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October 2021

Parking garage

Columbus Council votes in Astor Park parking lot near Crew Stadium

Columbus City Council is due to vote Monday to pay $ 21.82 million for the construction phase of a new parking lot in the new mixed-use Astor Park development adjacent to Columbus Crew’s new Lower.com field.

The council has already approved at least $ 1.4 million for the design of the city-owned garage by Columbus-based architecture firm Moody Nolan, bringing the total cost to at least $ 23.22 million.

The city had estimated the cost at $ 25 million, but that was based on a garage that could hold up to 750 cars. The final design of the five-story garage provides for 677 spaces to “serve residents, workers and visitors to the Astor Park area,” formerly known as Confluence Village until the team changed the name. in honor of the Astor House Hotel in New York City, where the United States Football Association (now known as the US Soccer Federation) was founded in 1913.

The garage will have a “perforated metal exterior” and vertical glass shaft with two elevators in the southeast corner, according to the ordinance.

The design will include two vehicle entrances with a total of five entry and exit lanes, located at the northeast and southwest corners of the structure, approximately 60 feet from the new stadium in the Arena district. There will be central ramps to access the parking lots, according to the ordinance that will be voted on Monday.

The garage’s utilities will include electric vehicle charging stations, a first-floor “bike center” accessible from an alleyway, and a groundwater reservoir. The garage will also include “openings for direct connection to adjacent residential buildings, built under a separate contract,” the ordinance said.

Why Columbus taxpayers pay for parking

The parking lot was part of what ultimately turned into a dramatic increase in costs to city taxpayers under an agreement between Mayor Andrew J. Ginther of Franklin County, the State and the crew to prevent the Major League Soccer team to leave town for Austin, Texas in late 2018.

While Ginther and other city officials initially said the city’s contribution to the deal was capped at $ 50 million, The Dispatch reported in 2019 that city officials were operating under two sets of books. separate: the public commitment of $ 50 million which included new streets and infrastructure and three cash contributions totaling $ 38 million and another unpublished budget filled with additional projects requested by the team and unforeseen cost overruns.

Following those reports, Ginther announced at a stadium dedication ceremony in 2019 that the city had in fact contributed an additional $ 63.9 million, bringing the total costs to the city’s taxpayers to just a bit. less than $ 114 million. But Ginther said the supplement was for projects not directly related to the stadium, calling it “additional funds for the infrastructure of this incredible new employment center.”

“I didn’t major in math, but the last time I checked, $ 113 million in infrastructure for a new job center leveraging $ 1.04 billion in private investment is a pretty good deal. return for central Ohio taxpayers, ”Ginther said at the event.

However, there were also contractual obligations of the stadium agreement, including the required municipal parking garage.

Meanwhile, the city is still in talks with the state to gain the necessary control of certain Ohio State Fairground parking lots near Historic Crew Stadium for a community sports park that , according to city officials, would be the public interest component of the present, nearly 3-year-old stadium deal.

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Uncategorized

Public security concerning the City’s car parks

Public car parks and surveillance cameras in the city center have been out of use for almost two years. City council unanimously approved $ 1.4 million for a new camera system at the October 5 meeting. The police department hopes the cameras will be installed before the end of the year. In the meantime, according to police, further steps are being taken to protect the area.

SoCo parking at 8 a.m. on Saturday.

During the council discussion, Mayor Whitaker said that neither he nor the other council members had ever received an email regarding a camera failure and that if he or his fellow council members had received such a notice , they would have made it a priority.

However, a city public documents request (R000627-091721) requesting emails regarding the cameras showed only one dated February 2020 from Chief of Police Dunn to all council members, City Manager Domer, Antonia Castro-Graham and Ellis Chang, explaining that the cameras had to be put back, replaced. There were no emails responding to Chief Dunn’s email.

Dunn is currently both Chief of Police and IT Manager.

Retirement Observer Editor-in-chief Sharon Kennedy also sent an email on Aug. 25 alerting every member of city council to the lack of surveillance cameras and the serious security concern for any citizen using public parking. Only council member Zahra responded and, in an August 31 email, said it was a priority and was forwarding the email to Chief Dunn for an update.

Fullerton Police Chief Dunn was invited by City Council at the October 5 council meeting to brief the public on the ongoing investigation into JP23, which resident Samantha Velasquez said she believed being drugged and after leaving the bar she was raped and left in the SoCo parking lot. .

“There have been several people who have made similar allegations to those of the original victim [Samantha Velasquez]Said Chief Dunn. “These investigations take months. We want to get all the evidence. The observer was later said by the Fullerton Police Department sergeant. McCaskill that the exact number of victims reported in this case could not be disclosed due to HIPAA regulations.

“Running in harmony with [the assault, drugging, and rape investigations] is the administrative process which is our entertainment license recourse process over which I have control in my office, ”said Chief Dunn. “This process is ongoing. We work through these [steps] now and I think the public will have a little more clarity on the department’s efforts in the criminal vein and the Fullerton Municipal Code (FMC) vein, which governs the entertainment licensing process.

Asked after the first police department remedy hearing for JP23, owner Jacob Poozhikala said one of the first remedies was removing the drink from the fishbowl, which Police Chief Dunn said is easily drugged. Since then, Poozhikala has also removed the tinted glass that limited visibility and installed a small sign in the women’s toilet that tells women how to protect themselves while drinking.

“These problems [over-intoxication and fights] aren’t JP23 issues, they’re all bar issues, ”Poozhikala said.

Observer volunteers visited the downtown nightlife scene and found several apparent Conditional Use Permit (UPC) violations (for which JP23 had previously been cited) occurring at other bars, including charges of customer coverage at Matador and Ziing. Matador had over 100 people lined up at Amerige’s corner, and Revolucion served drinks in fish jars (large enough to intoxicate five people).

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Parking spaces

Sarasota to Increase Rates for Certain Parking Spaces at St. Armands Circle

The City of Sarasota will slightly increase the rates for some of the parking spaces at St. Armands Circle starting next week. The city is also adjusting the hours people have to pay for on-street parking.

The city says the changes mean that the hours and prices of the St. Armands Parking District will align with those in downtown Sarasota.

“The adjustments to the St. Armands parking lot will ensure consistency with the downtown paid parking and are necessary to meet the tax liability requirements that funded the construction of the St. Armands garage,” the city said in A press release.

All on-street parking spaces in the neighborhood that require payment will have a rate of $ 1.50 per hour. Currently, some of the spaces cost $ 1.50 per hour, while others cost $ 1 per hour.

Following:Sarasota to review proposals to develop city-owned land near St. Armands Circle

Restaurant news: Lobster spot opens at St. Armands Circle in Sarasota

As of next week, on-street parking meters will be in service from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday to Saturday, excluding holidays. Currently, the meters are in service from Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

“We are moving to a single zone, single rate program in St. Armands,” said Mark Lyons, the city’s general manager of parking, in the press release. “With over 700,000 transactions since start-up, data shows that 85% of on-street parking users in St. Armands currently choose to use spaces at $ 1.50 per hour. The rate change will ensure consistency throughout the St. Armands parking district and downtown system, making it easier to use.

When using the Park Mobile app or pay kiosk, free 10-minute on-street parking will be provided in the St. Armands parking area, according to the press release.

The prices of the St. Armands garage will become consistent with those of the two downtown parking garages. The first two hours will be free, the third hour will be $ 3, and each additional hour will be $ 1 or a portion thereof.

The rate for the Fillmore Lot will be reduced from 75 cents an hour to $ 1 an hour or part thereof.

Approximately 150 free on-street parking spaces along the northern and southern Presidents boulevards will remain free.

Anne Snabes covers city and county government for the Herald-Tribune. You can contact her at [email protected] or (941) 228-3321 and follow her on Twitter at @a_snabes.

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