walker Consultants, the structure is in fair condition with some areas in poor condition, such as the poured-in-place concrete retaining wall along the exterior ramp. Other issues include loose aerial concrete, broken concrete at edges, wall cracking due to moisture issues, out-of-code ramps, washout, leak stains, column deterioration, worn paint, faulty window seals, clogged drains, etc.

Pugh Street Garage

Built: 1972 (CIP P / T lightweight concrete)

Parking spaces: 491 (158,000 square feet)

Estimated costs over 3 years: $ 1.43 million

Estimated costs over 10 years: $ 1.98 million

pughstreetSLAB.jpg
Walker Consultants Condition Assessment Report

Pugh Street is unique in several ways. On the one hand, it’s the oldest downtown garage in the borough for 13 years – and it’s the only garage to use lightweight concrete. Maybe then it shouldn’t be too surprising that this garage is nearing the end of its lifespan, even with repairs.

Depending on the borough, the Pugh Street garage can probably be used for another 7-10 years. After that? Well, that’s something the borough council will have to discuss. (“Strategic abandonment” or a new structure are the two options.) Either way, in order for this garage to remain functional in recent years, there are some structural components that need to be repaired. Further tests are also underway to rule out a change in the quality of the concrete, which could increase expected costs.

The cost in 2021 alone will be $ 591,000, with the largest expense – repairing slab edges due to cracks – accounting for more than half of that amount. Other issues include sealer failures, deterioration of edgings and columns, rusted handrail bases, out-of-code ramp guardrails, washout cracks, paint peeling, elevator maintenance , dirty and aging signage, etc.

The full report on the condition of the four garages, and their associated costs, can be found on Monday’s Borough Council agenda at statecollegepa.us.

Josh Moyer received his BA in Journalism from Penn State and his MS from Columbia. He has been involved in sports and news writing for almost 20 years. He’s got the best athlete he’s ever seen like Tecmo Super Bowl’s Bo Jackson.

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Parking garage

The new cool in parking garage design

The new cool in parking garage design

Parking garages present an aesthetic challenge to even the most creative design minds. Their vast scale and monotonous appearance is necessitated by their function, but comes with the difficulty of making garages visually interesting instead of just overwhelming. Coating a parking garage in a single material can add visual interest and texture to create a more human connection. However, this in turn creates concerns about bringing light and air into the garage.

To balance the aesthetic and functional needs of parking garages, Kaynemaile reinvented two-thousand-year-old chainmail armor into an architectural mesh that reduces solar heat gain and creates an interesting facade while allowing ventilation and transparency. visual. Unlike a panel facade, this system can be manufactured to any height and width without the need for annoying joints, ideal for large scale applications like a massive garage. Here are some case studies that take advantage of the unique properties of this polycarbonate mesh.

Bold waves for the Pacific Fair parking garage

Located on the Gold Coast in Australia, this parking lot had a predetermined structural framework within which the pavement system would need to function. With the unlimited screen size, however, designers always had the opportunity to explore different design concepts. Reducing heat gain while maintaining airflow was crucial in the subtropical climate of the Hold Coast. Kaynemaile reduces both radiant heat and thermal conductive heat by up to 70% without sacrificing daylight, ventilation or visual transparency.

Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Angus Martin
Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Angus Martin
Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Angus Martin
Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Angus Martin

The three-dimensional facade creates a wave pattern, reminiscent of the neighboring Pacific Ocean, using a layer of champagne-colored mesh in front of a second translucent navy-colored mesh. The double layers give the facade a radically different look from day to night. In daylight, the sun catches the rippling champagne mesh, hitting it at different angles across the facade. At night, on the other hand, architectural lighting highlights the marine layer behind, which ripples in the breeze as the structure shines from within.

Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Angus Martin
Pacific Fair parking garage, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Angus Martin

Sun shading for the Westfield carousel

Westfield Carousel is a shopping center near Perth, Australia. Three-dimensional mesh pyramids span the four facades of the huge complex, for a total area of ​​nearly 7,000 square feet (or 650 square meters). The pyramids are created from a shimmering bronze colored mesh which gives a vibrant look to the Australian sun.

Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Dion Robeson
Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Dion Robeson
Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Dion Robeson
Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Dion Robeson

The steel substructure was installed first, with a Kaynemaile mesh then applied to each rectangular frame. The simple and versatile mounting system made installation quick and easy, even given the scale of the project. Again, for Australia’s hot climate, it was imperative to keep air flowing throughout the garage. The mesh has an open structure of about 80%, which means that it will not hamper ventilation in the parking lot.

Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group.  Image © Dion Robeson
Westfield carousel, designed by the Scentre group. Image © Dion Robeson

Seamless parking garage exterior inspired by leather sofa

This multi-story parking lot in Adelaide was covered with just eight Kaynemaile mesh screens, the largest of which was about 190 feet wide by 52 feet high (or 58 by 16 meters). The unique design was inspired by a leather sofa and involved large-scale prototyping to achieve the desired look while maintaining fast installation speeds. Each large screen has been lifted and secured in a single day, the faceplate features “buttons” that give depth and texture to the screen through the way sunlight bounces off them.

Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs.  Image © Iain Bond
Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs. Image © Iain Bond
Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs.  Image © Iain Bond
Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs. Image © Iain Bond

The system is durable and impact resistant, yet flexible enough to allow for creative and organic facades like this one. The mesh is made from high performance thermoplastic which is thermally stable from -40 to 428 degrees Fahrenheit (-40 to 120 degrees Celsius). It won’t oxidize or corrode like wire mesh, and it won’t stain surrounding surfaces with rust when it rains. The mineral pigments are unalterable and the mesh also retains its tensile strength over time. The material is fully recyclable using low-energy processes and its unique manufacturing process reduces waste by producing only the amount needed for each job.

Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs.  Image courtesy of Kaynemaile
Agostino Group Parking Garage, Tectvs. Image courtesy of Kaynemaile

For more information on Kaynemaile, check out their first E-Paper.

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Parking spaces

Quadriplegic wants neighbors to swap parking spaces for his wheelchair-accessible van, but they won’t

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HIGHLAND PARK, Illinois (WBBM) – A quadriplegic from Highland Park has a request for his neighbors.

He wants them to swap their parking spots so he has enough space for his wheelchair accessible van in the garage.

But neighbors aren’t interested, and CBS 2’s Tim McNicholas has learned that disability rights laws don’t go far in situations like these.

For Chris Block, getting into the van is a small victory in itself.

“I have no downward armpit movement,” Block said. “I work the best I can to overcome my physical limitations and so on.”

The day we met Block, no one was parked in the square next to his – the place where his ramp extends from his parking spot.

But that space is linked to another condo unit, so when his neighbor parks in the garage, he can’t.

“I just wish I could get to grocery stores, restaurants – whatever I want – without having to knock on my neighbor’s door and ask, can you move your car for five minutes so I can get to my car?” Block mentioned.

The condo association said it had given it a second space – one just outside the garage. But he said it can be difficult to walk down the ramp if there is snow and ice.

“I make the blood circulate so badly, so when it’s really cold, I can’t move too,” Block said.

So Block identified a few other places in the garage that would work for him – places next to driveways with lots of space.

He asked these co-owners to swap places, but they are not interested. One of them told him that his lawyer advised against it.

“It would be really nice and nice if someone just swapped places with me, because it’s just a 10 foot difference.” Block said.

Federal law states that housing providers must make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities. So we decided to ask the attorneys at Access Living about situations like Block’s.

“We hear about this type of case from time to time,” said attorney Ken Walden.

Walden said when spaces are allocated to residents, like in many apartment buildings, management can often just tell someone to change. But condominiums can be trickier, as spaces are often ceded to owners.

“The association, its attempts to do so, are going to be blocked by the owners who own the spaces – so they come up against the property rights of the owners,” Walden said.

A lawyer for the condominium association said they contacted the other owners, but those owners are not moving.

The assistant lawyer said the client had done all he could and could not force someone to move.

“I can’t do anything,” Block said. “If anyone wants to be ignorant or shut the door on me, then I have accepted that is life.”

For now, Block is just hoping his neighbors will change their mind.

Note: this content is subject to a strict embargo in the local market. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you cannot use it on any platform.


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Parking spaces

Quadriplegic in Highland Park wants neighbors to swap parking spots so they can set up his wheelchair-accessible van, but they won’t

HIGHLAND PARK, Illinois (CBS) – A quadriplegic from Highland Park has a request for his neighbors.

He wants them to swap parking spots so he has enough space for his wheelchair accessible van in the garage.

READ MORE: Woman with concealed transport permit shoots potential carjacker with gun point in Roseland

But neighbors aren’t interested, and CBS 2’s Tim McNicholas has learned that disability rights laws don’t go far in situations like these.

For Chris Block, getting into the van is a small victory in itself.

“I have no downward armpit movement,” Block said. “I work the best I can to overcome my physical limitations and so on.”

The day we met Block, no one was parked in the square next to his – the place where his ramp extends from his parking spot.

But that space is linked to another condo unit, so when his neighbor parks in the garage, he can’t.

“I just wish I could get to grocery stores, restaurants – whatever I want – without having to knock on my neighbor’s door and ask, can you move your car for five minutes so I can get to my car?” Block mentioned.

The condo association said it had assigned it a second space – one just outside the garage. But he said it can be difficult to walk down the ramp if there is snow and ice.

“I make the blood circulate so badly, so when it’s really cold, I can’t move too,” Block said.

So Block identified a few other places in the garage that would work for him – places next to driveways with lots of space.

READ MORE: Weather in Chicago: cleared overnight, milder Tuesday

He asked these co-owners to swap places, but they are not interested. One of them told him that his lawyer had advised against it.

“It would be really nice and nice if someone just swapped places with me, because it’s just a 10 foot difference.” Block said.

Federal law states that housing providers must make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities. So we decided to ask the attorneys at Access Living about situations like Block’s.

“We hear about this type of case from time to time,” said attorney Ken Walden.

Walden said when spaces are allocated to residents, as in many apartment buildings, management can often just tell someone to change. But condominiums can be trickier, as spaces are often ceded to owners.

“The association, its attempts to do so, are going to be blocked by the owners who own the spaces – so they come up against the property rights of the owners,” Walden said.

A lawyer for the condominium association said they contacted the other owners, but those owners are not moving.

The assistant lawyer said the client had done everything he could and could not force someone to move.

“I can’t do anything,” Block said. “If anyone wants to be ignorant or shut the door on me, then I have accepted that is life.”

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For now, Block is just hoping his neighbors will change their mind.

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