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September 2021

Parking spaces

Restaurant St. Pete nixes in the parking spaces

ST. PETERSBURG – The Town of St. Pete will no longer allow restaurants to keep tables in parking spaces, effective October 18.


What would you like to know

  • Companies were told last week that the program would end in mid-October
  • Bandit Coffee on Central Avenue launched a changer.org petition in order to get the city to reconsider.
  • The city is considering a long-term solution, but it would not include the concrete barriers
  • More Pinellas County Titles

According to Ben Kirby, a city spokesperson, the concrete barriers marked “Restart St. Pete” will be removed later this month. These barriers were placed in front of nearly two dozen restaurants last year to allow more outdoor seating amid the pandemic.

Businesses were told last week that the program would end in mid-October and that they would have to withdraw their tables.

The city sent surveys to 914 downtown business owners in July asking for their opinions at the tables across the street. They received 18 responses and Kirby said 61% of those businesses were not happy with the tables that cut off the parking lot.

Bandit Coffee on Central Avenue launched a changer.org petition in order to get the city to reconsider. The top of their petition states that “The city has not asked or interviewed small businesses or citizens for comment regarding this measure. This is our chance to let them know how we feel.

The owner of The Lure, also located on Central Avenue, said the city had not asked them for their opinion either. Or if they did, they never saw the email or the notice.

“Just having fewer seats for people will definitely hurt our business a bit. I mean I enjoyed what we have here, ”said owner Tom Golden.

Kirby said the city is considering a long-term solution, but that it will not include the concrete barriers.

“We are currently working on a long-term, permanent program proposal, which will involve establishing minimum design standards, annual license fees and location criteria,” he wrote in an email to Spectrum Bay News 9.

It’s something Golden says he would definitely consider, and he understands why some companies want to reclaim additional parking.

“There is always the flip side in every situation and there is one in this one,” he said.

Tables are still permitted on the sidewalk in various areas of the city center.

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Parking garage

Downtown Parking Garage Reconstruction Plans Advance | Local news

LACONIA – The city parking lot, called both an eyesore and a potential downtown growth accelerator, is expected to cost more than $ 6 million to rehabilitate. The project could be funded by the city’s economic development and would provide parking for two more decades, the city council learned Monday evening.

The extensive reconstruction of the largely underused and deteriorating structure received a first green light on Monday.

City Council unanimously asked City Manager Scott Myers to prepare an overview of the engineering, construction and financing of the multi-million dollar project that Mayor Andrew Hosmer has called critical to support economic revitalization downtown.

Hosmer, who called the garage in its current state an “albatross and horror,” and several advisers said rehabilitation of the facility was urgent.

“We need to act quickly,” said Councilor Bruce Cheney.

“We need to vote and fix the problem,” said Councilor Bob Hamel, who chairs the council’s land and construction committee.

The deterioration of the condition of the 48-year-old parking structure has rendered much of the garage unusable in recent years. About 140 of the 250 spaces, including all those on the top floor, have been closed for security reasons.

Myers called the repairs the city has made to the structure in recent years as interim measures.

“These dressings are big dressings that have become tourniquets,” he said.

A 2019 technical study estimated it would cost $ 4.5 million to correct structural deficiencies and make the facility safer and more accessible for users. Myers now estimates the job could cost around $ 6.6 million, he told council.

He said the growing tax base in the city center alone would provide the city with additional income that would offset the cost of the project. He estimated that with reconstruction, along with regular preventive maintenance, the lifespan of the renovated facility should be 20 to 25 years.

The council’s decision came after a public hearing during which everyone spoke in favor of the project.

“We need the spaces that are in the garage and this is the only place that has covered parking spaces,” said Bob Sawyer, who owns a commercial block on Canal Street.

By its action on Monday, the city council did not commit to spending money on the project. But councilor Robert Soucy said he hopes council will approve the financing soon to take advantage of the low interest rates currently available on municipal bonds.

According to the New Hampshire Municipal Bond Bank, during the last bond sale in July, interest rates ranged from 0.96% on a 10-year loan to 2.01% on a 25-year loan.

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Parking spaces

Woman wants to turn thousands of parking spaces into small parks after being hit by motorcycle

A north London woman is campaigning to turn thousands of parking spaces in London into mini-parks after being hit by a motorbike.

Activist Brenda Puech is hosting the first-ever ‘People Parking Day’ in London this weekend to encourage people to sit and talk in a parking space on their streets.

The London Parklet Campaign, made up of volunteers, works with the Living Streets London charity and IBikeLondon to encourage Londoners to participate in the activities.



Campaign founder Brenda Puech says she wants “every Londoner, whether they own a car or not, have access to these public spaces”

READ MORE: Disabled man ‘disappointed’ as new elevators at Battersea station couldn’t even accommodate a wheelchair

She had the idea of ​​reclaiming parking spaces for community use while recovering from a serious collision when she was knocked off her bike by a motorist who turned on a red light.

After being refused permission, she set up a “guerrilla floor” outside her home in London Fields. The “People Parking Bay” was a piece of artificial turf with flowerpots, a bench and a sign that said “You can park on the bay”. It was then withdrawn by the board.

The London Parklet Campaign calls on Sadiq Khan and the district chiefs to allow Londoners to ask to create “parklets” in the streets where they live, with the aim of having a parklet on every street.

Campaign founder Brenda Puech: “I want every Londoner, whether they own a car or not, to have access to these public spaces.

“Not everyone is fortunate enough to have a private garden, so providing social spaces close to people’s homes is essential.

“We can really improve our environment and our well-being if we reclaim these areas as spaces to sit and socialize, and make London the parklet capital of the world. “



Research from the Center for London shows that there are over a million parking spaces in London, occupying more than 3,000 miles of curbside space.
Research from the Center for London shows that there are over a million parking spaces in London, occupying more than 3,000 miles of curbside space.

Pop-up events across the city will take place in empty parking spaces. The best-designed parklet entrance will earn £ 100. Entrants can share their entries using #PeopleParking on Twitter and Instagram.

Parklets are an alternative use of a parking space, allowing people to sit and talk, have lunch or enjoy their leisure time in many ways.

Hailing from San Francisco, they come in all shapes and styles, from functional to flamboyant.

Campaigners want to build on the success of London’s ‘streets’ – parking lot seating to support bars and restaurants during the pandemic.

Proponents of parklets believe they can help fight climate change by greening the urban environment and providing additional stormwater drainage.

Jeremy Leach, President of London Living Streets, said: “Enabling people to create parklets will empower communities, create social alliances and allow people to invest in the streets they live in, with a marginal impact on the number of parking spaces.

“In this time of recovery from Covid and real concerns about climate change, we need to initiate a huge shift from the streets for vehicles to the streets for people. “

Beatriz Puerta, who runs Humdingers Catering in Hoxton, said: We want a place where families can eat together when they come to our soup kitchen.

“Having a park outside our cafe would create a community identity and would be a lush green garden addition to the streets of Hoxton. “



Let us know your thoughts on community parklets in the comments
Let us know your thoughts on community parklets in the comments

Despite their popularity, the approval of “community parks” is a “bureaucratic nightmare” according to activists. There is no process in any London borough.

And residents are required to carry a massive liability insurance policy (offered up to £ 10million in one London borough) – for setting up a bench and table on the street.

Speaking of the ‘People Parking Bay’ she created in Hackney, Brenda continued, “People used Parking Bay as a rest stop on their way home from shopping or cycling; mothers used it to feed their babies; the inhabitants watered the plants. A couple had their first date there.

“You would see complete strangers smile and talk to each other. The response from residents has been surprisingly positive. At first, I found feedback on scraps of paper taped to the bay, so I decided to leave a guestbook on the table. Five books filled in four weeks!



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The parklet was removed by council, despite Brenda’s efforts to apply for a residential parking permit and lobbying from councilors in Hackney and Tower Hamlets.

A map being developed by the campaign will celebrate existing car parks and activities planned for People’s Parking Day, with the goal that the councils will enable local groups to install one on every residential street in the capital.

Motorization rates are much lower in London than in the rest of the country. In central London, almost two-thirds of households (61%) do not have access to their own car and cannot use these public spaces to socialize or play with their family.

In the capital, nearly half (46%) of households do not have access to a car. Islington has the lowest car ownership rate, at 26%, according to figures released by Transport for London.

Research from the Center for London shows that there are over a million parking spaces in London, occupying more than 3,000 miles of curbside space.

That’s roughly the distance between UK and US across the Atlantic Ocean. The average car in London is parked 95 percent of the time (that is, more than 23 hours per day).

Forty-three percent of cars are parked on the street, occupying the equivalent of 10 Hyde Parks.

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Parking garage

Plans to reopen downtown Sacramento and businesses parking lot after fire

A fire in the city hall parking lot in downtown Sacramento forced the building’s businesses to close in March, and the structure has been empty since. “Property is prohibited,” said Feras Jowaniyah, owner of Vela Café. “I can’t come in. I can’t operate or do anything, so since then we’ve been waiting.” He said it was one thing after another. First, it had to close its doors to customers last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Then the fire broke out. Just before 6:30 a.m. on March 20, a van in which someone was living caught fire. The city allowed people living outside their cars to park in the garage overnight. At the time, firefighters said someone may have tried using electricity from an electric car charging station. Today, Sacramento firefighters said the final cause was “undetermined” after an investigation. “The homeless issue here in downtown, especially in this park, affects all businesses in this block,” Jowaniyah said. “So that’s a major concern.” The city did not charge Jowaniyah rent as his business had to remain closed. It’s been about six months, but he said he was encouraged to see crews painting on Monday. KCRA 3 News has contacted the city. A spokesperson said the fire damaged part of the ceiling on the second floor. The initial repairs and consultation with a structural engineer will cost approximately $ 500,000. However, that does not include repairs for some of the worst damage, as the city has said it will only cordon off that part of the parking lot for now. The rest of the garage, including the shops on the first floor, should be able to reopen by the end of October or early November.

A fire in the downtown Sacramento town hall parking lot forced construction businesses to close in March, and the structure has been empty since.

“Property is prohibited,” said Feras Jowaniyah, owner of Vela Café. “I can’t come in. I can’t operate or do anything, so we’ve been waiting ever since.”

He said it was one thing after another. First, it had to close its doors to customers last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Then the fire broke out.

Just before 6:30 a.m. on March 20, a van in which someone was living caught fire. The city allowed people living off their cars to park in the garage overnight.

At the time, firefighters said someone may have tried using electricity from an electric car charging station. Today, Sacramento firefighters said the final cause was “undetermined” after an investigation.

“The homeless issue here in downtown, especially in this park, affects all businesses in this block,” Jowaniyah said. “So that’s a major concern.”

The city did not charge Jowaniyah’s rent as his business had to remain closed. It’s been about six months, but he said he was encouraged to see crews painting on Monday.

KCRA 3 News has contacted the city. A spokesperson said the fire damaged part of the ceiling on the second floor.

The initial repairs and consultation with a structural engineer will cost approximately $ 500,000. However, that does not include repairs for some of the worst damage, as the city has said it will only cordon off that part of the parking lot for now.

The rest of the garage, including the shops on the first floor, should be able to reopen by the end of October or early November.

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Parking garage

$ 4 million New Hope parking garage: dozens of people ask questions and offer feedback

NEW HOPE, PA – The New Hope Borough Council hosted the first public forum on a four-story parking garage project in the borough on Wednesday evening. Dozens of residents came to view current plans and offer feedback in a one-on-one discussion with consulting and design professionals.

Plans for the proposed $ 4.5 million parking garage began in December, when New Hope acquired a $ 1.75 million grant from the state’s capital redevelopment assistance program. New Hope hired THA Consulting to write an engineering and architectural proposal.

At present, the scope of the project will include approximately 325 spaces, a possible reception floor on the roof, a potential loading and unloading area on the ground floor and various utilities within the structure for future uses. , including provision for recharging electric cars.

The parcel is bounded by Stockton Avenue, Hardy Bush Way, and Union Square, accessible from Route 202. The company also provided possible measurements for the structure, claiming that the height of the building would be approximately 28 feet on the east sides and south, about 38 feet on the west side, and between 28 and 38 feet on the north side. As proposed, the building’s elevator tower will extend approximately 17 feet above the parapet.

The parking lot was proposed in part to deal with the high tourist traffic in New Hope, and the THA believes it could reduce the flow of cars on North Main Street. Street parking in the borough can be difficult to find.

“We lose reservations, we lose tables because it takes people 45 minutes and then they decide to go home and lose the table,” said Graham Lundeen, front desk and bar manager at Martine’s RiverHouse restaurant on Ferry Street at Bucks County Courier. Times. “And I know that is true in all areas.”

However, some residents have expressed concerns that the garage could lead to unwanted crowding or interfere with the city’s aesthetic sensibilities.

David Minno, of the architecture firm of Lambertville Minno & Wasko, offered possibilities that can make a large industrial structure less of an eyesore.

“We understand New Hope is a historic town, but garages are not historic structures,” he said. “There were no parking lots 100 years ago.”

Minno provided reference photos of historic, contemporary and transitional parking garage designs for residents to review and comment on.

“We can try to implement some of these ideas in the final design of the structure,” he explained.

Designs of historic garages can use brick materials, arches and paneling; contemporary garages can use an offset screen with a graphic to cover the scaffolding and create a more aesthetic building; transitional designs use stucco and false windows to bridge the gap between traditional and modern sensibilities.

(Kate Fishman / Patch)

One participant, Joe Balderston, remains skeptical whether the demand for a parking garage is worth the scale of the project. He brought a notice board with him to the meeting, displaying photos of an existing borough parking lot near the proposed site, taken during the weekend afternoons in August and early September of This year.

Joe Balderston presented these photos of Gordon H. Nieburg at the meeting. (Kate Fishman / Patch)

Balderston claimed the parking lot was empty in each of those photographs. He would prefer the existing lot to be extended on the west side or for the garage to have one story instead of four.

“It will drastically reduce costs,” he said. “We don’t know what the maintenance of a parking lot will be.”

A resident asked if the parking garage could be transformed into another type of building, such as apartments, if it was not in use. Minno said this possibility had not been discussed.

The borough intends to use the comments of the residents of the evening to inform the direction of the project. Stronger designs will be presented at future city meetings, which will include opportunities for public comment.


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Have any tips, story ideas or questions about Lower Bucks County? Send an email to [email protected]

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Boscov car park in Binghamton town center will be rebuilt

BINGHAMTON – Much of the deteriorating downtown real estate is ready for a major renovation in Binghamton.

Mayor Richard David on Wednesday announced plans to demolish the Water Street parking garage and build a mixed-use parking and housing park that will include 122 apartments.

The Water Street Parking Garage was built in 1970 and has been the primary source of parking for Boscov customers since 1984. Its integrity has been on the decline for years, evidenced by an August 2006 incident in which a 7,000-pound concrete slab broke outside the garage and plunged into a trailer near the Boscov’s loading dock.

The garage would require millions of dollars in structural repairs to extend its life by a few years. Instead, the city is taking a different direction with a new take on the city center.

“The required demolition of the Water Street parking garage provides the City with a unique opportunity to transform an entire city block in the heart of Binghamton’s waterfront and artsy district,” said David. “This development will not only revitalize the immediate area, but will also support small businesses and downtown restaurants.

“Downtown deserves better than a massive 50-year-old concrete horror. United-Pike’s proposal stood out because it didn’t depend on state economic development funding to get started, as it is. the case with so many large-scale projects. “

The project includes a total investment of $ 48 million, with United Group of Troy and The Pike Company of Rochester joining in the effort. The demolition and construction of the parking garage, as well as the geotechnical study and foundation work, are estimated at $ 23 million.

The five-storey public parking lot will reduce vehicle capacity slightly, providing 549 parking spaces from the 600 currently available at the Water Street parking lot. The 122 apartments will be at market price, spread over five floors above the parking garage. United-Pike estimates that part of the project will cost $ 25 million.

When the project is complete, it will be the second overhaul of a downtown parking lot, following the opening in January of the Hawley Street garage, which replaced the aging structure that served the Arena, the area on along downtown State Street and government offices.

Stacey Duncan, president and CEO of the Greater Binghamton Chamber of Commerce and executive director of the agency in Broome County, said she expects IDA to play a role in advancing the large-scale project.

“It is very important to continue to provide professional housing opportunities downtown, especially where we can improve our shoreline,” said Duncan. “This project is located downtown, along the river, and will serve as an important anchor point for retail and service businesses that can meet the needs of downtown residents.

“I know this has been a priority for the Mayor and I’m glad he was able to complete this project. We look forward to working with United and Pike, a great development collaboration for the community.”

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The demolition and construction of the parking lot will be funded from City reserves and the capital bond, David said. The housing part of the project is financed by the private sector. The city had issued a request for economic redevelopment proposals using the current Water Street parking garage site in September 2020.

“Pike Development is thrilled to have the opportunity to participate in the revitalization of the Water Street Garage,” said Peter Cornell, President and CEO of Pike Development. “We appreciate Binghamton City’s forward thinking staff led by Mayor David. Using air rights to the garage for a new apartment project brings into use an area that is generally underutilized and will generate 24 hour activity. We can’t wait to get started.

United-Pike will perform testing and analysis of the plot’s structural foundations over the coming weeks, while the project is expected to progress through the city’s planning review process in the coming months.

The Water Street Parking Garage also serves Boscov guests. The city said demolition should begin after Christmas Day to avoid any major impact on Boscov’s and the downtown holiday shopping season.

The city said it will work with holders of monthly parking permits at the Water Street Garage to move them to other parking lots in the city. He will also work with Boscov and the project developer to add temporary parking for customers during the project.

Chris Potter can be contacted at [email protected] or on Twitter @ ChrisPotter413. To get unlimited access to the latest news, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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Parking garage

Bloomington’s new parking lot will soon feature artwork and solar panels

The opening of the new Fourth Street parking lot last month eased some space constraints and made life a little easier for downtown employees and customers, according to business groups.

Downtown businesses are emerging from a pandemic-induced malaise, and not having to worry about lack of parking is some relief.

“Parking in general is a part of the daily lives of many downtown employees, businesses and customers,” said Talisha Coppock, executive director of Downtown Bloomington Inc., a non-profit organization.

Bloomington City Council:“A la carte” garbage collection, higher parking fees?

The economic recovery remains fragile, she said, and some customers are still reluctant to join crowded indoor spaces, so not having to worry about parking takes some of the stress away.

Erin Predmore, president and CEO of the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce, agrees.

“It’s great to have additional parking,” she said.

With the return of students and events like this weekend’s Lotus World Music & Arts Festival, downtown merchants are happy that parking constraints have been reduced, Predmore said.

While the garage receives customers on an hourly basis, she said the spaces primarily help employers who struggle to find adequate, nearby and secure parking for their employees.

Following:How many students have been exempted from IU’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate?

Outside the rented spaces, parking in the garage is supposed to cost 50 cents an hour. But some of the garage’s electronic equipment malfunctioned last week, forcing city officials to allow people to park in the garage for free.

However, Bloomington Public Works Director Adam Wason said a spare should be installed this week, starting on Tuesday.

The garage entrance is on West Fourth Street, between South Walnut Street and South College Avenue.

About 100 of the nearly 540 spaces will be dedicated to hourly parking, while the rest will be rented to downtown employers. There are few places left to rent, Wason said. Some of the rented spaces are booked 24/7, while others are rented 12 hours a day Monday through Friday, opening them up to hourly use at night and on weekends.

He also said the city still needs to complete additional landscaping, artwork that will be incorporated into the facade of the building and a sign indicating whether the garage is full.

Wason said when city officials opened the garage in August, they knew more work needed to take place and they expected to have to fix some issues. Nonetheless, they wanted the structure open to provide additional parking when students arrive for the Indiana University fall semester.

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Commercial offices and retail space on the garage’s ground floor are currently unoccupied and no lease has been signed, Wason said.

According to a brochure from Cockerham Commercial Real Estate & Consulting, the garage offers four 1,800 square foot spaces, which can be combined. Wason said the spaces could accommodate businesses such as restaurants, retailers or a coffee shop.

Wason also said he expects solar panels to be installed within the next month. City officials are hoping the panels will generate enough electricity to run the garage and businesses, but Wason said that depends a bit on the type of businesses that will occupy the space.

Although the garage has not yet been fully occupied, Wason said he has seen an increase in traffic, and he expects this trend to continue, especially as the nation emerges fully from the pandemic and people come to the city center more often to work, shop, dine or attend events.

The garage replaced a smaller one that the city had originally planned to rehabilitate but then demolished.

In February 2019, a report on additional structural inspections revealed significant deterioration. The council has issued a bond of $ 18.5 million for a new garage. Including interest, the total cost of the garage is expected to increase by almost $ 30 million. The deposit is to be paid through parking fees and income from financing tax increases.

After the city closed the old garage, downtown traders said they saw less foot traffic, though some council members at the time were also concerned about subsidizing parking at a time when the car traffic should be reduced to help combat climate change.

The discussion has erupted again during recent budget discussions, with some council members suggesting that the price of parking in garages, lots and streets should be adjusted in part depending on the popularity of parking spaces.

Boris Ladwig is the municipal government reporter for the Herald-Times. Contact him at [email protected]

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Parking spaces

Why are the parking spaces at Huntingdon station so tight?

Posted:
6:52 am September 21, 2021



Update:
7:00 a.m. September 21, 2021

The A1307 now offers a great quick route from Godmanchester to Huntingdon station parking lot, but I was very frustrated when I made the trip last week.

The journey time of six minutes, after 25+ years, and finally it’s now faster to drive than to cycle to the station and in wet weather it’s definitely a much better option.

However, it took 15 minutes to park as there were only four spots left and two were totally unusable as the drivers parked their car across the white lines.

There were also a lot of spaces blocked for no apparent reason in the middle of the parking lot.

I hesitated as the current ring road system meant it would not have been practical to go to another parking lot as I would have missed my train which I ended up running for anyway after taking so long with parking.

So I squeezed into a space and the trunk was the only convenient way to get in and out of the car.


Babs had to get in and out of the trunk of his car!
– Credit: BABS MOORE

My car is not very big and I was evenly spaced between the white lines.

May I ask if there is anyone who thinks these parking spaces are the appropriate size?

Has anyone else found the same problem?

Babs moore

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Write to the editor at: [email protected]

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Parking garage

The future home of the proposed parking garage on Market Street in Wheeling

Wheeling, WV (WTRF) – The proposed parking lot in downtown Wheeling is one step closer to reality.

Tonight City Council approved funds to demolish the old Chase Bank building on 11th and Market Streets: a new space for the parking garage.

This is all part of the redevelopment of the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Building. The parking structure will also have 10,000 square feet of retail space on both sides of the street.

And Mayor Glenn Elliott can’t wait to see how that turns this block.

“Right now you’re looking at one block on Market Street between 11th and 12th. It’s really not really a contributing block right now. We have an office building. We have a retail outlet. We have a lot of vacant spaces. By eliminating the Chase Bank and putting the new parking structure in motion, we will reactivate the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel building. “

Mayor Glenn Elliott, Wheelie Town

The mayor says retail space will run from where the Chris Miller building ends to the corner of 11th Street. He adds that the space can be filled with cafes, bagel shops and things like that.

Meanwhile, the demolition of the old Chase Bank building is expected to continue in the coming weeks. But the mayor says the actual construction of the parking structure won’t start until 2022 and will take about a year before it’s all done.

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Parking garage

New Kensington hires engineer to assess parking lot

New Kensington retained the services of a structural engineer to assess the condition of the 42-year-old downtown parking garage.

Edward Patton, owner of Patton Engineering, said his inspection would take three to four weeks and cost the city around $ 10,000.

Patton said it would be his first time inspecting the garage, formerly known as the Kensington Plaza Garage, located on Fourth Avenue at Seventh Street.

The garage was opened in December 1979, said city clerk Dennis Scarpiniti. Its construction had been the subject of criticism and hesitation, according to a Dec. 4, 1979 report on the garage’s $ 2.4 million dedication to the Valley News Dispatch. Traders, residents and officials attended the event.

The report states that even the most skeptical of the garage “were burying the hatchet and rallying behind the completed downtown parking lot.” An unnamed city official reportedly said, “There’s no point in bickering now, so let’s do our best. “

The garage and the development below were heralded at the time as a sign of the city’s redevelopment and revitalization. Officials predicted great and good things for the city in comments similar to those heard today, as downtown buildings are being rehabilitated and new businesses open within them.

Patton said his work will include taking core samples to check the strength of the garage’s concrete, visual inspections of the structure and identifying any deficiencies that need to be corrected. His report will cover the general condition of the garage and give recommendations.

The garage is open, but much of it is unused. Garage use declined after the nearby Citizens General Hospital closed in 2000, said city engineer Tony Males.

“The garage needs some work,” Males said.

To the untrained eye, the garage can be described as dark, dirty, and deteriorated.

The entrance to a stairwell is blocked on the first floor. The steps and the metal of the stairwells are rusty. Grass has been seen growing in crumbled concrete on the upper level, where the lines for parking spaces – unnecessary on a recent day when no cars were parked there – have all but disappeared.

The men said the garage’s last structural assessment was done over 20 years ago.

The men said the city was considering applying for grants to pay for the repairs. Patton’s report will help.

“They want to be able to see precisely what needs to be done and the cost estimates for it,” he said.

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Parking spaces

The surprising amount of space taken up by London parking spaces compared to the size of a royal park

Have you ever struggled to find a parking space in the capital and wondered why there isn’t more for a city of 9 million people?

When traveling to central London or any popular place in the capital, finding a place to park can often take a while – even longer if you’re desperate for free space.

It may be a huge surprise, then, to find out how much space in London is reserved for you to park your engine.

READ MORE: UK capital could be moved from London due to risk of intense flooding, expert says

As the parking spaces available in London occupy an impressive amount of space.

The Center for London has done calculations to see how much of London is actually occupied by parked cars.



A YouGov report from 2018 found that 85% of us have parked at some point on a sidewalk

They found that the on-street parking lot occupied more than 14 km2, or the equivalent of 10 Hyde Parks completely covered with cars.

The Royal Park is huge, so it’s hard to imagine the actual space.

But parking doesn’t just affect drivers. With just 56% of Londoners actually owning a car, those who don’t are still affected.

According to the Center for London, the average car is parked 95 percent of the time, an extremely inefficient use of the land.

The curbside parking space cannot be used for other things that could have a greater social benefit.

For example, tackling climate change and poor air quality will require a shift from private cars to public transport, walking and cycling.

Enabling people to make this change requires increasing the capacity of the public transport system.



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This also includes increasing the speed and reliability of the buses, which in turn means more priority bus lanes.

However, dedicating significant amounts of sidewalks to allow buses is much more difficult when there are long stretches of cars parked in the path.

Pollution is a big problem and the number of cars in the capital has had an impact on the air people breathe in the capital.

More recently, a Very Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) has been extended to other parts of London.

Now cars, especially older diesel ones, have to be safer for the environment or face a fine every time they drive through the area.

The area includes the majority of roads within the north and south circular roads.

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Parking garage

Structural issues close roads near downtown Knoxville parking lot

Spectators fill the streets of Gatlinburg for Fantasy of…



Lights spotted in the night sky over eastern Tennessee



Fun downtown vacation in December



Blount County Sheriff’s Office is playing Santa Claus for rehab …



Bertelkamps honored with the Knoxville Prize



Malayan Tiger Arya from Knoxville Zoo



3-year-old possibly hit by truck in Sevier County



Businesses in downtown Knoxville are feeling the joy of Christmas



Spark adapting toys for disabled children



The strange Al Yankovic returns to Knoxville



Vegan burger argument leads to arrest



Drug Raid at Caryville Waffle House



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Uncategorized

Parking structures will be key to Bushnell South’s development in Hartford

Parking structures will be a key component of Bushnell South, a development that aims to replace acres of parking lots with up to 1,200 new housing units and 60,000 square feet of retail and commercial space.

“The main objective is to take advantage of the [Capital Region Development Authority’s] are working in some critical properties and the investments they’ve already made in the Clinton Street parking lot, ”said Ben Carlson, director of urban design for Goody Clancy, a Boston-based architecture and planning firm, in a statement. updated September 16 at CRDA. plank.

As the existing supply of above-ground parking declines, Carlson said they will need to create more parking structures and then operate them in a shared-use format that will allow residents, office workers and theatergoers to use them at different times of the day and week.

“We minimize the costs and the square footage required and this opens up opportunities for development,” said Carlson.

The project focuses on approximately 20 acres bordered by Capitol Avenue and Elm, Trinity and Main streets near the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts.

CRDA built the new $ 16 million parking lot on Clinton Street. It is also contributing $ 13.5 million to the conversion of the former state office building at 55 Elm St., into 164 residential units, a $ 63 million project that is part of the first phase of the development. from Bushnell South. In total, the first phase will have 278 housing units.

CRDA executive director Michael Freimuth said the authority owns several plots in the area and plans to endorse other projects in line with the plan prepared by Goody Clancy.

The second and third phases take advantage of adding two levels and approximately 135 spaces to a CRDA parking structure by creating a mixed-use building facing the state office building, Carlson said.

Phases two and three represent half of the housing potential of the project, he said.

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Parking garage

Car crashes four stories in parking lot in Orange CA

title=

A woman in her 60s died Friday after her car plunged four stories into the parking lot of a hospital in Orange, Calif., Police said.

Screenshot of KTTV video

A woman in her 60s died Friday morning when her car plunged from the fourth floor of a hospital parking lot in southern California, police said.

The woman’s silver 2007 Toyota sedan crashed into a wall in the Orange parking lot at 9.21am and fell four stories to the ground, police reported on Facebook.

The car landed upside down, but onlookers rushed to turn it over to try and help the woman, the Orange County Register reported.

“By the time I got out he was flipped to the side,” Eddie Flores, 37, of Orange, told the publication. “Everyone jumped on it right away; it was a large group of people.

But the woman, who was the only one inside the car at the time, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. The accident investigation is continuing.

The accident happened in a parking lot at the St. Joseph Ambulatory Care Pavilion, across from the Providence St. Joseph Hospital, KTLA reported.

Don Sweeney has been a journalist and editor in California for over 25 years. He has been a real-time reporter based at the Sacramento Bee since 2016.

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Parking garage

Car crashes four stories in Orange CA parking lot

title=

A woman in her 60s died Friday after her car plunged four stories into the parking lot of a hospital in Orange, Calif., Police said.

Screenshot of KTTV video

A woman in her 60s died Friday morning when her car plunged from the fourth floor of a Southern California hospital parking lot, police said.

The woman’s silver 2007 Toyota sedan crashed into a wall in the Orange parking lot at 9.21am and fell four stories to the ground, police reported on Facebook.

The car landed upside down, but onlookers rushed to turn it over to try and help the woman, the Orange County Register reported.

“By the time I got out he was flipped to the side,” Eddie Flores, 37, of Orange, told the publication. “Everyone jumped on it right away; it was a large group of people.

But the woman, who was the only one inside the car at the time, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. The accident investigation is continuing.

The accident happened in a parking lot at the St. Joseph Ambulatory Care Pavilion, across from the Providence St. Joseph Hospital, KTLA reported.

Don Sweeney has been a journalist and editor in California for over 25 years. He has been a real-time reporter based at the Sacramento Bee since 2016.

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Parking garage

A conflict looms over the parking lot planned for OTR’s Logan Street

CINCINNATI – Longtime resident John Back knows all too well the urgent need for better parking access in Over-the-Rhine, especially near Findlay Market. Although he has access to a lot, he said he can still get stuck with no space to park. It is even more difficult to make room for guests in his home.

“It’s difficult, you know. People who don’t have a parking space, sometimes they take yours because they don’t know who it is. Sometimes your parking space is blocked.

Like a number of other residents and community stakeholders, he welcomes Hamilton County’s idea of ​​building a parking garage in the area to meet the needs. The garage is expected to include spaces for the public, especially Findlay Market patrons, TQL Stadium football fans, in addition to locations for local developers like The Model Group and Urban Sites.

However, Back is one of many people deeply involved in the preservation of the Overseas Territory and history who dispute how Hamilton County wishes to execute the plan. Project organizers intend to close part of Logan Street between Elder Street and Findlay Street, and build on the current street to create the new parking structure. They are also looking to create a new access street behind the garage that will connect to Central Parkway.

Tomorrow, the city’s planning commission is to consider Hamilton County’s request that part of Logan Street in Over-the-Rhine be vacated and sold to prepare the land for the garage. In addition to raising issues with the city’s planning for the project, critics argue that Hamilton County did not seek enough community input before entering the commission.

Residents say crossing Logan Street is important for their travel. Building the garage with this design will disrupt the network of the historic district, making it more congested and degrading the quality of life for residents.

“I’m in favor,” Back said. “But the main problem here is that there is a street called Logan Street that people use every day.” Back happens to be a developer and has returned a number of properties in the area. He also works for a real estate company and is an architect by training. Still, he said his concern about this effort was rooted not in his professional experience, but in his love and passion for Over-the-Rhine as a neighborhood.

“I don’t see anything more annoying than wiping out an entire street and cutting off people.”

Jennifer LeMasters, also a longtime resident and architect, shares Back’s concerns. LeMasters is the Co-Chair of the Over-the-Rhine Foundation Interim Committee. She feels that those who received enough information and commitment to the project were well-to-do business professionals who are exploited in the Over-the-Rhine business community. More than that, she and other critics argue that those who have consistently corresponded with Hamilton County about the new garage are the ones who will benefit the most from the structure.

Meanwhile, ordinary and marginalized residents who are out of touch with the city’s bureaucracy and Cincinnati’s business scene are out of the loop, according to LeMasters. She believes the county and the project organizers should have done a better job of reaching more residents who will be affected so that they had a better chance to provide their contribution.

“There’s a meaningful engagement, and then there’s just a engagement to tick the box. And I think they ticked the box on that 80% engagement, 70% maybe, but did they have any meaningful engagement here? No.”

But Phil Beck, Hamilton County Construction Manager, opposes the criticism.

“I can categorically say that is not the case.” Beck, the garage project leader, dismisses the idea that Hamilton County has not made a concerted and energetic effort to educate and engage with various residents as well as important institutions. He said Hamilton County had held around 20 meetings with people from the community over the past few months.

Joe Hansbauer, CEO of Findlay Market, is supporting county officials in the face of criticism. Hansbauer said he had never seen so much community outreach on a project in his 10 years at Findlay Market.

“At the end of the day, I think they picked a design that maximizes the contribution of the community. Does that mean they hit 100% of all concerns? Of course not. It’s not possible, right? But they recognize where, you know, there were concerns that they couldn’t address. And I think that’s what it is. “

Bobby Maly of The Model Group also took issue with criticism that the garage disproportionately adapts to the needs of private companies by giving them the bulk of the spaces. He said a large chunk of those spaces would also serve as parking for workers during the day and public parking at night and on weekends.

Still, critics like LeMasters and Back blame the county for not formally hiring the Over-the-Rhine Community Council before approaching the city’s planning commission to evacuate and sell the land on Logan Street.

“I hope the planning committee realizes that this goes against the overall plan,” Back said. “It is against the values ​​that we have adopted as a city.”

The planning committee is due to address the vacation and the Logan Street sale at 9 a.m. on Friday, September 17. Those interested in following the discussion can watch a live broadcast here on the city’s website.

Monique John covers gentrification for WCPO 9. She is part of our donor-supported journalism program Report For America. Learn more about RFA here.

If there are any stories about gentrification in the Greater Cincinnati area that you think we should cover, let us know. Send us your tips at [email protected]

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Parking spaces

LCC rents 387 on-street parking spaces to the city

LANSING, Michigan – Lansing Community College recently purchased 387 additional street parking spaces in the town of Lansing. The cost of these additional spaces, reserved for LCC students, faculty and staff, was $ 400,000.

The college lost 1,000 parking spaces earlier this year when it demolished the Gannon parking ramp on its downtown campus.

To compensate for this lack of parking, the college spent $ 400,000 on 387 parking spaces on city streets for the following year.

Marguerite Cahill

On-street parking reserved for Lansing Community College

The college is replacing the Gannon Ramp with a five-storey, 1,800-storey structure, slated to open in September 2022.

But in the meantime, even after renting the additional parking on the city street, LCC is still short by 793 spaces compared to what it was previously able to offer students.

Parking lot on Capitol Ave owned by LCC

Marguerite Cahill

Parking lot on Capitol Ave owned by LCC

However, Chris MacKersie, executive director of administrative services at LCC, said parking is not an issue.

“With the combination of COVID and online courses, we are currently in a good position with the parking lot we have in the city,” Mackersie said. “But we would like to have a parking problem, though. The more students the better on campus.

MacKersie said the street parking deal with the city will run until August 2022.

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Parking garage

This Amsterdam Underwater Bicycle Parking Lot Helps Aquatic Life

In the Netherlands, where there are more bicycles than inhabitants, urban stations have more than half a million parking spaces for bicycles (including, in Utrecht, the largest single garage in the world that can accommodate 12,000 bikes). But it is still often difficult for cyclists to find parking, and the country is building room for 100,000 more bikes before 2025. In Amsterdam, the most recent garage will be unique – it’s underwater , leaving the public space open above, and with features to support aquatic life below.

[Image: VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism (design)/B1 Design (rendering)]

Behind Amsterdam Central Station, a hub where trains, trams, buses, taxis, pedestrians and cyclists converge, the bicycle parking lot will be part of a semi-floating structure originally designed to help protect the platform, the built area along the water bank where the station is located – accidental boat crashes from the adjacent river. “The protection put in place for the train and bus station, road traffic and the Michiel de Ruyter tunnel meant that there was unused space between the collision protection and the platform,” says Danny Esselman, principal architect at VenhoevenCS, the architecture and town planning design firm that worked on design with Van Hattum in Blankevoort and DS Landschapsarchitecten. “This is where the client decided to add bicycle parking, as there is always a shortage of parking spaces in the city. Designing the project to be semi-submarine meant we could create additional public space above.

[Image: VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism (design)/B1 Design (rendering)]

The garage, which is slated to open in 2022, will accommodate 4,000 bikes and is designed to attract cyclists. “Good, attractive design means cyclists will want to use the parking lot,” says Esselman. “This means good accessibility, limited height difference, efficient traffic flows, a safe and light environment and the use of aesthetically beautiful materials. Cyclists are guided down in a smooth motion from the entrance to the boulevard. This movement invites you to slide quietly to a parking space, without stress.

[Image: VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism (design)/B1 Design (rendering)]

The structure is also designed to help support aquatic life in the river. Porous concrete, for example, lets plants and mussels stick to walls. Coconut mats help purify water and provide another place for vegetation to grow. Mesh baskets called “organic huts” help shelter young fish. A net will help trap plastic waste.

[Image: VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism (design)/B1 Design (rendering)]

“As we took a ‘bite’ of a current biotope – the home of fish and plants – we also needed to take steps to build a better habitat for aquatic life than before,” he says. “As designers you have to be aware that you are changing the environment and it is important to minimize the impact of your work. Our goal was to go beyond just minimizing impact and improving conditions, being attentive every step of the way. During construction, the methods we used meant that there was minimal disturbance to the river bed and the surrounding biotope.

It’s an approach, he says, that could be used for parking bicycles at other stations near the water. “A major advantage is that it allows you to use the little space available at ground level for other purposes,” says Esselman. “Think about the space that could be devoted to public space, new parks or trails. “

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Uncategorized

Amid declining revenues, city modernizes parking structures

(TNS) – With fewer people parking downtown due to COVID-19, new technologies will be added to city parking lots that officials say should be more convenient for drivers.

“We’re getting totally modern,” said Debbie Pacific, director of the Danbury Parking Authority, a quasi-municipal agency in charge of downtown garages, meters and public land.

The barriers at the Patriot and Bardo garages will be removed. Instead of paying an attendant, drivers will enter their license plate and payment into a kiosk or new mobile app. The cameras will recognize the license plate of license holders, who will not need to use the kiosk or the app. Bollards will be installed for on-street parking, the mayor said.


Danbury City Council was due to discuss at its Thursday meeting changes to the parking ordinances to reflect the new technology.

The city included $ 100,000 in its approved capital budget for the project, with the authority contributing an additional $ 10,000. Pacific expects the new technology to go live by November 1.

“In the long run, it will also help us generate more income,” she said.

Parking revenues have been hit due to the coronavirus pandemic, with fewer people heading downtown to shop, eat and work, she said. Pacific estimated that the number of monthly permits fell by 25 to 30 percent.

“As soon as we felt things were starting to go up we got the new delta variant and that set us back a bit,” Pacific said. “We remain hopeful. We are always waiting for things to change.

Revenue fell 24% from $ 200,000 from June 2020 to June 2021, she said. The authority also cut salaries by about as much, she said.

Some employees were put on leave at the start of the pandemic, with staff, including Pacific, taking reduced hours and pay. Only two employees are returning full time, she said. Employees always have their benefits.

The authority has grown from 16 pre-COVID employees to nine, with a few retiring and some part-time workers finding other jobs, she said.

The garages have been operating on reduced hours due to reduced staff, but new technology should allow them to be open 24/7, Pacific said. The plan is to always have security in the garages.

“We’re just going to look and see if we need someone and where we need them,” she said.

Danbury will continue to use the ParkMobile app for street parking.

“So many people know him and he’s really accepted all over the country,” Pacific said.

The rates will remain the same, with parking lots being charged $ 1.50 per hour. The permit rate is $ 55 per month.

Downtown life

The Mayor and CityCenter Danbury, the organization that supports the downtown business district, are excited about the new technology.

“This feature will be something that will move Danbury forward,” said Angela Wong, Executive Director of CityCenter.

Life in the city center is slowly returning to normal as residents return to shopping and dining, she said. She doesn’t expect COVID to have a long-term effect on downtown or the parking lot.

“People are very anxious to get back to what they are used to,” said Wong.

The new downtown sidewalks are designed to attract customers and businesses to the downtown area. The first phase of this streetscape project is expected to be completed this month.

“I think it’s working exceptionally well,” said Mayor Joe Cavo. “I have no doubt it will be done in time, if not sooner.”

Pacific said she hopes the effect of COVID on parking will be temporary. Some parking lots started returning to Metro-North station grounds last month, she said.

“People are feeling a little bit comfortable working from home and staying home and shopping from home, but I think it’s going to be short lived,” she said. “I think we want to be in public. We want to get back to normal life, so hopefully things will work out soon. “

© 2021 The News-Times (Danbury, Connecticut). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Parking garage

Columbia Gets Security Update Offer For Parking Lot Known For Suicides

On the same day, a suicide occurred in downtown Fifth and Walnut Parking Garage, the city of Columbia calling for tenders for safety measures to help prevent them.

The nomination process has been expedited, with the nomination period ending on Thursday, city spokesman Sydney Olsen wrote in an email to the Tribune.

The city received an offer.

In October 2020, Columbia City Council held a special hearing regarding suicide prevention measures for the parking lot first built in 2011. Since its construction, there have been more than half a dozen suicides in the structure.

The city had also researched prevention options in 2019.

Council allocated $ 300,000 to the project following the October hearing of last year.

An organizer posted a community petition online shortly after the September 1 suicide, imploring the city to act to improve garage security. As of Friday, it had 1,063 signatures out of a target of 10,000 signatures. Of those who signed, 699 were from Colombia.

Following: Petition renews calls for updated safety measures at Fifth and Walnut garages in Columbia after recent suicide

“The petition calling for safety measures emphasizes the importance of the city continuing its efforts to modify the garage in the most efficient way possible,” Olsen wrote. “The city is committed to making improvements to the garage while working with our community partners to ensure we have safe facilities.

Temporary measures taken

Besides the week-long tender, the last action taken by the city council on security measures was in July, when the council authorized the construction and the tender through the purchasing division. from the city.

The reason for the delay between appropriation, construction authorization and tender is linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, Olsen wrote.

“During the pandemic, supplies were very limited for items like steel, making it difficult to get things like custom samples for this project,” she wrote. “The pandemic also had an impact on the ability of project partners, such as engineers and the consulting firm, to travel to Colombia to see the structure and engage with the public. “

In the meantime, the city is working on the installation of temporary barricades on levels eight and nine of the parking lot.

One of the barrier styles offered for Fifth and Walnut parking garages is an Aegis II High Security Industrial Ornamental Fence.

The garage security improvements will come in two phases, Olsen wrote. The first will be the installation of fencing on the upper level.

Fences and other barriers can help prevent a person from committing suicide, says Jill Harkavy-Friedman, vice president of research for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

“The barriers give time. It gives the crisis time to slow down a bit so the person can think a bit more,” Harkavy-Friedman told the Tribune in 2019.

An attachment to the July 6 city council agenda provides an example of what the fence might look like. The construction and tender authorization was first read on July 6 and was approved through the consent agenda on July 19.

The next step will be to install steel panels on the windows of the upper levels of the garage.

“With the two phases of the project, the city is striving to implement the best long-term solution that provides optimum security,” Olsen wrote.

The city’s public works department budgeted an additional $ 300,000 for fiscal 2022 “as a safety net to increase costs during the pandemic,” she added.

Crisis resources

There are a growing number of resources available for people experiencing a mental health crisis.

A national resource is the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, which is always open and includes a specific option for veterans.

The central Missouri crisis line is 1-800-395-2132, also monitored 24 hours a day.

There are additional resources through the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

Burrell Behavioral Health announced to the Columbia Chamber of Commerce on August 11 its goal of opening a crisis mental health and addiction center in Colombia in partnership with Phoenix Programs.  Columbia's city council planned to allocate $ 3 million in US bailout funds to establish the facility at its August 19 budget meeting.

Burrell Behavioral Health and Phoenix Programs announced last month their partnership to eventually open a 24/7 crisis center in Colombia. The cost of running such a center is estimated at between 2 and 3 million dollars per year.

Following: Community partnerships to open 24/7 crisis center could ease burden on hospitals and law enforcement, officials say

The implementation and success of a crisis center will depend on community and financial support, Burrell President and CEO CJ Davis said last month.

“Burrell has a plan. He has the partnerships. And now what we need to do is get enough civic engagement that we can say, ‘It’s not the Burrell program, it’s the community program,'” he said at the time.

The company promotes measures to prevent driving-related deaths, but “why not mental health and suicide? Mat Gass, president of the Central Burrell region, wrote in a Tribune op-ed last month.

“The most effective model is a walk-in crisis center (think emergency care, but devoted only to behavioral and substance use needs),” he wrote. “These facilities exhibit an interaction between public health and safety systems, including community mental health centers like Burrell Behavioral Health. “

At its August 19 budget meeting, city council planned to allocate $ 3 million in US bailout funds to the crisis center to help create it.

Ongoing community support will also be necessary.

“Yes, behavioral crisis centers are proven lifesavers; they are also prohibitively expensive to operate without a concerted and collaborative community effort, due to the range of services and the 24/7 environment. “Gass wrote last month. “Burrell is ready and willing to work with the city to provide this vital service to the people of central Missouri.”

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Parking spaces

Opinion: Fewer parking spaces are forcing commuters to cross campus on foot | Opinion

Our university spans over a thousand acres and educates more than 34,000 students, yet there is one unifying belief among those who have ever had to park a car here: the university really hates its commuters.

If you are one of the 26,407 students living off campus, you’ve probably noticed less parking, as a former suburban lot has been converted to residential land.

As a result, commuters found it frustrating and difficult to find parking within a reasonable distance of their classrooms. The closest spots fill up quickly, leaving many departures on foot much on the ruthless treeless road Skip Bertman.

It might not have been a big deal last year with the majority of courses being online, but this year the campus is alive again.

A sea of ​​students rush across campus trying to readjust to in-person classes. They must find the best seat in the class, preferably away from the noisy mechanical monsters that filter the air, and brave the student union queues for lunch. Pandemic or not, it’s a lot to deal with.

Now we also have to deal with our arrival to class blowing, panting and sweaty, as the only available parking spot was in the completely opposite direction from where you needed to be.

Add to that the extremely unpredictable weather in Louisiana, and it’s no wonder students are starting to think that the university maybe really hates its commuters.

Forget your umbrella? Have fun walking for 30 minutes in the downpour, praying that your laptop will survive water damage free. Heat warning? Hope you are ready for some relaxation to stroll at 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

The university has a lot to do, so I don’t expect the administration to prioritize building new parking lots or promoting a better commuter experience. I would like them to care a little more about our well-being.

I understand the financial and geographic difficulties of creating a new parking lot. Instead, maybe offer some extra services that don’t add to our already high tuition fees.

Simple changes like a more reliable bus system to get people from the farthest parking spots to the Quad, or water stations that provide free water on hot days, would go a long way in showing that the university really cares about his students.

These are just small ideas that I had on the spot while writing this. The university pays people for it and has the funds to generate ideas and execute them.

I don’t expect a bold move like opening a parking lot. I just want an ounce of effort, just an inch of movement in the right direction, to see that this college really doesn’t hate its commuters.

Anthony Bui is a 21-year-old English senior from Opelousas.

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Parking facilities

Delhi to get two multi-level bus parking lots

Representative picture

Highlights

  • Construction of these multi-level bus depots, the first of their kind, will begin by the end of this year.
  • The construction of these depots will be completed in a phased manner by 2024.
  • Hari Nagar and Vasant Vihar depots can accommodate 100 and 230 buses each respectively.

New Delhi: Soon there will be two multi-level bus parking lots in Delhi. Transport Minister Kailash Gahlot on Thursday announced that two multi-level bus parking lots will soon be constructed at Hari Nagar and Vasant Vihar bus depots in the national capital of the Delhi Transport Corporation.

“This multi-tiered bus parking lot will be another world-class state-of-the-art public transport infrastructure that Arvind Kejriwal’s governance model will deliver to the people of Delhi,” said the India time Gahlot quoted in a statement. “This facility, built on a stand-alone model, will undoubtedly place Delhi in the list of best cities in the world when it comes to public transport and transportation infrastructure,” he added.

The project, which aims to develop these two depots at prime locations into world-class depots with up to three times the current parking capacity as well as retail spaces, will be executed by National Buildings Construction Corporation Limited (NBCC ). Construction of the multi-level bus depots, the first of their kind, will begin by the end of this year and be completed in stages by 2024, the statement said.

Hari Nagar and Vasant Vihar depots can accommodate 100 and 230 buses each respectively. The Delhi government said in a statement that these depots could accommodate 330 and 400 buses each over four and seven floors after the redevelopment. These depots will also represent an underground car park of over 2.6 lakh square feet, accommodating over 690 cars and retail spaces.

It is worth mentioning here that last year in October, DTC had signed a Memorandum of Understanding with NBCC, whereby NBCC will act as project management consultants for the development of its main plots of land at various locations in across Delhi, for multi-level bus parking depots, redevelopment of DTC residential settlements and more commercial facilities. DTC’s residential settlements in Shadipur and Hari Nagar are also being redeveloped into residential units as well as commercial and retail facilities, according to the publication.

According to the statement, these deposits are designed with a vibration isolation system through the use of steel coil springs, after noise and vibration impact analyzes and a 45 degree angle for maximum parking efficiency. Various other features such as washing pits and electric charging stations will also be incorporated into these sites, the government said.

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Parking facilities

Initially, Delhi will have 2 multi-level bus parking lots

Delhi: The nation’s capital will soon have multi-level bus parking at various depots, the city’s Transport Minister Kailash Gahlot said.

Bus parking spaces would be provided at two main depots of the Delhi Transport Corporation (DTC): Hari Nagar and Vasant Vihar.

Gahlot said that the Hari Nagar and Vasant Vihar bus depots will be configured as world-class depots with 2-3 times parking capacity as well as retail space.

He said the new parking lot will have a capacity of over 700 buses.

Multi-level bus parking at depots, according to Gehlot, would put the national capital Delhi on the list of the world’s best cities for public transport.

“This facility, built on self-sustaining zero energy, will undoubtedly place Delhi in the list of the best cities in the world for public transport and transport infrastructure,” said the Minister of Transport.

DTC depots will also have basement parking over 2.6 lakh square feet that will accommodate 690 cars and retail space.

In addition, Gahlot said the Delhi government will redevelop the DTC settlements in Shadipur and Hari Nagar 3 into residential units. It will include EWS housing in accordance with Delhi 2021 Master Plan standards.

The project, executed by National Buildings Construction Corporation Limited (NBCC), is expected to start by the end of this year and could be completed by 2024.

In October 2020, the DTC had signed a memorandum of understanding with the NBCC for these projects.

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Parking spaces

Kanpur will soon have smart parking spaces with the possibility of digital payments for citizens

The 4th wave will peak on August 23

This yet to be peer-reviewed study was led by Sabara Parshad Rajeshbhai, Subhra Sankar Dhar and Shalabh from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, IIT Kanpur. Using a statistical model to make the predictions, this study claims that the severity of the next wave will depend on two factors, the emergence of a new variant of COVID and the country’s overall vaccination status.

“The data indicates that the fourth wave of Covid-19 in India will arrive after 936 days from the date of initial data availability, which is January 30, 2020,” the study authors said. “Therefore, the fourth wave starts from June 22, 2022, peaks on August 23, 2022, and ends on October 24, 2022,” the researchers added.

Notably, it was the same team that predicted the peak of the third wave of the Omicron-led pandemic in India by February 3, 2022. In the current study, researchers studied the country’s COVID data to predict the beginning of the fourth wave. According to the researchers, “This methodology can also be used to predict the fourth wave and other waves in other countries as well.”

While many countries have seen three waves of the pandemic so far, countries like South Africa and Zimbabwe have already been hit by the fourth wave of COVID and more, the researchers said. Speaking about the accuracy of the study, the authors said, “The third wave of Covid-19 was predicted for India using data from Zimbabwe, and when the third wave in India ends, it is now clear that the prediction was correct. “

Next COVID variant likely to be more contagious, WHO says

According to the researchers, the new variant of the coronavirus with its infectiousness rate and its mortality rate will be a decisive factor impacting this analysis. “Apart from this fact, the effect of vaccinations – first, second or booster dose can also play an important role on the possibility of infection, the degree of infection and various issues related to the fourth wave,” added authors.

Meanwhile, World Health Organization officials recently warned of the emergence of a new variant after Omicron, which is expected to be more contagious than this strain that triggered the third wave around the world. “The next variant of concern will be more suitable, and what we mean by that is that it will be more transmissible because it will have to exceed what is currently circulating,” said Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO technical lead for the Covid-19.

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Parking spaces

Maranatha seniors can take advantage of personalized parking spaces – Pasadena Schools

The parking lot at Maranatha High School is one of the coolest spaces on campus, thanks to the creative talents of some seniors.

For the first time, the school is allowing its final year students to personalize their own parking space in the underground car park. Just before the start of the school year, a handful of enthusiastic seniors got their parking permits and allocated a dedicated space. Armed with instructions, paint and supplies, they began to draw and paint their parking space to reflect their hobbies, skills, talents or passions. The results were, frankly, more astonishing than one had imagined!

The students appreciated being able to express themselves in a unique and new way. And the parking has never been so beautiful! Each of the artistic spaces is reserved for the elderly person to whom it has been assigned and that student has the exclusive use of his space during regular school hours. Although it almost seems a shame to cover the artwork with a vehicle parked on it! If you haven’t seen them yet, you’ll want to take note of them the next time you’re in the parking lot.

On September 25, ASB Maranatha is hosting another parking spot painting day for seniors who still want to customize their own space. To be eligible, a final year student must have a valid driver’s license, purchase an annual parking permit from the school, and pay the material fee of $ 25. Detailed directions and the paint request were emailed to seniors last week. For any questions, please email Ms. Brown at [email protected]

Maranatha High School, 169 S. St. John Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 817-4000 or visit www.maranathahighschool.org.

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Parking spaces

More parking spaces among the list of upcoming improvements to the south lot of the LIRR station in Huntington

There is good news and bad news for motorists parking in the south parking lot of the LIRR station in Huntington.

Good news: the 224-seater pitch will increase to 253 seats with renovations starting on September 13.

Bad news: Construction will require the land, south of the train tracks and adjacent to the south garage, to be closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic for up to three months, city officials said in A press release.

Access between the south platform of the Long Island Rail Road station and the parking lot will also be closed.

“This complete overhaul of the south parking lot will add improvements to parking and public safety for our commuters,” said City Supervisor Chad Lupinacci. “These upgrades are part of a number of upgrades to our commuter parking facilities at LIRR Huntington Station, which are happening in conjunction with the MTA LIRR’s project to replace the East Pedestrian Bridge.”

The project will add 29 parking spaces, an ADA-accessible sidewalk on the east side of Fairground Avenue, drainage improvements, lighting upgrades, resurfacing with new asphalt paving, sidewalk traffic two-way traffic in every driveway, new planting around the lot and reconstruction of the south retaining wall, city officials said.

Access to the South Platform from the South Parking Lot will remain open. Vehicles must access the south parking garage through the south entrance from Second Street and the east entrance from Lenox Road. There will be no access to the garage from Fairground Avenue.

In February, funding for construction of improvements to the city-owned north parking garage and west pedestrian bridge was approved by city council. Huntington’s Department of Engineering Services is expected to issue a request for proposal in about a month, city officials said.

The MTA began work Aug. 30 on the East Pedestrian Bridge. During construction, commuters should hop on and off all trains from the first six cars and note changes to parking availability and parking lot access points, city officials advised.

Construction is expected to be completed in the third quarter of 2022.

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Parking spaces

‘Reduce parking spaces in Yorkshire market towns to make centers more shopping friendly’, report suggests

Would places like Northallerton be improved by less parking in the town centre? Photo: Tony Johnson

The authors of the report, which was commissioned by the York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership alongside Historic England, said pandemic-related behavioral changes, such as the rise of working from home, have increased the potential for passing trade in the towns.

He said: “The historic form and character of historic market towns is inherently on a human scale and easily accessible. While the current retail offering may not be ideal, the structure of most centers creates an environment where local, non-car dependent shopping should be possible.

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“In many ways, Market Town Centers are the original ‘mixed-use development’ with a range of commercial, domestic and ancillary properties in a small area.”

The report adds: “The lessons of the pandemic must be learned and applied quickly – getting as many people walking and cycling where possible, ensuring that less mobile people who need use cars can do it and park easily.

“Car use in more rural areas is likely to remain significant for the foreseeable future and will remain a key part of the visitor profile of rural market towns, with visitors from surrounding villages etc., but the reduction in parking in the surrounding sensitive sites – where space for people might be prioritized – can be advantageous.

Historic England regional manager Trevor Mitchell said the pandemic has offered an opportunity to rethink issues such as parking as people adapt to new ways of working and how they spend their free time.

“We need new thinking and need to be innovative and Covid has absolutely changed the way we live and work,” he said.

“It offered the opportunity to live a life less car-related and less travel-related. In the future of townships, you may have a different balance between the need for cars and the need for pedestrian priority. Now is the time to consider the balance between asphalt and pedestrian space.

Support the Yorkshire Post and become a subscriber today. Your subscription will help us continue to bring quality news to the people of Yorkshire. In return, you’ll see fewer ads on the site, get free access to our app, and receive exclusive member-only offers. Click here to subscribe.

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Parking spaces

More parking spaces among the list of upgrades to come on the south lot of LIRR station in Huntington

There is good news and bad news for motorists parking in the south parking lot at LIRR station in Huntington.

Good news: the 224 space lot will expand to 253 spaces with renovations starting on September 13.

Bad news: Construction will require the land, south of the railroad tracks and adjacent to the south garage, to be closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic for up to three months, city officials said in a press release .

Access between the south platform of the Long Island Rail Road station and the parking lot will also be closed.

“This complete overhaul of the south parking lot will add improvements to parking and public safety for our commuters,” said City Supervisor Chad Lupinacci. “These upgrades are just one of many upgrades to our suburban parking lots at Huntington LIRR Station, which are happening concurrently with the MTA LIRR’s project to replace the East Pedestrian Bridge.” ”

The project will add 29 parking spaces, an ADA accessible sidewalk on the east side of Fairground Avenue, drainage improvements, lighting improvements, resurfacing with new asphalt paving, traffic in the two directions in each alley, new plantings around the land and the reconstruction of the southern retaining wall, city officials said.

Access to the south platform from the south car park will remain open. Vehicles should access the South Parking Garage through the South Entrance of Second Street and the East Entrance of Lenox Road. There will be no access to the garage from Fairground Avenue.

In February, funding for the construction of improvements to the city-owned north parking garage and west pedestrian bridge was approved by city council. Huntington’s Department of Engineering Services is expected to issue a request for proposal in about a month, city officials said.

The MTA began work on August 30 on the east pedestrian bridge. During construction, commuters must board and exit all trains from the first six cars and note changes in parking availability and parking garage access points, city officials have advised.

Construction is expected to be completed in the third quarter of 2022.

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Parking spaces

LIRR South Lot to close as town adds parking spaces – Huntington Now

The southern parking lot of Long Island Rail Road will be closed starting September 14 as the City of Huntington will add more parking spaces.

Scheduled to start on September 13, the project will add 29 new parking spaces, from 224 spaces to 253 spaces, a new accessible sidewalk on the east side of Fairground Avenue, drainage and lighting improvements, a resurfacing with a new asphalt paving, two-way traffic down each lane, new planting around the lot and reconstruction of the south retaining wall.

Land use at the station is around 25% of what it was before the Covid-19 outbreak, city spokeswoman Lauren Lembo said. The south lot will be closed to car and pedestrian traffic for about 2-3 months, as will the access between the south platform of the station and the parking lot. Access to the south platform from the south parking garage will remain open. Vehicles should access the south parking garage through the south entrance on Second Street and the east entrance on Lennox Road; there will be no access to the garage from Fairground Avenue.

“This complete redesign of the south parking lot will add improvements to parking and public safety for our commuters,” said supervisor Chad A. Lupinacci. “These upgrades are just one of many upgrades to our suburban parking lots at Huntington LIRR Station, in parallel with the MTA LIRR’s project to replace the East Pedestrian Bridge.”

The city also approved funding in February for construction of improvements to the north parking garage and west pedestrian bridge (owned by the city).

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Parking spaces

Students complain about lack of parking spaces

At the start of the fall semester, students begin the annual struggle to find parking spaces on campus.

Delaney McKeown, a psychology student at Weatherford, said it took her 10 to 15 minutes to find a parking space and an extra 10 minutes to walk to class because she had to park so far away.

“It’s almost impossible to be on time in class,” McKeown said. “There are not enough parking spaces in enough on-campus destinations where there are classes.”

McKeown isn’t the only one to notice a lack of parking. Many off-campus students complain about how long it takes them to find parking and walk to class.

Although students are noticing the problem now, ACUPD Lt. Randy Motz said students having difficulty finding parking is nothing new, or exclusive to ACU. Motz said all universities struggled to provide enough parking spaces for their students.

“Almost every university in the state of Texas, or the country, will have parking issues,” Motz said. “If they don’t have parking problems, that means the university is failing.”

Motz said full parking lots are actually a good sign, showing that ACU is a thriving university, equating full parking lots with high enrollment. Although construction around campus is contributing to the lack of parking, Motz said the facility renovations are also a good sign for the university.

“We’ve turned a corner and we’re not Abilene Christian College anymore,” Motz said. “We have become a nationally recognized university. That comes with success, and success often means finding parking spots is difficult.

Motz recommends that students arrive on campus early before their classes start to ensure they find a place to park and allow themselves plenty of time to walk to class in case available spaces are tight. away from their building.

For some students, however, remote parking outweighs the inconvenience and raises safety concerns, as the lack of parking in the Residents’ Hall can mean traveling long distances late at night.

Motz said ACUPD is working with the University Church of Christ to install better lighting in the parking lot for students living at Bullock Hall to make the lot safer. Additionally, if students find themselves in a situation that they feel is unsafe, ACUPD is available to escort students safely to their car or dormitory.

ACUPD can be reached at (325)-674-2911.

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