close

November 2021

Parking garage

Low bid for new downtown Wheeling parking garage is $ 12.3 million | News, Sports, Jobs

This artist’s concept drawing by the Mills Group shows the planned design of the new City of Wheeling parking lot to be built at the corner of 11th and Market streets in the downtown area. (Image provided)

WHEELING – Bids to build the proposed parking structure on Market Street have been received, and Wheeling City Council members are due to meet today to consider a first reading of an order to award to the lowest bidder saying a contract of nearly $ 12.3 million.

A special council meeting was scheduled to take place today at noon in the council chamber of the City-County building for the sole purpose of discussing the new legislation and holding a first reading of the new ordinance. The legislation allows City Manager Robert Herron to spend $ 12,297,777 with Carl Walker Construction of Pittsburgh on the construction of the new Market Street parking garage on the corner of 11th Street in downtown.

A second reading and final approval of the ordinance is expected to take place at the next regular Wheeling City Council meeting on December 7.

On Monday, Herron said the special meeting was being held because timing is crucial in controlling the costs of large projects like this.

“Due to the current construction market and the potential for price changes, we have a 30-day suspension on bids, so the special meeting for the first reading,” Herron said.

In order to generate funds for the project, the city recently approved legislation allowing the issuance of rental income bonds through the newly activated Wheeling Municipal Building Commission. Project bonds are expected to close on Dec. 16, according to the city manager.

Herron described Carl Walker Construction as a highly regarded contractor who submitted the lowest bid among the four companies that submitted bids for the project. Other offers included an offer of $ 16,730,000 from Thomarios, a contractor with offices in Pittsburgh, Pa., And Akron, Ohio; an offer of $ 15,284,000 from Cps Construction Group of Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania; and an offer of $ 17,173,000 from Colaianni Construction of Dillonvale.

“The lowest bidder is an experienced parking structure contractor, and the supply is very good – very close to where we thought it would start out,” Herron said. “The architect’s estimate and our budget for the tenders was $ 13,023,000. “

There are additional costs associated with the construction, the city manager explained. Materials testing costs during construction are estimated at an additional $ 45,000, and garage access and traffic control are expected to cost an additional $ 250,000, he said. This still brings the total construction costs to $ 12,592,000, which is in the original budget.

During recent council meetings, city leaders had received criticism from the public over the escalating costs of the project, which is being completed to facilitate a $ 30 million private investment in the former headquarters. of Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel. The vacant 12-story structure is being converted into an apartment complex that will be known as Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts, a project by owner Access Infrastructure LLC of Dr John Johnson and developer Steve Coon of Coon Restoration and Sealants.

The six-story parking garage will provide necessary parking for tenants in the 120-apartment complex, and it will provide additional parking for other downtown businesses. The ground floor of the parking garage is expected to have retail units that should eventually be filled with businesses that support the additional influx of downtown residents.

Officials have touted the developers’ claim that there is a great need for new residential options in downtown Wheeling.

Initial projections for the overall cost of the Market Street parking structure ranged from $ 13 million to around $ 17 million, as concerns about construction costs during the supply chain crisis and geotechnical issues on the site have resulted in escalating cost projections.

In addition to construction costs, the City authorized an expenditure of $ 194,800 to hire the Mills Group to perform architectural services for the design of the parking structure. The city has also authorized the expenditure of $ 475,000 with Raze International of Shadyside for the asbestos removal and demolition of the vacant Chase Bank building on Market Street, where part of the new parking structure will be installed.

“Asbestos removal is complete and demolition is imminent,” Herron said Monday, noting that a follow-up meeting with Raze officials had been scheduled this afternoon. “Construction of the parking structure, if approved by city council, should start right after the first of the year. “

The latest news today and more in your inbox

read more
Parking garage

Georgetown asks for feedback on downtown parking – City of Georgetown Texas

The City of Georgetown is asking the public for input on various options for a downtown parking garage, including location, levels, costs, etc.

“As businesses continue to open and expand downtown, parking space is shrinking and we risk losing visitors and customers to our beautiful, vibrant downtown,” said Mayor Josh Schroeder. “We want to hear as many voices as possible before the board makes a decision. If you live, work or visit downtown, you are part of this project and we hope you will share your experiences and preferences with us.

The City has been working for several years to assess and resolve parking issues in the downtown area. Research and recommendations for parking solutions were informed by numerous City Council discussions and presentations, a 2015 downtown parking study, land use codes, public engagement on design, a stakeholder steering committee, our consulting firm, Wantman Group Inc. (WGI), and others.

Potential parking garage locations were also informed by the 2014 Downtown Master Plan Update. The plan identified four potential parking garage locations, including the Tamiro Plaza site and Ninth and Ninth Streets. Main, both of which are currently under investigation (page 8 of chapter 5 of the 2014 plan identifies potential sites of origin).

In 2021, WGI assessed potential parking garage sites on a range of criteria, including:

  • Total cost
  • Number of new parking spaces added
  • Location (relative to square)
  • The concept must support residential, retail or both
  • Access to traffic and impact

On November 9, 2021, City Council identified three potential locations for the parking garage:

  1. Tamiro Plaza, at the southwest corner of Sixth Street and Austin Avenue
  2. Ninth and Main streets, whole block
  3. Sixth and Main streets, southwest corner

People can share their feedback via a digital survey, available from November 27 to December 31, 2021. Until December, garden signs with a QR code for the survey will be displayed around the square, and postcards, with the survey QR code and three short questions will also be available at the Visitor Center, 103 W. Seventh St. People who came to the plaza for Shop Small Saturday also had the opportunity to learn more and to share their comments with city staff.

The survey provides additional details on the proposed locations, including the number of parking spaces won and costs, and asks the public to share their feedback on potential sites, the number of levels they would like to see in a garage , costs and other options. to be considered. Once the investigation is complete, City staff will compile the results and share them with council to help inform their decisions about the project. Council is expected to discuss the parking garage project in early 2022.

For more information on the Downtown Parking Garage Project, visit the project’s website.

read more
Parking spaces

Several shopping malls open their parking spaces to the public at night in Mumbai

About eight malls in the city will offer their parking lots to car owners overnight, for a weekly or overnight fee.

Bringing relief to Mumbaikars, vehicle owners in the city will soon be able to park their cars overnight at no less than 8 multiplexes, spread across the city.

According to the Times of India (TOI) report, the Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA) has recently unveiled its plan to provide parking lots for companies and buildings near several shopping malls. About eight malls such as Growels 101 Mall in Kandivli (E), Infiniti Mall in Andheri (W) and Malad (W), Inorbit Mall (Malad), Phoenix Market City Mall (Kurla), R-City Mall (Ghatkopar), RMall (Mulund) and Phoenix Mall (Lower Parel) will have parking lots for residents.

The report says malls will charge between Rs 2,500 and Rs 3,500 per month for installation. For the uninitiated, around 6,500 vehicles can be parked in the eight malls each night. It will be available between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. and some malls will only offer weekly passes.

The official said, “Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility.”

“This will be especially beneficial for crowded residential settlements where adequate parking is not available and people park their vehicles on the street or at the side of the road,” he added.

City planner Prachi Merchant, a member of the proposed MPA, told TOI, “The plan is ready and the facility should be launched soon. It will take off organically as people learn about it.”

“This effort is part of the proposed MPA’s efforts to create a City Parking Pool (CPP), where all city parking lots will be accessible through a common IT platform in the future. Until then, the BMC is working to get private and commercial entities, residential corporations and government organizations to share their parking spaces for public parking,” she added.

READ| Business trip turns tragic as Ukrainian woman falls to death from 12th floor in Mumbai

Click here for IndiaToday.in’s full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic.

read more
Parking spaces

Gazebo at West Frisco Park will be removed to add parking spaces | Local News

Eureka officials plan to remove the gazebo from West Frisco Park to increase parking in the Old Town business district.

City Administrator Craig Sabo said the parking lot has 39 spaces and the removal of the gazebo at 14 West Frisco Ave. will make room for 17 more, for a total of 56.

“(The gazebo) was not used much and was a frequent target of vandalism,” he said.

Sabo said the city will reconfigure the parking lot near the corner of West Frisco Avenue and South Virginia Avenue to make it easier for vehicles to enter and exit.

“Circulation (will) be improved by eliminating diagonally opposite parking, as well as closing the lane entrance/exit to clearly define traffic flow,” he said.

Sabo said officials haven’t discussed whether the park will be renamed, but the area likely won’t be called a park.

“If it’s named at all, it would seem logical to rename it West Frisco Parking Lot,” he said.

Sabo said the gazebo was built in 2011.

Eureka Parks and Recreation Coordinator Lizzie Roberds said the gazebo is the least-praised park facility in town, but has been used for parties and weddings.

Sabo said a rack that can hold up to nine bikes will be added to the lot.

Sabo said the total project cost is around $90,000.

“I anticipate that funds from the capital improvement program will be used for the project,” he said.

Sabo said a portion of the proceeds from Eureka’s sale of its water and sewer system to Missouri American Water can be used to cover capital projects such as parking lot improvements.

“I anticipate that a proposed order authorizing the contract to be entered into will be considered at the December 21 Board of Aldermen meeting,” he said.

Sabo said the gazebo is expected to be removed by the end of this year and improvements to the parking lot will likely begin after early 2022.

“Although the successful bidder will receive a notice to proceed on January 3, the completion date will depend on their workload as well as the weather, as if it is too cold they will not be able to obtain and lay the asphalt. “, did he declare. “Scratching the pitch also requires the air and ground temperature to be at least 40 to 50 degrees.

“Of course, there is also less demand for parking during the winter months, and it will be finished well before spring, when demand starts to increase.”

read more
Parking spaces

Bombay: Eight shopping malls open their car parks to the public at night

In a bid to address the lack of parking space in Mumbai, locals, visitors and commercial vehicle owners will be allowed to park their vehicles between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. at eight malls in the city from of December 1.

According to a plan drawn up by Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and the new Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA), 6,500 new parking spaces will be available. The MPA, responsible for regulating parking in the city, had met with shopping center owners in 2019 to discuss the idea of ​​using vacant parking spaces on their premises during non-working shopping center hours.

While five malls charge for parking on a monthly basis, others have opted for weekly or overnight charges. The largest number of parking spaces, over 1,100, is available at the Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel at Rs 3,500 per month. The parking rates have been decided by the mall authorities. “This will be particularly beneficial for crowded residential settlements where parking spills out into the streets and adequate parking is not available on their premises. Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility,” MPA said.

Earlier, MPA opened the BEST bus depots for private bus parking. BMC had also declared 100 meters around 29 public car parks as no-parking zones. Sections along five thoroughfares in different parts of the city have also been turned into no-parking zones. However, the plan was later withdrawn,

The MPA, formed in January this year, won the approval of the BMC Standing Committee in May and is headed by Additional Municipal Commissioner P Velrasu. Based on the suggestion of Municipal Commissioner IS Chahal, MPA is in the process of creating a Municipal Parking Pool – which will be an online aggregation platform that will contain details of all available parking spaces in the city.

Chahal had appealed: “All other government agencies, which have parking areas under them, should be encouraged to participate in the City Parking Pool (CPP) to ensure that citizens can reserve any parking in the city using a single platform”.

Under the CPP, owners (commercial spaces, shopping malls) will be free to open their premises as they wish and will have the flexibility to keep schedules, prices and rules to their liking.

The authority also made recommendations on the planning and control of all on-road and roadside parking in the city.

Experts appointed by the authority will carry out nine tasks, including studying legal issues relating to the implementation of the workforce, preparing a comprehensive plan for parking management in the 24 districts, drafting of a parking policy, uniform signage and consideration of appropriate parking rates, officials said.

To meet the growing demands for affordable parking spaces in every neighborhood, the MPA team also actively identifies open and vacant lots that can be converted into surface or underground parking.

The eight malls that have opened their car park are – Growels 101 in Kandivali, Infinity malls in Andheri and Malad, R City mall Ghatkopar, R mall in Mulund, Inorbit Mall in Malad, Phoenix Market City in Kurla and Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel.

read more
Parking garage

Miami suspends work on deepest underground car park: CEG

Since October, two water table breaks have occurred at the site, located at 175 SE 25th Rd.

Miami building officials decided to halt construction of the city’s “deepest” underground parking lot on November 16 to conduct a comprehensive engineering assessment following a series of groundwater violations and complaints from affected Brickell residents.

The garage is located under the luxury condominium tower Una Residences in the Brickell neighborhood of Miami. Local developer OKO Group is offering a 47-story residential tower on the site, with units starting at $ 2 million. It will also feature a three-level basement, which the developer touts as “Miami’s deepest and most expensive underground garage.”

However, since October, two water table breaches have occurred at the site, located at 175 SE 25th Rd., And residents of neighboring properties have expressed concerns about the impact the breaches could have on their buildings, especially following the deadly Surfside condo collapse last summer.

An aerial view of the evacuation site on November 16 showed water accumulation in a different section of the cavernous pit where water bubbled to the surface on November 12 in a second breach.

A spokesperson for the Miami-Dade County Regulatory and Economic Resources (DERM) Department told WPLG-TV Local 10 News in Miami that water “will continue to enter the site” until engineers repair “what is called the hopper seal”. The agency considers this to be an operational issue rather than an environmental violation.

Those same officials noted that the November 12 violation was capped by engineers on November 17 and that a stop work order on this project had been issued. Currently, three engineers have been recruited to assess the possible impact of the project on the surrounding properties.

This will include a geotechnical engineer, a structural engineer and a seismic testing engineer. Miami commissioner Ken Russell said this was being done as a precautionary measure and the building department would cover all costs and the trio of engineers would report their findings to the city.

Mandy Karnauskas lives in the Brickell Townhouse, next to the Una Residences under construction. Speaking with WPLG-TV, she said the second upwelling in Una occurred a day after her management company emailed residents that their structural engineer claimed their property was suffering. the impacts of the first breach of the construction site in October.

The management company claimed that the project caused soil erosion, which caused the brick pavers to move from their tiki hut area.

“We see the ground shift, part of our property is sinking and our little tiki picnic huts start to collapse,” Karnauskas said.

Ant Yapi, of Civic Construction in Miami, general contractor for Una Residences, said “our team is correcting these leaks as they occur, and there is no evidence of any impacts. on the surrounding properties “.

Experts ask for a thorough review of the site

“I think it’s a really good idea to take a break and check on the situation,” said Shimon Wdowinski, of the Institute of the Environment at Florida International University. He is an expert in land subsidence, sea level rise, sinkhole activities, wetland hydrology, earthquakes and other natural hazards.

Wdowinski explained that the geotechnical engineer of Una Residences will “look after the earth under the buildings” to “assess the ownership of the soil on the job site or beside the job site to see if there have been any changes in the soil. ground”.

In addition, he said the role of a structural engineer would be to assess whether there is “damage to buildings” with an analysis that would “seek [to see] if the columns or walls or any new cracks formed in the building, [and] to see if there have been any changes in the building itself. “

As for the seismic testing engineer, he told Miami TV station that this person would collect data on “ground motion – the elastic motion of the ground – to see how much motion near the building” can take place. produce. “assess if there is a problem that can cause damage to buildings.”

The entrepreneur is working hard to solve the problem

A statement from Civic Construction reads, in part: “As with any high-rise development in South Florida, our team suffered a series of minor leaks during the excavation process. The source of these leaks is the water table, which does not interact with Biscayne Bay or the drinking water from the Biscayne Aquifer.

“Our team corrects these leaks as they occur, and there is no evidence of impacts to surrounding properties. Since the water table stretches across all of South Florida, water intrusions of this nature are common during the early stages of high-rise developments in the area. . We anticipate that additional leaks could occur as construction progresses. “

In a letter to some nearby residents obtained by Local 10 News on November 16, Miami-Dade County DERM Director Lourdes Gomez noted that “the soil we live on in Miami-Dade County is very porous and contains groundwater. [here]It is common to encounter the water table when digging into the ground. She added that contractors will generally try to mitigate the amount of groundwater they encounter by “sealing or cementing the ground … before starting the excavation.”

Builders will also use a dewatering technique, she wrote, which involves pumping out any water that seeps in “to help keep the area dry while they do their job,” including when they train. and pour concrete.

“Unfortunately, in this specific case, it appears that the soil sealing work during the excavation did not work adequately and there was groundwater seeping into the disposal area.” , noted Gomez.

According to city construction records, DERM inspectors reported on November 15 that with water continuing to enter the site, a retention pond was created with backfill soil to limit flooding.

Challenges of a project in a shallow water table

Rachel Silverstein, Miami Waterkeeper, said: “It’s very difficult to build underground in South Florida because we have very porous limestone rocks under us. We also happen to have a shallow water table. You only have dry rock for a short time before you hit the water, so it can be very complicated to build an underground parking lot here in Miami. “

This is one of the reasons, she said, that you don’t see basement construction in homes in South Florida like in other parts of the country.

Una Residences’ underground garage can be considered the deepest, but construction of underground garages is common in Miami, said City Commissioner Ken Russell, who pointed to the recently completed underground garage in downtown Brickell.

“There are just more challenges here in Miami with porous limestone, aquifers and water bodies,” he said, adding that as long as it is deemed “safe,” the city will continue to allow this. type of projects.

In this case, the October groundwater breach occurred one evening when Local 10 News meteorologists said South Florida experienced coastal flooding with seawater. full moon helped create the King Tides phase during the third week of November.

Additional control in a post-Surfside era

Some residents of neighboring Brickell buildings said they were concerned about another incident like the Surfside condo collapse. Wdowinski recently published the results of his groundbreaking research into the June 24 disaster that killed 98 people. Analyzing spatial radar data, the CRF researcher “identified the 12-story Champlain Towers South condominium as the only location on the east side of the Barrier Island where land subsidence was detected from 1993 to 1999”.

He added that “the subsidence of the land by itself is unlikely to cause a building to collapse.” But, in the post-Surfside era, Wdowinski said it’s understandable that neighboring residents and city building officials come under closer scrutiny regarding soil foundations and integrity. structural structures of buildings and projects along our coastline.

“What happened at Surfside … put everyone on alert and rightly so because we don’t see such situations – it was scary,” he told the station. Miami Local 10 information.

Wdowinski added that another lesson learned from Surfside is the importance of monitoring buildings after they are constructed.

“I think that if we learn something from the Champlain Sud towers, it is that it is not enough to verify it when they make these buildings, but also afterwards,” he explained. “We must continue to monitor these buildings, especially when [they age]. “

read more
Parking garage

Mineola parking lot awaits final repairs before moving to village: Mayor Scott Strauss – Williston Times

MTA spokesman Aaron Donovan previously said the Harrison Avenue parking lot is expected to open in November. (Photo courtesy of MTA)

The village of Mineola is waiting for minor issues to be corrected in the new Harrison Avenue parking structure before taking ownership, according to Mayor Scott Strauss.

Earlier this month, the MTA said the structure, which has been completed since November 2020, is awaiting approvals for construction documents and permits before the village takes ownership.

Strauss has previously said he doesn’t want to take control of the garage until everything is sorted out on the development side. He likened it to paying a contractor before the job was finished and said he believed that if any potential problems arose after the village was taken over, the contractors would not be able to return in a timely manner.

With similar projects, after completion any maintenance or issues that need to be resolved would be dealt with by the MTA. Specifically, with the Harrison Avenue parking structure, the village would be responsible for any repairs, modifications or issues that occur during its ownership.

In a statement to Blank Slate Media, Strauss said difficulties with the later stages of development are not uncommon, but the village is working to confirm a firm deadline.

“This project has been extremely difficult and at times incredibly frustrating,” Strauss said. “The village demands and must ensure that all 3TC works meet all contract requirements and operate properly.

Reasons for the delay include, according to Strauss, minor drainage issues on the south side basement and exceptional training for village workers for lighting, ventilation and parking systems.

Although unhappy with the delays, Strauss said the village was lucky the board had not factored in any income from the structure. Since construction began three years ago, administrators have differed over whether to include projected income in village budgets, ultimately agreeing not to do so until it is fully ready.

“We were lucky not to put it in the budget,” Strauss said. “I can’t explain something that I don’t have.”

As part of the LIRR expansion project, the garage was built at Mineola Station west of Mineola Boulevard between Harrison Avenue and First Street and replaces an aboveground parking area. The five-level, 551-space garage represents a net increase of 446 parking spaces serving Mineola station.

The parking garage is one of two built in conjunction with the Long Island Rail Road project, which adds a third track on the main line between Floral Park and Hicksville.

Efforts to reach the MTA for comment were unsuccessful.

read more
Parking spaces

PHOTOS: City adds 210 paved parking spaces and electric vehicle charging stations to Steamboat rodeo grounds

The City of Steamboat Springs wrapped up an improvement project in November, bringing newly paved parking spaces, electric vehicle charging stations and more to Brent Romick Rodeo Arena in Howelsen Hill Ski Area.
Town of Steamboat Springs/Courtesy Photo

A total of 210 parking spaces are now paved at the Brent Romick Rodeo Arena in Howelsen Hill Ski Area, following the completion of the Steamboat Springs Town Improvement Project.

The project included paving the east side of the rodeo’s existing gravel lot, as well as adding drainage infrastructure, stormwater quality fixtures, sidewalks, lighting and landscaping. The site also now includes nine charging stations for electric vehicles accessible to the public.

The project was partially funded by the Colorado Department of Transportation through a Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Grant, which is intended to support efforts that help improve the quality of air and congestion.



Brent Romick Rodeo Arena at Howelsen Hill Ski Area in Steamboat Springs seen before the 2021 improvement project, which was completed in November.
Town of Steamboat Springs/Courtesy Photo

Steamboat and Routt County readers make the work of Steamboat Pilot & Today possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to provide quality and locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is essential to help us keep our community informed about the evolution of the coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, big or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for development and creating increased media coverage.


read more
Parking spaces

Enclosures, round tables and car parks – How Arsène Wenger created the Arsenal culture

Few clubs are as proud of their history, traditions and values ​​as Arsenal.

Arsene Wenger embraced this when he arrived in 1996 and his hospitality in making every visitor to the stadium or training ground was at the heart of it.

The values ​​and DNA of the club are an expression often used in football. But what does that actually mean? And can one person set the tone for an entire club? Wenger’s ideal was that he could – and that should be his legacy.

For example, there is a special way of welcoming players into The Arsenal Way with a unique touch that each new signing is given when they join the club.

They are given a ‘signature pen’ with their name, date and Arsenal football club engraved which has been designed to play within the tradition and values ​​of the club.







Arsene Wenger has created many small touches at Arsenal to build a pleasant environment
(

Picture:

Jamie McDonald/Allsport)


Former Arsenal transfer fixer Dick Law has revealed: “It was Stuart Wiseley, who was working in the finance department at the time, who suggested having ‘signing pens’ ready for the player. , his agent and his family members in remembrance of the day.

“The club secretary’s office went looking for a supplier and from then on first team and academy players had a tangible memory of the day they signed their contract – name, date and Arsenal Football Club engraved on the pen.The way of Arsenal.

It’s these personal touches that the club have always been proud of and it’s Wenger who put so much thought and design into every detail of the training ground.

Among the careful planning, Wenger insisted on:

  • ROUND tables in the training ground dining area so that no one is considered at the head of the table
  • There were no assigned spaces in the car park and Wenger himself drove the same car for many years while Gilberto Silva drove a BMW 3 Series from day one to day one.
  • ORGANIZE each visitor personally rather than having their personal assistant do it to make guests feel special. They even hosted Toyota boss Akio Toyoda and several colleagues at London Colney in October 2016 as they wanted to pay tribute to Wenger 20 years after leaving Grampus Eight for Arsenal.
  • INSPECTION of tile material samples of different colors, cutlery samples, even table and chair samples, all while demanding to look at the cupboards in each room and what would be inside.
  • THE main building became sacrosanct with no agents, reporters or junkies allowed as they had to report to the media building across the parking lot.
  • A PERSONAL touch even in the directors’ box because even an hour before kick-off, Wenger walked around the tables and stopped to chat with all the guests. The manager’s table was next to the general manager’s and chairman’s table as a sign of respect for his role in building the stadium.

Law recalls: “It is difficult to explain how values ​​permeate an organization. Powerful values ​​such as respect for others, the personal touch, restraint in one’s personal behavior, simplicity, modesty and frugality can move from one department to another until raising awareness everywhere.

Is Arsene Wenger Arsenal’s Greatest Manager? Comments below







Wenger’s legacy is still felt at Arsenal
(

Picture:

Getty Images)


“Arsène excelled in the practice of management by “walking around”. The pressures of any high-level leadership position can often cause individuals to isolate themselves in their office.

“Arsène was a constant presence: in the staff offices, the kit room and even the laundry room. The message was clear – the ‘gaffer’ – cared about all aspects of the football department and, more importantly, was visible.”

But Wenger has also made his presence felt in the Emirates hierarchy to make everyone feel special when they visit the stadium or training ground.

Law said: “Sometimes up to an hour before each home game, Wenger was in the Directors’ Box directors’ lounge, quietly walking around the tables to make everyone feel special as he stopped to chat, say hello and make conversation.

“That personal touch made the experience of watching an Arsenal match in the director’s box unique. Visitors felt valued and respected.

“During these wanderings, Arsène embodied the class of the club. To my knowledge, no other top football coach or manager wants to be part of the club’s identity.

“When the new London Colney training ground was built, the dining room was central to the design. Arsène has planned a space with key characteristics: no physical barriers and where you sit defines your status.

“The Academy players were seated at the north end of the dining room and the first team at the other end. Food was served from a buffet which served all players equally. But there was an unspoken rule. Academy players sat with Academy staff and the first team sat with first team staff.

“The Training Ground dining room had to be a comfortable space. The visual perception created by the space was equally important to Arsène: open and high ceilings, lots of light and a view of the training grounds.

“The Manager’s Table at London Colney, Arsenal’s training ground, was the reference point in the room. It could comfortably accommodate six people, eight at a pinch. More than that, it was elbows tucked in.






Arsene Wenger trains with Gunnersaurus

“But attention to detail has become a lesson in management for all staff. Sean O’Connor, the new facility manager, was instructed by Arsène to bring him samples of tile materials in various colors, sample tableware, and even sample tables and chairs. Arsène insisted on round tables to minimize hierarchy. In a circle, there is no “table head”.

These guests were a wide range of football legends, managers and businessmen who formed a fascinating who’s who – but it was always Wenger who organized it.

Law said: “When it came to inviting a personal guest to Colney, Arsene did it himself. Not once did his personal assistant organize things. When another coach, player or friend showed up, it was because Arsène had organized it.

“Arsene’s guests ranged from high profile sports personalities to intimate personalities. Eddie Jones, Avram Grant, Christian Karembeu, Sami Hyypia, Paul McGinley and AP McCoy. The most notable guest, however, was in October 2016.

“Mr. Akio Toyoda and senior management of Toyota Corporation had flown overnight from Japan to pay their respects to Arsene on the 20th anniversary of his departure from Nagoya Grampus Eight and his arrival at Arsenal.

“Arsène’s respect for Japan and the Japanese people is well known, but it was still a remarkable moment to see one of the leading figures in business in London Colney.

“They watched training, had lunch, visited Arsene in his office and flew back to Japan. The director’s table barely had enough room even with the elbows tucked in.

Wenger’s eye for detail and perfection was crucial. It inherited head gardener Steve Braddock on arrival and Paul Burgess joined later, but they were also perfectionists and valued the training ground almost more than the stadium.

And while they knew their place in the training ground dining room, there was a special incentive for academy players when it came to their pitches.






Arsene Wenger tried to make the training ground a special place

“The Academy players trained within 100 yards of the first team and many Academy players were surprised one morning when they were asked to train with the first team,” recalled Law. “Arsène wanted young players to see the first team as an ambitious goal.”

Wenger also tried to keep the special training ground. “You were there by invitation only. It was a special place,” Law said.

“When I became head of football operations at Arsenal in August 2009, Arsene and I discussed the location of his office. Both agreed that receiving agents in and around the main building would be a problem.

“Agents, even the wisest, would find it irresistible to approach other players. We decided to put my office in the Media Building, at a safe distance from players and staff.

“Simplicity and restraint were the tone of the training ground. Bell Lane entrance was easy to miss as there was no sign. The only indication that this small lane may have been the entrance to a football club was a sign telling fans that players would not stop for autographs.






Arsene Wenger’s off-field touches led to plenty of silverware

“There were no allocated parking spaces in the first team car park. Arsène drove the same car for years and to some extent set the tone. The best example might be Gilberto Silva who, from day one to day one at Arsenal, drove a BMW 300 series.

“For every employee in the football department, Arsène had one instruction: ‘do your job’. In a world defined by the latest game result, people tend to second guess others or worse, meddle in the area of ​​responsibility of someone else.

When people talk about a club’s values ​​or DNA, it’s often hard to describe what it actually means, other than something that has become rather cliché.

Read more

Read more

read more
Parking spaces

Ghaziabad Development Authority selects land for parking spaces at RRTS stations

The Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA) has identified and finalized the proposed land to be made available for vehicle parking at five of the seven stations of the Regional Rapid Transit System (RRTS) project, officials said on Thursday.

GDA officials said that a plot of at least 2,000 square meters (m²) has been identified for the project parking lot, and it is also included in the proposed master plan 2031 which will soon be finalized.

The National Capital Region Transport Corporation (NCRTC), implementing the 82 kilometer long RRTS project attached to 30,274 crore – which is proposed to link Delhi, Ghaziabad and Meerut with high-speed rail connectivity, and is expected to go live in 2025.

Part of it – about 40 km of the route – falls under the jurisdiction of Ghaziabad, where the NCRTC is developing RRTS stations at Sahibabad (land not found), Ghaziabad (already has parking arrangements), Guldhar, Duhai, Muradnagar, Modinagar (South and North).

“Following the traffic and usefulness of the project for commuters, we have identified land in five stations, where at least 2,000 m² of land have been identified. At Modinagar (south) station, the land area is almost 3,000 m². Provision for parking at Ghaziabad railway station is already included in the project. Also, we couldn’t find any land to park near Sahibabad Railway Station,” said Asheesh Shivpuri, Chief Architect and Urban Planner, GDA.

“The land will be handed over to the NCRTC for development and maintenance. It is expected that a 2,000 m² site will accommodate nearly 84 cars or 400 to 500 two-wheelers. The proposal has also been included in the upcoming master plan 2031 and sent to the state government for approval,” Shivpuri added.

According to estimates by GDA officials, a car for parking and taking turns, among other things, requires at least 24m² of space. More two-wheelers will be seen at stations like Modinagar, Muradnagar and Duhai among others, and city stations will have comparatively more cars, they said.

According to the detailed project report, the estimated ridership of the RRTS project is around eight lakh passengers per day. The NCRTC occupies a 17 km stretch between Sahibabad and Duhai in Ghaziabad – as a priority stretch – which will be the first stretch opened for suburban operations in India. It is expected to be open to passengers by March 2023.

Meanwhile, NCRTC officials said they are working closely with local administration and government authorities to provide parking spaces and park-and-ride arrangements based on particular station requirements and vehicle availability. lands.

“At RRTS station locations, feeder roads are provided to separate station-bound traffic from regular road traffic to facilitate traffic operations and avoid traffic jams. Further, for effective multi-modal integration, various space arrangements are made for suitable pick-up and drop-off facilities for various modes linked to RRTS station locations for efficient traffic dispersal,” said Puneet Vats, Relationship Manager (PRO) of the NCRTC.

The RRTS project is expected to provide a better experience for commuters and will also allow commuters to switch from private to public transport, officials said.


  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Peeyush Khandelwal writes about a range of issues in Western Uttar Pradesh – from crime to development authorities and infrastructure to transport. Based in Ghaziabad, he has been a journalist for nearly a decade.
    …See the details

read more
Parking spaces

Hesperia Park & ​​Ride adds 200 parking spaces – VVNG.com

HESPERIA, CA (VVNG.com) — The Park & ​​Ride located at the southwest corner of US Highway 395 and Joshua Street in Hesperia will soon have additional parking spaces.

Rachel Molina, deputy city manager of Hesperia, told VVNG that the city is expanding by adding 200 more spaces.

Molina said they expect the project to be completed by the end of January 2022.

According to the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, Park & ​​Ride lots provide parking spaces for commuters to park and meet their rideshare or vanpool, or for commuters making transit connections. San Bernardino County Park & ​​Ride lots are free and do not require a permit.

Park & ​​Ride car parks are restricted to daytime use only, overnight parking is not permitted unless carpools are parked in designated carpool overnight parking spaces.

Click on HERE to view the full list of Park & ​​Riee locations.

(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)
hesperia park and ride on joshua street in hesperia
(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)

To follow updates to this article and more, join our newsgroup on Facebook with over 140,000 members. Like our Facebook page, and Follow us on instagram and Twitter.

read more
Parking spaces

Love’s opens 3 new stores and adds hundreds of parking spaces for large platforms

The new Love’s Travel Stop in Garden City, Georgia is shown.

OKLAHOMA CITY – At a time when it is very difficult to find a safe place to park a large platform, Love’s Travel Stops has created 300 new truck spaces across the country with the opening of three new locations.

The new Love’s stores are located in Bellefontaine, Ohio, Milton, Florida and Garden City, Georgia.

“Opening three locations in one day is no small feat, but our team members are ready to show customers Love’s Highway Hospitality in Bellefontaine, Milton and Garden City,” said Greg Love, Co-CEO of Love’s. “Whether it’s fresh food, snacks or coffee, today’s latest technology or just a place to stretch your legs, Love’s offers the amenities that professional drivers and customers alike. four wheels need when they are on the road.

Together, the new stores created 200 jobs.

Here are the amenities of each store:

Bellefontaine, Ohio

  • Over 13,000 square feet.
  • Hardee. (Opening December 6)
  • 126 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 55 parking spaces.
  • Seven motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Eight showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Milton, Florida

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • that of Arby. (Opening November 22)
  • 88 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 85 parking spaces.
  • Four motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Eight showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Speedco.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Garden City, Georgia

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Hardee. (Opening November 22)
  • 97 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 63 parking spaces.
  • Three motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Six showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.
Trucker News Staff

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. Trucker News staff are based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

read more
Parking garage

The Chicago Loop parking lot was once the Teutonic building

A parking lot in the Loop has a secret identity.

We’re not talking about the one on Lake Street that postmodern architect Stanley Tigerman designed in the 1980s for looks like a vintage Rolls Royce.

No, a modest 12-story parking lot is about six blocks away on Washington and Wells streets. Today the building is conventional, square and drab. But it has long hid a secret: It was once an ornate skyscraper, built in the 1890s with a pointed roof and columns of bay windows running along its brick facade to a terracotta crown at frilly.

An illustration of a skyscraper at the 179 W. Washington Street Building in Chicago, 1893. Handy & Cady. Inland Architect 20, no. 1 (1892): 13, Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago. Digital file # IA20XX_1007.

Designed by Jeremiah Cady, the German Renaissance-style building opened in 1893 as the Teutonic Building. (Teutonic is an ancient term for people in Germany and other northern European countries, where an ancient tribe called the Teutons lived.)

Over the years, the tower has housed mortgage companies, the owners of a Midwestern movie theater chain, the offices of a 1920s campaign to support the human rights of the Jewish people, a newspaper called the Chicago eagle, and the architectural firm Schmidt, Garden & Martin, which designed, among others, the giant building in the Montgomery Ward catalog on the North Branch of the Chicago River. By various owners, the name was later changed to Roosevelt Building and then back to Wilkinson Building, according to the Chicago History website. Chicagology.

But in 1993, a more substantial change occurred: the building was emptied and turned into a parking garage, including a new section to the south.

One thing that hasn’t changed – and which reveals the secret – is the pattern of the windows on the outside. On a rendering of the Teutonic building that Burnham Ryerson of the Art Institute posted, the windows on each floor follow this pattern: 2, 2, 4, 2, 2, with the 4 middle windows as a bay. The pattern is the same on the facades of the Teutonic on Washington and Wells streets (formerly Fifth Avenue).

Standing at the corner of Washington and Wells streets today, you see the same pattern. Only the 4 windows are no longer a bay now, they are flat on the facade like the others.

There are two other obvious signs of the old building. If you stand a short distance east of the building at the corner of LaSalle and Washington streets, you can see that the east side of the garage does not have modern signs. This side is more of a large brick wall with empty openings where the windows once stood.

Still not convinced? Enter the parking lot and take the elevator to a parking level. On exiting the elevator, head towards Washington Street. You will see very clearly that the wall is built of brick on the inside, with the modern paneled exterior attached to it. Above are old iron beams.

A red brick wall and four open windows and two paned windows
If you stand a short distance east of the building at the corner of LaSalle and Washington streets, you can see that the east side of the garage does not have modern signs. This side is more of a large brick wall with empty openings where the windows once stood. Vashon Jordan Jr. / WBEZ

The wall is built of brick on the inside, with the modern paneled exterior attached to it, to the left. Above are old iron beams, to the right.
Jason Marck / WBEZ

Now turn around and walk south along Wells Street. You will stop seeing brick pillars and iron beams above. Now everything is concrete. You have entered the modern part of the parking lot, which is attached to the shell of the old Teutonic building.

When you are in the newer part, go east. You will see to your left a view of the old red brick on the east side of the garage.

The transition from an office building to a multi-story parking lot happened in 1993, according to permits from the City of Chicago Archives. This was a little noticed change, now only recorded to the extent that some cities allow the demolition of non-loadbearing walls.

A view through a concrete structure of a red brick wall in the distance
When you are in the newer part of the parking lot, you can see a view of the old red brick on the east side of the garage. Vashon Jordan Jr. / WBEZ

In 1954, the owner of the building, John C. Wilkinson, was in talks with a developer to sell the site, according to the Chicago Tribune. The proposal was for the new owner to demolish the building (then 62 years old) and replace it with a three-story parking structure. This agreement must have failed, because the Teutonic building is still there, hidden in plain sight.

This makes it perhaps the oldest building you can park a car in in Chicago: an office skyscraper from the 1890s, when cars were in their infancy and not so common as garages for they were needed in the Loop.

In 1918, the first multi-story Loop parking lot was built less than a block west of here at 217 W. Washington Street. The five-story garage for guests of the LaSalle Hotel was a luxury at the time, intended for a wealthy clientele. It was demolished in 2005.

Dennis Rodkin is the residential real estate reporter for Crain’s Chicago Business and Reset’s “What’s That Building?” donor. Follow it @Dennis_Rodkin.

read more
Parking garage

100% Affordable Housing Project and Parking in Downtown Flagstaff Could Be One More Step Toward Realization | Local

After several years of work, Flagstaff is perhaps one step closer to the development of 100% affordable housing development and a downtown parking garage.

The Foundation for Senior Living’s project, which specializes in affordable housing projects across Arizona, is expected to go to Flagstaff City Council early next year and seek several exemptions from the city code.

The project will replace the former Catholic Primary School and historic Babbitt House, and is expected to provide 146 affordable housing units to a city that declared a housing emergency last year. These units and associated parking will be in the form of two buildings, each of four floors, which will largely occupy the entire block.

In a meeting this week, city staff and Steve Hastings of the Foundation for Senior Living detailed the project to city council.

The project is the result of a collaboration between the foundation, Catholic charities and the city of Flagstaff, Hastings told the council.

Hastings said the foundation plans to build the project in two phases, the first starting in June 2022 and the second phase starting in fall 2023.

“I know this project will be a really welcome addition to Flagstaff,” said Deputy Mayor Becky Daggett.

People also read …

The first phase of the project will encompass the northern half of the property. Called San Francisco Square, the first phase will be largely intended for seniors and will include 70 units. Of these, 60 would be one-bedroom units while 10 would be two-bedroom units. It will also include 59 parking spaces for residents.

The second phase of the project, called Aspen Lofts, will then be built on the southern half of the property and is part of a collaboration with Catholic Charities. The units built under phase two will target more than just a senior population, but instead will be designed for a wide variety of family types.

Thus, phase two will include 37 one-bedroom units, 20 two-bedroom units and 19 three-bedroom units for a total of 76 units. The phase will also provide 55 parking spaces for residents and 97 parking spaces that will be sold to the City of Flagstaff for use by the nearby municipal courthouse and members of the public.

The city currently rents several public parking spaces on the former school property, largely to meet the parking needs of the courthouse. This arrangement will continue until the construction of the first phase.

Once the second phase of the project – which will include the parking lot – is built, the city is expected to purchase these spaces without profit for the developer. In other words, the cost of building those 97 parking spaces will be what the city ultimately pays.

However, much of the parking garage will not be visible from the outside, as the project is designed with the apartments wrapping around the structure and hiding it from view.

Residential use and the density of the project are allowed directly in the area, but the foundation still requests several exemptions from certain parts of the city code.

The foundation’s request comes after city council voted in March to allow developers building 100% affordable projects to ask the council for loopholes in the zoning code. Council approved this measure as a way to encourage the construction of affordable housing in a state that does not allow cities to require the inclusion of affordable units in projects.

Although the foundation project had been in the works for several years before the adoption of this measure, it seems that this development could be the first to benefit from the new cuts.

Planning director Alaxandra Pucciarelli said the foundation has requested nearly 20 exemptions from the city code. Some of these exemptions include lowering the height required for the ceilings on the first floor, as the first floor will be used for residences and not for commercial spaces.

The foundation previously built and still operates the Flagstaff Senior Meadows development on McMillan Mesa.

The project is partially funded through the use of the low-rental housing tax credit, and residents earning at least 80% of the region’s median income will be able to qualify for the units. For a family of four in 2021, that equates to an annual income of $ 61,450.

Adrian Skabelund can be reached by phone at (928) 556-2261, by email at [email protected] or on Twitter at @AdrianSkabelund.

read more
Parking garage

100% Affordable Housing Project and Parking in Downtown Flagstaff Overnight, One Step closer to Reality | Local

The first phase of the project will encompass the northern half of the property. Called San Francisco Square, the first phase will be largely intended for seniors and will include 70 units. Of these, 60 would be one-bedroom units while 10 would be two-bedroom units. It will also include 59 parking spaces for residents.

The second phase of the project, called Aspen Lofts, will then be built on the southern half of the property and is part of a collaboration with Catholic Charities. The units built as part of phase two will target more than just a senior population, but instead will be designed for a wide variety of family types.

Thus, phase two will include 37 one-bedroom units, 20 two-bedroom units and 19 three-bedroom units for a total of 76 units. The phase will also provide 55 parking spaces for residents and 97 parking spaces that will be sold to the City of Flagstaff for use by the nearby municipal courthouse and members of the public.

The city is currently renting several public parking spaces on the former school property, largely to meet the parking needs of the courthouse. This arrangement will continue until the construction of the first phase.

Once the second phase of the project – which will include the parking lot – is built, the city is expected to purchase these spaces without profit for the developer. In other words, the cost of building those 97 parking spaces will be what the city ultimately pays.

read more
Parking garage

Innovative Parking Garage Begins Construction in Fairfax County | WDVM25 and DCW50

FAIRFAX COUNTY, Va. (WDVM) – Fairfax County officials and representatives celebrated the start of construction of the Monument Drive Commuter Parking Garage and Transit Center.

Representatives from the Fairfax County Department of Transportation, the Fairfax County Department of Public Works and Environmental Services, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and community partners participated in the event.

The parking garage will include eight levels and more than eight hundred parking spaces, a bus transit hub, carpool pickup and drop-off, and indoor and outdoor bicycle storage. Officials say commuters and their comfort are the main focus of the garage and the center.

“What we’re celebrating here today are innovative transportation solutions that move people and give them options for how they get to work,” said Jeff McKay, chairman of the County Board of Supervisors. Fairfax.

The parking garage is also said to benefit the environment. Officials say the parking lot will include solar panels on its roof that will power the facility’s electrical uses.

The commuter parking garage and transit center are expected to be completed in 2023.

read more
Parking spaces

Morley Stanwood students to create parking spots for veterans

MORLEY – A group of Morley Stanwood students are working on a project to provide parking for veterans on school grounds, board members learned at this week’s meeting.

A student-led effort in a leadership class, led by Jay Gross, the new parking spaces will be reserved for veterans visiting the school.

Superintendent Roger Cole said the new parking spaces will be designated with new signage.

“The kids in the leadership class are the ones running the whole show with this project,” Cole said. “They wanted to choose a project in the community and started looking for ways to serve the city. Another school district had done something similar with veterans-only parking signs, and the kids said they wanted to incorporate that into our school.

“Some of the students involved in the idea of ​​the project showed up to the board and presented their plans,” he added. “The board of directors was thrilled with the idea and we gave the green light to complete the project. “


The next step in the project plan is to get the new signage designating the veterans’ parking spaces and have them mounted on a movable cement block for each space.

Cole said the goal of the project for the students is to provide parking for veterans in the area and start doing little things that make a difference in the community.

“The idea is to say that if you are a veteran, you have a designated space to visit our school,” Cole said. “We want to let the veterans know that we appreciate them and want to say thank you. We weren’t going to dedicate the spaces to specific veterans, but instead create spaces for any veterans who might be visiting for a sports game or other event and maintain those spaces for them.

During the meeting, the council also discussed improvements to be made to the outdoor educational space on the north side of the current primary school. The education space was built with the help of a multi-year-old grant that funded the construction of the school when the primary building was used as a college, but it has fallen into disrepair over the years in due to less frequent maintenance.

The council discussed ongoing plans to revitalize the space to make it usable for educational purposes.

“There is a lot of interest in reviving the space into something we can use for teachers and students,” Cole said. “We want to take the time to make it a space where children can come and learn. It will be a closed steel structure that will withstand the elements better, and we look forward to how the space will be used by our teachers as there will be a lot of learning opportunities. “

If the plan is approved, the proposal is to completely demolish the space and rebuild and upgrade the space to include more area and year-round use. Cole said the newly constructed structure is expected to be a unique new addition to the school grounds.

read more
Parking spaces

Luton Council boss receives ‘extremely hostile’ reception for car park cuts ‘which will kill business’

The chief executive of Luton Council received a hostile reception from business owners angry at parking cuts, during a trip to High Town.

Robin Porter had visited the conservation area along High Town Road last week after business bosses said plans to drastically reduce their parking spaces for a new housing estate would drive away shoppers.

Estate agent Mohammed Shahid said Mr Porter faced angry shopkeepers.

Barriers around the Ville Haute car park

“It was extremely hostile,” he said. “Business people feel very disappointed.”

He has now started a petition in the area calling on the council to rethink its plans to remove 28 public parking spaces, which businesses fear will drive away customers who cannot park. Merchants will be left with only 12 places for themselves and the customers they say.

“We were not consulted on the plan,” he said. “We were all taken by surprise.

“All businesses have been closed during the shutdowns and some are barely surviving. The loss of parking closes a lifeline, they will close.”

The warning of advice to traders

Mr Shadid said since parking spaces were removed to accommodate a new development of flats, there has been chaos on the road, with people parking in yellow lines or on the pavement.

“The parking lot has been around for 45 years,” he said. “We all have to find somewhere else to park. The general manager has witnessed chaos in the area with people parking on double yellow lines.”

Dorota Bodniewicz lives and works in High Town and said: “It’s ridiculous what’s happened here. They’re literally killing businesses as customers struggle to park. They’re just killing the area.

“The council is keeping its fingers crossed that we get used to it.”

Twenty-eight places were lost

The petition states: “Luton City Council has failed to properly consider the impact of the loss of these car parks and has made no proposals regarding alternative parking arrangements.

“The construction process has already started and is progressing rapidly. This will significantly reduce the level of on-street parking in the area, but will also remove the vast majority of long-term parking in the High Town Road commercial area.

“This long-term parking lot is used by both local residents and people who work in businesses and shops in the upper town. This change will also impact people with reduced mobility and parents with strollers who again rely on the ability to park closer to the store or business they are visiting.”

And he calls on the council to rethink the situation. “We are asking the Upper Town Councilors and the Chief Executive of Luton Council to reconsider LBC’s decision and retain this vital parking resource on High Town Rd / Brunswick Street. Alternatively, to allocate an appropriate number of spaces to accommodate relocation within the local (High Town Road, Brunswick Street and Back Street) at a distance equal to that of the existing Brunswick Street car park.

A council spokesperson said: “The council is committed to investing in redundant sites across Luton to meet the needs of residents. In High Town in particular, we have recently invested £275,000 in improving street lighting and additional funds to facilitate public realm improvements at the junction of High Town Road and Burr Street.

“The new High Town development supplied by Foxhall Homes on the former Taylor Street car park, will improve the area and provide large family homes, which are rare in Luton. There will be 23 homes for sale between individuals and nine homes for rent affordable..

“As part of our aim to make Luton a carbon neutral city by 2040, we are committed to encouraging the use of local facilities that are easily accessible on foot or by bike and believe this development will benefit retailers across the area as it will bring new buyers to the locality.

“Once the work in progress is complete, there will be 12 spaces for public use, accessible from Brunswick Street and the 27 spaces, accessible via Back Street, for private parking.

“There are other pay and display car parks on Wenlock Street and Hitchin Road within a few minutes walk. There is a full bus service and a mainline rail station less than 0.2 mile away.

“We continue to work and engage with local businesses, not just in the Upper Town but across Luton, to achieve our Luton 2040 goal of having a city where everyone thrives and no one lives in poverty.”

read more
Parking garage

City plans to temporarily halt construction of Miami’s ‘deepest’ underground parking lot

MIAMI – Miami building officials have decided to halt construction of the city’s “deepest” underground parking lot for a comprehensive engineering assessment after a series of groundwater violations and complaints from affected Brickell residents.

On Tuesday, an aerial view of the evacuation site showed water accumulation in another section of the cavernous pit where water bubbled to the surface on Friday in a second breach.

A spokesperson for the Miami-Dade County Regulatory and Economic Resources Department said Tuesday that water “will continue to enter the site” until they repair “what is known as the trench seal. “. They said it was an operational issue rather than an environmental violation.

City construction officials have said Friday’s violation is expected to be capped tomorrow and at that time they will issue a stop work order on the project and bring in three engineers to assess the impact, if any, of the project on surrounding properties.

A d

This will include a geotechnical engineer, a structural engineer and a seismic testing engineer. Miami commissioner Ken Russell said this was being done as a precautionary measure and the building department would cover the engineering costs as the three engineers will report their findings to the city.

Related story: Construction next to a Brickell condo causes safety concerns

Mandy Karnauskas lives in the Brickell Townhouse, next to the Una Residences under construction. She said the second upwelling at Una occurred a day after her management company emailed them saying their structural engineer claimed their property was being impacted by the first breach at the construction site. construction in October.

A d

The management company claimed that the project caused soil erosion, which caused the brick pavers to move from their tiki hut area.

“We see the ground shift, part of our property is sinking and our little tiki picnic huts start to collapse,” Karnauskas said.

Ant Yapi Civic Construction, general contractor of Una Residences, said “our team is correcting these leaks as they occur, and there is no evidence of impacts to surrounding properties. “.

Related story: Will Miami’s Deepest Underground Garage Cause Biscayne Bay Problems?

“I think it’s a really good idea to take a break and check on the situation,” said Shimon Wdowinski, of the Institute of the Environment at Florida International University.

Wdowinski is an expert in land subsidence, sea level rise, sinkhole activities, wetland hydrology, earthquakes and other natural hazards. He said the geotechnical engineer “will look after the earth under the buildings” to “assess the ownership of the soil on the job site or next to the job site to see if there have been any changes in the soil.”

A d

Wdowinski said the role of a structural engineer would be to assess whether there is “damage to buildings” with an analysis that would “look at whether columns or walls or new cracks have formed in the building, to see if there have been any changes to the building itself.

As for the seismic testing engineer, Wdowinski said that person would collect data on “ground movement, elastic ground movement, to see how much movement near the building” can occur to “assess whether it there is a problem that can cause damage to buildings.

From his subject’s point of view, Wdowinski said that what he would look for in these engineering reports would be data on any potential damage that could be caused due to ground movement and “whether there is any damage to buildings due to this. construction nearby ”.

Excavation is underway on the site of a new “ultra-luxury” condo tower project. On its website, developer OKO Group claims the waterfront site at 175 SE 25th Rd. Will feature a 47-story luxury residential tower, Una Residences, with units starting at $ 2 million. It will also include a three-level underground basement “which will become Miami’s deepest and most expensive underground garage”.

A d

According to ConstructionDive.com, the project managers used a “deep soil mix construction process to create an impermeable tub-like structure that protects the building’s concrete mat above the tub from groundwater and forms the base of the garage “.

The statement from the general contractor, which was sent on behalf of William J Real of Civic Construction Company, Inc. reads in part: “As with any high rise development in South Florida, our team suffered a series of minor leaks during the excavation process … The source of these leaks is the water table, which does not interact with Biscayne Bay or the drinking water that comes from the Biscayne aquifer.

“Our team corrects these leaks as they occur, and there is no evidence of impacts to surrounding properties. Since the water table stretches across all of South Florida, water intrusions of this nature are common during the early stages of high-rise developments in the area. We anticipate that additional leaks could occur as construction progresses. “

A d

In a letter to some nearby residents obtained by Local 10 News on Tuesday, the director of DERM said that “the soil we live on in Miami-Dade County is very porous and contains groundwater. Therefore, when excavating in Miami-Dade County, it is common to encounter the water table when digging into the ground. He said contractors will generally try to mitigate the amount of groundwater they encounter by “sealing or cementing the ground … before starting the excavation.”

Contractors, he wrote, will also use a dewatering technique that involves pumping out any water that seeps in “to help keep the area dry while they do their work,” including when they train. and pour concrete.

“Unfortunately, in this specific case, it appears that the soil sealing work during the excavation did not work adequately and there was groundwater seeping into the disposal area.” , wrote the director of DERM.

A d

According to city construction records, inspectors noted Monday as water continued to enter the site, a retention pond was created with fill soil to limit flooding.

Project issues in the water table

Following the first breach in October, Ant Yapi of Civic Construction said that “flooding has occurred at the UNA Residences construction site due to the intrusion of the water table.”

Rachel Silverstein, Miami Waterkeeper, said: “It’s very difficult to build underground in South Florida because we have very porous limestone rocks under us. We also have a shallow water table. You only have dry rock for a short time before you hit the water, so building an underground parking lot here in Miami can be very complicated.

This is one of the reasons she said you don’t see basement construction in homes in South Florida like in other parts of the country.

A d

Una Residences’ underground garage can be considered the deepest, but building underground garages is not uncommon in Miami, said Miami Commission Ken Russell, who pointed to the recently completed downtown underground garage. by Brickell.

The breach in groundwater in October occurred one evening when Julie Durda, a local 10 News meteorologist, said southern Florida suffered “coastal seawater flooding,” and the Local meteorologist 10 Jordan Patrick explained that the full moon helped create the King Tides phase that we expect until Thursday.

“We live in an environment with very shallow groundwater,” Wdowinski said. “That’s why most houses don’t have a basement here. I think it’s a design issue, does that justify having a deep parking garage in a situation where we have such a shallow groundwater level? “

Wdowinski said this question is best answered by the architects of the project and the engineers who approved it. Russell said it’s a standard engineering process.

A d

“There are just more challenges here in Miami with porous limestone, aquifers and water bodies,” Russell said, adding that as long as it is deemed “safe,” the city will continue to allow this type of. projects.

This is because, said Russell, “in the Florida building code this is acceptable,” adding, “my job here is to make sure they meet the permit requirements from a standpoint. environmental “.

A closer look in the era of post-Surfside building collapse

Some residents of neighboring Brickell buildings said they were concerned about another incident like the Surfside condo collapse.

Related story: Brickell residents fear the worst after parking garage floods on site of luxury condo

In 2020, Wdowinski published the results of his groundbreaking research. Analyzing the spatial radar data, the CRF researcher “identified the 12-story Champlain Towers South condominium as the only location on the east side of the Barrier Island where land subsidence was detected from 1993 to 1999”.

A d

Wdowinksi added that “the land subsidence by itself is unlikely to cause a building to collapse.” the structural integrity of buildings and projects along our coastline.

“What happened at Surfside, the tragic collapse there, put everyone on alert and rightly so because we don’t see situations like this it was scary,” Wdowinski said. . “Several years before the collapse, there was this construction of a new property south of the South Champlain Towers, so maybe that analogy puts people on alert and it’s good that people are aware of the situation and let the engineers do their job, to make sure we’re not going to have a similar situation again.

Wdowinski added that another lesson learned from Surfside is the monitoring of buildings after they are constructed.

A d

“I think that if we learn something from the Champlain Sud towers, it is that it is not enough to verify it when they make these buildings, but also afterwards, things can cascade afterwards, so we must continue to monitor these buildings. , especially when it gets old.

Copyright 2021 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.

read more
Parking garage

Council approves 300-car parking lot, plans to leave florist alone

County-owned vehicles can be found in a parking lot just west of the Morgan County Administration Building. On Monday, council approved the construction of a 300-car parking lot on this and adjacent land.

MARTINSVILLE – Council members have postponed their regular meeting to Monday evening due to publicity issues with a request for additional credit.

Despite the two week delay, the meeting room was full.

The big issue was the discussion and voting on the county’s future building plans.

“Quite humiliating”: The Martinsville native was voted best bartender in Indianapolis.

For about two years, county officials discussed the county’s building needs.

Some officials believe historically low bond rates are now a good time to start replacing old buildings or building new ones.

The discussion included discussions about which buildings should be replaced or renovated, which new buildings to consider, and how much bond the county should get.

The status of the County Roads Department on Blue Bluff Road has been discussed as it sits in a bypass canal.

The county jail is in need of major repairs.

For years, the county court system has discussed a new building that would house all the county courts, the probation service, the district attorney, and possibly a future public defender’s office.

The county administration building south of Main Street no longer has room for some county departments. There have been discussions about expanding the building or moving some departments to new locations.

Others read: The public expresses concern regarding the search for Superintendent MSD.

And the endless problems with downtown parking were discussed.

On Monday evening, the council made its decision, which included a 300-vehicle parking garage, a security addition to the administration building and a new building at the county fairgrounds.

The cost of the work is estimated at $ 14.6 million.

Eric Ratts, of architecture and engineering firm DLZ, gave council members an update on the plans presented by the Morgan County Council of Commissioners at its October 18 meeting.

This plan had four different versions, ranging from building a parking garage to covering two lots west of the administration building with a sidewalk for parking.

This showed that one had to leave an adjacent flower shop alone to use this property for the county.

The cost ranged from a low of $ 8.7 million, without the garage, to a high of $ 14.6 million.

Land of toys, Land of toys: WCBK Truckload of Christmas returns for the holiday season.

Board members received a report from Bakertilly’s financial advisers on the estimated costs of issuing bonds of $ 14.7 million.

County auditor Dan Bastin said the report is based on information currently available and may change when and if they request bond issuance.

At present, the debit service rate for the low amount is 0.0240 per $ 100 of appraised valuation.

The rate for the high amount is 0.0400 per $ 100 of appraised valuation.

It has been estimated that a $ 100,000 home would pay between $ 5.15 and $ 8.58 more per year, depending on the amount of the deposit.

Lots of discussions

County commissioner Bryan Collier told members a lot has happened since he became commissioner 11 months ago. Collier had previously served on the county council before being elected to the post of commissioner.

Collier said he discussed the plan with a lot of people. He said a 21-year-old asked him, “When do we start investing in ourselves?

I-69 in Martinsville: Ind. 37 northbound to cross onto a new carriageway in the coming weeks.

Collier said the county is growing and must be able to meet the needs of the future.

Collier admitted there were other issues, like putting millions of dollars in the county courthouse. He said people are passionate about the courthouse and keep it as it is. But he said, it’s almost a bottomless pit when it comes to money.

As for adding security to the administration building, Collier said it was long overdue.

Morgan I County Superior Court Judge Peter Foley and Superior Court II Judge Brian H. Williams attended the meeting. Foley reminded the council of the needs of the justice system. He said that, as it stands, the courthouse does not meet the requirements of the American with Disabilities Act.

Martinsville planning director Gary Oakes said the city was very happy with the county’s construction of a parking garage. He said it would help the development of the city center.

Parking history

Years ago, Martinsville’s zoning ordinance prohibited the use of downtown properties for residential purposes. The idea at the time was that residents parking downtown would do away with business parking. The only building that was “protected” were the apartments at the intersection of Pike and Main streets.

“I thought we had a deal”: The Redevelopment Commission is considering a new prosecutor after the purchase of the land.

That way of thinking has changed and many second floors are now used for residential purposes.)

County Council member Chip Keller, who has a business on North Main Street next to the plaza, has at times said parking can become an issue.

Board member Jason Maxwell said he had many questions and concerns about the proposed garage.

His list of concerns included the safety of the structure and the cost of maintaining it.

He wanted to know if there would be paid parking or if it would be free for anyone. He was concerned that some people were starting to live in the structure.

Ratts said there are parking lots in Indianapolis that are over 50 years old and still in good repair.

Exhibition center building

There was a discussion about the proposed building at the fairgrounds.

Ratts said the building will house county soil and water, solid waste and county extension offices.

COVID in Indiana K-12 Schools: Cases are climbing again.

By moving the extension office, this will open approximately half of the second floor of the administration building.

Board member Kelly Alcala said it was a lot of money, especially for the new building on the fairgrounds. She was also worried about the cost of parking for the county.

“We have to be proactive and not reactive,” Morgan County Council Chairman Kim Merideth said, adding that the council had to make a decision that evening on which option it wanted to make.

The owners of the Flowers by Dewey flower shop next to the administration building complained that they had been threatened with prominent property if they did not sell their property.

Merideth said there were no plans to take their property.

Following: Morgan County COVID cases increased 114.8%; Cases in Indiana increased 65.5%.

More people in the audience spoke out for both the plan and the plan.

Merideth kept asking for a motion on the option the board wanted.

After a while, board member Vickie Kivett brought forward a motion for the first option, which included the 300-car garage and left the company alone.

Merideth seconded the motion and called for the vote. The vote was 5-2 in favor of Option 1. Keller, Melissa Greene, Troy Sprinkle, Kivett and Meredith voted for the motion.

Maxwell and Alcala voted against.

The next Morgan County Council meeting is scheduled for 6:30 pm Monday, December 6 at the Morgan County Administration Building, 180 S. Main St., Martinsville.

This article originally appeared on The Reporter Times: Morgan County Council Cleared 300-Car Garage, Considering Leaving Flower Shop

read more
Parking spaces

Drivers who occupy two parking spaces, you piss me off

There are certain things in life that annoy me. For some reason, the majority of annoying things in my life involve chewing vehicles and people. One of the most irritating things is people taking up two spots in a parking lot, especially when it’s full.

With the holiday shopping season in full swing, the worst lots will be at the mall, Consumer Square and major retail stores everywhere. The scenario that really triggered me today was the parking lot at one of the local restaurants I frequent. Who would have thought that the Tuesday morning crowds would lead to a mad dash for easy parking. But, of course, there was a perfectly good spot that was hampered by a jerk in a white Mercedes.

Now I can understand some circumstances where you as a driver are forced into a position where you end up looking like the jerk based on how others around you have parked, but in most cases, there is a gross lack of care for other motorists and diners/buyers. I understand that you don’t want your car to be “bumped” or “damaged”, but no one wants to damage your vehicle either. No one wants to be left without a parking space either. In fact, they’re more likely to want to “ring” your car if you’re a jerk.

Other factors that can contribute to inadvertent double parking or parking in two places are snow in the winter. Now obviously it’s harder to see the lines of the terrain, but you have to use common sense and logic when it comes to figuring out the best way to give other cars enough space. When you go out shopping this year, keep these thoughts in mind so you don’t look like the jerk in the white Mercedes.

Check out these bizarre moments captured on CNY Ring doorbells

More and more people are replacing their old doorbells with RING or other video doorbell systems. It’s really amazing what this new technology can do. The video and audio quality of these devices is so good that in some cases the captured images have helped police solve crimes. These images are from bizarre moments captured by RING users.

What You Need to Know About New York’s Marijuana Legalization Law

On March 31, 2021, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill legalizing adult cannabis use, called the New York State Cannabis/Marijuana Regulation & Tax Act. Here are the 13 things you need to know about New York State law

Route 5 8 12 Construction in Utica, New York

Route 5 8 12 Construction in Utica, New York

The hamlets of Oneida County, New York

Have you ever heard of a hamlet? No, not Shakespeare’s character. It is a small settlement, usually smaller than a village, and there are several in Oneida County. Some are more common than you might think. Others, which you’ve probably never heard of unless you live there.

read more
Parking garage

Start of construction of a new car park in downtown Temple

Construction of the buildings began in October and is expected to take around 18 months.

TEMPLE, Texas – Construction on the new Temple downtown parking lot began on November 10, according to a press release.

According to officials, construction of the parking lot is expected to take 13 months.

In addition to the city’s parking garages, visitors to downtown will see a variety of private projects take shape this year, such as the Hawn Hotel, the Arcadia Theater and the Sears Building and several new and expanded businesses.

The City will also make improvements to roads and landscaping from Central Avenue to Adams Avenue.

“As the revitalization of the Downtown Temple continues, we look forward to an increase in the number of visitors to the area,” said City Manager Brynn Myers. “We will be ready with an expanded parking lot to provide a practical and dynamic downtown experience”

On September 23, the City of Temple announced its partnership with real estate developer Waco Turner Behringer Development to transform buildings into apartments, shops and restaurants, offices, as well as a function and event hall.

“The Hawn Hotel and the Arcadia Theater have been mainstays of Temple’s historic downtown for nearly a century, so we are delighted to see these monuments get a second life,” said the Director of Temple City, Brynn Myers. “There have been so many dedicated people who have worked to make this a reality, and we can’t wait to see what the end result will be. “

Turner Behringer plans:

  • 57 one to two bedroom apartments in the Hawn and Sears buildings, totaling approximately 45,000 square feet
  • Approximately 32,000 square feet of commercial retail space, which will include storefronts, new restaurants and offices

“Adaptive reuse refers to the conservation attempt to reuse an existing structure for purposes other than what it was originally built for,” said Shane Turner, partner and broker at Turner Behringer. “We have had great success with our adaptive reuse projects at Waco … and we are excited to be expanding at Temple,” continued Turner.

All projects are expected to be completed by spring 2023.

The real estate developer’s past projects have included the Hippodrome Theater, Madison Apartments and Altura Lofts.

No traffic slowdown is expected at this time. But some road closures are planned as this work progresses. The City will coordinate with local businesses to minimize the impact.

For updates on these and other key downtown construction projects, visit siteletstalktemple.com. Those with additional questions can contact the Temple City Engineering Department at 254-298-5660.

RELATED: Temple’s Downtown Hawn Hotel Revitalization Project, Arcadia Theater Includes New Apartments and Restaurants

RELATED: More Road Closures for Killeen in November

read more
Parking garage

Memphis Residents Oppose St. Jude Parking Lot Project – FOX13 News Memphis

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – Residents of downtown Memphis continue to voice their opposition to a proposed parking garage near the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

ALSAC / St. Jude proposed a seven story parking tower in the Greenlaw / Uptown neighborhood on AW Willis Avenue downtown.

The building is twice the height limit of the established building code, according to a statement from a local group called Parks Not Parking.

The group has been holding meetings since October on residents’ concerns about parking.

On Wednesday, residents will gather outside Town Hall before a vote on the Memphis Shelby County Adjustment Council’s plan.

On Monday, the group held a press conference on their opposition to the proposed garage.

According to their statement, the proposed parking garage would have a negative impact on the community and the plans were developed without any input or feedback from residents.

Members of the Downtown Neighborhood Association have also met with city, county and even St. Jude officials to voice their concerns.

They said the parking would have an impact on safety, traffic and the environment.

The press conference included guest speakers, Tanja Mitchell, Uptown resident; Jerred Price of the Downtown Neighborhood Association; and Valerie Peavy, business manager.

Mitchell said, “I wish we didn’t have to have this conversation, but we do. “

A survey of more than 100 people living in the neighborhood showed that 90% were opposed to the structure.

Mitchell said the proposed parking garage would take away the character of the neighborhood she has lived in since the early 2000s.

“It’s right across from our community garden between two churches,” she said. “Traffic is already a nightmare here.”

Mitchell said she hopes St. Jude will continue to grow, but not at the expense of Uptown.

“We can work together,” she said. “We love the work St. Jude does. We can grow together.

Another resident, Valerie Peavey, said alternative sites could be used for the garage.

“When we talk about this garage, take the time to drop by and see where it is,” she said. “This is Greenlaw’s front door. “


Download the FOX13 Memphis app to receive alerts for the latest news in your neighborhood.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD


Trending stories:

read more
Parking spaces

Property of London: the posh city where parking spaces sell for £ 5million

Central London has become so expensive that parking spaces are selling in the millions.

Estate agents in the upscale neighborhoods of Kensington and Chelsea are full of lists of parking spots costing six figures.

A variety of private parking spaces are listed with the real estate agent John D Wood & Co in some of the most luxurious streets of the capital.

A parking space has been put up for sale at Kingston House South in Knightsbridge for £ 350,000.

READ MORE: Harrods parking space is on sale for £ 250,000 and people are ‘very frustrated’

But in its last sale in March 2016, it grossed an unimaginable amount of £ 5,050,000.

A four bedroom house in the borough is listed for around £ 5million on Zoopla.



Parking spaces across Kensington and Chelsea cost a staggering amount

The three-meter-wide parking space has its own metal gate and is half a mile from South Kensington Station.

A parking space opposite Harrods costs £ 250,000 and has its own private entrance and 24 hour security.

Luxury buyers can even take a 360-degree virtual reality tour of the location to make sure it’s perfect for their supercar.

The high demand for private parking in central London has also led to much more usual parking spaces costing a tempting sum.

A double parking space next to Gloucester Road tube station is available for £ 150,000.

Potential buyers can get a mortgage to help pay for the place, but it will cost £ 572 per month for the next 25 years.

Meanwhile, at Holland Park, a 10-foot-wide parking spot will set you back £ 119,000.

The dramatic prices of parking spaces are reflected in the prices of housing throughout the borough.

A mansion in Chelsea is listed on Rightmove for £ 35million and the average property in Knightsbridge costs £ 2.83million, according to the Foxtons estate agency.

Kensington and Chelsea council said it was in desperate need of housing due to the borough’s huge prices.



Do you want to stay on top of the latest news, views, features and opinions from all over the city?

MyLondon’s brilliant newsletter, The 12, is packed with all the latest news to keep you entertained, informed and uplifted.

You will receive 12 stories straight to your inbox at around 12 noon. It’s the perfect read for lunch.

And what’s more, it’s FREE!

The MyLondon team tells London stories to Londoners. Our journalists cover all the news you need – from city hall to your local streets, so you never miss a moment.

Don’t waste time and sign up for The 12 newsletter here.

City Councilor Johnny Thalassites, responsible for environment, planning and venue, said: ‘We are in desperate need of housing and as a borough with some of the most expensive land and property in the UK – it’s very frustrating to see a six-digit number. price tag on a parking space and discouraging for those looking to climb the property ladder.

“This is a major challenge for us as a city council as we seek to build new homes. Despite the challenge, we are making progress, with the first of our 600 new homes – 300 on social rent – currently under construction on Hewer Street and Kensal Road.

John D Wood & Co Director Matthew Harrop said: “These parking spaces have traditionally attracted shoppers with classic cars and motorcycles and expensive or rare cars which, if left on the street, are in danger of falling. ” be stolen or damaged.

“The spaces have excellent security recognized by the Safer Parking Scheme award; with a 24 hour concierge desk, entry barrier, security video cameras throughout, electric gates and an automated key.

“Closed garages that were built in the 1950s-1970s are now often too narrow for modern cars and as such are popular with homeowners who want storage right on their doorstep – which is. more practical than renting a storage room which could be a 30-. minutes by car.

“We have also seen an increase in the popularity of garage spaces as more of these garages have electric charging points that allow owners to safely charge their cars on the main street at night. “

read more
Parking garage

Police arrest 2 people for starting a fire in Branson parking lot

Branson Police have arrested two suspects in several incidents earlier this month, including a car fire in a parking lot at Branson Landing.

Christian Sneath, 23, from Springfield, and Cordilia Niederhelman, 19, from Taneyville, were arrested on charges of first-degree property damage after police said a fire broke out as Sneath attempted to siphon off l gasoline from a vehicle in the Branson Landing parking lot.

On November 7, Branson police said they were first called to the Cox Branson parking lot after discovering that the gas tank of an SUV had been punctured. Later that night, officers were called to Branson Landing where a vehicle was on fire and someone had broken the stop arm on the way out of the garage on the way out.

Sneath and Niederhelman were arrested after police found them in a vehicle matching the description seen in the fire. Sneath has admitted to attempting to steal gasoline from vehicles in Cox and Branson Landing, court documents show.

Sneath reportedly told officers he was puncturing a vehicle’s gas tank in the Branson Landing parking garage when the drill slipped and caused a spark that set the vehicle on fire. Sneath added that his hand, sleeve and drill had also caught fire, according to court documents.

After leaving the garage and hitting the stop arm with his car, Sneath said he drove to Ball Parks of America and went to the Boston Stadium grounds where he removed the stickers from identification of his car and had thrown them away. Sneath also told police that Niederhelman was with him the entire time, according to court documents.

Court documents indicate that the fire destroyed the vehicle, which was valued between $ 22,000 and $ 24,000, and possibly caused a stress fracture at the Branson Landing parking lot, compromising the structural integrity of the garage.

“A structural engineer is contacted to assess the damage to the structure,” court documents said.

In addition to the stress fracture, Sneath and Niederhelman also reportedly caused $ 1,250 in stop arm damage upon exiting. Sneath also faces another charge of property damage for causing $ 80,000 in damage to the turf at Ball Parks of America, according to court documents.

Neither Sneath nor Niederhelman have a lawyer listed as their representative. They are due in court next week in Taney County for bail hearings.

Following: ‘We still have no answers’: Branson’s mother still looking for her missing son nearly 19 months after his disappearance

Jordan Meier covers public safety for the Springfield News-Leader. Contact her at [email protected], (417) 597-7663 or on Twitter @ Jordan_Meier644.

This article originally appeared on Springfield News-Leader: Branson Police Arrest 2 for starting a fire in Branson parking lot

read more
Parking spaces

Where are the affordable parking spaces near Camperdown Plaza in Greenville?

Juniper, the rooftop space of the AC Hotel Greenville Downtown at Camperdown Plaza.

Question: Where is Greenville affordable public parking for Camperdown Plaza? The Falls Park lots are identified as hotel and Juniper only. Valet parking costs $ 30! The Broad Street pop-up bundle costs $ 10. Didn’t the city help fund this project? Where is their public parking lot?

Reply: Camperdown’s large mixed-use development on Main and Broad streets has public improvement costs of nearly $ 20 million funded by taxpayers, according to a Greenville News article from September 2020.

Following: Camperdown project in downtown Greenville costs taxpayers $ 20 million

Beth Brotherton, a spokesperson for the City of Greenville, said there were several city-owned parking lots within walking distance of Camperdown Plaza.

They are as follows:

Poinsett Garage: 0.1 mile (less than 3 minutes on foot)

Riverplace Garage: 0.2 mile (less than 5 minutes on foot)

River Street Garage: 2 miles

Broad Street Garage: 0.2 miles

Spring Street Garage: 0.3 mile (5 minute walk)

This map shows the public parking lots near Camperdown on South Main Street

This map shows the public parking lots near Camperdown on South Main Street

(Walking distance and map information were extracted using Google Maps, according to Brotherton.)

There is no charge for the first hour in the garages. The cost for the second hour is $ 2. Each additional hour costs $ 1 with a daily maximum of $ 7, according to Brotherton.

Do you have a question you want answered? Email it to me at [email protected] or mail it to Angelia Davis, 32 E. Broad St., Greenville, SC 29601.

This article originally appeared on Greenville News: Ask Angelia: Where To Find Affordable Parking Near Camperdown

read more
Parking spaces

Why Hong Kong is building parking lot-sized apartments

Mainland Chinese leaders, who have increasingly tightened their grip on the city, blamed unaffordable housing for the massive social unrest that erupted in 2019 and called for political solutions.

Completion of these units would take years, while supply continued to shrink. The number of private homes that can be produced from available land has fallen from a peak of 25,500 in 2018 to 13,020 in 2021, according to think tank Our Hong Kong Foundation.

Home values ​​have risen another 5% so far in 2021. City officials have also expressed a desire to stop developers from building the smallest of homes, under 200 square feet.

However, markets can sometimes come up with their own corrections, and it looks like homebuyers are less than happy with the microflats trend. According to data provided by Liber Research, prices for apartments under 260 square feet only increased by 78% between 2010 and 2019, less than half of the overall market increase.

“The popularity of nanoflats has dropped over the past year,” says Joseph Tsang, chairman of Jones Lang LaSalle in Hong Kong.

Some new projects have struggled to sell nanoflats while larger apartments have continued to find strong demand, he says. Some buyers have even sold at a loss compared to what they paid to buy new construction.

“People realize that if they could afford such a high unit cost, they might as well buy a bigger one, or buy in a more remote location with more space,” he says.

Nonetheless, the average cost of a nano-apartment under 200 square feet rose to US$3,276 per square foot in the first nine months of 2021, according to Midland Realty; this makes smaller homes more expensive than a typical sized apartment – ​​nearly US$500 more per square foot.

Some civic groups have filed a petition to ban developers from building ever smaller houses: the same square footage divided into two apartments yields higher profits for developers, while harming society as a whole.

“It’s not that people really want to live in small apartments, it’s just very unfortunate that we don’t have a strong enough societal consensus that decent housing is a right,” Ng says, professor at Chinese university.

“People have, year after year, really shifted to a mindset that only concerns ownership for its exchange value, rather than what we call use value. Housing is for people to use, to raise families, to develop a social network, to build communities and to thrive as a result.

Most micro-apartment dwellers hope their situation is temporary, that by the time they are ready to couple or start a family, they can modernize. Dr Lee, who is currently renting out his home in Kowloon, is saving a day for a down payment on a two-bedroom unit. “I live in such a small unit to save money,” he says. “I want to move as soon as possible.”

read more
Parking spaces

Dining tables above parking spaces: street shops move towards permanence in certain areas of Philly | Local news

The pandemic-inspired Philadelphia experiment with expanded alfresco dining is about to end with streeterias made permanently legal in parts of the city.

The city council’s streets and services committee on Tuesday unanimously approved an amended bill that would allow restaurants to serve diners in outdoor structures built on parking spaces in the city center, the old town, University Town, East Passyunk and other specified areas.

Restaurants outside these limits would need a member of the district council to introduce an ordinance and the entire council to approve the measure, keeping intact a long-standing practice known as the council prerogative. , which gives legislators considerable control over activities in their districts.

The amended bill, introduced by council member Allan Domb, represents a compromise – an earlier version would have extended alfresco dining permanently across town exclusively through a system of approvals managed by the Kenney administration .

“The Committee’s approval is a big step forward in making this remarkable alfresco dining room a permanent fixture in our city,” Domb said in a public statement. “The streets have saved so many restaurants throughout the pandemic, and we expect the permanence will allow businesses to invest in high-quality, safe and accessible structures that will support our city’s future. “

Following a flurry of behind-the-scenes activity, the committee also approved a bill introduced by Council Chairman Darrell Clarke that would allow restaurants to issue temporary sidewalk licenses under the program. of the city to continue to operate them until the end of 2022.

Clarke had argued that Domb’s original legislation did not give communities the ability to influence the impacts of restaurant expansion in their neighborhoods.

“I think it is important for the people who know these communities best – that it is an RCO [Registered Community Organization], whether it is a block captain, whether it is someone who has been elected to represent a specific group of people – to have an integral part and involvement in the locations and placement of those, ”Clarke said Tuesday .

The Kenney administration has said it supports the creation of a permanent outdoor dining program – “with limitations on structures related to public safety and accessibility.”

Both bills will be voted on by the full Council in Thursday’s regular session, potentially setting up a final vote next week.

Two other related bills were owned by Domb and Clarke, who came up with competing visions for al fresco dining in Philadelphia.

Standardize the rules of the game for neighborhood restaurants

Evidence during the three-hour hearing was overwhelmingly in favor of Domb’s legislation, with speaker after speaker urging Council to make permanent the “lifeline” they were offering to restaurants in town as part of the program. emergency.

“We need these invoices to simplify the process and make sure that operators can be in good faith and do it right,” said Qamara Edwards, director of business and events for Sojourn Philly, which operates several restaurants in the city. , including Jet Wine Bar and Rex at the Royal in the city center.

“The vast majority of operators are trying to add beauty to this city and add vibrancy to the city and bring the economy back to the city of Philadelphia.”

Others praised Domb’s legislation because they say it would create a streamlined city-wide process for obtaining a permanent street license – a process which in many many cases, would not require a bill from a member of the district council.

Jabari Jones, president of the West Philadelphia Corridor Collaborative, said the ongoing agenda outlined in the bill going forward would allow city council to tackle more “important” issues, as well as standardize rules of the game for small neighborhood restaurants, which may be less familiar with city processes than some of their counterparts.

Legislation passed last year as a matter of urgency allowed restaurants to apply for temporary licenses for sidewalk cafes and streets. The program has seen the number of outdoor dining licenses increase from 230 to 830, according to city data analyzed by Domb’s office.

Not surprisingly, most of the city’s outdoor dining licenses are clustered in and around the city center. However, licenses have been issued for restaurants across the city, according to the analysis.

Zip code 19147, which encompasses Queen Village and part of Bella Vista in South Philadelphia, had the most sidewalk cafes and streets.

The city has not licensed restaurants in a dozen zip codes, including those covering parts of North Philadelphia, Northeast Philadelphia, West Philadelphia, and Northwest Philadelphia.

“We should be working to remove political barriers that limit the income businesses can generate and limit the number of jobs they can employ,” Jones said. “Most importantly, we should have confidence in our business community that they have the same vested interest as the Council in ensuring that outdoor dining facilities are safe, secure and comfortable.”

Design to be “shock resistant”

Under Domb’s legislation, restaurants could apply for an annual street license from the Department of Licensing and Inspections, which would be responsible for enforcing the regulations of the measure and would have the power to abolish a particular structure if it did not. does not comply with the code or is not used. .

The requests would cost $ 200. The money would go to the first annual fee. (The city did not charge restaurants to have a temporary street permit). Under the bill, the Department of Licensing and the Department and the Streets Department would also assess applicants for administrative and enforcement fees yet to be determined.

To be approved, structures would have to meet certain design and placement requirements. For example, they shouldn’t be wider than six feet; include a physical “anti-shock” barrier to protect diners from traffic; be accessible by ramp; and be located in a parking lane directly adjacent to the restaurant.

Streeteries could only be operated from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday to Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

This article first appeared on WHY.org.

read more
Parking spaces

Lack of security in paid parking places angers SHC – Pakistan

KARACHI: The Sindh High Court on Tuesday expressed its anger at the Karachi Metropolitan Corporation (KMC) for charging money for parking cars and motorcycles in different areas without providing any security and other facilities.

A bench of two judges led by Judge Zafar Ahmed Rajput objected to the failure of the parking lot instructed by the director of the District Municipal Corporation-South to file comments despite the court’s earlier directives.

He ordered her to be present on December 1 and to file paralegal comments on the next hearing without fail.

The bench noted that despite the collection of parking fees, there was no facility or protection for vehicles, which were stolen from these parking spaces.

Bench points out that people’s vehicles are stolen despite paying parking fees

A petition has been filed against provincial, road and local authorities asking for directions to remove illegal and illegal parking spaces and keep traffic flowing on the roads of the provincial metropolis.

The petitioner also sought an injunction against the respondents to charge high and excess charges for the parking of vehicles.

He argued that “double parking” was illegally permitted on various arteries in the city, causing massive traffic jams.

Citing the Chief Secretary of Sindh, Commissioner of Karachi, DIG Traffic Police, KMC, Paid Parking, DMC-Sud and others as defendants, the petitioner added that there were many illegal parking lots being managed. by private parties in collusion with the defendants. without any auction or legal route.

Just last month, another CHS bench, at the hearing of another petition filed against paid parking, ordered DIG Traffic and all DMCs to file comments on November 29 and also help the court whether there was any structure available to regulate paid parking in Karachi.

The bench also asked the authorities under which law parking fees were charged to citizens and who had authorized the parking of vehicles on the roads because in several areas both sides of the lanes were used for parking disrupting traffic.

A citizen filed a petition stating that the Supreme Court clearly prohibited relevant authorities from charging fees under the guise of parking, but respondents still charged such fees in different parts of the city using public spaces in violation of the Supreme Court . order.

Posted in Dawn, le 10 November 2021

read more
Uncategorized

Paid parking comes into effect at Vail parking structures as Vail Mountain opens Friday

The Town of Vail issued the following press release on Tuesday on starting paid parking at both city lots starting Friday with the opening of Vail Mountain for the 2021-22 ski season:

Paid parking at Vail parking structures and outlying lots will coincide with the start of the 2021-2022 Vail Mountain ski and snowboard season, which is scheduled for Friday, November 12. Parking passes can be purchased in person from 8 a.m. to 4 a.m. 45 pm Monday to Friday on the lower level of the Vail Municipal Building, 75 S. Frontage Road. Bring proof of eligibility as restrictions apply.

The city offers parking pass options that offer significant discounts off standard daily rates. Holders of value cards from the previous season will be able to confirm carry-over balances from the previous winter season and top up the value of their cards using the walk-in payment stations in the Vail Village and Lionshead car parks, by contacting the sales office parking pass at 970. -479-2014 or by going to the office in person. The recertification process has been lifted again this season to take into account public health protocols.

To coincide with the opening of Vail Mountain, Vail Transit has added service to West Vail, Lionsridge Loop, Ford Park and city roads to complete the start of the winter season ahead of the implementation of the schedule. full winter on December 13, which will include West Vail Express. West Vail Frontage Road parking service every 20 minutes via the sandstone interchange during morning rush hours. Passengers must adhere to federal requirements to wear face covers to protect the health and safety of drivers and passengers.

For more information on the sale and description of parking cards, call the parking sales office at 970-479-2104 or visit the city’s website at www.vailgov.com/parking. For more information on bus timetables, call 970-479-2178 or www.vailgov.com/transportation-services.

read more
Parking spaces

MBMC will include designated parking spaces in buildings as part of the property tax

In a desperate attempt to increase revenue generation, the cash-strapped Mira Bhayandar Municipal Corporation (MBMC) took the controversial decision to place designated parking spaces in residential and commercial buildings under the umbrella of property tax. An ordinance to this effect was passed last week by Deputy City Commissioner (Property Tax) Ravi Pawar.

In the order, Pawar issued standing instructions to local ward officers and tax officers to assess designated parking spaces assigned to an apartment owner or commercial establishment and include the charges in the property tax application. . The ordinance further states that rates are to be charged based on the nature of the use of residential and commercial parking spaces.

With municipal elections scheduled for next year, the move is expected to spark major controversy. However, civic leader Dilip Dhole maintained that there was a provision in the bylaw to levy taxes on parking spaces.

“Although parking spaces were not in the scope of the tax until now, this will be done from now on. Open spaces which are operated commercially by private landowners will also be taxed”, Dhole said.

Vehemently opposing the move and calling it “unwarranted and illogical”, Deputy Mayor Hasmukh Gehlot said, “Firstly, imposing an additional burden on citizens is totally wrong; secondly, levying such taxes on parking spaces is a political decision that cannot be taken without submitting the proposal to the general assembly.

Citizens said common amenity areas, including parking spaces in residential buildings, are not included in the Floor Area Index (FSI) and should remain exempt from property taxes. However, since malls, theaters and commercial establishments continue to charge exorbitant parking fees, they should be subject to taxation.

The city administration expects additional revenue of around Rs 20 crore from this new levy. Since builders were prohibited from selling parking spaces, those buying apartments paid between Rs 3 lakh and Rs 7 lakh for a single parking space under a memorandum of understanding.

(To receive our daily E-paper on WhatsApp, please Click here. We allow the PDF of the document to be shared on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

Posted: Tuesday 09 November 2021, 17:38 IST

read more
Parking garage

Parking garage problem progresses despite mayor’s call to slow down | Local News

LACONIA – Plans for a multi-million dollar upgrade to the city’s downtown parking lot are advancing. But if this project will prove to be the best long-term solution, spirits were heated at Monday’s city council meeting.

The city council voted unanimously to allow a design office to develop more detailed plans to correct the structural problems that forced the closure of much of the structure and to make the facility more user-friendly. Once completed, downtown businesses, property owners and members of the general public will have the opportunity to comment on the plans and make suggestions starting next month.

But ahead of the vote, Mayor Andrew Hosmer said any work on the 50-year-old parking lot should wait until there has been a thorough study of the parking situation in the city center to determine whether the cost of upgrading Garage level – estimated at $ 6 million – would be a good investment and part of a good long-term solution to parking problems downtown.

The council concluded in previous meetings that due to the resumption of commercial activity in the city center, restoring the parking garage to its full capacity of 250 vehicles has become an urgent priority. At present, only around 110 spaces are usable. The others are closed for security reasons.

Hosmer said what he deemed necessary was a comprehensive study of overall downtown parking needs, including up-to-date traffic studies, hiring of consultants who specialize in parking issues and design. , and obtaining new cost estimates for alternatives to repairing the parking garage, such as building a brand new parking structure in a different location.

He said he believed the council was taking a piecemeal approach to the parking issue and that there had not been enough outreach to downtown business owners to get their opinion on the best solution. to the parking problem.

“I have reservations,” Hosmer said of the board’s preferred direction. “I think we should recruit the right people and guide the city through this process. “

Several advisers quickly pushed back.

“This is just the start of the process,” said Councilor Bob Hamel, chair of the council’s land and buildings committee, who had previously met with engineer Bob Durfee of Dubois and King, and architect Peter Stewart. . Hamel assured Hosmer that the public, including those with a vested interest in the city center, would be consulted on what they think of any changes that may be proposed to the parking lot.

“We started this long enough,” Hamel added, noting that the engineering and architectural studies for the garage modernization had started several years ago, to be suspended in 2016. “We did studies. At the moment, we can fix it.

Councilor Henry Lipman was even more blunt, criticizing Hosmer for “ambushing” the council by calling for a slower approach.

“It is not fair to drop this bomb on us. It’s a low blow, “he said, adding:” Mayor Ed Engler wouldn’t have done that. “

Hosmer bristled at Lipman’s remark and said the adviser was out of order.

The owner of a downtown business, Bree Neal, told council she wants the city to look at parking issues in the city center in general.

“I want to see more vision and creativity so that we can solve the parking problem as a whole and not just the garage,” she said.

read more
Parking garage

Nashville Zoo wants city-funded parking lot

Why the Nashville Zoo wants city-funded parking

the Nashville Zoo; Graphic: Jacques Schrag / Axios

For the past 24 years, visitors have flocked to the Nashville Zoo in Grassmere to pet kangaroos, stand a few feet from an Andean bear, or play in the city’s best jungle gym.

  • The zoo has become one of Nashville’s main tourist attractions and has won industry awards for its creative exhibits and financial management.
  • To help fuel more growth, Nashville Mayor John Cooper offered $ 15 million for a new parking lot, but the idea was strongly rejected by the Metro Council.

Why is this important: Zoo president and CEO Rick Schwartz told Axios that the new parking lot is the keystone of its ambitious $ 185 million expansion that will include a one-of-a-kind African river safari in which visitors will board a ‘a boat to float among the animals.

  • Continued growth is impossible without the new 1,044-space parking structure, says Schwartz. And the zoo’s plans for a fundraising campaign to help finance its expansion depend on the garage being built.

The context: While Nashville struggles with its tourist reputation, the South Nashville Family Zoo offers a completely independent option of light beer and George Strait blankets.

  • Between 2009 and 2019, zoo attendance more than doubled from 615,086 to over 1.2 million visitors, more than the combined attendance at the Predators and Titans home games in 2019. Attendance fell to 544,000 last year in the midst of the pandemic.
  • Schwartz tells Axios they expect 2 million visitors a year by 2027.
  • The zoo has not received funding from Metro since Mayor Karl Dean committed a total of $ 26 million to infrastructure projects during his eight-year tenure, which ended in 2015.

What he says : On the zoo’s busiest days, vehicles overwhelm its current parking lots. It’s not uncommon for traffic jams to pile up in Nolensville Pike.

  • “Without this parking lot, we can’t just fail to grow, we can’t sustain what we’re doing now,” said Schwartz.

The other side: Some Metro Council members, led by Freddie O’Connell, questioned the large capital investment for the zoo’s parking lot.

  • O’Connell tells Axios he’s “very pro-zoo.” But he says he is “appalled” that Metro is not spending more on bike paths, sidewalks and bus lines.
  • He tabled an amendment to redirect the funds Cooper allocated to the zoo parking lot to be spent on those modes of transportation instead.
  • A potential compromise would add $ 15 million to the capital spending plan for these priorities while retaining funding for zoo parking.

??

Support local journalism by becoming a member.

Learn more

Following Nashville stories

No story could be found

Get a free daily recap of the most important news in your backyard with Axios Nashville.

??

Support local journalism by becoming a member.

Learn more

read more
Parking garage

Police arrest 2 people for starting a fire in Branson Landing parking lot while stealing gasoline

BRANSON, Mo. (KY3) – Police arrested two people on Sunday on charges of starting a fire inside a car in the Branson Landing parking garage. Police said the two were removing gas from the car when the fire broke out.

Police believe they did so by drilling a hole in the gas tank. A 23-year-old man and a 19-year-old woman, both from Springfield, were located and arrested. The two were then also linked to significant damage to one of Ball Parks of America’s ball fields, located at 1000 Pat Nash Dr, which occurred after the parking lot fire.

“We also had an earlier incident where attempts were made to steal gasoline from another parking lot in town, so we don’t know if this is related or not,” the fire chief said. Branson, Ted Martin.

The fire caused problems for the firefighters. The location of the fire made it difficult for firefighters to access the scene. The teams used fire hydrants in the parking garage to put out the fire. Branson Fire Chief Ted Martin said visitors nearby had reported a car explosion. He says the explosions were the exploding car tires.

“The vehicle was fully involved and obviously was affecting the engine compartment, the tires, a bit of noise with that when the tires burst, there was also a thick black smoke coming out of the structure,” said Martin.

It took only a few minutes for the firefighters to extinguish the blaze. It took a lot longer to get the car out of the parking lot.

“Because it’s a low-profile garage platform, we couldn’t just put it on a tow truck and get the vehicle out,” Chief Martin said. “They were able to put the car on the bed of the tow truck itself, then the fire department cut off the top of the car to make it shallower and exit the structure safely.”

Jim Viebrock, a Branson resident, said he was watching television when he thought he heard gunshots nearby.

“We looked out the window and could see the flames coming out of the third floor of the parking lot,” Viebrock said.

Viebrock says he initially thought the flames were coming from a restaurant, but after taking a closer look he realized it was the parking lot.

The car belonged to a Branson Landing employee.

No one was hurt.

To report a correction or typo, please send an email [email protected]

Copyright 2021 KY3. All rights reserved.

read more
Parking garage

Porcupine rescued after being found in Winchester parking lot | Everyday

WINCHESTER — According to the ‘You don’t hear this every day’ file, city officials this week rescued a wild porcupine from the Loudoun Street car park in Winchester’s Old Town.

Yes, you read that right. A porcupine. In a parking garage. In downtown Winchester.

It happened on Tuesday. Winchester Facilities Maintenance and Parking Division Manager Corey MacKnight said one of his maintenance technicians, Chris Moses, was cleaning the stairwells at the Loudoun Street car park when he saw a porcupine about as big as a medium-sized dog.

“He called the police,” MacKnight said. “The police came and managed to trap him humanely.”

Porcupines are large rodents covered in spiny quills that protect them from predators. The quills have barbed points at the ends that expand when stuck into a victim’s hot skin. Getting stung with one can be extremely painful and usually requires a trip to the hospital. So how did someone catch the porcupine and live to tell about it?

Winchester police officer Felicia Marshall, who said she had never seen a porcupine outside a zoo, used a catch pole – a long stick with a looped rope at its end – to glue the creature and place it in a cage.

“I was chasing him [through the garage] for a good 10 to 15 minutes before I could put the pole around his neck,” Marshall said. “I sweated.”

Fortunately, Marshall and the porcupine emerged from the encounter unscathed.

The porcupine was taken to the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center near Boyce, where he was sedated so staff could safely check on his physical well-being. Veterinarian Jen Riley said the little guy – a young adult man who could possibly double his current weight of 10 pounds – was showing symptoms of a lung infection and was missing a patch of quills on his back.

“He may have been attacked by a dog or some predator and went to defend himself with those quills,” Riley said. “But he still has a good number of quills and he’s relatively healthy.”

Patient 3156, as the porcupine is called — Blue Ridge Wildlife Center does not name the wildlife it treats — also had several ticks removed from his face.

Riley said the porcupine was being treated for his lung infection and was doing well. He had a diminished appetite during his first days at the center but started eating normally again on Friday morning.

“It improved his prognosis a bit,” Riley said. “We were sort of 50-50 on him early on.”

Fingers crossed the porcupine could be healthy enough to be returned to a safe wooded area in or near Winchester as soon as this weekend, she said.

While it might seem odd that a porcupine was found in a parking lot in downtown Winchester, Riley said it wasn’t as unusual as you might think.

“Like any wild animal, unfortunately, their habitat is constantly fragmented,” she said. “These guys probably live in the more wooded areas on the western end of Frederick County. … Maybe he was just looking for a sheltered area after being attacked by something.”

Riley said porcupines thrived in the North Shenandoah Valley during the Pleistocene, a geological epoch that lasted about 2,580,000 to 11,700 years ago, but were thought to be extinct or locally extinct in mid 1800s.

Recently, however, there have been sporadic sightings of porcupines in western Virginia, including the Winchester area. Riley said they appear to be expanding into the area from southern Maryland and eastern West Virginia.

“Over the past 15 or 20 years, there have been a little over two dozen confirmed sightings … in the northwest corner of Frederick County,” she said.

If you spot a porcupine or other wildlife that appears to be in distress, Riley recommends keeping your distance and contacting the Blue Ridge Wildlife Center so they can advise you on how best to handle the situation. The center’s emergency phone number is 540-837-9000.

The Blue Ridge Wildlife Center is a non-profit facility dedicated to treating sick and injured wildlife and returning animals to their natural environment. For more information, visit blueridgewildlifectr.org.

read more
Parking garage

Community college opens parking garage for homeless students

Leaders at Long Beach City College are allowing up to 15 homeless students to stay overnight in their cars in a campus parking structure, the Los Angeles Times reported. The effort is part of a pilot program announced Monday.

As part of the program, students enrolled in a roaming situation can stay in the parking garage between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., where they will have access to Wi-Fi and campus washrooms. Students can also use the campus showers between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. Students must be independent and cannot have spouses, partners or children staying in vehicles with them, according to the advertisement.

A security company has been hired to monitor the premises for the duration of the pilot program, which began on October 25 and is scheduled to end on June 30, 2022. The college will also provide case management services to help students find a stable housing.

“The sad truth is that the LBCC has nearly 70 students sleeping in their cars every night – probably more,” said Mike Muñoz, the district’s acting superintendent-president in a press release. “If we can help keep our students safe so they can better focus on their student responsibilities, this program is absolutely worth pursuing. “

Uduak-Joe Ntuk, chairman of the district administration board, said the goal of the program is to “serve as a pathway to stable housing” for students.

“Otherwise, these students would have to worry every night about their vehicles being broken into, try not to be seen or disturbed, and not be called by the police, while attending their classes,” he said in the report. communicated. “It could be an exhausting situation that makes it harder to progress. “

read more
Parking garage

Parking garage plans to deepen | Local News

LACONIA – Spacious and convenient parking is seen as an essential ingredient in the continued resurgence of the city’s downtown core, giving a sense of urgency to a meeting on Monday to discuss the future of downtown parking.

The city council’s lands and buildings committee is to meet with a design engineer and an architect to discuss options for reconstruction and modernization of the underused and deteriorating structure.

The cost to correct structural flaws in the garage, add modern convenience, and improve its appearance has been valued at $ 6 million, according to a preliminary estimate.

City Manager Scott Myers said a big question is whether the consultants think it’s best to go ahead with the plans that were discussed when talks to upgrade the facility were suspended there five or six years ago, or to consider “new ideas”.

The garage was built to accommodate 250 cars, but can now handle less than half of it. The entire upper level of the three-level structure and parts of the second level are now closed due to deterioration of some of the structural supports.

City Councilor Mark Haynes, who sits on the committee, said he was particularly interested in hearing changes that would encourage more people to use the facility.

Myers said a glass staircase and better lighting were among the ideas suggested to make the garage more user-friendly.

Haynes, stressing that he only spoke as an individual member of the committee, said he wanted to hear not only about the project itself, but also how to plan the ongoing maintenance of the rebuilt garage to ensure its use. keep on going.

“I think we need to have a maintenance program and possibly regular policing for people to use it,” he said.

Haynes said he hopes the project will move forward quickly enough that the city can take advantage of the current low interest rates on municipal bonds.

Myers said if the engineering design work is completed by next June, funding for the project could be included in next year’s city budget, with the city guaranteeing bonds soon after.

The committee meeting with architect Peter Stewart and engineer Bob Durfee is scheduled to begin at 6:15 p.m. in the Council Chamber at City Hall. The entire board must receive a report from the committee at the board meeting which will begin at 7 p.m.

read more
Parking garage

College lets homeless students sleep in their cars in a parking lot

(KTLA) – California’s Long Beach City College will allow homeless students to sleep in their vehicles in a secure parking lot on campus overnight, school officials said on Monday.

The “Safe Parking Program” pilot is the only known program of its kind in the region at a community college, LBCC officials said in a press release. It is intended to help homeless students at the college, which has at least 70 students sleeping in their cars every night, according to Dr Mike Muñoz, district manager of LBCC.

Registered students who are homeless will be able to stay in the Pacific Coast Campus parking lot between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. seven nights a week.

They will have access to restrooms and Wi-Fi throughout the night and can use the showers at the Pacific Coast campus in the morning.

Participating students would also benefit from help from college staff to find longer-term stable accommodation, according to the LBCC.

“Our goal for this program is for it to serve as a path to stable housing for our students,” LBCC Board Chairman Uduak-Joe Ntuk said in a statement. “Otherwise, these students would have to worry about their vehicles being broken into every night, try not to be seen or disturbed, and not be called by the police, while attending their classes. It could be an exhausting situation that makes it harder to progress. “

Students will not be able to have partners or children sleeping in the vehicle with them.

The college hired a security company to provide surveillance for the duration of the pilot program, until June 30, 2022.

“If we can help keep our students safe so that they can better focus on their student responsibilities, this program is absolutely worth pursuing,” Muñoz said in a statement.

A study from the University of California at Los Angeles, published late last year, found that 1 in 5 students at California Community College, 1 in 10 students at California State University, and 1 in 20 students at California ‘University of California were homeless.

And including students in Kindergarten to Grade 12, the number of homeless students in the state has increased by nearly 50% over the past decade, according to the study.

A 2020 report from the Department of Housing and Urban Development found that based on overnight estimates of sheltered and unprotected homeless populations, 1 in 10 people were homeless and staying in protected places, while almost 4 in 10 were in unprotected places, such as on the street.

Researchers said the numbers are likely higher in reality due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

read more
Parking spaces

15 parking spaces at Long Beach City College to reserve for homeless students

Long Beach City College has launched a pilot program to designate safe overnight parking for students living in their cars, an initiative designed to give the most vulnerable people some semblance of emergency help.

From 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m., up to 15 students will be able to park in a campus car park under the supervision of security guards and have access to Wi-Fi, electricity and toilets, and from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m., have access to campus showers. Two students – who refused to speak – signed up. Nine others applied.

The effort is the first step in providing immediate help to community college students who live in cars. About 68 students have been identified to date. According to Safe Parking LA, an organization that will serve as a consultant for the college’s program, more than 15,700 people in Los Angeles County live in their vehicles every night.

The program also reflects the deep need of many students in Long Beach City and beyond seeking higher education amidst many hardships.

“It’s not just meant to be a long-term solution for students,” said Long Beach Community College Acting District Superintendent Mike Munoz. “All students who participate in the Safe Parking program can receive case management services through our Basic Needs Office. We are looking for ways to get them out of homelessness.

The LBCC said at least 199 students have identified themselves, through a request for emergency student aid funds, as chronically homeless, meaning they have been homeless for more than a year. year.

About 1,000 of the 20,000 students who responded to a pre-enrollment survey have not had stable or permanent accommodation at some point in the past five months. About 3,000 said they had difficulty paying their bills, including rent, in the past six months.

The program was strongly inspired by a California Assembly Bill, who died in the state Senate last year, which had offered a statewide overnight parking program for homeless students across California Community Colleges’ 116 campus system. The bill failed in large part because of liability issues and funding issues.

Munoz, however, supported the intentions of the bill and felt that some form of temporary emergency assistance – even a safe parking space – was needed.

“I think it will take courageous schools,” he said, noting that additional concerns about the unsuccessful bill among community college leaders centered on security issues.

Munoz described the parking program as part of a multi-pronged approach to help students tackle homelessness now and in the future.

“We need to have a strategy for the students who are in this housing crisis,” he said. “Safe parking is that short-term answer for students with precarious housing who need help now. “

A middle ground solution would expand partnerships with nonprofits Jovenes and Economic Roundtable, which help homeless students find housing. The long-term solution would be to build affordable housing in two or three years.

LBCC officials ask students looking for a place to complete an emergency aid application and be enrolled in at least nine units of the college. Students must also have up-to-date car registration and insurance, a requirement that may be a barrier for some, Munoz said.

Patricia Lopez, 34, is one of the LBCC students who have experienced homelessness. After fleeing domestic violence in December, she and her 12-year-old daughter spent months living in their car or a friend’s campervan without electricity and surfing on the couch at various friends’ homes – all the while continuing to work and take courses like her. girl did distance learning.

“It was a testing time in my life,” Lopez said. “I couldn’t afford to take a shower, I didn’t have groceries, I couldn’t cook,” she said, adding that all of her and her daughter’s belongings were still in their car.

She struggled to do better for her daughter, but felt inadequate and unmotivated.

When she found herself depressed last semester, she told a teacher that she was struggling. The teacher introduced her to the LBCC’s basic needs staff, who helped her with groceries and hygiene products and put her in touch with Jovenes. With the help of the organization, Lopez and her daughter were able to move into an apartment at the end of July.

“It was a breath of fresh air.”

She believes that an overnight parking program like LBCC’s could provide some stability for students who have found themselves in situations like hers.

The LBCC’s program will be evaluated at the end of June, Munoz said. Munoz is hoping that the data collected on the program, which took place as a result of the board’s discussions around the Assembly bill, could inspire other colleges to launch similar initiatives.

Data on student homelessness was not regularly tracked before the COVID-19 pandemic, Munoz said, but Latino and black students were disproportionately affected.

A last year’s report from the Center for School Transformation at UCLA found that homelessness for K-12 students and those at the University of California, California State University, and the community college system increased by 50% over the past year decade, the pandemic being seen as a key factor. The study found that one in five community college students were homeless.

In LA County, 74% of homeless students were Latino and 12% were black.

For students like Lopez, housing security has made a huge difference to her and her daughter.

“We used to live in a motorhome with no electricity, no water, no toilet – my baby was dirty. I don’t ever want to do this to him again. She is too precious for this world, ”she said through tears.

Lopez never considered dropping out of school. In previous years, she had struggled with health issues and a drug problem. When she finally enrolled in college in 2019 with financial assistance from CalWorks, she maintained a GPA of 3.6.

“I believe education should come first because knowledge is power – no one wants to hire you without [an associate of arts degree]. Having an education is really important to me, more than having a job, ”she said. “Because if I work at McDonald’s for the rest of my life, where do I go?” “

Lopez will graduate at the end of the next semester and plans to become a drug and alcohol counselor. She plans to earn her Bachelor of Arts in Social Work.

read more
Parking garage

Rethinking the idea of ​​the CVS parking garage

This is the idea of ​​multi-level parking in the CVS parking lot in Amherst.

There are already occasional traffic jams up to the roundabout where East Pleasant and Triangle streets meet. Can you imagine what will happen if hundreds of parking spots are created with one-lane access only available from North Pleasant, which crosses a pedestrian sidewalk? The exit from this lot is also single-lane and onto a narrow one-way residential street. Traffic and environmental impact studies should be shown to the public before such senseless projects are undertaken.

Part of the rationale for this project is that two more projects will bring hordes here for tourism. Who in our highly educated community thinks that thousands of people will travel to Amherst from Boston and New York to visit a library or an outdoor music group? Will these structures eclipse those of large cities? What joke.

I just read that an architectural firm is designing a concert hall called The Drake. This could attract hundreds of people, but especially in the evening when the existing grounds are less frequented.

I’m all for expanding the library, as it’s primarily for the residents of Amherst. The CVS garage project would be a can of shoehorn sardines which, if completed, is likely to result in huge traffic jams and an angry backlash from city taxpayers.

Steven B. Kurtz

Amherst

read more
Parking spaces

Here’s why you should back up in perpendicular parking spaces

It happened once on Facebook. The question was rhetorical, I think. It was something like “People going back to parking lots: Why? I don’t think this friend expected genuine answers, but genuine answers did exist. Ultimately, I’m not sure if this person has adopted the backing method before, but they clearly understood and sympathized with those of us who do it most often. There are good reasons why support is a best practice.

The implication is that you have to wait for the person to do such a maneuver. Guess if you’re in a rush to park it could be frustrating, especially if the driver hasn’t made enough of their intentions.

I haven’t looked at any studies on this phenomenon, and I’m not sure they exist. But, for the record, here is my experience, as well as the reasons why I believe that in the vast majority of situations it is both for the individual and for the greater good to back up in a perpendicular parking space. .

Parking can be about as quick when backing up. Having wheels that swivel backwards facilitates the sharp angle in reverse, reducing or eliminating the need to back up and straighten up.

Leaving the parking space is much faster because you are registering another multi-part turn. More than likely, you’re saving more time on your exit than you sacrificed to come back. It also saves everyone around you time. This is especially true for event parking when everyone is leaving at the same time.

It’s safer for you and yours. Getting out of a perpendicular parking spot in a narrow parking structure meant I was putting my child (or anyone in the back seat) in danger before I could even assess the situation. The proliferation of backup cameras has helped. Rear cross-traffic alerts and automatic rear braking help even more, but we shouldn’t put ourselves in positions where we totally rely on this technology or, worse yet, others to see you or anticipate your recoil.

It is also safer for everyone around you. You can actually see this person pass in the way of their own car, and you can see this vehicle waiting for someone else to back up.

It can save from bumps or scrapes. No matter what car I drive, it’s more likely to have a rear view camera than to have one up front. With this camera, I can make sure that I won’t scratch a divider on a sidewalk or hit a sign or other car with my bumper. If I pull forward I often allow myself enough distance to know that my front is not going to be mauled by its surroundings, which can leave my rear sticking out where it is most likely to be hit. By backing up and using the camera, I can close that gap as much as I want, stowing my car in its parking space as deep as possible. But hey, you don’t have to take my word for it.

What if someone encroaches too close that you can’t back up? Well what do you do when you parallel park on a street? You had your turn signal on (please tell me you had your turn signal on) to indicate where you planned to park. They should have been careful, and it’s up to them to find out. They can decide whether they should back up to give you the room (assuming they can) or bypass you.

Of course, there are times when it doesn’t make sense to back down. Maybe you need some extra space to load the rear cargo space. With some electric vehicles, like the Nissan Leaf, it sometimes makes more sense to park your nose forward for easier access to the charger. And obviously, if a sign or guard asks you to park face to face, you should listen, even if it’s a stupid rule … James.

So get started. Just as I will leave room for you to merge at an actual melting point, I will happily wait for you to come back to your parking space so that I don’t have to wait for you to blindly remove it later. This is the way.

UPDATE: I contacted Dr William Van Tassel, AAA Manager of Driver Training Programs, on this issue. He told me that the organization recommends the forward reverse / retreat method of perpendicular parking. He even sent me a link with scientific research this suggests that it is indeed the safest way to park, being associated with fewer accidents than parking forward and out of the parking space. In fact, in North Carolina, where the study was conducted, 90 percent of fatal and serious parking injuries occurred while backing up. Stay safe there.

Related video:

read more
Parking garage

Concerns Raised But Wheeling City Council Approves Funding for Downtown Parking Garage | News, Sports, Jobs

This artist’s concept drawing by the Mills Group shows the planned design of the new Wheeling Town parking lot to be built at the corner of 11th and Market streets in the downtown area. (Image provided)

WHEELING – Despite cost concerns raised by the public and some council members themselves, Wheeling City Council voted unanimously on Tuesday in favor of an ordinance on a $ 19.5million bond. dollars to finance new downtown parking.

The proposed six-story parking structure is expected to be built at the corner of Market and 11th Street to provide necessary parking for tenants at Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts, a nearby landmark being renovated into apartment buildings by a private promoter.

In a public hearing on the matter at the Wheeling city council meeting on Tuesday, only one resident stepped forward to speak. Julia Chaplin – who had spoken out against plans for the new parking lot at the previous two council meetings in October – again questioned the need for the structure and criticized the recent spending habits of city leaders.

“You continue to convey what I consider to be your wants and needs, not those of your constituents,” Chaplin said. “Have you ever done surveys of our current garages, looked at parking garage statistics, or taken into account the debt load of your constituents and their families for spending $ 19.5 million on garages in parking? “

Chaplin claimed city officials were ignoring signs surrounding a tough economic climate created by the Biden administration.

“If it was your own money, I seriously doubt you would be so speculative,” Chapline said. “Yes, you were elected by the voters, but if they knew you would be so cowardly with their money, I doubt you would be in office today. “

Initial plans for the new parking structure started at around $ 13 million, Chaplin said, noting that the most recent estimates provided by the city have multiplied by the millions.

“The final cost has not yet reached $ 19.5 million,” she said. “In government, the cost is always higher than the estimate. With the current backlog of supplies, inflation, climate initiatives, tax increases, and environmental rules and regulations, it’s nowhere near just $ 19.5 million.

Victor Greco, architect of the parking garage project, confirmed that the estimated cost of the project has increased from the initial projections. Town leaders asked him to come forward and explain why this happened. Greco agreed that the current supply chain crisis has made the cost of building materials sky-high. He also noted that geological issues were also contributing to escalating cost estimates.

“Wheeling’s geological makeup is a series of caverns and rocks and deep conditions of geological content that require the building to be built on a deep foundation,” Greco said, noting that the same problem was encountered during construction. of the health plan building in the city center. “This has a significant impact on the cost of the project.”

Chaplin asked why the developer of Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts – Access Infrastructure, which is reportedly investing $ 30 million – failed to include parking fees in its plan to redevelop the city’s tallest building.

“I want Wheeling to thrive, but this garage is an expensive dream,” Chaplin said. “I don’t think our citizens are prepared to absorb this financial debt, as well as the expenses of renovating and expanding the city police, fire department and county buildings.”

City Councilor Jerry Sklavounakis noted that he had also raised concerns about the parking garage proposal to other council members and the city administration, including concerns about the cost.

“It’s not something I think we take lightly here in the town of Wheeling,” Sklavounakis said. “But, I think there’s one thing we can all agree on. I think everyone in the community agrees that the Wheeling-Pitt building is something that needs to be brought back to life. The building has been empty for 10 years now. This is the only solution we have at the moment. “

Sklavounakis said the city can make that investment, work with the private developer now and help spur downtown economic growth – or just do nothing and potentially watch the Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel building sit vacant for another decade. or more.

“This is a project that people have strong opinions on,” said Mayor Glenn Elliott, describing the Wheeling-Pitt Building as basically the only skyscraper in town and a structure that has been “donated” by previous generations to serve as an important anchor in the city center. “I think if we lost it, I don’t think we would ever see another 12-story building built here – at least not one that looked like this.”

Officials noted that many private investors can attest to the need for housing, and with housing comes the need for parking. The mayor said moving forward with these projects will not only help save the Wheeling-Pitt building, but will activate the need for more retail locations in the downtown core.

“At the moment, there is only one retail outlet in this entire block,” said Elliott, noting that bringing more activity to the downtown core of the city is a good thing and a worthwhile investment.

“I am also concerned about the costs,” added City Councilor Ben Seidler. “We’re talking an astronomical amount of money at this point.”

Seidler asked City Manager Robert Herron to reiterate that there will be protections in place to ensure all funding for access infrastructure is strong and that their commitment to complete their redevelopment project continues to d ‘move forward before the city starts to build this new garage.

“Last night we released the requests for funding proposals for this project,” Herron noted, explaining that the city’s lender will require documents from the developer of Wheeling-Pitt, including documents related to their funding, credits. historical federal and state taxes being used and other certifications required from the bank for their due diligence.

Now that the bail order has been approved, the parking garage project will move on to its next steps, including demolishing the vacant Chase Bank building on the site, securing financing through ” a local lender and the awarding of bids to a contractor for the construction of the new structure.

“We are expecting offers on November 18,” said Greco. “We had five eligible contractors who attended the mandatory pre-tender meeting last week. We have generated a lot of interest, which is a good thing.

“I hope that in the end we will have a nice building and, along the way, good construction work with it. “

The latest news today and more in your inbox

read more
Parking garage

Norfolk International Airport opens huge parking lot for travelers, guests and employees

NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – There is new parking at Norfolk International Airport for travelers, employees and guests.

The newly constructed garage D contains 3,208 daily (long-term) parking spaces. The garage took about 2 years to build at a cost of $ 68 million.

Garage D is a 1,113,000 square foot poured-in-place concrete parking structure on nine levels with double-thread helical entry and exit ramps. Construction crews used a total of 42,000 cubic yards of concrete and 2,600 tonnes of rebar to build the garage which is lit by 700 energy-saving LED lights.

The airport has relocated the daily east parking lot as well as the employee parking lot formerly located on Robin Hood Road, eliminating costly shuttle bus trips.

The number of parking spaces per floor is available in garages A and D. With the addition of garage D, four garages are now connected to the ORF arrivals terminal, connecting vehicles and airline doors.

Download the WAVY News app to stay up to date with the latest news, weather and sports from WAVY-TV 10. Available at Apple and Google Play stores.

read more
Parking garage

Construction of the 2nd Dublin BART parking garage could begin soon

DUBLIN, CA – Construction of a second parking lot at Dublin-Pleasanton BART station could finally begin early next year – three years after a groundbreaking ceremony in 2018.

Located on property owned by Alameda County, right next to the existing BART garage, the five-story structure was due to be completed last year. The coronavirus pandemic has intervened, delaying the tendering process to select a contractor.

This process resumed last month and proposals from pre-qualified contractors are now expected on November 15 with a contract award expected by the end of the month.

When completed, the new garage will add some 570 parking spaces to complete the 1,484 spaces already available in the existing BART-owned garage on the north side of the station.

Currently, there are approximately 2,969 parking spaces available at Dublin-Pleasanton station, not counting disabled or motorbike stands. The nearby West Dublin-Pleasanton station has approximately 1,048 parking spaces in two garages.

Funding for the estimated $ 34 million project is being provided by several Bay Area transportation agencies, although the final price will not be known until bids open due to escalating construction costs during the pandemic.

As a sponsor of the project, the Livermore-Amador Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) will provide the bulk of the funding with a $ 20 million grant from the California Transportation Commission provided under the California Managed Intercity Transit and Rail Program. by Caltrans. This grant includes $ 10.9 million in public transportation funds from vehicle registration fees and fuel taxes and $ 9.1 million from the state’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund.

The remaining $ 14 million is provided by the Metropolitan and Alameda freight commissions, each committing $ 7 million.

Headquartered in Livermore, LAVTA operates Tri-Valley Wheels transit services in Dublin, Pleasanton, Livermore and the unincorporated areas of Alameda County. LAVTA buses connect BART, Contra Costa County connecting roads, and Altamont Commuter Express trains.

While state funding required the award of a construction contract by April 9, the Transportation Commission approved in March a one-year extension for the selection of a contractor.

The new garage was seen as a welcome solution to the chronic overflow problem of the existing BART facility, where parking spaces were almost impossible to find after 7:30 am.

However, with BART now struggling to regain ridership after the coronavirus lockdown in March 2020 virtually emptied its trains when commuters lost their jobs or were forced to work remotely, the regional transit agency will be happy to see the 36 garages it operates overflow again because parking fees have been a substantial source of revenue.

In fiscal 2019, BART’s system-wide gross parking revenue totaled $ 37.5 million, of which $ 2.4 million was raised in Dublin-Pleasanton. With operations reduced for a third of fiscal 2020, system-wide revenue fell nearly 25% to $ 28.2 million and fell to $ 7.2 million during the year. fiscal year 2021, which ended on July 31.

In Dublin-Pleasanton, parking revenues fell to $ 1.86 million in 2020 and to $ 818,000 in 2021. Perceptions of parking infractions at the station, totaling $ 249,000 in 2020, fell to just a bit. less than $ 30,000 in fiscal year 2021.

A second project slated to kick off next year is the six-story Westin Hotel by Marriott slated for construction on a property just east of BART’s garage on a property purchased by Pleasanton developer Charles Patel in 2018 for about $ 11 million.

Patel told Patch last week that he expects construction to begin next summer.

read more
Parking garage

Construction of the 2nd BART parking garage could begin soon

TRI-VALLEY, CA – Construction of a second parking lot at BART Dublin-Pleasanton station could finally begin early next year – three years after a groundbreaking ceremony in 2018.

Located on property owned by Alameda County, right next to the existing BART garage, the five-story structure was due to be completed last year. The coronavirus pandemic has intervened, delaying the tendering process to select a contractor.

This process resumed last month and proposals from prequalified contractors are now expected on November 15 and contract award is expected by the end of the month.

When completed, the new garage will add some 570 parking spaces to complete the 1,484 spaces already available in the existing BART-owned garage on the north side of the station.

Currently, there are approximately 2,969 parking spaces available at Dublin-Pleasanton station, not counting disabled or motorbike stands. The nearby West Dublin-Pleasanton station has approximately 1,048 parking spaces in two garages.

Funding for the estimated $ 34 million project is being provided by several Bay Area transportation agencies, although the final price will not be known until bids open due to escalating construction costs during the pandemic.

As a sponsor of the project, the Livermore-Amador Valley Transit Authority (LAVTA) will provide the bulk of the funding with a $ 20 million grant from the California Transportation Commission provided under the California Managed Intercity Transit and Rail Program. by Caltrans. This grant includes $ 10.9 million in public transportation funds from vehicle registration fees and fuel taxes and $ 9.1 million from the state’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund.

The remaining $ 14 million is provided by the Metropolitan and Alameda freight commissions, each committing $ 7 million.

Headquartered in Livermore, LAVTA operates Tri-Valley Wheels transit services in Dublin, Pleasanton, Livermore and the unincorporated areas of Alameda County. LAVTA buses connect BART, Contra Costa County connecting roads, and Altamont Commuter Express trains.

While state funding required the award of a construction contract by April 9, the Transportation Commission approved in March a one-year extension for the selection of a contractor.

The new garage was seen as a welcome solution to the chronic overflow problem of the existing BART facility, where parking spaces were almost impossible to find after 7:30 am.

However, as BART now struggles to regain ridership after the coronavirus lockdown in March 2020 virtually emptied its trains when commuters lost their jobs or were forced to work remotely, the regional transport agency in common will be happy to see the 36 garages it operates overflow again as parking fees have been a substantial source of income.

In fiscal 2019, BART’s system-wide gross parking revenue totaled $ 37.5 million, of which $ 2.4 million was collected at Dublin-Pleasanton. With operations reduced for a third of fiscal 2020, system-wide revenue fell nearly 25% to $ 28.2 million and fell to $ 7.2 million during the year. fiscal year 2021, which ended on July 31.

In Dublin-Pleasanton, parking revenues fell to $ 1.86 million in 2020 and to $ 818,000 in 2021. Perceptions of parking infractions at the station, totaling $ 249,000 in 2020, fell to just a bit. less than $ 30,000 in fiscal year 2021.

A second project slated to kick off next year is the six-story Westin Hotel by Marriott slated for construction on a property just east of BART’s garage on a property purchased by Pleasanton developer Charles Patel in 2018 for about $ 11 million.

Patel told Patch last week that he expects construction to begin next summer.

read more
Parking spaces

Los Feliz estate with 13 parking spaces sells for $4.7 million | Filming of Echo Park | Daily Digest Morning Edition

Welcome to the Daily Digest, featuring the latest content from TheEastsiderLA.com.


On the first day of November, we recover from a post-Halloween candy coma and prepare for Día de Los Muertos. But we found time to deliver your batch of Monday news. Continue reading!

Jesus Sanchez, editor

• Do you have a story idea or a photo to share? Submit it here

• Support Community News: Contribute to The Eastsider today






EAST STAGE








Aztec dancer dia del los muertos 600




An Aztec dance ceremony kicked off Self Help Graphics’ 48th annual Dia de Los Muertos celebration in Boyle Heights on Saturday. Thanks to Todd Frankel for the photo.

Go here to share your neighborhood photos or send them to [email protected] You can also tag your Instagram photos to #theeastsiderla.







Dot Dot Dot

NEWS


Filming of Echo Park

Gang officers responded to a Friday night shooting that left a man injured in the Block 1300 of Mohawk Street. There have been two other shootings on Mohawk Street this summer. the east side







Dot Dot Dot

REAL ESTATE


Need parking for 13 cars?

The Eastside’s most expensive home sale last week was $4.7 million for a Los Feliz estate sitting on three quarters of an acre bordering Griffith Park.

The sprawling Vermont Avenue resort features four bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms, plus a guesthouse, pool, spa, and waterfall. In addition to a three-car garage, the property has an automobile lot that can accommodate 13 cars.

In other real estate news: Hollywood Presbyterian in East Hollywood wants to complement its five-story parking structure with three floors of medical offices; a 109 year old house in Highland Park has been named a historic monument; an update on the transformation of Taylor Shipyard in 100 acres of parkland.

Details in The Eastsider


Did someone forward you our newsletter?

Head here to sign up for your free Daily Digest subscription







Dot Dot Dot

Sponsored by Tracy Do








cadman 600

All signs point to the best deal at Prime Los Feliz

Every part of Los Feliz is stunning, and it’s no secret that homes ‘north of the boulevard’ are particularly sought after.

For many, this exclusive enclave is out of reach, but here’s a standout exception: an elegant four-bedroom residence tucked away on a cul-de-sac above Los Feliz Boulevard, priced at just $1,599,000.

• Learn more about this house







Dot Dot Dot

NOTEBOOK


Disappeared in Echo Park

Friends and family searching for a Monterey Park woman who disappeared last week have posted flyers in Echo Park after his car was found near Sunset Boulevard and Sutherland Street. ABC7

altar maker

At 89, Ofelia Esparza from East LA reigns as the nation’s most revered altarist or altar maker who helped bring Día de los Muertos to the United States Los Angeles Time

you have art

Art Unite is an online and in-person art auction that will benefit Central City Action Committee, an Angelino Heights nonprofit that works with at-risk youth. Organizers ask local artists and collectors submit work for auction. The deadline is November 12. (The Eastsider is a sponsor of ArtUnite).







Dot Dot Dot

Sponsored by LACFEPS








LA Band Harger 600

Local public schools provide enriched education for student success

Public schools like Alliance College-Ready Public Schools, Ednovate, Green Dot Public Schools-CA, and KIPP SoCal Public Schools have quickly learned that, even during a global pandemic, in today’s competitive college environment, schools must provide students and their families with an enriching public education that requires additional resources, services, and supports so they can succeed in college, in their careers, and beyond.

• Learn more about these schools







Dot Dot Dot

ADVERTISEMENT


Text ads run for 3 consecutive days in the morning and evening editions of the Daily Digest, with nearly 6,000 subscribers.

$19.99 for up to 25 words or $34.99 for up to 50 words

Go here to place your ad







Dot Dot Dot

SCHEDULE


November, 1st : Lake Los Muertos de Silver 2021

November 3: Introduction to Oil Painting with Riley Strom

November 4: Popular kids club with Mary Lynn Rajskub, Kurt Braunohler and MORE!

Go here for event details

Go here for Eastside Halloween and Dia de los Muertos Calendar







Dot Dot Dot

SUPPORT LOCAL NEWS


The Eastsider offers free access to its latest neighborhood news and features, including extensive coverage of COVID-19, as a community service. To keep our stories accessible to everyone during these difficult times, we need your support.

Go here to contribute







Dot Dot Dot
News that hits home

The Eastsider needs your support!

The Eastsider is committed to providing free news and information to everyone as a community service. But reporting and writing neighborhood news takes time and money. Join other Eastsider readers whose one-time contributions and monthly sponsorships help pay our bills and allow us to provide you with the news and information that keeps you connected to your community. — Jesus Sanchez, editor

read more
Parking spaces

Leighton Hospital plans 312 more parking spaces as part of massive redevelopment

Plans have been submitted which could see an additional 312 parking spaces at a hospital in Cheshire.

Mid-Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has applied to Cheshire East Council to provide additional parking at Leighton Hospital in Crewe.

If plans are approved by council, the car park will include ‘disabled parking spaces’ and electric vehicle charging spaces, as well as additional parking for staff.

Find out more about the best stories from all over Cheshire here.

In September 2021, Leighton Hospital unveiled ambitious plans for a £663m redevelopment as it prepared to bid for government funding.

Now plans for additional parking have been submitted as part of the ‘upgrading’ of the hospital site and aim to ensure appointments do not impact the surrounding area by ‘moving parking away from the site’ .

The proposed car park includes “mainly” staff parking, but will include spaces dedicated to the disabled and areas for electric charging stations (ECP).

In the design and access statement, it is stated that the ECP spaces will be separated from the main car park while the disabled car park will be located close to the hospital to provide easy access to the main entrance.

Of the figure of 312 additional parking spaces, 20 will be parking spaces for people with reduced mobility and 12 will be charging spaces for electric vehicles.

In the design and access statement, the NHS Trust said: “The design confidently meets the requirement to provide additional parking on the site which was historically nursing accommodation, to ensure that with planned improvements to the hospital, some of which are nearing the end of their useful life, the applicant can continue to deal with on-site parking while this occurs, ensuring there is minimal impact , or even zero, on the surrounding areas.

“The program is also expanding and providing better access to disabled spaces, as well as the introduction of electric vehicle charging stations.

“Additional landscaping to the proposals will enhance the nature/appearance of the parking areas.”



The CheshireLive newsletter is the easiest way to go straight to the top stories of the day.

You can try the CheshireLive newsletter here, by clicking on this link. If you like what you see, you can sign up in seconds and it will be delivered straight to your inbox every day.

To register, go to this link. There are no forms to fill in, no questionnaires, just enter your email address and you’ll be set to receive the CheshireLive newsletter from today.

Know someone else who might be interested in signing up? Why not share this link with them, and they too can make sure they never miss the best Cheshire news.

The proposed car park is already based on the existing site where a former nurses accommodation is currently being demolished.

As a result, the plans indicate that the development of the car park will be “staggered” to allow the safe demolition of the existing buildings and that the parking will not be compromised for the duration of this work.

In the design and access statement, the objectives of the car park are defined and read as follows: “The proposed car park will not only add additional parking for staff, but will improve parking facilities for the disabled and add new spaces for electric charging stations, for ever more popular electric cars.

“The proposal will form part of a wider review of traffic management, within the site.”

read more
Parking garage

Parking lot murals could celebrate Redlands’ ‘forgotten history’ – Redlands Daily Facts

Behind Mario Saucedo, the concrete bones of a four-story parking lot rise from scaffolding, and beneath his feet is a diverse story that he works hard to avoid being forgotten.

This part of Redlands, on the north side of the railroad tracks, was once called “Sonora colonia,” or settlement, and “Sonoratown,” the planning commissioner and longtime community advocate said on Friday (October 29th). Sanborn fire of 1915 The insurance card refers to the block which is now a construction site as “Many Mexican cabins”. On this map, “China Town” is one block to the west, south of the tracks.

Redlands Railway District LLC, which is building the brick garage and an adjoining Metrolink station on Stuart Avenue, is holding a public workshop in November to collect wall painting ideas for the project.

  • This 1915 fire insurance map created by the Sanborn Map Co. shows an area of ​​downtown Redlands south of Stuart Street, about a block west of Orange Street. A four-storey parking lot is being built in the upper right section labeled “316” and “Many Mexican Cabins”. “China Town” is pictured north of Oriental Avenue. (Map courtesy of the Library of Congress)

  • On Friday, October 29, 2021, Planning Commissioner and longtime community advocate Mario Saucedo explains why it’s important for the new downtown Redlands parking structure to feature works of art that reflect cultural heritage from that part of the town of Redlands. hold a community meeting on November 8, 2021 to gather public input on the art of the parking lot being built in downtown Redlands, slated for completion later this year. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin / SCNG)

  • On Friday, October 29, 2021, Planning Commissioner and longtime community advocate Mario Saucedo explains why it’s important for the new downtown Redlands parking structure to feature works of art that reflect cultural heritage from that part of the town of Redlands. hold a community meeting on November 8, 2021 to gather public input on the art of the parking lot being built in downtown Redlands, slated for completion later this year. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin / SCNG)

As the metal resonated at the construction site on Friday, Saucedo said he would like to see the culture of the locals represented in the art.

“They had their parties, they had their religious events, they had days in the park, they were going to drive, they had trucks, they had life,” Saucedo said.

His goal, he added, is “to try to make sure that this is interpreted and reflected so that it is not forgotten, and we can feel proud, yes they are building this beautiful new building, but also reflect the history you are “rebuilding on top of.

Redlands Railway District, LLC, which is building a 4-level parking lot in downtown Redlands, is soliciting public input on the structure’s murals. (SCNG)

Glen Feron of the Redlands Railway District told the Redlands Planning Commission on October 12 that some designs have already been chosen, but the subjects for the rest of the art will be selected after the final public meeting, which will be held on 8 November. Two of the meetings have already taken place.

“Some of these are meant to commemorate historical events that happened in Redlands, or some of the local flora, as Railway cares about the natural side of things,” Feron said of the wall themes, “ and then just a celebration of the town of Redlands.

Designs already decided include AK Smiley Public Library and the University of Redlands, he said.

Feron said that at Saucedo’s suggestion, the builder decided to add the workshop in person in November.

Saucedo calls the murals “one of the last opportunities to truly interpret the forgotten history of Redlands.”

He had some ideas of what he would like – and not like – to see.

“They can reflect more than just who we were, more than just workers, more than just what we did for the job, there is a lot more to our culture and traditions,” Saucedo said.

A good subject for a mural, he said, would be “folk ballet with these beautiful dresses, because it goes back to our culture.”

He would like other pioneers from the region to be represented as well.

“There were other cultures here… Asians, African Americans,” he said. “It’s an opportunity for the city to really recognize and say ‘hey, it wasn’t just all the Anglos, it wasn’t just all the Orientals. “”

Some artistic motifs are already appearing throughout the city.

“I told them please don’t put on orange pickers or citrus labels,” he said, “we’ve had enough, let’s make sense.”

Murals can be more than beautiful art, Saucedo said.

“It’s important for us as a community,” he added. “And if we feel like we don’t have a way to be represented and to be considered, we feel lost, we feel like we don’t matter. What we have done and who we are is not celebrated.

He said he thinks the larger community will enjoy learning about the cultures of the city’s various early settlers.

This will give the community “an appreciation for who we are as a whole,” he said. “I think they were kind of wronged on part of the story.”

The workshop will be held at 5 p.m. on November 8 at the Redlands Senior Center, 111 W. Lugonia Ave.

Surveys in English and Spanish will also be available until November 8.

To complete the survey, visit:

For more information on murals, contact consultant David Christie at 714-315-4303 or [email protected], or visit redlands.z13.web.core.windows.net.

read more