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August 2021

Parking spaces

Viera High seniors show off artwork in parking lots | Schools

The rain dampened a high school tradition, but couldn’t wipe out the enthusiasm for creating a unique parking spot.

Viera High School seniors spent August 7 painting their parking spaces like other students before them have done for more than 15 years.

But when rain momentarily interrupted the art work two days earlier, the students finished the tradition of painting on August 9.

Each year, seniors can paint the stop blocks in their parking space in any design they choose – each a unique artistic creation.

“I like it because I’ve always seen every other senior do it and now I’m doing it, it’s like a rite of passage,” said Ryan Luciani as he finished his painting.

Despite the August heat, the atmosphere was festive as many seniors listened to music while painting.

Each parking stop block sports its own design. Some paintings included words, others painted objects or geometric designs, but no design resembled another. Seniors have been allowed to express their own creativity on the space they are expected to use for the rest of the school year.

“It’s a good way to express yourself and show off your skills. We have watched other seniors do it over the years and now is our moment,” said Leen Abu-Ammour.

Students pay $20 to reserve a spot and an additional $20 allows them to paint the space.

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Parking spaces

Lexington Church battles for parking spaces

LEXINGTON, Ky. — For years, the Main Street Baptist Church has fought to regain its parking spaces after losing more than two hundred spaces to the city of Lexington.


What do you want to know

  • Main Street Baptist Church is fighting to reclaim its space
  • Ralph Hill spoke on behalf of Main Street Baptist Church
  • The Church raised the issue during public comment at the Council meeting on August 26, 2021
  • At-Large Board Member Richard Moloney agrees with the church

Ralph Hill with the Main Street Baptist Church is one of many fighting to keep the church’s existence and history alive.

“The first meeting we had with the park board. When they came to our chapel, they walked in and said we were here to tell you what we were going to do, not that we didn’t want any input from you about it. And it has been since that time, to this day,” Hill said.

After a proposed plan for the space around the church to become part of Town Branch Park, Main Street Baptist Church would lose hundreds of parking spaces.

“We asked for it. We asked for it because we needed it. On demand for funerals and emergencies,” Hill said.

At-Large Council member Richard Moloney says he agrees with Hill and the Church asking for their return and encourages the city to rethink its plans.

“To me, that’s the easiest fix. And if you start this fix, it will spread through the community that Lexington hears the concern that African Americans need and that’s the easiest fix that you can do,” Moloney said.

Moloney said now he and the church must wait for Mayor Linda Gorton to respond to public comments.

We contacted the mayor’s office and members of council to get their answers on the matter and have not heard back.

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Parking garage

Seattle’s first robotic parking lot opens

Residents of this luxury Seattle tower drive their cars onto a platform, get out of the car, and enter a code. Then their car disappears into a hole.

This is called the “parking lot” at the Spire.

Seeing the technology demonstrated for the first time, most people say, “Whoa”. And then they want to see what’s in the hole.

“We are the only ones who have the key to this door, because the parking system is a building-sized machine and no one should be in the lower basements while the machine is running, down the road. ‘except qualified technicians and engineers,’ said Michael Dennison with the American company that distributes Swiss-made robotic parking equipment.

Seattle’s first automated parking system is part of the Spire, a 41-story luxury condominium tower built on the outskirts of Belltown, not far from the Space Needle.

Robotic garages like this may be new to Seattle, but they’re an old hat in Switzerland.

Related: This Seattle robot garage can be taken apart like LEGOs

The next level from the surface is called the “transfer floor,” and is reminiscent of the interior of a cuckoo clock. Cars went up and down on three different pistons, while residents upstairs above us picked up and dropped off their cars. Robotic carts transported these cars to and from a central elevator, which descended another eight floors, each with its own system of carts, wrapping the cars in slots, like an underground beehive.

“I’d love to take a picture of this,” I said, leaning over the hole with my camera.

“You can,” Dennison said. “The only thing is… you will die, if you fall into the hole. So don’t fall into the hole.

“I won’t fall into the hole,” I promised.

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Paul Menzies is the CEO of Laconia, who developed the project. He says the automated garage takes up much less space. It doesn’t need ramps or other lanes. Vertical circulation is very efficient.

“This particular site is very small – 10,660 square feet,” he said. “It’s about a quarter of an acre. So, to give an idea, it’s about as much for a single family home in the suburbs.

To complicate matters even more, the site is triangular. Many local engineers told him that you cannot install underground parking at this site. But a young engineer in Switzerland, working for robotic parking company Sotefin, had studied Seattle’s land use code and asked to tackle it.

“So he was gone for half an hour and he came back with a set of drawings in his hand showing how, in fact, it could work when a lot of people said it couldn’t be done,” Menzies said. . “That’s one of the reasons. I love working with young people. They don’t know what can’t be done, so they do it anyway.


Caption: Amazon HQ, seen from the Arrow

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This site is just two blocks from Amazon, so Menzies says many software engineers have requested garage tours. He hopes that will translate into condo sales in Speyer, which range from half a million to almost $ 4 million.

But demand was not as strong as he had hoped. This spring, he had to cut prices by 10%.

Lots of buildings are being built in Seattle without parking garages these days. In dense Seattle neighborhoods, city regulations no longer require them because they add to traffic congestion and cost money to build.

Michael Anderson of the Sightline Institute estimates that underground parking spaces in deep parking garages today cost an average of around $ 100,000 per space to build, including financing costs. Previous analyzes from Sightline have determined that the downtown area has excess parking that goes unused during the day.

At least in the luxury condo market, “most of the people who live in the residential tower want to park in the building,” Menzies said.


Caption: Paul Menzies poses for a portrait on the Speyer roof terrace.

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Remarkably, robotic technology doesn’t seem to have increased the cost of parking spaces, at least in this case. The parking spaces in this building sell for $ 75,000. The robotic garage technology itself adds $ 8 million to the project, and the concrete work is more expensive because it has to be poured with more precision than in a normal garage. But efficient use of space means there is much less soil to excavate, which saves huge amounts of money. Whether this completely offsets the additional costs associated with robots, Menzies couldn’t tell.

While this may be the first to open, Seattle will soon see more robotic parking lots. The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance will finish pouring concrete on its robotic parking lot site on Friday, August 27. This building is slated to open in 2023. And unlike the Speyer parking lot, the SCCA system is designed in such a way that it can be converted to another use, such as a lab space, should the parking lot become obsolete in the distant future.

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Parking spaces

Goliad students paint the parking lots | Education

Students at Goliad High School have participated in the tradition of repainting their parking spaces before the school year.

On August 15, 16-year-old Harley Jarzombek painted her parking space. It was his first year of participation because the tradition is limited to only students of the upper classes.

The tradition is held by the National Honor Society. To paint a parking space, students must pay $ 20 to the student organization.

“It’s fun to get together with a bunch of friends and say ‘Hey let’s go paint a parking spot,’” Harley said.

Harley decided to participate because she wanted to have a designated place next to her friends, she said.

The parking spot was painted with exterior paint and had four flowers painted on the inside of the lines, Harley said. It also included his name in the middle with his graduation year “2023”.

“It feels good to know that I’ve finally come to where I can paint my place,” she said.

For Harley, the parking space is a way for her to leave her mark on Goliad High School, she said. There are parking spaces in the lot which were repainted by older people two or three years ago.

Harley asked her mother Lana Jarzombek to help paint the parking spot.

“We were delighted to do it,” Jarzombek said.

It’s a tradition to paint the spot, but it’s also a great fundraiser for the National Honor Society, Jarzombek said.

Jarzombek said it went beyond tradition and gave her and her daughter a chance to make memories together.

“It was fun,” she said. “I was glad she asked me to help her.”

Samantha Douty is the educational reporter for the Victoria Advocate. She grew up in Corpus Christi and graduated from UT-Arlington with a BA in Journalism.

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Parking spaces

Call for more parking at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary as charges will be waived

Let us know what you think and join the conversation at the bottom of this article.

The appeal comes after the Scottish Government announced parking charges at PFI Hospital were to be permanently scrapped by buying out the parking contract.

Lothian Tory MSP Miles Briggs welcomed the abolition of charges but said there was a wider issue of ensuring there was enough parking space to accommodate patients, visitors and staff who needed it.

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Miles Briggs says parking at Edinburgh Royal Infirmary is likely already overcapacity

He said: “We need to see investment in parking facilities beyond this and potentially more parking spaces provided. “A lot of services have been put in Little France and we haven’t seen a similar increase in the level of parking available. Parking is probably already beyond capacity.”

The new Sick Kids Hospital is now operational alongside ERI and if the Scottish Government approves the plans there could soon be a new eye hospital on the site.

He said: “This is an opportunity to get it right for patients, visitors and staff. If we don’t, parking might be free, but there might not be of available parking spaces and residents around this area will become frustrated as parking is displaced in their communities.

“Encouraging people to use public transport doesn’t go very far, especially in the winter months.

“And a lot of employees complained to me that they had been told before that they couldn’t park there and they couldn’t have a pass to park, that they would have to use park and ride facilities or ride a bike.”

Mr Briggs said that before Government support for the eye pavilion replacement was withdrawn last year he was pushing for more parking than was on offer as part of the move and now there are signs that the project is back, he wants an assurance that there will be an increase in parking provision.

NHS Lothian deputy chief executive Jim Crombie said work was already underway to improve car parking.

“As NHS Lothian remobilizes services, hospital sites are getting busier. This is particularly the case for the Petite France site, which is becoming increasingly congested.

“The Pan-Lothian Acute Car Parking Group is closely monitoring the situation and working to ensure the site remains safe and accessible to blue lights, staff, patients and visitors.

“Traffic management teams are on site, the distribution of spaces has been redesigned to provide balanced access and existing spaces have been reallocated between partners. A temporary car park on vacant land has been developed with Edinburgh’s BioQuarter and funding for a 250 space car park has also been secured.

“However, we realize there is still much to do and we are working with staff across the organization to hear suggestions to make the site more accessible to everyone.

“As a result, negotiations with Lothian Buses are continuing to try to arrange a shuttle bus which would run regularly between Sheriffhall Park-and-Ride and Little France.

“Discussions have also begun around the development of an ambitious on-campus ‘carpooling’ initiative and we also intend to reintroduce the staff permit system, at no cost to staff, which was in effect before the pandemic. .”

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Edinburgh Royal Infirmary parking contract takeover will remove parking…

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Parking spaces

Some parking spots in Toronto cost $ 120,000 right now and here’s why

Just when you thought real estate in Toronto couldn’t be more ridiculous, several parking spots have recently been marketed in the city for more than double what the average Canadian earns in an entire year. How is that possible, you ask? According to Layers Agents Gilda Motamed and Francisco Hiebert, it comes down to the scarcity, location and lifestyle changes fueled by the pandemic.

This coveted place, for example, is located in the underground parking lot of the Massey Tower, a short walk from Yonge-Dundas Square. Not only is it $ 120,000, but the maintenance fee is $ 211 per month. A lot of people would need to take out a large loan just to park their cars here. But, that’s about the going rate in this particular building, where available parking spaces are scarce, Hiebert explains.

“Parking spaces at [The Massey Tower] are hard to find. Limited places with high demand will result in higher prices. Of the 9 listings currently for sale, only 3 have parking facilities, ”Hiebert told Curiocity.

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“The building was built on top of an existing structure, so the developer couldn’t dig in the same way as on empty land. This resulted in limited availability of parking spaces during pre-construction sales.

For this reason, however, if you own a condo in the building, it will add value to your unit when you are ready to sell. In most buildings, parking is valued between $ 30,000 and $ 50,000, according to Hiebert.

“By purchasing a site, your condo will increase in value. But keep in mind that your maintenance costs will also increase, ”Motamed said. It also means that if you own a condo with a parking spot and choose to sell it, the value of your home could go down.

It’s not just the limited availability that’s driving costs up. Changing priorities amid COVID-19 have “caused people to buy cars to avoid public transport and have the freedom to get out of town,” Hiebert said.

All the more reason to move to one of the affordable cities that still exist in Ontario.

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Parking spaces

Joshua Tree National Park offers new entrance, more parking – Press Enterprise

Overwhelming attendance at Joshua Tree National Park stemming from a desire for outdoor recreation due to the coronavirus pandemic causes mile-long vehicle stops at the entrance and a parking crisis for visitors attempting to hike, camp, and climb the desert park.

The park proposes two major projects as possible solutions to the long queues and the shortage of parking spaces inside the park. But the projects are large and in their early stages, requiring environmental reviews and public comment before they can move forward.

Cars line up at the west entrance to Joshua Tree National Park in this May 9, 2015 file photo. The long lines of cars have gotten worse over the years. The National Park Service proposed a new west entrance pay station that would have a longer route and more pay kiosks to better handle increased visitor traffic. (Photo courtesy of Joshua Tree National Park)

First, the National Park Service is proposing to tear down the existing west entrance fee station just inside the park boundary on Park Boulevard and build a new one that would be placed half a mile away in the park to extend the entrance causeway.

In addition, the project would increase the number of fee collection kiosks from one to four and add three lanes of inbound traffic. The four new kiosks would be located two per island and would connect to walkways and shade structures covering the paid kiosks. The project would also add a toilet block for staff and a nine-space parking lot for staff.

The new gate station would be powered by a solar panel with battery storage and include a satellite for data communication. Architecturally, it would be compatible with mid-century buildings, according to the National Park Service project website.

“We have a long-standing problem with severe traffic jams literally blocking driveways and houses,” said Jennie Albrinck, spokesperson for the park. “With a new gate, we can better staff people to get the public through faster and clear the traffic jams that sometimes stretch 2-3 miles down the road.”

Construction could begin next summer, she said. The project would take between eight months and a year to complete. For comment on a developing EA, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/West_Entrance. The comment period began on August 18 and will run until midnight on September 17.

In this file photo, a US Park Ranger climbs back into his vehicle after clearing a side road in Joshua Tree National Park Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG).

The second project involves converting two blocks of land of approximately 11,000 square feet within the Barker Dam parking area. The project would add 40 parking spaces. This would involve clearing vegetation, including the removal of 13 Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), which would be replanted somewhere in the park, Albrinck said.

“They will receive the highest standard of treatment” and be cared for by a biologist, she said.

The park currently accommodates approximately 4,000 vehicles per day and has 1,500 parking spaces. Lately, motorists have parked vehicles on the shoulders of roads, sometimes driving through sensitive desert habitats, she said. Additional parking spaces would help, but not necessarily solve the overall parking deficit.

Barker Dam is a popular use area with multiple trailheads. “The idea is to get more parking in busy areas,” she explained. For more information and to leave a comment, go to: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/barker_dam_parking_expansion. The deadline for comments is September 17.

The cost of the projects has yet to be determined, Albrinck said. No timeline was available for the expansion of the Barker Dam parking lot.

Funding for both projects would come from the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which is partially funded by visitation fees, Albrinck said.

The park receives around 3 million visitors a year, she said. Vehicle fee is $30 and is valid for up to seven days. The walk or bike fee is $15. An annual pass to Joshua Tree National Park costs $55. The park is open, but face coverings are required to enter inside any building, including the visitor center.

Joshua Tree National Park straddles the Mojave and Colorado deserts about 130 miles east of Los Angeles and is known for its rock formations, pristine desert landscapes, and spiky Dr. Seuss-like trees, including the park takes its name.

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Parking spaces

Joshua Tree National Park offers new entrance, more parking – San Bernardino Sun

Overwhelming attendance at Joshua Tree National Park stemming from a desire for outdoor recreation due to the coronavirus pandemic causes mile-long vehicle stops at the entrance and a parking crisis for visitors attempting to hike, camp, and climb the desert park.

The park proposes two major projects as possible solutions to the long queues and the shortage of parking spaces inside the park. But the projects are large and in their early stages, requiring environmental reviews and public comment before they can move forward.

Cars line up at the west entrance to Joshua Tree National Park in this May 9, 2015 file photo. The long lines of cars have gotten worse over the years. The National Park Service proposed a new west entrance pay station that would have a longer route and more pay kiosks to better handle increased visitor traffic. (Photo courtesy of Joshua Tree National Park)

First, the National Park Service is proposing to tear down the existing west entrance fee station just inside the park boundary on Park Boulevard and build a new one that would be placed half a mile away in the park to extend the entrance causeway.

In addition, the project would increase the number of fee collection kiosks from one to four and add three lanes of inbound traffic. The four new kiosks would be located two per island and would connect to walkways and shade structures covering the paid kiosks. The project would also add a toilet block for staff and a nine-space parking lot for staff.

The new gate station would be powered by a solar panel with battery storage and include a satellite for data communication. Architecturally, it would be compatible with mid-century buildings, according to the National Park Service project website.

“We have a long-standing problem with severe traffic jams literally blocking driveways and houses,” said Jennie Albrinck, spokesperson for the park. “With a new gate, we can better staff people to get the public through faster and clear the traffic jams that sometimes stretch 2-3 miles down the road.”

Construction could begin next summer, she said. The project would take between eight months and a year to complete. For comment on a developing EA, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/West_Entrance. The comment period began on August 18 and will run until midnight on September 17.

In this file photo, a US Park Ranger climbs back into his vehicle after clearing a side road in Joshua Tree National Park Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG).

The second project involves converting two blocks of land of approximately 11,000 square feet within the Barker Dam parking area. The project would add 40 parking spaces. This would involve clearing vegetation, including the removal of 13 Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), which would be replanted somewhere in the park, Albrinck said.

“They will receive the highest standard of treatment” and be cared for by a biologist, she said.

The park currently accommodates approximately 4,000 vehicles per day and has 1,500 parking spaces. Lately, motorists have parked vehicles on the shoulders of roads, sometimes driving through sensitive desert habitats, she said. Additional parking spaces would help, but not necessarily solve the overall parking deficit.

Barker Dam is a popular use area with multiple trailheads. “The idea is to get more parking in busy areas,” she explained. For more information and to leave a comment, go to: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/barker_dam_parking_expansion. The deadline for comments is September 17.

The cost of the projects has yet to be determined, Albrinck said. No timeline was available for the expansion of the Barker Dam parking lot.

Funding for both projects would come from the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which is partially funded by visitation fees, Albrinck said.

The park receives around 3 million visitors a year, she said. Vehicle fee is $30 and is valid for up to seven days. The walk or bike fee is $15. An annual pass to Joshua Tree National Park costs $55. The park is open, but face coverings are required to enter inside any building, including the visitor center.

Joshua Tree National Park straddles the Mojave and Colorado deserts about 130 miles east of Los Angeles and is known for its rock formations, pristine desert landscapes, and Dr. Seuss-like spiky trees from which the park derives her name.

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Parking spaces

Joshua Tree National Park offers new entrance, more parking – Orange County Register

Overwhelming attendance at Joshua Tree National Park stemming from a desire for outdoor recreation due to the coronavirus pandemic causes mile-long vehicle stops at the entrance and a parking crisis for visitors attempting to hike, camp, and climb the desert park.

The park proposes two major projects as possible solutions to the long queues and the shortage of parking spaces inside the park. But the projects are large and in their early stages, requiring environmental reviews and public comment before they can move forward.

Cars line up at the west entrance to Joshua Tree National Park in this May 9, 2015 file photo. The long lines of cars have gotten worse over the years. The National Park Service proposed a new west entrance pay station that would have a longer route and more pay kiosks to better handle increased visitor traffic. (Photo courtesy of Joshua Tree National Park)

First, the National Park Service is proposing to tear down the existing west entrance fee station just inside the park boundary on Park Boulevard and build a new one that would be placed half a mile away in the park to extend the entrance causeway.

In addition, the project would increase the number of fee collection kiosks from one to four and add three lanes of inbound traffic. The four new kiosks would be located two per island and would connect to walkways and shade structures covering the paid kiosks. The project would also add a toilet block for staff and a nine-space parking lot for staff.

The new gate station would be powered by a solar panel with battery storage and include a satellite for data communication. Architecturally, it would be compatible with mid-century buildings, according to the National Park Service project website.

“We have a long-standing problem with severe traffic jams literally blocking driveways and houses,” said Jennie Albrinck, spokesperson for the park. “With a new gate, we can better staff people to get the public through faster and clear the traffic jams that sometimes stretch 2-3 miles down the road.”

Construction could begin next summer, she said. The project would take between eight months and a year to complete. For comment on a developing EA, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/West_Entrance. The comment period began on August 18 and will run until midnight on September 17.

In this file photo, a US Park Ranger climbs back into his vehicle after clearing a side road in Joshua Tree National Park Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG).

The second project involves converting two blocks of land of approximately 11,000 square feet within the Barker Dam parking area. The project would add 40 parking spaces. This would involve clearing vegetation, including the removal of 13 Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), which would be replanted somewhere in the park, Albrinck said.

“They will receive the highest standard of treatment” and be cared for by a biologist, she said.

The park currently accommodates approximately 4,000 vehicles per day and has 1,500 parking spaces. Lately, motorists have parked vehicles on the shoulders of roads, sometimes driving through sensitive desert habitats, she said. Additional parking spaces would help, but not necessarily solve the overall parking deficit.

Barker Dam is a popular use area with multiple trailheads. “The idea is to get more parking in busy areas,” she explained. For more information and to leave a comment, go to: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/barker_dam_parking_expansion. The deadline for comments is September 17.

The cost of the projects has yet to be determined, Albrinck said. No timeline was available for the expansion of the Barker Dam parking lot.

Funding for both projects would come from the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which is partially funded by visitation fees, Albrinck said.

The park receives around 3 million visitors a year, she said. Vehicle fee is $30 and is valid for up to seven days. The walk or bike fee is $15. An annual pass to Joshua Tree National Park costs $55. The park is open, but face coverings are required to enter inside any building, including the visitor center.

Joshua Tree National Park straddles the Mojave and Colorado deserts about 130 miles east of Los Angeles and is known for its rock formations, pristine desert landscapes, and Dr. Seuss-like spiky trees from which the park derives her name.

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Parking spaces

Joshua Tree National Park Offers New Entrance, More Parking Spaces – Daily Bulletin

Overwhelming attendance at Joshua Tree National Park resulting from a desire for outdoor recreation due to the coronavirus pandemic is causing vehicle backups of several miles at the entrance and a parking crisis for visitors trying to ride. hiking, camping and rock climbing in the desert park.

The park offers two major projects as possible solutions to the long queues and the lack of parking spaces inside the park. But the projects are large and are in their early stages, requiring environmental reviews and public comment before they can move forward.

Cars line up at the western entrance to Joshua Tree National Park in this file photo from May 9, 2015. The long lines of cars have worsened over the years. The National Park Service proposed a new west entrance pay station that would have a longer route and more pay kiosks to better handle increased visitor traffic. (Photo courtesy of Joshua Tree National Park)

First, the National Park Service proposes to demolish the existing west entrance pay station just inside the park boundaries on Park Boulevard and build a new one that would be placed half a mile further into the park to extend the entry route.

In addition, the project would increase the number of fee collection kiosks from one to four and add three inbound traffic lanes. The four new kiosks would be located two per island and would connect to the walkways and shade structures covering the pay kiosks. The project would also add a sanitary block for staff and a nine-space parking lot for staff.

The new entrance station would be powered by a solar panel with battery storage and would include a satellite for data communication. Architecturally, it would be compatible with mid-century buildings, according to the National Park Service project site.

“We have a long-standing problem of severe traffic slowdowns that literally block driveways and homes,” said Jennie Albrinck, spokesperson for the park. “With a new gatehouse, we can improve the staff to allow the public to pass more quickly and eliminate the traffic jams that sometimes extend 2 or 3 miles down the road. “

Construction could begin next summer, she said. The project is expected to last between eight months and a year. AT comment on a developing EA, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/West_Entrance. The comment period began August 18 and ends September 17 at midnight.

In this file photo, a U.S. ranger climbs back into his vehicle after opening a side road in Joshua Tree National Park on Thursday, January 10, 2019 (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin / SCNG).

The second project involves converting two land islets of approximately 11,000 square feet within the Barker Dam parking area. The project would add 40 parking spaces. This would involve clearing vegetation, including the removal of 13 Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), which would be replanted somewhere in the park, Albrinck said.

“They will receive the highest level of treatment” and will be under the care of a biologist, she said.

The park accommodates an average of around 4,000 vehicles per day and has 1,500 parking spaces. Lately, motorists have parked vehicles on the shoulders of the road, sometimes passing over sensitive desert habitat, she said. Additional parking spaces would help but not necessarily solve the overall parking deficit.

Barker Dam is a popular use area with several starting points. “The idea is to have more parking spaces in high-traffic areas,” she explained. To find out more and leave a comment, visit: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/barker_dam_parking_expansion. The deadline for comments is September 17th.

The cost of the projects has yet to be determined, Albrinck said. No timetable was available for the expansion of the Barker Dam car park.

Funding for both projects would come from the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which is partially funded by visitor fees, Albrinck said.

The park receives around 3 million visitors a year, she said. The vehicle charge is $ 30 and is valid for up to seven days. Fees for walking or cycling cost $ 15. An annual pass to Joshua Tree National Park costs $ 55. The park is open but a face covering is required to enter inside any building, including the visitor center.

Joshua Tree National Park straddles the Mojave and Colorado Deserts about 130 miles east of Los Angeles and is known for its rock formations, pristine desert landscapes, and the spiky Dr. Seuss trees from which the park derives its name.

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Parking facilities

Single permit in Abu Dhabi to access all multi-storey car parks

Multi-storey car park subscribers can now use the seven multi-storey car parks in Abu Dhabi City, without having to pay a separate fee for each facility.

The decision was announced Monday by the Integrated Transport Center (ITC) of the Ministry of Municipalities and Transport in Abu Dhabi.

The subscription fees for the use of multi-storey car parks are 1,369 Dhs for 3 months, 2,738 Dhs for six months and 5,475 Dhs for the whole year.

The multi-storey parking spaces are located at the following points: Parking building n ° 1 in the East sectors 1-3, and Parking building n ° 3 in the East sector 5, Parking building n ° 4 in the East sector 8, Parking Building # 5 in East Sector 2-3, Parking Building # 6 in East Sector 6, Parking Building # 7 in East Sector 6 and Parking Building # 8 in East Sector 11 .

The total number of parking spaces available in the seven multi-storey car parks on Abu Dhabi Island is now 3,788. Of these, 31 spaces are specifically dedicated to determined persons and 182 are reserved for female drivers. The car parks also include 16 parking spaces for recharging hybrid vehicles.

ITC said the decision to introduce a single subscription card to access all multi-storey car parks was intended to encourage the public to use these facilities and avoid congestion in surface parking areas.

Each subscriber to upper-level car parks will receive a magnetic subscription card to be used at entry and exit barriers.

The system also has a license plate reading camera that identifies subscriber information, allowing easy access to the facility.

Subscriptions can be applied through ITC’s website or by visiting its Customer Satisfaction Center located in Abu Dhabi Municipality, or Abu Dhabi Government Service Centers – TAMM. Applicants are required to provide their Emirates ID card and vehicle owner card, as well as the granted subscription card immediately after providing the documents and paying the fee.

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Parking facilities

Festival Place wins an award for car parks

BASINGSTOKE Festival Place has been recognized for its high parking standards and received the Park Mark Plus award, making it the largest accredited shopping center in terms of parking space.

The Park Mark Plus award assesses a range of criteria from services and operations to design and construction.

In 2019, Festival Place completed a multi-million pound renovation of its parking lot to dramatically improve the user experience, which includes orientation technology, electric charging stations and increased security measures.

The car park now has 2,624 spaces spread over five floors, operates 24/7 and is open to the general public in Basingstoke, including season ticket holders.

Neil Churchill, Center Director at Festival Place, said: “Our ambition with the recent Festival Place car park renovation was to provide a clean, modern, smart and safe car park for our visitors and the general public in Basingstoke.

“The old parking lot was not in tune with the larger retail and entertainment experience at Festival Place and the renovation we carried out was key to providing an overall enjoyable experience. We are honored to see our efforts rewarded with this award. ”

Warren Bradshaw, Regional Director of the British Parking Association, said: “I am delighted that the Festival Place shopping center parking lot has been awarded the Park Mark Plus award.

“Gary Cooper and his team have demonstrated their hard work and commitment to providing a safe parking environment for their customers. I was particularly impressed with the continuous improvement ideas presented to me during the evaluation.

Festival Place is the top-ranked shopping center outside of a major UK city. It is in the top 20 of GlobalData’s UK shopping center report and Trevor Wood Associates ranks it in its Premier League of shopping centers.

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Parking spaces

Abu Dhabi: now access 7 multi-storey parking spaces with a single permit – News

Multi-storey car park in Abu Dhabi. — Photo provided

Abu Dhabi – The decision to encourage the public to use the multi-storey car parks



Published: Mon 23 August 2021, 16:27

Last update: Mon 23 Aug 2021, 4:32 PM

Subscribers to the multi-storey car park in Abu Dhabi can now use all seven parking spaces at no additional cost, authorities have announced.

The Integrated Transport Center (ITC) of the Department of Municipalities and Transport Abu Dhabi said the aim of the move was to make it easier for subscribers to park in multi-storey car parks and provide them with plenty of parking spaces in allowing them to use their subscriptions at all facilities.

ITC also aims to encourage the public to use these multi-storey car parks to relieve congestion in surface parking areas, thereby increasing customer satisfaction with the city’s parking services.

The center said the total number of parking spaces available in multi-storey car parks in Abu Dhabi is now 3,788, spread across seven car parks. Among these, 31 places are specifically dedicated to determined people and 182 reserved for female drivers. The car parks also include 16 parking spaces for charging hybrid vehicles.

How it works

Officials explained that each subscriber to the multi-storey car parks will receive a magnetic subscription card to be used at the entry and exit barriers in all the multi-storey car parks that use the latest state-of-the-art technology. The system also has a license plate reading camera that helps identify subscriber information, giving them easy access to the building.

A subscription card will now facilitate access to Abu Dhabi’s seven multi-storey car parks without having to pay the additional fees previously charged for using other car parks.

The ITC noted that multi-storey parking spaces in Abu Dhabi are spread across seven different locations in the capital.

Motorists can obtain quarterly, semi-annual or annual parking passes for their vehicles. Subscription fees for using the multi-storey car parks are Dh1,369 for three months, Dh2,738 for six months and Dh5,475 for the whole year.

Vehicle owners can apply for subscriptions by visiting ITC’s official website, www.itc.gov.ae, or ITC’s Customer Satisfaction Center located in Abu Dhabi Municipality, or the centers of Abu Dhabi Government Services – TAMM.

[email protected]

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Parking spaces

“Innovative office experience”, more than 650 parking spaces arrive in Provo in a new development

PROVO, Utah (ABC4) – An “innovative new office experience” is coming to Provo thanks to a network of local business leaders. The group aims to ease the challenges of transitioning to office work for a post-pandemic workforce.

PEG Companies, which focuses on commercial real estate, changes headquarters and welcomes other companies joining them in a multi-block development in downtown Provo. The Freedom Commons, the new business park, is the first Class A office to be built in downtown Provo in nearly a decade. Designers say offices are meant to promote employee well-being while promoting a work / life balance.

“Right now, people across the United States are taking note of Utah for the entrepreneurial and industrious spirit we exude here. There is nothing better for business or for raising a family, ”said Utah Governor Spencer Cox. “As we plan for the continued growth that we will no doubt see in the years to come, building world-class infrastructure like Freedom Commons will be essential. “

The Freedom Commons, located at 182 N Freedom Boulevard in Provo, will feature a 2,000 square foot fitness center, urban-green design with outdoor work spaces, a 4,500 square foot plaza, landscaped paseo, germ reduction technology and several plug-in spaces for food truck parking. The developers say several retail stores and a large 654-space indoor parking lot for the community to use will be adjacent to the offices.

SLIDESHOW: Renderings of the Freedom Commons, currently under construction

“Provo is a growing hotspot for innovative companies. You look at very successful companies like Nu Skin, Qualtrics, Novell and so many others who have chosen to locate their headquarters here, and that makes sense, ”says Cameron Gunter, CEO of PEG. “We have two top performing universities in our backyard, we have a highly skilled workforce, a culture of hard work, and an incredibly strong economy. “

According to PEG, Freedom Commons is in one of 8,700 Qualified Opportunity Zones across the country, which were established by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 and are designated to “stimulate economic growth and job creation ”.

On Wednesday, a finishing ceremony was held and the last steel beam was put in place at the Freedom Commons. For more information, Click here.

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Parking garage

First look at the parking available on Market Street in Wheeling

OHIO COUNTY, W.Va. (WTRF) – The public got their first glimpse of a parking structure proposed to support the ongoing Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Building Project. For this project to work, the city needed more parking lots nearby. So they took a look at Chase Bank’s former location on Market Street.

The city worked with architect Vic Greco and the Mills Group, who gave Council a presentation tonight using a CGI type of rendering of what the location might look like when complete. Details are not finalized, but they hope to have around 250 parking spaces, as well as several retail locations on the ground floor.

But the cost of the project is an issue for the city and the taxpayers. There are some architectural issues with building a foundation for a parking lot there, and the pandemic is pushing up construction prices across the country.

“We started talking about this project in 2018-2019 or so, and since then the costs have increased. So we will try to reduce the costs, between 13 and 14 million dollars will be the cost of the project when all is said and done, at least that is what we hope. “

Mayor Glenn Elliott, Wheeling

Mayor Elliott explained that a project like this would typically be run by the private sector in a big city like Pittsburgh, where they can charge more for parking. He says that in small towns like Wheeling, parking garages are usually subsidized by local governments.

“In the state of West Virginia and the town of Wheeling, you know, parking garages usually don’t pay off. He will collect money, he will bring income every year. Not only parking spaces but first floor retail rentals but it probably won’t pay off as you can’t charge enough in the town of Wheeling to make sense of a project like this.

Mayor Glenn Elliott, Wheeling

Officials hope the cost of the project will drop as prices normalize after the pandemic.

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Parking garage

project w: Parking Garage Altstadt-Hafen, Wismar

Wismar is a city in northern Germany, on the Baltic Sea, known for its well-preserved medieval buildings. The car park was reopened in 2018.

A total of 211 parking spaces are available to visitors on five levels, which cover the parking space needs of surrounding residential buildings, hotels and tourist attractions. All the parking spaces have a comfort width of 2.6 meters. In addition, there are six disabled parking places as well as four charging places for electric car.

The planning was carried out by architects Lengfeld + Willisch from Darmstadt, who are experienced in parking lot construction. Red protection wall

The multi-storey car park was designed as an “open car park” using steel and reinforced concrete construction. This makes it particularly clear and user-friendly. The five levels of Parking Garage are designed as couples. Interior access to the cars is via two single-level ramps located opposite each other in the central area. Of the 250 integrated INTEGRA-pw 943 auto security barriers, representing 10.74 tons of steel, 64 pieces were installed in the ramp areas alone.

About the project w

project w

projekt w was founded in 1984 and is located in central Germany and specializes in parking lot security barriers. We have made it our mission to harmoniously integrate our products into parking structures. The INTEGRA-pw product range replaces conventional systems such as concrete parapets or guardrails and meets applicable European and American standards.

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Parking garage

Car falls from Los Angeles parking lot, authorities respond to find no one at the scene

(KTLA) – A red sedan fell from the seventh floor of a Los Angeles parking lot on Friday, prompting a response from the city police and fire department.

Reports emerged around 5:40 p.m. that the car, a Kia, had plunged from the downtown parking lot onto West Eighth Street, landing on its hood. The car fell about 70 feet, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

A Los Angeles fire department representative said there was no driver or passenger in the vehicle when authorities arrived at the scene. The investigation was entrusted to the Los Angeles police on Friday.

A police representative was not available to issue updates on Saturday afternoon. It is not yet clear whether the authorities were able to locate the owner of the vehicle.

The parking lot structure is one of the most recognizable in the city, thanks to its 11,000 square foot “Harbor Freeway Overture” mural depicting members of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra circa 1991.

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Parking spaces

Truck parking spaces are open on the highway. 402 near Sarnia, Ont.

A former commercial vehicle inspection facility north on Highway 402 near Sarnia, Ontario has been converted into an official truck parking area.

The construction project, which began in March 2021, is now complete, confirms the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.

The rest area is accessible from the westbound lanes and will accommodate up to 13 commercial vehicles, with 12 spaces for tractor-trailers and one for a long combination vehicle (LCV).

It represents an investment of $1.5 million.

Works included repaving the parking area, opening temporary toilets, repairing entry and exit ramps, pavement markings and signage, new approach and parking lot lighting and a pair of cameras to monitor the site, a department spokesperson told Today’s Trucking.

“The government recognizes that there is a significant need for more truck parking in the province,” the spokesperson added, referring to a previously announced five-year plan that includes repairing or expanding 14 parking areas. existing rest areas, the construction of 10 new rest areas and the addition of 178 additional truck parking spaces at four existing ONroute centres.

SPR Associates of Toronto, a consulting firm behind a $280,000 study of truck parking in southern Ontario, has been openly critical of Ontario’s response to the shortage. His research required more than 350 new parking spaces per year, supplemented by emergency measures such as partnering with municipalities and repurposing public land.

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces in urban areas targeted for redevelopment

There are so many parking spaces in the United States that we have lost count. Some say 800 million or a billion; other estimates are as high as 2 billion.

No matter the exact number, it is far too many. There are only 250 million cars in the country.

State-by-state data is sparse, but it’s safe to assume Colorado has at least 10 million parking spaces. Denver has a few million, more or less. Instead of an urban fabric, we end up with a checkerboard of asphalt heat islands.

While growth from the 1950s through the 1980s was largely dictated by car culture, the parking pendulum is swinging the other way. McGregor Square at Coors Field is a high-profile example of surface land redevelopment in the heart of the city, with more to come at Empower Field at Mile High (where there are over 36 acres of parking) and Elitch Gardens ( where the River Mile project will transform the amusement park and its many surface lots into a new neighborhood).

But these are only large-scale projects. Drive into metro Denver or Colorado Springs, or just about any other city in Colorado – and the United States in general – and fill-in opportunities for parking lots are all over the map.

“There are way too many parking spaces everywhere,” says Robert Steuteville, senior communications adviser for the Washington, DC-based Congress for New Urbanism. Noting that there are far more parking spaces than people in the United States, he adds, “A lot of them aren’t heavily used.”

The best solution is as simple as removing parking requirements from municipal building codes (or allowing on-street parking to count as requirements), but that’s a tall order when you consider it there are approximately 90,000 local governments throughout the country. “Changing the code is definitely the way to have the biggest impact,” says Steuteville. “It makes so much more possible in terms of redevelopment.”

Now may be the time, he adds, as tremors shake existing paradigms in real estate: “Shopping malls, office parks, all of those things are in decline. Redeveloping these sites is something we will be doing, and that involves redeveloping parking lots.

RTD has approximately 80 lots at metro Denver transit stations. “The biggest problem we have with the development of our park and ride lots is that we use them,” says RTD’s Transit Oriented Development (TOD) manager Chessy Brady, noting that spaces typically cost to developers about $25,000 per space. With these calculations, an apartment complex that replaces all wasted space generally does not calculate from a budget perspective.

RTD’s best practice is to require developers to replace every wasted space. The agency’s new fair TOD policy “allows us to be flexible,” Brady says, encouraging the development of affordable housing with less stringent parking requirements.

Alameda station is the only clear example, but there are also projects at Olde Town Arvada station and Sheridan station on the Denver-Lakewood line that involved land swaps. RTD has also launched a request for proposals to redevelop a parking lot at Boulder Junction station in Boulder.

And it’s difficult to balance the different uses: without a dedicated park-and-ride, it took several years for the Alameda station to recover lost ridership, as riders moved to nearby stations.

“The joy of the city is being able to walk out your door and get the things you need without a substantial trip in an automobile,” says Stephen Dynia, principal of Dynia Architects of Denver and Jackson, Wyoming, and the spirit behind many Zeppelin Development projects in RiNo. “But Denver’s city size has a problem: it’s hard not to have a car.”

Dynia calls surface parking “the most inhospitable landscape,” and noting that it was the result of a push for urban redevelopment that Denver began to embrace in the 1950s. “Post-war planning tended to demolish buildings, even in the heart of the city, under the auspices of various urban planning strategies,” says Dynia. “Denver ended up with a lot of missing teeth. So did most cities in the United States in the second half of the 20th century.”

In the 1990s, the “lack of continuity in the urban experience” catalyzed the decline. Although zoning changes in the city have often reduced parking needs, he adds, “Planning moves takes generations to accomplish. We’ve seen the fabric of Denver improve, certainly over the past 10 years.

In Dynia’s mind, it’s not a crazy idea to completely eliminate parking requirements. “You just have to change your mentality, don’t you?” he says. “Spreading is not a good thing.”

One of his ideas is to turn the parking lot of an outdated suburban mall into a park. He says it makes a lot of sense if they move from pure retail to mixed uses that require less parking. “Find a mall that no longer exists, that no longer has life,” says Dynia. “You can imagine the parking requirement being reduced to allow the car park to be turned into a partial park.”

A potential project at Lamar Station in Lakewood (formerly JCRS Plaza and better known as Casa Bonita) passed through the Dynia office a few years ago, but a construction project along Colfax Avenue in the parking lot has been pushed back, so nothing materialized.

Dynia says the Cinderella City redevelopment in Englewood is another good target to redevelop excess parking, as well as a “parking strip” that serves as an overflow for Coors Field that he can see from his office window in RiNo. . “This is massive real estate in the heart of River North,” he observes. “I never see him full, even when there are games. What an opportunity for urban planning that would help unite RiNo.

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Parking garage

VyStar Launches $ 22 Million Downtown Parking Garage | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record

When VyStar Credit Union decided to build and own a seven-story parking lot valued at $ 22 million to support its growing downtown corporate campus, CEO Brian Wolfburg said the organization “didn’t want to not build just any parking lot “.

“Downtown Jacksonville is our home and we know that investing in Jacksonville’s infrastructure will help it thrive, help it grow,” Wolfburg said.

“We have invested time and energy to come up with top-notch design. “

Wolfburg and VyStar board members were joined on August 11 by city and JAX Chamber officials in a groundbreaking ceremony for the 807-space structure at 28 W. Forsyth St.

The garage, designed by Dasher Hurst Architects, features fabric sails, VyStar-branded blue lighting and 12,000 square feet of retail space on the main level.

The credit union purchased the nearby 23-story VyStar Tower at 76 S. Laura St. in July 2018 for $ 59 million. It has acquired an adjacent parking garage and is renovating a seven-story building next door at 100 W. Bay St. with three restaurant concepts by The Bread and Board.

Part of the retail plan

The contractor for the Danis project expects construction of the garage to be completed in 12 months.

Danis vice president of operations David Kottmyer said work on the site would begin Aug. 16 and the cranes could be in the air within four to six weeks.

Wolfburg told reporters he was “very confident” that the 8,000 to 9,000 square foot garage retail space on Laura Street will be leased when the parking lot is operational.

VyStar management has not defined what will be in this space or the remaining 3,000 to 4,000 square foot shopping area facing Main Street, which Wolfburg says could be leased for “experimental” or pop-up stores.

A tear in the parking lot of the VyStar Credit Union. The $ 22 million structure will have seven levels and 807 spaces.

Wolfburg said the credit union is considering restaurants, daycares and pet services.

“We try to think about things that our employee base would need, as well as other people when they make the choice to move downtown,” he said.

Downtown Investment Authority CEO Lori Boyer said VyStar and his agency are aligned with their strategy to build street-level business in the central core.

“It’s a beautiful building. It’s not just a parking lot that creates dead space along the street, ”Boyer said. “It will not be.”

VyStar took over the garage project in September 2019 from developer Laura Street Trio SouthEast Development Group LLC.

The garage was part of SouthEast’s original agreement with the city to restore and renovate the historic Barnett and Trio National Bank building across Forsyth Street.

SouthEast was unable to begin construction on the garage before the deadline with the city.

City Council has approved an agreement to sell 0.77 acre municipal land to VyStar for the parking garage.

VyStar also contracted with Regions Bank to purchase 0.26 acre parking at 54 W. Forsyth St. for the garage.

Boyer said on Aug. 11 that the garage’s earliest designs date back to 2016.

Downtown Investment Authority CEO Lori Boyer speaks at the inauguration.

VyStar Growth

With the outbreak of the delta variant of COVID-19, Wolfburg said VyStar has postponed the return of its office workers from August 2 to September 7.

VyStar will have nearly 1,200 of its 2,100 employees working at its downtown Jacksonville campus and Wolfburg expects this to increase over the next two years. Originally, VyStar expected 700 to 800 employees.

The additional employees created a need for the 500 to 600 parking spaces. Wolfburg said VyStar plans to add office and retail space as the credit union grows.

“I think we’re approaching the capacity of our buildings and we’re talking about where we place people as we continue to grow,” Wolfburg said.

According to Boyer, VyStar’s garage will free up its surface parking lot near the former Jacksonville Landing for private development.

Wolfburg said this is not a location VyStar plans to develop.

The credit union has 775,000 members and over $ 11 billion in assets.

VyStar will become the 13th largest credit union in the United States and gain a headquarters in South Atlanta with its acquisition of Georgia-based Heritage Southeast Bank announced on March 31.

Wolfburg said employees can also be based at its Orlando and Tallahassee offices, but added that VyStar executives want a bigger footprint in downtown Jacksonville.

Boyer said VyStar’s decision to maintain employee presence in the office after the pandemic may be linked to the growth of the downtown area.

“This downtown workforce is critical to the success of retail establishments and the growth of restaurant corridors and the growth of downtown retail,” she said.

Representatives from VyStar, city officials and others inaugurated the credit union’s seven-story parking lot at 28 W. Forsyth St. Downtown on August 11. Left to Right: Danis Chairman Steve Betz; Jax Chamber President and CEO Daniel Davis; Lori Boyer, CEO of the Downtown Investment Authority; VyStar Senior Vice President Installations and Safety Brian Kitchens; Chad Meadows, Executive Vice President and COO of VyStar; VyStar President and CEO Brian Wolfburg; VyStar board members George Berry and Diane Fears; Danis vice president of operations Dave Kottmyer; Tom Hurst, director of Dasher Hurst Architects; and Jake Gordon, CEO of Downtown Vision Inc ..

Be the first to hear about the latest news and information business leaders rely on in this fast-paced Northeast Florida economy. Regional business news, trends and statistics needed to grow your business. Key events you can’t miss and much more.

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Parking garage

Downtown Parking Lot: Time to Fish or Cut the Bait | Local news

LACONIA – The city has kicked the street regarding the city center parking lot where possible, the city council was told.

Public Works Director Wes Anderson told council on Monday that unless the city spends money to strengthen and modernize the structure, it will soon have no choice but to demolish it.

“We’re at the point where we have to make the decision to deconstruct it or rehabilitate it,” Anderson told the council on Monday.

Anderson estimated that the cost to tear down the parking lots and build a new roof over the commercial space on the ground floor would be $ 2 million, while the cost of refurbishing the structure is estimated to be between $ 4. 5 and 6 million dollars.

Councilor Bob Hamel, who chairs the council’s lands and buildings committee, has requested that council hold a public hearing on September 13 on the plans and funding for the project.

City Manager Scott Myers said the cost of building a new garage would be around $ 10 million.

The parking deck areas are supported by chocks, Anderson noted. He said the structure is scheduled for its next safety inspection next month.

“” It’s structurally sound if we screen it. If we can no longer screen it, it is structurally defective, ”he stressed.

The garage’s upper deck was closed about five years ago due to structural issues, and parts of the second level are blocked because they cannot safely support the weight of the vehicles.

The garage was built to accommodate 250 cars. However, only 105 spaces are currently usable, according to Anderson.

The city has the second and third levels of the structure, while the ground floor is privately owned.

Hamel said the rehabilitation of the garage is necessary in light of the increase in commercial activity in the city center.

“We will need these spaces in the future,” he said.

Council Bruce Cheney also spoke in favor of the rehabilitation of the facility.

“The sooner we find the money to do it, it can save our taxpayers money,” he said, noting the current low interest rates. But he warned that the council will have to be attentive to the reaction of the public.

“If we get a bunch of people (at the public hearing) saying no, we have to take a step back,” he said.

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Parking garage

Good and bad news for the construction of a parking garage | Local news

LACONIA – The city’s much-criticized parking garage today is both a harbinger of a downtown rebirth and proof of its unstable past.

All commercial space on the ground floor of the three-story structure is let for the first time in recent memory.

At the same time, the city finds itself where it must now decide how to deal with the problems posed by the deteriorating condition of the building.

The city council will be looking into the question of what to do with the facility that was built during the major redevelopment of the city center in the early 1970s as part of urban renewal.

Council is expected to take up the matter on Monday at the request of Councilor Bob Hamel, who chairs the council’s land and buildings committee.

The city owns the second and third levels of the structure, while the land and commercial space under the parking garage is owned by 5623 Real Estate LLC, a private company.

Over the years, the maintenance of the parking lot has become an increasing expense for the city as it has fallen into disrepair.

The city spent more than $ 100,000 in 2015 to pay for emergency repairs and to have the condition of the structure assessed, according to a report prepared for the council by the city’s public works manager, Wes Anderson. Since 2017, he has spent a total of $ 135,000 on annual safety inspections and temporary repairs.

“We spent the money to heal him,” City Manager Scott Myers said Thursday.

In recent years, the council has debated a number of options, including renovating the structure or demolishing it.

Anderson’s report puts the cost of rehabilitation at over $ 4.5 million. The cost of its demolition is estimated at $ 2 million.

Two years ago, Anderson told council it would cost $ 10.8 million to build a new garage, not including the cost of deconstructing the old one. Myers said the cost for a new facility would run between $ 30,000 and $ 35,000 per parking space.

The second terrace of the parking garage also serves as a roof for the buildings under the garage. Parking is allowed on most of the second bridge, although some areas are blocked off due to structural weakness. The entire third bridge has been closed for several years due to structural issues.

The garage is particularly prone to deterioration because its metal frame is exposed to the elements. Additionally, water on the bridges and salt brought in by vehicles over the winter corroded both the structural steel and the steel bridge panels, according to Anderson.

That the council is ready to deal with the parking issue is a good sign. This shows that the demand for parking in the city center is increasing, according to Brandon Borghi, whose family owns the first level of the building and who manages real estate for 5623 Real Estate.

“We have a good problem. People want to come here now, ”Borghi said.

The last vacant space on the ground floor has just been rented to someone who is going to open a juice bar. Filled out, there will be six street-level businesses, including Fit Focus, which Borghi manages.

He hopes the city will decide to make the necessary improvements so that the parking garage can be fully functional again.

Borghi’s family brought the structure to the 28,000 square foot ground floor five years ago. Since then, they have spent money on a new air conditioning system, as well as improved lighting in the premises. Further improvements are planned in the coming months, he said.

Borghi and Myers agree that another parking issue that needs to be addressed is whether to charge for parking.

Borghi said it made sense to charge “a little” for parking in the garage.

Myers said the city needs to thoroughly examine the parking situation, including whether to charge for it.

“How do you charge for garage parking if you don’t charge for street parking?” He wondered. “Where are the reasons people use the garage then?” “

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Parking spaces

Condo Smarts: parking spaces in the common property cannot be purchased by owners

Dear Tony: Our Condominium Board Chairman recently posted a notice in our building that there are 10 additional parking spaces available for sale at the Condominium Corporation’s rate of $15,000.


Dear Tony: Our Condominium Board Chairman recently posted a notice in our building that there are 10 additional parking spaces available for sale at the Condominium Corporation rate of $15,000.

Our building is five years old and many of us have purchased a parking space from the developer. All parking is presented as common property, so how do we purchase a parking space that is part of our condominium lot and secure for our future use?


Daniella J. Vancouver

When parking is shown as common property on the condominium plan, an owner/purchaser is not purchasing a parking space. In most transactions, this is some sort of license that gives the owner of the condominium lot exclusive use of those identified parking spaces for a prescribed period, usually 99 years.

Parking spaces can also be designated as limited common property by the owner developer, which provides a better definition of security in the process of a future sale of your condominium lot.

Strata companies are essentially in the same position as the owner-developer. They do not sell the common property parking space; they can grant some sort of license in exchange for the long-term allocation of the parking space to the designated strata lot. These types of transactions do not fall within the jurisdiction of the condominium board. The condominium corporation must approve these transactions by a 3/4 vote resolution at a general meeting and may also authorize a material change in the use of the property.

Although this may be an opportunity for the condominium company to raise additional funds, legal advice is essential to ensure that the condominium company and potential buyers clearly understand the implications of the agreement and the allocation of allocation of parking space.

Additional parking spaces can be a substantial added value asset for a condominium lot. Attribution and use are subject to the bylaws and rules of the Company and any agreements or licenses that may have been created by the Proponent Owner. Developers will frequently issue notices to owners of remaining parking lots that are available for transfer or purchase rights. Before you buy, talk to your lawyer to fully understand if the agreements are valid, how spaces are regulated, if there are any limitations or restrictions on conversions to charging stations, how space allocations are transacted at new owners, how the property is designated, whether there is reliable documentation to verify assignments, and whether it is possible to have parking spaces designated on limited common property.

The parking lot designated by the owner-developer as limited common property can only be changed by the condominium corporation by unanimous vote. In new developments, a developer-owner may, at any time before the first annual general meeting of the condominium corporation, amend the condominium plan to designate parking spaces as common property limited to the exclusive use of the owners of lots. condominium in the condominium plan. The developer-owner may amend the condominium plan to designate up to two additional parking spaces as common property limited to the exclusive use of the owners of each condominium lot in the condominium plan. This is the ideal option for condominium lot owners as it secures their purchase/transaction to land documents.

[email protected]


Tony Gioventu is Executive Director of the Condominium Homeowners Association of BC


Covid-19 Notice: As a precautionary measure to avoid the spread of COVID-19, CHOA staff are working remotely and our offices are temporarily closed. We understand that times are tough for condominium corporations and we are here to help. Even though CHOA Advisors work remotely, we are only a phone call or email away and able to help you arrange meetings and prepare notices.

Tuesday Lunch and Learn Live with CHOA: CHOA is hosting a series of webinars once a week for the next few months. Join us every Tuesday as we bring together industry experts to discuss the many issues affecting BC’s strata community. For more information visit our website at choa.bc.ca/seminars/

Please stay safe and healthy.

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Parking spaces

Calgary’s new platform innovation center promises more than just parking spaces

CALGARY –

The new parking lot in the heart of East Village is a multifunctional space for investors and startup projects to come together and create ideas that will shape the future.

Open in the fall of 2021, the Platform Innovation Center will be a hub dedicated to supporting start-up projects and entrepreneurs at each stage of their career.

This project is more interesting than meets the eye. From the outside, the Innovation Center looks like an ordinary parking lot with a modern surface. Once people can step inside, they will experience how unique this structure is.

This car park is a first of its kind, which means it is not intended to be a car park forever. The idea here is that as the city becomes more pedestrian-friendly through improved public transit, the parking lot can be transformed into a different space depending on the future needs of the city.

This parking lot could become affordable housing, office space or a recreation center if that is what the area needs. This is possible thanks to the construction method which provided for the parking lot to be reassigned later.

The building’s parking lot, which is operated by the Calgary Parking Authority, is already open, but the real treat is coming later this year, officials say.

When the Platform Innovation Center opens in the fall, it will have a pitch stage and community event space on the ground floor for tech startups to showcase their companies.

(Provided/Youtube)

The Innovation Center provides a centralized location for accessing resources, programming, and events to help start-ups successfully grow and develop their ideas.

The city hopes the innovation hub will help connect local innovators who can then drive economic growth and job creation in the city.

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Parking facilities

Lack of parking in West Wicklow highlighted by local councilors

Concerns have been expressed over the lack of parking facilities in rural areas of West Wicklow.

The issue was raised at the July meeting of the Municipal District of Baltinglass.

Cllr Patsy Glennon (FF) pointed out that there was a need for parking in the Hollywood Village. He pointed to a recent incident in which a garda patrol car issued a number of parking tickets to cars parked on the sidewalk on a Sunday morning.

“People were furious to get parking tickets during mass,” said Cllr Glennon, adding that most of the available parking was gone by early morning due to walkers visiting St Kevin’s Way.

He suggested that part of any funding to make improvements to Glendalough should go to Hollywood, as the village is a main route to the historic site from the west of the county.

Cllr John Mullen (FF) said a number of cars had also received parking tickets in Knockananna. He said the parking issue created headaches for opening businesses. He argued that there is a need for safe parking that also allows agricultural vehicles to travel on rural roads.

Councilor Gerry O’Neill (Ind) requested an update on parking plans in the Burgage neighborhood of Blessington. He suggested that there was space on the land owned by the Council to provide parking facilities.

District manager Breege Kilkenny said she raised the issue of the warden and that double yellow lines can only be installed where parking regulations are in place. She suggested that a lot near the cemetery could provide parking, but that would require public consultation. Regarding the Council land in Burgage, she said parking was unlikely to be provided there, as the land is reserved for social housing.

Cllr Glennon noted that parking enforcement is the responsibility of the warden, but the district needs to consider alternative parking facilities to discourage inappropriate parking.

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Parking spaces

PARK (ing) Day is back in September – Greater Greater Washington

PARK (ing) Day in DC in 2011 by Eric Fidler under license Creative Commons.

Have you ever looked at all the space on a street dedicated to storing cars and thought about what that space could be, if only given the chance? Well now is your chance: the DCs Annual PARK day (ing), in which paid parking spaces are temporarily converted to miniature parks, is set for September 17.

The concept of PARK (ing) Day was created in San Francisco in 2005 and takes place every year on the third Friday of September. The concept of performance art turned event has been unfolding in various forms in DC for over a decade.

Since then, the idea of ​​converting parking into a public space has gained ground. During the pandemic, parking spaces around the city have been converted to streets, which are so popular that a a permanent program is in progress.

If you have a creative idea for a parking lot, applications are open until August 27 (the application fee is $ 55, but the meters for that day are free). Parks can include features such as potted plants, seating, free food, crafts and cultural activities, and signs. Unfortunately, the Department of Transportation says to leave your open flames and sand at home.

Looking for inspiration? Here are some PARK (ing) daytime parklets that have been parked in and around DC over the years.



PARC (ing) Day 2017 by licensed airbus777 Creative Commons.



PARC (ing) Day 2012 by Brett VA licensed Creative Commons.



PARC (ing) Day 2013 by Eye4Shot under license Creative Commons.



PARC (ing) Day 2015 by BeyondDC licensed Creative Commons.

Libby Solomon is a writer and editor for GGWash. She was previously a reporter for the Baltimore Sun covering the suburbs of Baltimore and a writer for the Centers for Civic Impact at Johns Hopkins University.

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Parking spaces

Neighbors welcome more parking in part of Bestwood used by hospital staff

Residents of Bestwood have spoken about the benefits of having more parking in an area where staff park to get to Nottingham City Hospital.

No less than 10 garages were demolished in Wyton Close, creating more parking spaces for residents.

Neighbors said the area is now much nicer and easier to park.

Carl Thomson, 50, of Wyton Close, said hospital staff tended to park in the area to use a cut through Nottingham City Hospital.

“We find a lot of employees park here to park for free instead of parking at the hospital,” he said.

“It created a lot of parking, it makes it look a lot nicer than it was when the garages were up there.”

He added, “We were thinking ‘where do you want to park.’ You don’t want to park in front because you might have an accident with a passing car.



Wyton Close, Bestwood.

“I saw it coming, cars are turning too fast around the corner and it caught up with one of the cars which is parked.”

Mr Thomson said there was now always a place to park, saying the program had “taken a week or two before people started using” the new parking lot.

He added: “There were 10 garages up there, half of them had nothing in there anyway when they emptied them.”

Local neighborhood councilors worked with Nottingham City Homes to demolish the disused garage and create additional parking.

Mercy Kamau, 35, who works part-time and lives in Wyton Close, said: “It’s good to have more parking lots – and that’s for sure.

“Sometimes you find it is [existing parking facilities] full.

“Sometimes there are two of you and maybe two of us have cars, there is not enough parking space.”

A 50-year-old woman, who lives nearby and asked not to be named, said the double yellow lines could be of benefit in the larger area, saying: “Some people don’t know the rules of the road” .

She said residents tend to park on sidewalks.

“You see people walking in the middle of the road with strollers and mobility scooters because they cannot get on the sidewalks because the cars are parked there.

“Even though it’s 20 miles an hour here, they [drivers] going at 30/40 miles per hour. They have no regard for anyone. “

She added, “You have people parking here for the hospital and the hospital staff as well.”

New parking spaces have also been created at Winterton Rise, Bestwood Park.

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Parking spaces

OB planners will tackle replacing car parking spaces with bicycle spaces and a roundabout at West Point Loma – Wednesday, August 4

The Ocean Beach Planning Council is meeting this Wednesday August 4th. The Council still meets via Cisco WebEx and attendees must register (go here).

According to its agenda, the council has no development projects to consider, but it has three items to note on the agenda.

First, the Board will finalize its priority list of CIPs (Community Infrastructure Projects), following its last meeting. At the request of the city, the Régie draws up such a list each year. Now, whether the city is actually looking at the list or “complying” with it is uncertain, but at least the OB planning board is recording the community’s priorities.

Next on the agenda, it looks like Council will be getting involved in the controversies surrounding the replacement of car parking with bicycle parking. This issue has been raised by the Transportation Committee of the Board since the last meeting. (I couldn’t decipher the description of this agenda item without my trusty copy of the San Diego municipal code, which I don’t have on hand.) ration of two bicycle parking spaces for each space vehicle parking spaces”, whatever that means.

The third issue that Council must address is whether it should commission a traffic study to assess a roundabout along West Point Loma Avenue at Ebers, Cable and Abbott streets. The question of a roundabout on West Point Loma has been trifled with for years, and evidently nothing conclusive has ever been done.

Here is the official agenda.

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