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December 2021

Parking facilities

DC Srinagar reviews measures for adequate parking facilities, traffic decongestion in the city

To ensure adequate parking facilities in highly congested areas of Srinagar city, Srinagar Deputy Commissioner Mohammad Aijaz Asad on Friday chaired a joint meeting of all stakeholders at the meeting hall of the office complex of Srinagar. DC here.

During the meeting, a discussion took place on the issue of providing adequate parking space for traders in Lal Chowk, Residency Road, Poloview, Batmaloo, Hari Sing High Street, Goni Khan, Shaheed Gunj and other adjacent areas to overcome traffic congestion. in the city.

The meeting also discussed the measure undertaken to streamline and improve the traffic system, apart from the measures taken to reduce the nuisances of improper parking and road encroachments in the city.

On occasion, the Deputy Commissioner stressed the need to coordinate the efforts of the district administration, traffic police, SMC, SDA and all stakeholders including traders and customers , strictly following traffic rules in letter and spirit for the greater good of the public.

The DC has also focused on making the best use of existing parking and simultaneously identifying and developing new parking spaces to accommodate merchant and customer vehicles. He also asked to reserve adequate parking spaces for traders at a reasonable monthly fee.

While interacting with the representatives of various trades, the DC asked them to cooperate with the Administration to ensure smooth regulation of traffic in the city especially on congested and dense traffic lanes to overcome traffic jams.

The DC also asked them to motivate other traders and the general public to use paid parking lots to overcome traffic jams.

Regarding the merchants’ request to provide parking for merchants at preferential rates, the Deputy Commissioner requested the concerned authorities of SDA to consider the merchants’ demand as a matter of priority and review the parking fees for merchants because they must use daily.

The Deputy Commissioner also requested the SDA authorities to submit the land allocation requisitions for new parking sites in the city so that enough parking space is made available to accommodate more vehicles.

The Deputy Chairman of Srinagar Development Authority also addressed the occasion and briefed the Chairman on the current parking capacity available in Srinagar.

Vice President, SDA, Bashir Ahmad, Additional Deputy Commissioner Srinagar, Dr. Syed Hanief Balkhi, SP Traffic, Zaffar Ahmad, Director of Planning, SDA Secretary, Tehsildar South and other concerned persons were present at the meeting.

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Parking facilities

DC Srinagar reviews measures for adequate parking, decongestion of traffic in the city

To ensure adequate parking in the heavily congested areas of Srinagar city, Srinagar Deputy Commissioner Mohammad Aijaz Asad chaired a joint meeting of all stakeholders in the meeting room of the DC office complex here on Friday.

During the meeting, a tense discussion took place regarding providing adequate parking space for traders in Lal Chowk, Residency Road, Poloview, Batmaloo, Hari Sing High Street, Goni Khan, Shaheed Gunj and other adjacent areas to overcome traffic jams. in the city.

The meeting also discussed measures taken to streamline and improve the traffic system, in addition to measures taken to reduce nuisance due to poor parking and roadside encroachments in the city.

On occasion, the deputy commissioner insisted on coordinating the efforts of the district administration, traffic police, SMC, SDA and all stakeholders, including traders and customers. , strictly following the traffic rules in letter and spirit for the greater good of the public.

The DC also insisted on the optimal use of the existing car park and on the simultaneous identification and development of new parking spaces to accommodate the vehicles of traders and customers. He also asked to reserve adequate parking spaces for traders for a reasonable monthly fee.

While interacting with the representatives of the various professional bodies, the DC asked them to cooperate with the Administration to ensure a good regulation of the traffic in the city in particular on the congested and heavy traffic axes to overcome the traffic jams.

The DC also asked them to motivate other traders and the general public to use paid parking lots to overcome traffic jams.

Regarding the demand of traders to provide parking spaces to traders at preferential rates, the deputy commissioner asked the relevant SDA authorities to examine the trader’s request as a priority and to review the parking fees for traders because they must use on a daily basis.

The deputy commissioner also asked the SDA authorities to submit land allocation requests for new parking sites in the city so that sufficient parking space is available to accommodate more vehicles.

The Vice President of Srinagar Development Authority also spoke on this occasion and briefed the President on the current parking capacity available in Srinagar.

The Vice President, SDA, Bashir Ahmad, Additional Deputy Commissioner Srinagar, Dr Syed Hanief Balkhi, SP Traffic, Zaffar Ahmad, Director of Planning, Secretary SDA, Tehsildar South and others concerned were present at the meeting .

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Parking spaces

Toora Township horse parking spaces entice Gippsland riders to stay awhile

It’s straight out of an old western.

Anna Hopkins and her friends saddle up and ride to town, although in this scene there is no shooting or sheriffs.

Toora in eastern Victoria is more of a coffee and art place.

Until recently, if you rode around town, you had to hold the reins while waiting for your latte.

From now on, the municipality has parking lots for horses. Six enclosures along the shopping street of Toora.

The South Gippsland Shire Council has built public stables along the Great Southern Rail Trail, not far from the Toora pub.

Your horse can drink and lodge for free while you ride through the township.

Anna Hopkins regularly rides Toora on her black and white mare Indi.

“I ride around town all the time. Last weekend I passed by and the cafe had just opened, so I passed by and had a coffee,” she said.

Friends Kylie Beaumont, Sarah Reeves and Anna Hopkins with Sarah Dunsty’s son and horses Oaky, Catory, Minx and Indy.(Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

“Before horse parks, we usually couldn’t stop unless you were standing there holding your horse.”

Ms. Hopkins, chair of the Toora Community Action Team, was one of the driving forces behind the horse paddock project.

“We hope it will bring opportunities to our city, bring in different people who normally couldn’t stop.”

South Gippsland infrastructure planning officer Tony Peterson said that if the Toora Horse Parking Lots brought tourism to the town and were a success, the council would build more horse facilities along the track.

Riders enjoy a beer at the Toora pub with horses in the background.
The riders enjoy a beer at the Toora Pub, but don’t let go of the reins!(Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

“The local railroad is like a backbone that runs through our community. It’s no more than about 10 kilometers before another town,” he said.

“We plan to build more hitch bays along the way, determining which cities would have enough space.”

Mr Peterson said the people of Toora were involved in the design process.

“Local pony clubs and riders were key in the planning so that we could meet their needs. It works out really well,” he said.

Wood parks under the gum trees, horse paddocks.
New stables built to ‘park’ mounted horses in Toora, Victoria. (Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

Anne Roussac-Hoyne, who owns Rare Earth Studio Gallery in Toora, said she looked forward to more people visiting her town.

“I see so many bikes going up and down the street off the rail trail and the horse lessons mean people on horseback can do the same,” Ms Roussac-Hoyne said.

“It should definitely be good for Toora’s businesses.”

And the bigger question, what about all the horse poop?

“People can put it in their gardens,” said Toora local Ms Hopkins.

Horse parking spaces are located at Sagassa Park in Toora, South Gippsland, Eastern Victoria.

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Parking garage

Downtown parking garage to reopen Thursday after structural repairs

CLARKSVILLE, TN (CLARKSVILLE NOW) – The parking lot in downtown Clarksville is slated to reopen Thursday morning, according to city spokesperson Linda Gerron.

The parking garage, located at the corner of Second and Commerce streets, was closed in July after a routine inspection revealed structural problems.

An inspection by TRC Worldwide Engineering revealed cracks in the concrete slabs at the column level above the slab and cracks at the bottom of the slab at mid span in both directions.

The city is expected to release more details about work on the garage tomorrow.

Gerron told Clarksville Now the garage will open “first thing in the morning.”

The new garage is moving forward

The city continues to express its intentions for an additional garage downtown. According to city project manager John Hillborn, the new garage will be a joint city and county project, although planning is still underway.

Hillborn told Clarksville Now that the city hopes to send out requests for proposals for the new garage within the next 60 days, after which it can select a supplier.

Parking garages are incredibly expensive projects, according to city officials. At a recent Economic Development Board meeting, EDC CEO Buck Dellinger estimated that a 600-space garage would cost $ 18 million.

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Parking garage

Car park, substations highlight LIRR 2021 achievements – Featured

The Long Island Rail Road could see infrastructure improvements in the coming months. (Photo courtesy of MTA)

The $ 2.6 billion Long Island Rail Road expansion project is due for contract completion in late 2022, and the MTA has said it is on track and within limits. budget to complete the four-year project.

In December, the project released Milestones Achieved in 2021, which involve a number of community improvements in Floral Park, New Hyde Park, and Mineola, among others. The project adds a third track on the main line from Floral Park to Hicksville.

In Mineola, the eighth and final crossing on Main Street was closed in February and replaced with an underpass. The two-year construction project joins Willis Avenue and the two New Hyde Park intersections at Covert Avenue and South 12th Street, among others.

Another checkpoint at Mineola resulted in the opening of the Harrison Avenue parking lot. The structure, one of two completed in 2021, was built at Mineola Station west of Mineola Boulevard between Harrison Avenue and First Street and replaces an aboveground parking area. The five-level garage represents a net increase of 446 parking spaces.

The December opening ended years of delays that consistently pushed back the planned transfer of ownership from the MTA to the village.

MTA spokeswoman Kayla Shults said the project would serve taxpayers.

“The LIRR expansion project is on time and on budget and continues to be the best example of MTA’s new method of allowing a team to complete design-build contracts,” Shults said in a statement to Blank Slate Media. “The project has many benefits for the community and for LIRR users that have already been put in place this year, including the removal of level crossings, the reopening of stations at Carle Place and the floral park, new sub-stations. electrical stations and two new parking structures. ”

For Floral Park, the G13 substation was installed to help provide power for the increased workload when additional trains are in service. In addition, the Parc Floral station is ADA accessible thanks to the installation of elevators. By 2022, residents can expect construction of the noise barrier on the north side of the tracks, behind houses on Charles Street, to be completed in March, according to administrator Archie Cheng.

Another substation has been delivered to New Hyde Park, and with regard to the village station, improvements are to be continued in the new year, including infrastructure and rehabilitation works. As for the sound barrier between Covert Avenue and New Hyde Park Road, residents can expect its completion in the first quarter of 2022.

In Elmont, the first new LIRR station in nearly 50 years opened in nearby Belmont Park, days before the UBS Arena opened to the public.

A potential project delay could arise in Garden City, where construction of the Denton Avenue Bridge has long been delayed amid a battle between the village and the MTA.

Since 2019, the MTA has been trying to obtain the required permits for street closures and road excavations in order to rework public service pipes. However, the village refused to issue any, delaying the project for several months.

On November 30, Judge Helen Voutsinas sided with the MTA in the lawsuit filed to obtain the permits earlier this year. Garden City appealed the decision and lost last Wednesday in the New York State Appeal Division.

MTA officials said the agency filed motions on Monday asking the court to hold Garden City in contempt of court after the village disobeyed the order.

The MTA said it is asking for a daily fine of at least $ 50,000 until the village complies.

Denton Avenue remains the pending project that has not yet started, and the MTA, according to court documents, expects to complete in four months what was initially considered a six-month process. Nonetheless, officials said the project is on schedule and will be completed on budget.

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Parking garage

New Ochsner Lafayette General 547 Parking Garage Tower, Hospital Main Tower Progress – Lafayette Development

Ochsner Lafayette General is adding a new $14 million, 547-vehicle parking tower at the corner of S. College Road at 109 Pasa Pl.

We all know how important it is to find parking at the hospital, especially when loved ones are patients there. Over the past few months, if you’ve tried to park at OLGMC, you may have noticed how difficult it is to find a spot that isn’t on the roof.

Render provided

The new parking garage tower began construction on December 1 and is being built where hospital staff previously parked. But with the decrease in availability in these spaces, a larger car park has become the priority.

The new garage is expected to be completed in September 2022.

In the photos below you can see the area where the new parking tower is being built. To get these photos we could have taken our drone, but no, we drove our happy little asses up to the rooftop bar in the actual parking lot (there’s no bar, actually) to get a semi view – project fly. Up there, we also got a glimpse of the progress of the new $98 million 6-story tower expansion project, see picture below. You can also learn more about all of thand expansion plans to https://developinglafayette.com/wp/ochsner-lafayette-general-medical-center-building-new-6-floor-tower-additional-parking-in-100-million-upgrade/.

Render provided
Parking garage layout
6-story tower expansion progress


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Parking garage

Listen to the 9-1-1 call: Lakewood parking lot collapsed the day construction crews were on site without a permit, city says

Mayor Meghan George says garage is now boarded up but cars have been moved under the supervision of engineers

CLEVELAND – Lakewood Mayor Meghan George told 3News the exact same thing residents of Marine Tower West and its neighboring tower have been saying for days: There was construction going on inside the garage within days that preceded Thursday’s collapse.

George said some sort of construction took place on Thursday and such work likely would have required the company to apply for a permit. George said the city had no record of a work permit and that fact was part of the city’s investigation.

Today, 3News watched the cars roll out of the garage. Residents said they were not allowed to enter the parking lot, but said building management chased the cars away. George said the cars were recovered under the supervision of structural engineers.

“It’s a pretty big collapse, it’s a pancake collapse, so the second story bridge collapsed onto the first floor bridge, and after that sections of it also collapsed.” Lakewood Fire Chief Tim Dunphy said at the time of the collapse. “It’s substantial.”

LISTEN TO THE 9-1-1 CALL BELOW:

3News contacted Burton Carol Management, who manages Marine Towers West. No one was available to answer questions but a secretary said a manager was on site at the garage.

PREVIOUS COVER OF THIS STORY:

RELATED: Lakewood Tower Residents Displaced by Collapsed Garage Allowed to Return to Their Apartments

RELATED: Underground Parking Lot Collapses at Marine Towers West Apartments in Lakewood

Editor’s Note: The in-player video above is from a related story posted previously.

RELATED: How to Tell If You Have the Omicron COVID Variant Or Just A Cold, Tracking COVID Cases In Cleveland: 3News Now With Stephanie Haney

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Parking spaces

Why are EV charging stations necessary in commercial parking spaces? – Hometown station | KHTS FM 98.1 & AM 1220 – Radio Santa Clarita

Businesses with electric vehicle (EV) charging stations often attract more visitors, occupants and customers. It helps to increase income.

If you currently operate a carport or parking lot, you may have realized that maintaining high housing standards is essential to being productive. With electric vehicles now common, drivers will continue to look for places to charge their vehicles.

When EV charging stations are brought into your parking lot or parking lot, you will attract these drivers. These are potential customers who keep coming back. Find out why you should install these charging stations in your garage.

4 reasons EV charging stations are important

An EV charging station has many advantages. Drivers can charge more safely faster and that gives your business a boost. Here are four reasons why EV stations are important.

Adds an attractive image to your building

One of the advantages of having EV charging stations in your parking lot is that they will give your structure an attractive image. It also attracts more people because they will see that you are doing environmental safety. They might be more willing to help your business or choose your building for office space, depending on the property you own.

Add to your income

Assuming you need something beyond a method of attracting customers to your business, you can use EV charging stations to increase your income.

You can set a price for what people will pay to power their electric vehicles. The most straightforward approach is to keep the price constant whether or not the people using the stations enter your business environment.

To retain your customers, you can offer free charging services, especially those who are real patrons. You can charge a fee to those who only use the charging stations.

More commercial notoriety

Yes, organizations continue to look for good ways to improve awareness of their businesses to reach and capture customers. This is vital and should be an ongoing activity.

Have some VE Recharge Stations installed in your business can be a great strategy to attract more customers. This increases the awareness of your business. People who search online for nearby areas with EV charging services are likely to find your business. Since this business is not yet generous in many places, your business will be a good catch.

Boosts environmental sustainability

This is the biggest advantage! Adding EV charging stations to your parking lot will help prevent toxic pollution to your environment while conserving its limited resources.

Many people now know about the ecological problems that society causes. They are now taking concrete steps to reduce the negative effects caused by their lifestyle.

With these charging stations, there will be opportunities for environmental sustainability as you will provide a separate place for electric vehicle owners to constantly park and charge their vehicles.

Conclusion

Providing EV charging stations is a great initiative if you are currently operating a parking lot or commercial garage. In addition to earning additional income, it also promotes brand awareness of your business.

Do you have a news tip? Call us at (661) 298-1220 or email [email protected] Don’t miss a thing. Get the latest KHTS Santa Clarita News alerts delivered straight to your inbox. Report a typo or error, email [email protected]

KHTS FM 98.1 and AM 1220 is the only local radio station in Santa Clarita. KHTS mixes a combination of news, traffic, sports, and features with your favorite contemporary adult hits. Santa Clarita News and Features are broadcast throughout the day on our airwaves, on our website and on various social media platforms. Our nationally-awarded daily KHTS newsletters are now read daily by more than 34,000 residents. A dynamic member of the Santa Clarita community, the KHTS broadcast signal reaches throughout the Santa Clarita Valley and parts of the high desert communities located in the Antelope Valley. The station broadcasts its talk shows across the web, reaching potentially global audiences. Follow @KHTSRadio on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Uncategorized

Deadline for submitting ideas for creative bicycle parking structures is approaching

the Atlanta Department of Planning seeks ideas for creative bicycle parking structures, including amenities such as bicycle racks, performative art, and bicycle repair stations. Applicants can choose to submit from three types of awards and be judged through a competitive application process.

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Applications are open to community organizations, including neighborhood associations, advocacy groups and professional associations and must be submitted online by December 31, 2021. Based on the scoring criteria, conditional rewards will be awarded to the best projects, which will then have to bring together support from the neighborhood to move the project forward. Once the final awards are announced, the City will partner each recipient with an artist to develop and implement custom artwork for each award location.

According to the City’s website, the three types of bicycle parking structures include:

  • Bike Corral – Bike corrals are the conversion of an on-street parking space into a bike parking structure. City of Atlanta corridors with existing on-street parking are eligible for this type of award.
  • Sidewalk-Level Bicycle Parking – Sidewalk parking will use the sidewalk or furniture area for creative bicycle parking. Sidewalks must be at least 8.5 feet to be considered.
  • Open Space Bicycle Parking – Open space parking ideas include a destination in the City-owned public park. However, private properties or open spaces owned by other public bodies are not eligible destinations.

Project rating criteria include:

  • Priority equity areas (low to moderate income areas)
  • Destination (local shopping districts, main street districts, Friends of Park affiliation with city parks).
  • Cycling facilities (adjacent to existing cycle paths or paths).

According to the City’s website, the Bike Parking Structure competition is part of the Love our places initiative to reimagine Atlanta’s public spaces through small, low-cost, high-impact projects across the city. Past projects have included art-filled crosswalks and redesigned parking spaces as street food options.

Source: Official
Source: Official

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Parking garage

Brightline begins construction of Boca Raton station parking lot

Brightline has started construction on the new Brightline / Downtown Library parking garage for its future station in Boca Raton, Florida. Brightline contractor Kaufman Lynn has started initial work on the site. This project, which is a partnership between Brightline, the City of Boca Raton, and the Federal Railroad Administration, is expected to be completed in the fourth quarter of 2022. When complete, the 4.5-story, 455-space garage will include the necessary parking for La Brightline’s Boca station, as well as a separate entrance for the library parking lot. Visitors to the library will have dedicated, covered parking on the first floor, which will be free. Brightline plans to sign the contract to build the Boca station later this month, with construction scheduled to begin in early 2022.

In October, Brightline completed construction of the new community garden for the Boca Raton Junior League as well as the temporary parking lot for the downtown library. Brightline managed and financed the construction of these two important projects as part of the agreement to build the Brightline station.

“The construction of the Brightline station parking lot in Boca is an essential step in bringing the station closer to the service launch,” said Brian Kronberg, vice president of development for Brightline. “The community of Boca Raton has shown great enthusiasm and support for this resort, which we believe is vital for the connectivity of communities from Miami to Orlando.”

“So many residents and businesses have been discussing how Brightline will be a game-changer for Boca Raton, and in particular our downtown area,” said Boca Raton Mayor Scott Singer. “We look forward to the many cyclists who will come to Boca Raton to add to our thriving businesses and visit the cultural, food and business attractions of Mizner Park and beyond, and for our residents to connect to a major transportation network of Miami to Orlando. We can’t wait to say everything on board in Boca Raton!

Brightline currently serves Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, with its expansion station at Aventura opening in 2022. Brightline’s current construction project in Orlando is over 70% complete with more than 1,300 daily workers. at work totaling more than four million working hours. .

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Parking garage

911 calls posted following the collapse of a “pancake” in the underground parking lot of the Lakewood apartment

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) – The Town of Lakewood is beginning a full investigation into the collapse of an apartment garage at Marine Towers West.

Emergency crews responded to a collapsed multi-level underground parking lot at an apartment building in Lakewood.

According to Lakewood Fire Department Chief Timothy Dunphy, crews were first dispatched around 9:40 a.m. Thursday for reports of the collapse of the Marine West apartment building on Edgewater Drive.

Chief Dunphy described the incident as a “pancake” collapse, meaning the second floor fell to the lower level.

“I’m at Marine Towers East and there’s a big hole in there,” a caller told 911 operators.

A photo provided to 19 News by a witness at the scene shows that much of the land collapsed onto the ramp to the underground parking lot.

The collapse of the Lakewood garage(Source: provided to WOIO / @ alec_kwait Twitter)

Investigators conducted an initial search for the debris and examined surveillance video, the chief said.

As of 11:30 a.m., no casualties had been reported and it is believed that no humans were in the garage at the time of the collapse.

There were vehicles inside, but the number of damaged cars is not known.

Residents of the Marine Towers West building were evacuated as a precaution.

Structural engineers were called in to assess the integrity and safety of the building.

Lakewood Police activity in a building
Lakewood Police activity in a building(Source: WOIO)

According to Chief Dunphy, the building was constructed in the late 1960s and is inspected annually.

Members of several surrounding emergency response services were called in for assistance at the scene, the mayor of Lakewood and the fire chief said.

The building was deemed safe on Friday and residents have returned home.

Now the city is investigating after neighbors say a construction project may have been the cause of the collapse.

“What I can confirm is that there was a construction company in sight that morning,” Mayor George said. “I can also confirm that no building permits have been withdrawn by this construction company.”

As of Monday, there were no new developments in the investigation.

Our team reached out to Marine Towers West for feedback and an update on the residents’ vehicles.

We have not had an answer.

This is a developing story and will be updated throughout the day.

Copyright 2021 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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Parking garage

Lakewood Parking Garage Collapse Update

LAKEWOOD, Ohio (WJW) – Although it seemed miraculous that no one was injured in an underground parking lot collapse, residents of Marine Towers West are waiting to see if they can return home for Christmas .

The apartment buildings were evacuated as a precaution after the collapse around 10 a.m.

The Town of Lakewood has set up a hotline for residents that they can call for updates.

It’s 1-866-647-1306.

A full site assessment is performed by a structural engineer.

“They’ll do a full assessment of the building, of the structure itself, and then they’ll open it again. We hope to open, get it back to residents within the next 24 hours, ”said Lakewood Fire Chief Timothy Dunphy.

The collapse was so powerful that residents felt their high-rise apartments shake.

“There was like a little shaking in the building, I thought it was like an earthquake or something… Just kind of like a ‘boom’. It was quick, like ‘boom’ and that was it, ”said resident Matt Bennett.

“I had just returned after taking out the trash. I had heard some noises in the metro because that is where the dumpsters are. I hurried and got back to my unit, I’m on the 12th floor and when I got to my unit that’s where I heard the ‘boom’ and it rocked the whole building, kind of left to the right, from right to left, ”explained a resident, who did not wish to give his name.

Crews will sift through rubble and debris on Friday.

On Thursday they took out 3 cars which were mutilated and run over.

There is no indication yet on what caused the collapse.

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Parking garage

Residents authorized to return, investigation underway

LAKEWOOD (WJW) — Residents displaced by the collapse of an underground garage attached to their Lakewood high-rise have been allowed to return to their apartments while investigators look for the cause.

Residents of Marine Towers West Apartments began returning to their apartments on Friday afternoon after city officials said a structural engineer and city officials inspected the building and deemed it safe.

Search crews worked until 2 a.m. to remove debris and more than a dozen crushed vehicles from the two-level underground garage that suddenly collapsed on Thursday morning.

After the collapse, firefighters evacuated the residents. Many said they heard a boom and felt the building shake as the collapse occurred.

“I was literally taking a shower and I heard a big bang,” said resident Mari Gonzalez.

Lakewood Mayor Meghan George said search crews clearing the debris confirmed no one was in the area or injured when the garage collapsed just before 10 a.m.

FOX 8 Picture

“It’s a Christmas miracle,” she said. “The time this happened, if it was a few hours earlier or later in the day, we most likely would have had people in the garage going to work or coming home.”

George said the city confirmed a construction crew was working on the property the morning of the collapse, but no building permits were taken out for the work.

“The fact that no permits were withdrawn and there was a construction crew there is very concerning,” George said.

She said city officials have already begun a cursory review of the building’s history and past inspection reports.

“From what we’ve seen at this point, it appears to be a building that has retained its structures, but we’re still investigating further,” George said.

George said the city will conduct a full investigation into the building and the cause of the collapse.

Residents said they saw work going on in the garage in the days leading up to the collapse.

“They were removing the rebar that was basically holding the beams under the garage,” Gonzalez said.

Several residents spent Thursday evening at a hotel and eagerly awaited any updates from property manager Burton Carol Management.

“Communication would help because we’re anxious, we’re worried,” Gonzalez said. “Our life is here.”

Building management emailed residents on Friday saying two engineers and its insurance company had determined the building was safe and “the issue in the garage did not affect the 18-story tower.”

Residents were grateful that no one was injured. The collapse happened near the entrance to the garage, where dumpsters are kept and cars often enter and exit.

“It’s surreal,” said resident Fatemeh Pishdavian. “I can’t help but think someone might have been there.”

Residents were still waiting for information on the removal of undamaged vehicles that remained stuck in the garage.

George said the city and building management are working on plans to remove those vehicles.

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Parking garage

Construction restarts at Miami’s deepest parking lot

Dive brief:

  • Work resumed at Miami-based developer OKO Group Una Residences, a 47-story, 135-unit residential tower in the Brickell section of Miami, after shutting down in November. By order of the city’s construction officials, construction was halted last month due to groundwater violations and complaints from nearby residents, according to local Miami TV station WPLG.
  • After conducting a site review, the Miami Building Department and a team of three independent engineers “concluded that the water intrusion that occurred earlier this year did not cause any impact to surrounding structures and that the Una construction can now continue, ”the project said. entrepreneur, William J. Real, founder and CEO of Civic Construction Co., said in prepared remarks for Construction Dive.
  • The building, which the developer says will have Miami’s largest underground garage, is located just yards from the Biscayne Bay waterfront. Residents of neighboring Brickell townhouses have spoken to WPLG of their concerns about the construction causing soil erosion, concrete cracks and soil displacement.

Dive overview:

Miami-based developer OKO Group has ambitious plans for the 236-car, 100,000-square-foot parking lot at Una Residences, which is buried three stories underground and is designed to serve as a waterproof foundation for the structure.

The construction team uses cutting edge technology, design and engineering to build the garage. The project, which began earlier this year, required workers to drill 800 holes 50 feet deep into the ground and fill them with concrete and water. The interlocking pillars created a cement block that is hollowed out to build the garage, according to OKO Group.

In an email to Construction Dive, Quentin Suckling, structural engineer at Australia-based Sheer Force Engineering, said building basements is one of the highest risk items in the construction industry, because there are more unknowns.

“When constructing a deep basement adjacent to an existing building with shallow foundations, some movement of the existing building may be unavoidable, especially if the neighboring building is close enough to the proposed new basement,” said Suckling said.

If things go wrong, it can lead to significant structural damage to neighboring buildings. If the basement is not waterproof enough, this can also cause problems.

“If not rectified, excessive leaks can have an adverse effect on neighboring buildings, as it can lead to lowering of the water table and collapse of neighboring foundations,” Suckling said.

Building close to a shore can also lead to a host of problems if not done right, as it can be below the water table and be in a saltwater environment, he said. .

“If the basement is not detailed enough to protect key structural elements from the corrosive effects of the saltwater environment, degradation of the basement walls can occur,” Suckling said. “This can cause the wall to fail prematurely, which can have serious consequences for nearby neighboring buildings. “

In its statement to Construction Dive, Real said the company “will continue to work with the City of Miami and its team of independent consultants to ensure the safe progress of construction.”

Concerns about surfing persist

The Champlain Towers South condominium collapse in Surfside, Fla., Which left 98 people dead on June 24, has led to increased scrutiny of how construction is affecting neighboring properties, according to Jonathan Kurry, partner based in Miami at global law firm Reed Smith.

“I think there is definitely a lot more attention on things that could cause harm. [next door], especially in light of Surfside, ”he told Construction Dive.

At Surfside, a class action The November 10 update alleges that the towers were “severely damaged and destabilized” as a result of excavations and construction at the nearby 18-story condominium, Eighty Seven Park, according to court documents.

The lawsuit, filed in Miami-Dade Circuit Court on behalf of the victims of the collapse and their families, alleges that 8701 Collins Development ignored warnings about vibrations and other issues from residents of Champlain Towers South.

Law firm Greenberg Traurig, attorneys for Eighty Seven Park developer Terra Group, responded to Construction Dive with a backgrounder claiming that the Eighty Seven Park construction team did not cause any structural damage to CTS and that “neither their work nor their equipment was capable of damaging the reinforced concrete which failed.

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Parking garage

Lakewood apartment complex parking lot collapses

LAKEWOOD, Ohio – Structural engineers and firefighters investigate the collapse of a two-story underground parking lot at an apartment complex on Edgewater Drive.

Lakewood Police and Fire Department responded to 12540 Edgewater Drive in Marine Towers West to a report of an underground garage attached to the collapsed building.

Residents of Marine Towers West, which is the adjacent building next to the collapsed garage, have been asked to leave their residences for at least 24 hours while authorities investigate the collapse.

The exact number of displaced residents remains to be determined as some were at work, authorities said.

Photo courtesy of a resident of a neighboring building.

Image of a collapsed parking garage on Edgewater Drive.

Lakewood Fire Chief Tim Dunphy said based on video of the parking garage entrance, no one was in the garage when the collapse occurred. No injuries are to be deplored for the moment.

There were vehicles inside the garage. The exact number is yet to be determined, Dunphy said.

Watch an update from Dunphy in the media player below:

A fire official speaking after a parking lot collapsed on Edgewater Drive in Lakewood.

“Fairly large collapse of what we call a pancake collapse. The upper deck collapsed onto the first floor deck and after that sections of the first floor collapsed,” he said.

Witnesses say they heard a loud boom and then felt everything shake. The garage is located between Marine Towers West and Marine Towers East.

A video taken by a resident of the East Tower shows the damage caused by the collapse.

Emergency crews at the scene of a collapsed parking lot on Edgewater Drive in Lakewood

A woman who lives in the building adjacent to the collapsed parking lot said it looked like an earthquake.

“I looked out the window and saw everyone running around and hearing people saying 911 so I ran,” she said.

Another resident who spoke to News 5 said he was visiting his parents in Akron a day earlier.

“Glad to be alive. It felt like a huge gust of wind. Like an explosion of air. I knew something had happened,” he said.

For a resident, at first, this was not thought of as it is usually very windy on the upper floors of the Marine West Tower.

“It was kind of like an earthquake. I didn’t think about it because it’s very windy. I actually learned from a friend who sent me a story online and a photo of it. So I thought I’d better go investigate, “he said.

Image from iOS (343) .jpg

Scott Noll | Cleveland News 5.

Partial collapse of the garage on Edgewater Drive in Lakewood.

A Google map shows the underground parking lot with a grass covered roof.

The Red Cross meets with displaced residents at a local school.

The marine towers garage collapses 2.jpg

Scott Noll | Cleveland News 5

According to county records, the building was constructed in the early 1960s and consists of 171 apartments. The fire chief said structural engineers would determine whether the building is safe for the residents to return, but it could take at least 24 hours.

The city has set up a telephone line for residents who have been displaced. Residents can call 1-866-647-1306 for more information regarding the collapse and evacuation.

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Brentwood City Council Seeks Solutions to Parking Garage Problems | Brentwood

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Underground Parking at the Building Caves in Lakewood Ohio

Dec. 23 (UPI) — An underground parking lot at a building in Lakewood, Ohio, collapsed on Thursday.

Lakewood Fire Department Chief Timothy Dunphy said crews were first dispatched around 9:40 a.m. to the collapse of the multi-level underground parking garage at the Marine West building on Edgewater Drive, a reported Cleveland 19 News.

Dunphy called it a “pancake” collapse where the second floor fell into the lower level.

As of 11:30 a.m., no casualties were reported and officials do not believe anyone was inside the garage at the time.

Vehicles were inside the garage, but the number of damaged cars was not known.

The West Shore rescue team was called to the scene and West Shore apartments were evacuated for 24 hours as a precaution, WKYC reported. The cause of the collapse is not yet known.

The building was built in the late 1960s and has been inspected annually.

Structural engineers were called in to assess the integrity and safety of the building.

Lakewood Mayor Meghan George told WKYC the building appears to be safe.

In June, an apartment collapsed in the Miami suburb of Surfside, killing nearly 100 people.

Authorities have yet to determine why the Champlain Towers South condo collapsed on June 24, but structural issues have been reported in the building.

The collapse prompted a structural review of other South Florida coastal buildings and the evacuation of another Miami condominium building weeks after the Surfside collapse. Over the summer, a federal agency announced a team to investigate the Surfside collapse.

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Parking garage

David Stamps: Comments on the changes to the parking lot | Letters to the Editor

Laconians have always hated using the parking lot. Few of the proposals address this fundamental problem.

The second floor is not designed to facilitate parking; with steel vertical supports, it’s like stepping into a jungle gym. Indoor parking and turning radii are terrible for most cars. That alone will ensure that Laconia will continue to hate parking there.

Without a public toilet, the interior stairs will continue to function as a public urinal.

It’s all well and good to say that there will be better lighting and better security, but within two years the cameras will not work or be removed because the police do not have the staff to monitor. Without cameras, there will be no sense of security and no possibility of examining a problem. The lights will probably not be maintained. At least there should be two public safety kiosks with visible blue light and automatic one-button dialing, as is the case on most college campuses.

On the third floor, without lights or cameras and without 24-hour surveillance, it will continue to be a meeting place for young people, the homeless and drug addicts.

The garage is not in the right place. It acts as a barrier and not as an invitation. The entrance to the ramp is unsafe for pedestrians without a sidewalk on the west side of Beacon Street East. Visually, this confuses motorists who are immediately confronted with a narrow lane obscuring a main street or a sharp S-turn to the right or left. Street parking on Beacon Street helped calm traffic, but overall the structure reveals nothing of the skyline when approached from the south. It’s beautiful from a pedestrian perspective, but motorists don’t have time to appreciate the great work done by parks and recreation.

Signage will not solve the problem of the abruptness of the access ramp. The wide-open Rotary Park takes the eye off the ramp, which also contributes to pedestrian safety concerns.

It seems that Laconia is not shaken up well. Instead of building a parking lot below in the middle of the town hall parking lot with open prestressed concrete floors and ceilings, we are only offered lipstick on a sow. There were several public hearings in 2005, but they were ignored. This is the real box that gets kicked out on the road. Laconia hasn’t done any real planning for downtown traffic and parking since the Big Air ideas were introduced by professional planners for Laconia’s main street.

Consider removing the top story of the existing garage and replacing the ceiling on the second story with a roof that doesn’t require all of the interior steel brackets. Laconia may hate the garage a little less.

Aside from the middle of the holiday season, people may have skipped the public hearing because they didn’t like the ideas forced on them by city council. Why doesn’t the public have the opportunity to review the suggestions before finalizing the design? I never found the plans before the hearing, there should have been an obvious homepage link. Ultimately, parking and traffic should be discussed at the downtown level master plan level given the enormity of all the recent changes.

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Parking spaces

How Oslo is recycling its old parking spaces for cyclists

In recent years, Oslo has seen a proliferation of pedestrian streets, public transport now serves all corners of the city, and parking spaces, usually reserved for cars, have transformed over time into cycle paths. When they don’t end up like this, they are replaced by green spaces or bicycle parking lots.

The trend is now for the transformation of old car parks into cycle paths, easily recognizable by their red color. Bikes (including cargo bikes) are available through bike-share systems to help those without their own bike get around the city center, which is fully geared up for them.

However, there are still a few parking spaces, reserved primarily for disabled drivers, emergency vehicles or delivery drivers (even if the latter are generally only allowed to drive in the morning). Others are dedicated to charging electric vehicles. In addition, there are still many parking lots on the outskirts of the center.

It should also be noted that the few cars still circulating in the center of Oslo are mostly electric. The Norwegian capital is now one of the European cities with the highest rates of electric vehicles on the road, according to a recent report by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT).

All of these changes are being made to help improve air quality and combat climate change. But another advantage is the safety of road users. A pioneer in the pedestrianization of its city center, Oslo recorded no deaths of pedestrians or cyclists in 2019, a unique case in the world for a city of its size.

While Oslo began its transformation decades ago, other major European capitals, such as Paris, Madrid and Berlin, often face greater opposition from residents when imposing this type of policy. – AFP Relax news

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More downtown parking spaces among the list of upcoming urban projects | Government and politics

Officials in the town of Dothan hope to link the project to plans involving the Poplar Springs creek that passes near this area.

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In other cases, City Manager Kevin Cowper has awarded Lisa Reeder, Chief Financial Officer, on her retirement from the town of Dothan after many years of service.

In other actions, the municipal commission:

Approved restaurant retail liquor license application (on-site) for The Juicy Crab, 4753 Montgomery Highway, by Leo Chen.

Approved an application for a Beer and Table Wine (Offsite) Retail License for Beeline 643, 1378 Hodgesville Road, by Pankaj Patel.

Annex certain properties owned by Raefield and Jacquline E. Vester, located at 165 Vester Court, within the city limits of Dothan.

Declared certain properties as creating a nuisance, endangering the public health, safety and convenience of the citizens of the Town of Dothan, and authorizing the demolition and removal of said structures.

Agreed to purchase a parcel of land located at 825 Dusy Street for $ 8,500 in order to access existing drainage facilities.

Change order approved with Saliba Construction Co., Inc. for the erection, management and dismantling of the Wadlington Park ice rink to include additional hourly labor estimated at $ 37,347.52.

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Parking garage

When will the repairs to the Buchanan Street parking lot in Lafayette be completed? | News

The first phase of repairs to the downtown Lafayette Buchanan Street parking lot is expected to be completed in January.

The six-story structure built in 1981 was abruptly closed in October 2018 after it was deemed unsafe, exacerbating parking problems for patrons of the nearby Lafayette Parish Courthouse as there is plenty of street parking. near the courthouse were then reserved for courthouse employees who used the garage.

It is not known when the parking garage will reopen.

Buchanan Street parking garage repairs begin Tuesday

The plans for Phase 2 are expected to be delivered in January, unless unforeseen circumstances arise, according to city engineer Fred Trahan.

Phase 1 involves structural repairs to the parking garage, as well as sanding and painting the exterior of the structure and installing an impact resistant cable system.

Downtown EDD Board of Directors Approves Economic Development Fund Application Process

Corrosion damaged more than half of the steel beams and columns that support the floors of the 344-vehicle parking garage.

Twice a day, we’ll send you the headlines of the day. Register today.

Mayor-President Josh Guillory signed an emergency declaration in March 2020 after an engineer report revealed advanced to severe corrosion in the latches that connect some of the 200 panels to the garage itself. The panels were removed to lighten the load on the structure.

Phase 1 is expected to cost just over $ 1.6 million.

A downtown Lafayette performing arts center? DDA wants to get there, has the site in mind

Phase 2, Trahan said in an email response to the questions, is expected to include repairs or replacement of elevators, as well as repairs to stairwells and the electrical system, at an estimated cost of $ 1.6 million. of dollars. The second phase can also include interior painting for an estimated cost of $ 500,000 to $ 800.00.

If interior painting is not allowed, he said, the final design of the elevator and stairwell work could allow part of the parking garage to be used during construction. This decision will be made once the final elevator and stairwell designs are completed.

Lafayette could house a new Louisiana music museum

The parking lot was closed in 2018 shortly after the parish’s former city council rejected a proposal from then-mayor Joel Robideaux that the city buy the structure from the parish. Some council members saw this decision as a way to help the budget of the struggling parish.

Robideaux then issued a request for proposals to redevelop the parking garage and other nearby properties – some not owned by LCG – into a mixed-use development with residences and businesses. It received four proposals in 2019, but took no action after determining that none of the proposals were financially viable.

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Update on the collapse of the Clearwater parking garage

CLEARWATER, Fla. (WFLA) – Efforts to salvage a construction worker who is believed to have died after two floors of concrete and stairs collapsed in a Clearwater parking lot continued on Tuesday as crews faced the wrong time and concerns about the potential for another collapse.

Dozens of first responders were called in for the collapse of the structure around 12:30 p.m. Monday. According to rescue teams, two floors of a concrete stairwell fell on a construction worker in a parking lot.

The worker is still missing and presumed dead, Clearwater Fire Department Chief John Klinefelter said. Although his name is withheld, Klinefelter said the victim was a 23-year-old man. His family has been notified.

The scene near the garage on Enterprise Road, off Countryside Boulevard, was still active on Tuesday morning as crews completed work to prepare for the next leg of the salvage operation.

“We had to remove trees, contractors are there to stabilize the ground, we have a light pole that we are taking apart to move away with the help of Duke Energy – for the next piece of equipment that is in the works. route, ”he said.

Klinefelter said strong storms that moved through the area slowed down some of those operations, as well as equipment coming from across the Southeastern United States to help. He noted that they would continue to work in bad weather as long as it is safe to do so.

According to Klinefelter, the next piece of equipment – a large excavator – is being brought in from central Florida and is expected to arrive Tuesday afternoon.

“Once that equipment is there and installed, it will start working on the building. We’re going to start from the top down – it’s the safest way for us to do this at this time, ”Klinefelter said. “This machine, as large as it is, is going to be used in a very delicate way. “

The excavator will be used to remove pieces of concrete “the size of a soccer ball” from the parking lot.

Klinefelter said the goal is to prevent any secondary collapse.

“The stairs are still very unstable, which is why we cannot put crews inside,” he said.

After the shovel clears the top concrete, Klinefelter said Pinellas County Tech Rescue Team and Clearwater Fire and Rescue will step in to remove the last piece of concrete that fell.

“This corner – this stairwell is a separate structure from the main parking garage structure, but it’s not secure,” Klinefelter said. “It’s not safe for us to put lifeguards, contractors or anyone in there to get things done faster than we already are.”

Teams don’t have a timeline for when they think the operation will be complete, but Klinefelter said the excavator “won’t stop” once it arrives and starts removing concrete.

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Parking garage

Amherst City Council Approves Downtown Parking Lot Zoning

AMHERST – Planning for a second parking garage in downtown Amherst that could be built on existing municipal land between North Pleasant and North Prospect streets may proceed following City Council approval of a ward highly controversial overlay.

In a 9-4 vote on Monday, securing the two-thirds majority needed to pass a zoning change, councilors created the parking overlay for the 0.68-acre site, bordered by the Parish Center of the St. Brigid’s Church to the north and the CVS Pharmacy Parking and Jones Library to the south.

District 4 Councilor Evan Ross, who helped lead the rezoning work, said the approval paves the way for improving the “mishmash” of Amherst’s surface lots and reflects his optimism for a vibrant and vibrant shopping mall.

“This zoning measure is a first step towards creating centralized destination parking in the heart of our downtown, to support our local businesses, to support downtown events and to enable our downtown to grow and thrive,” Ross said.

The zoning change, supported by the business community as part of an initiative by Destination Amherst, was one of two passed at the last inaugural council meeting. The other zoning amendment, passed by a 12-1 vote with only District 5 Councilman Darcy DuMont opposed, will require developers of mixed-use buildings to set aside at least 30% of the ground floor for non-residential purposes.

For the Parking Facilities Recovery District, District 3 Councilwoman Dorothy Pam said she was “proudly” voting against the measure because her constituents, including those who live on North Prospect Street, have strongly opposed it. the presence of a car park near a residential area.

She was joined in opposition by District 1 Councilors Cathy Schoen and Sarah Swartz, and DuMont.

Schoen said the city needs more time to plan and understand the implications of the overlay district. “There’s no need to rush,” Schoen said.

There needs to be better work to establish the need for more parking and to study alternative sites, DuMont said.

If the vote had been postponed, it might not have reached the necessary two-thirds threshold. Ross and District 3 George Ryan, who also led the rezoning campaign, lost their re-election bids in November.

Incoming District 4 Councilwoman Pamela Rooney used public comments to argue for a pause on rezoning and any talk of a parking lot, until the best site is determined.

Several other people who opposed the rezoning also spoke, including Winnifred Manning of Fearing Street. Manning said a no vote would show concern for all residential neighborhoods. But John Sheldon of Sunset Avenue called on council to pass zoning, citing the need for aggressive action and a request for proposal for parking so a project could move forward quickly.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said her affirmative vote does not mean parking at the site is imminent. “I’m not sure that’s the best location,” Griesemer said.

Swartz disputed this, however, describing a garage as a fait accompli. “If we do it now, we’re voting to do it,” Swartz said.

At-Large councilor Alisa Brewer, who voted in favor of the zoning, said it was “patently ridiculous” that supporters of a garage were accused of being in the pockets of developers.

At-Large Councilor Andy Steinberg said more studies are needed and he hopes the Amherst Business Improvement District will support them. Before any projects begin, Steinberg said the city could consider making the existing parking lot more visible, including possibly turning the one-way north prospect into a two-way street so visitors can access the lot from Amity Street. .

Although also controversial, the near-unanimous vote on mixed-use buildings came after Schoen made an amendment, defeated by a majority of councillors, to increase the required commercial space on the first floor to 35%. Schoen said she wanted it to be as high as possible.

At-Large Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke said that in a perfect world, she would agree with that idea, but exceeding 30% puts Amherst at risk of significant vacancies. “We have to face reality, though,” Hanneke said.

Ross said he hesitantly backed 30% but warned any demands could be too much.

Although she voted for it, Pam said she found it strange that a super majority of councilors wanted a second car park, but not to advocate for more commercial space in the developments.

“I see a huge contradiction in what’s going on,” Pam said.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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Worker feared death in Clearwater parking lot stairwell collapse

Clearwater firefighters said a construction worker died after a stairwell collapsed in a garage next to the Tampa Bay Water administrative offices on Monday.

First responders from across Pinellas County responded to the parking structure at 2575 Enterprise Road on Monday afternoon.

Officials said two construction workers were making repairs to the stairwell when two floors of the concrete stairwell collapsed, trapping one of the workers below. The other worker was not injured.

Division chief John Klinefelter said a structural engineer determined the garage was safe for first responders, despite visible cracks on the exterior walls of the stairwell.

“At this point we have some heavy equipment on its way to the location to start disassembling the stairwell from the corner of the parking garage. Engineers assured us that the stairwell, structurally, is separate from the parking garage, so there is little risk of the parking garage collapsing, ”said Clearwater Fire Rescue division chief John Klinefelter.

Tampa Bay Water said the garage is adjacent to their administrative office and is not their building. They said they are one of the many companies that rent out spaces in the parking garage.

The utility added that the construction workers are not employees of Tampa Bay Water.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with construction workers and their families as emergency officials respond,” Tampa Bay Water General Manager Chuck Carden said in a statement.

Family members of the construction workers gathered at the scene Monday evening and were told there was no chance rescuers would find the worker alive.

“We believe at this point it will be a salvage operation,” Klinefelter said.

The cause of the collapse was still under investigation.

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Parking facilities

Noida will get digital parking lots by the end of December this year

The Noida Authority will soon operate all parking lots in the city, including the multi-level parking lot, through a mobile app (not yet named) that will launch by the end of December.

This will help ensure transparency and make the parking process easier for all users. (Representative image)

The Noida Authority has released a statement saying it will operate all parking lots in the city, including the multi-level parking lot, through a mobile app (not yet named) to be launched by the end of December.

This will help ensure transparency and make the parking process easier for all users.

Vehicle parking spaces in sectors 18 and 38A, and Film City, and underground parking lots in sectors 1, 3 and 5 are under the authority of Noida, as well as at least 60 parking sites – managed by different private entrepreneurs – across town.

The authority is in the final stages of launching the app and once the app is up and running, people will be able to book parking spaces through digital payment, saving them time, officials said.

The Noida authority will also open an escrow account, connected to the app, so that the collected revenue goes to this account and information about it is recorded from each parking site.

The Noida Film City car park has a capacity of 1,400 vehicles and areas 38A (7,000), 1 (534), 3 (565) and 5 (262). The others in the city are surface parking lots.

Click here for IndiaToday.in’s full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic.

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More than 60 additional parking spaces arrive at the TPP in time for Christmas

Vance Lewis

Management at the Cyril B. Romney Tortola Pier Park (TPP) is creating an additional 60 parking spaces to accommodate more visitors to the multimillion-dollar facility as the holiday season and cruise ship arrivals gear up.

According to TPP CEO Vance Lewis there have been complaints over the years about the lack of adequate parking spaces at the pier park and he and his team have sought to address this issue with the new car park which is expected to be ready soon.

“You know, because Christmas is coming up, we’re kicking things into high gear. We’re in the process of making sure we have improved parking. Improved parking means we have additional parking options. One of the perennial complaints that we had in the pier park is that parking is limited so just at the entrance there is a space which is cleared, rolled and paved and it is going to be marked to provide some 60 additional parking spaces” , Lewis said.

“Then we will open the gate to allow people to enter the park directly from the pier. Thus, you will be literally a stone’s throw from the park of the pier. This is in addition to the parking we currently have at the facilities,” added the CEO.

Lewis noted that the holiday season, which includes TPP’s annual three-day Christmas event, means there will be a greater influx of patrons into the park. He said that means more and safer parking lots are needed to make park users feel comfortable while they shop and have fun.

The CEO added that the reopening of the cruise ship has also led to increased activity in the pier park, which also requires additional parking spaces for taxi operators; therefore the area is being prepared in time for Christmas.

Lewis hopes the parking lot will be ready for vehicles next week as the postponed three-day Christmas celebration kicks off on Tuesday.

The event, which was to take place from Thursday December 16 to Saturday December 18, has been postponed due to bad weather.

However, according to management, everything should go as planned on December 21.

Copyright 2022 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.

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A decision is imminent regarding the parking garage overlay district in downtown Amherst

AMHERST — City Council is expected to decide on a new parking overlay district for downtown at its final meeting of 2021 next week.

The car park covering area, as well as a modification of the rules for the development of mixed-use buildings and the commercial areas required on the ground floor, will be on the agenda of the meeting on December 20. The meeting is the last for advisers who took office in the fall of 2018. Six new advisers will join seven old ones after a swearing-in ceremony Jan. 3.

Initially postponed by District 5 Councilor Darcy DuMont at the Dec. 6 council meeting, DuMont introduced a motion at a Dec. 9 meeting to further delay zoning changes using a second provision of the city’s charter. city. This article reads as follows: “if, in the next vote on the question, 4 or more members oppose the vote, the question will be further postponed for at least another 5 days”.

DuMont was joined in the report by District 1 Councilors Cathy Schoen and Sarah Swartz and District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said that with articles pushed back until Dec. 20, residents and others are encouraged to continue providing input and feedback on the proposals.

The idea of ​​the overlay neighborhood is for the city-owned parking lot between North Pleasant and North Prospect streets to accommodate a private parking garage. The site is next to the private CVS lot. In a 1990 city study, city and CVS lots were recommended for a parking garage, before authorities later decided to build a garage on the site owned by the Amherst Redevelopment Authority on Boltwood Walk.

The parking garage overlay neighborhood is supported by many in the business community, but residents, primarily those who live on North Prospect Street, have expressed concern.

The Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce and the Amherst Business Improvement District are advocating for rezoning.

Chamber Executive Director Claudia Pazmany said rezoning is critical as the final piece of a Destination Amherst initiative and is the “most important link to keeping people in town, to spending time, money and enjoy our vibrant downtown Amherst, strengthening our economic footprint. ”

A petition started by the House states that “Parking will concentrate personal vehicles near shops, restaurants and public services such as the town hall, community center, health center and the Jones Library”.

Opponents disagree. Ira Bryck of Strong Street is among those who wrote to the council that the site is not the best location for parking:

“As for the garage, it is far from the best site, will disrupt the quiet enjoyment of a historic neighborhood, goes against the advice of experts who have studied Amherst’s parking situation, is difficult to find and even harder to get in and out of, will require the removal of parking that already works well in a residential area, may have been chosen because of special interests rather than for the good of our community, and will not have setbacks and other restrictions that might make a well-designed garage.

Both zoning changes require a two-thirds majority of city council to pass.

At the end of the November 29 council meeting, in which a first reading on the four zoning changes was completed, Pam expressed concern that so many meetings and lengthy conversations were being held on the zoning, and moved a motion not to have such topics. brought up again during the holiday season.

“It ruined my vacation and I know I’m not the only one. I’m really angry about this,” Pam said.

Schoen said the board agreed to end meetings at 10 p.m., rather than extending them until nearly midnight. “I just think what we do to ourselves and what we do to the staff wears us out,” Schoen said.

Griesemer said this month of December would be unusual. “I would like to say never again because I don’t love him any more than you do,” Griesemer said.

But she said the long meetings were the result of advisers talking without regard to time constraints.

“I have to return it to you. Stay in control of your time,” Griesemer said.

District 2 Councilman Pat De Angelis said the zoning changes needed to be voted on. “I’m kind of sick of people saying we don’t need to do this.” De Angelis also criticized those who spoke out against District 4 Councilman Evan Ross and District 3 Councilman George Ryan, top supporters of the overlay district who did not win new terms.

“We have to respect each other and that starts with respecting each other and limiting what we say to what’s important, not saying the same thing six times because you want to get your point across,” De said. Angelis. “I’m sorry, but I needed to say it.”

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IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out


IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out

Mangaluru: Talk about the magic that the issues highlighted on Mangalorean.com are fixed in no time. civic issues and within hours or days the authorities concerned, who cannot stand criticism of their negligence, swiftly step into action and rectify civic issues. In the past, Mangalorean.com has highlighted various civic issues on our website, and there has been a huge effect with most issues resolved in no time, from the rectification of dilapidated roads, open drainage, unfriendly trails, dog threat, neglect, garbage, illegal palisades, potholes, dying trees, etc.

Following the report (Ref: Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!) posted in Mangalorean.com, relevant officials at Mangaluru Smart City Ltd have decided to remove unscientific parking spaces and come up with better parking facilities, and details of this plan will be updated soon when we have it. . After the report was highlighted on our website, many of our avid readers forwarded the links of the report to officials at MSCL as well as to the Commissioner and Mayor of Mangaluru City Corporation, who received affirmative action.


One reader praising the efforts of the Mangalorean team to highlight civic issues commented, saying, “This is why I love the Mangalorean.com web for news that is unbiased. Your website is totally different from other web news in Mangalore history. So much social awareness that inspires others to follow in your footsteps. Thank you for the various civic issues reports and also for keeping Mangaluru clean through much of your news. Continue like this and we are with you ”. Thank you, dear reader, for your kind words of wisdom.

Providing such unscientific parking spaces for four-wheelers on this LHH road is nothing but a dumb idea. Every educated person the Mangalorean team interacted with all said the parking spaces made here were nothing but foolish and an absolutely stupid idea, on the part of the officials behind the plan. . Did the SMART CITY engineers and managers believe that four-wheeled vehicles parked in these spaces with their bumpers sprawling across the road would create problems for traffic on that road during rush hour? Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces? Aside from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have become extensive parking spaces for vehicles instead of taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

Yet another reader of our website, Praveen Chandra Shetty, a social worker and auto insurance claims adjuster, followed our report on this matter with Er Arun Prabha, the General (Technical) Director of MSCL, and he managed to get the good news. from Er Arun that unscientific parking spaces will soon be phased out and better parking facilities with a better plan will be implemented soon. I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every few meters can divide congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.
As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to encourage people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to make it easier for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove the bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.
Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more enlightened drivers to choose the appropriate mode. transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! So until the new parking system is implemented on the LHH road, drive or ride safely on the LHH road and don’t run into those unscientific parking barriers.

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Parking facilities

Noida Authority to digitally operate all parking lots by end of December

The Noida authority will operate all parking lots in the city, including the multi-level parking lot, through a mobile app (not yet named) that will launch by the end of December, officials said on Sunday.

The authority wants to ensure transparency and make the parking process easy for users. Once the app is up and running, people will be able to book parking spaces through digital payment, which will save them time, officials said.

“We will probably start operations via the app in all the main parking lots in the city by the end of December. We are in the final phase of launching the application. Once the application is operational, the parking services will become completely digital and this will help to maintain transparency, ”said SP Singh, deputy general manager of the Noida authority, who also heads the Noida traffic cell.

Vehicle parking spaces in sectors 18 and 38A, and Film City, and underground parking lots in sectors 1, 3 and 5 are under the authority of Noida, as well as at least 60 parking sites – managed by different private entrepreneurs – across town.

Many times people complain that parking attendants misbehave with them and overload the space. “When the app is up and running, people won’t face such problems. They can easily get the service through the app, ”Singh said.

The Noida authority will also open an escrow account, connected to the app, so that the collected revenue goes to this account and information about it is recorded from each parking site.

The Noida Film City car park has a capacity of 1,400 vehicles and areas 38A (7,000), 1 (534), 3 (565) and 5 (262). The others in the city are surface parking lots.

“The Noida Authority keeps talking about transparency and ease of use, but nothing like this has happened so far. We hope that this service starts as soon as possible, without delay … Many private contractors for the service are overloaded, and sometimes their behavior is not appropriate either, ”said Kummu Joshi Bhatnagar, a social activist from the Noida sector 77.

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Parking garage

Opening of the Harrison Avenue car park in Mineola – News

The Harrison Avenue parking garage, completed in 2019, has been officially open for business since December 15.

The Village of Mineola has just received one of their gifts in advance.

The Harrison Avenue parking lot is fully operational and open to business, city officials said.

A smooth opening took place on Wednesday, December 15, and allows users to park their cars in available locations for a fee associated with the hours spent.

“I’m happy to have it,” Mineola Mayor Scott Strauss said of the 551-space garage. “It has been a long and arduous process and I appreciate the combined work of the MTA, 3TC, our DPW, the village attorney, administrators and parking authorities to cross the finish line.”

At the last board meeting, the village finalized the payment structure and monthly permits for residents and non-residents. In January, cards accessible by sensor will be issued.

Two hundred and twenty-five cards will be 2-hour “day” permits, available to residents of Mineola for $ 105 per month. Non-residents can purchase a similar permit for $ 250 per month, and 75 will be created.

For 24 hour permits, 50 cards will be created for residents of Mineola at $ 300 per month. Non-residents will be billed $ 500 per month and 20 cards will be issued.

Hourly parking will be charged for a maximum of 24 hours. Rates start at $ 2 for up to two hours and drop to $ 6 for two to three hours accrued.

The maximum daily rate for the garage is $ 30, which covers 15 hours of parking.

Administrator George Durham said the new facility is good for those who make short trips and cannot find parking on Mineola Boulevard.

“It’s two dollars for the first two hours, it’s a great place for quick trips,” Durham said during his report.

The opening of the car park ends after a year of delay. Originally completed in 2019, COVID-19 and minor structural issues have consistently delayed the transfer of ownership from the MTA to the village.

Revenue generated by the garage can now be incorporated into future village budgets, which Strauss previously said he was hesitant to include due to uncertainty over the project’s timing.

The MTA said the parking lot has been owned by the village since early December and will remain involved until the project is completed. Unlike other projects, any maintenance or issues from this point on will be handled by the village, not the state.

As part of the LIRR expansion project, the garage was constructed at Mineola Station west of Mineola Boulevard between Harrison Avenue and First Street and replaces an aboveground parking area. The five-level garage represents a net increase of 446 parking spaces serving Mineola station.

The parking garage is one of two being built in conjunction with the Long Island Rail Road project, which adds a third track on the main line between Floral Park and Hicksville.

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Parking garage

New Town Hall and Parking Garage for Huntsville

Downtown Huntsville will get new jobs and new parking options with construction.

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama – One of the oldest and most significant buildings in downtown Huntsville is getting a facelift with a new parking lot.

The new Huntsville City Hall will replace the current municipal complex, which opened over 50 years ago at 308 Fountain Circle. The new town hall will be built directly across the street on the site of the current municipal parking lot, which will soon be demolished.

The project took nearly five years, will cost more than $ 78 million, and is expected to create hundreds of jobs in Rocket City. The two-year construction project is scheduled to begin in mid-January when the parking lot along Fountain Circle is demolished, resulting in immediate changes in parking availability.

Huntsville General Service Manager Ricky Wilkinson said, “During construction there will be lane closures along Gates, Fountain Circle and also on Madison Street. We’ve tried, especially on Madison Street and Gates, we’ll only take one lane, so we’ll still have north and south along Madison Street. “

And these jobs? Wilkinson says, “Obviously this will initially provide a lot of opportunities for the construction trades and for hiring people to take care of some of the construction activities on site. and really the city as a whole. “

Why a new city hall for Huntsville?

City administrator John Hamilton said there are many reasons a new city hall is needed, but the main one is simple – better and more efficient use of taxpayer dollars. Due to limited space, some departments operate in buildings rented elsewhere. The current building also has maintenance issues, which become more and more costly every year. Hamilton praised city maintenance crews for keeping it functional with “bubble gum and baling wire.”

The new building will cover one city block and be seven stories tall with clusters of related departments. Hamilton says it will be easier for residents and business owners to renew their permits, pay taxes, obtain building permits or conduct any other activity related to the city.

Construction schedule

Construction of the Town Hall will not begin until after the demolition of the municipal parking lot and the removal of debris, which is expected to take place by the end of 2021. Hamilton anticipates that a construction contract could be submitted to the city ​​council for approval in October.

Construction is expected to take about two years.

Artistic rendering of downtown Huntsville with the New Town Hall:

RELATED: Meet The Huntsville, Asteroid & Orbit Hospital ‘Adaptation Dogs’!

RELATED: Huntsville City Council Votes To Approve Redistribution Plan

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Parking spaces

Portland considering ‘climate and equity surcharge’ on driver parking spaces

“Helping people think that their decision to drive and park downtown has climate and equity impacts.”
— Shoshana Cohen, PBOT

(Photo: Jonathan Maus/BikePortland)

The Portland City Transportation Office is in dire financial straits. With a budget that was repeatedly slashed before Covid ravaged income (which is largely driven by parking fees and fuel purchases), there isn’t much meat left on the bone. At the office’s budget advisory committee meeting on Thursday night, PBOT staff painted a gloomy picture and sought comment on where to focus planned cuts. Staff also shared some short-term steps to boost revenue, which could mean fewer cuts are needed.

Among these “high-level” short-term income ideas are three approaches that would increase the price of driving in Portland. In addition to increasing meter rates and citation fines, a new idea is on the table: the city is calling it a “climate and equity impact surcharge.” This would be a “small increase” in parking fees, “to start capturing the externalized costs of driving in the city centre”.

Jeramy Patton, director of the PBOT’s business services group, said the bureau currently faces a $26 million shortfall over the next five years, which would require $4.8 million in annual cuts to balance out. the budget. “Not to be catastrophic,” he added at last night’s meeting, “but our sixth year is looking at a shortfall of about $22 million in that particular year alone.” And there is currently no help on the horizon. “If you look at our curve, it continues to widen the difference between the type of income we bring in and the expenses that come out,” Patton explained.

We’ve known for years how overly dependent PBOT is on car parking revenue, which puts them in direct conflict with their goal of reducing the number of people driving cars. The slides below from the November PBOT Budget Advisory Panel help tell that story:

As you can see, massive changes in the city center and significant changes in the workplace due to Covid mean incomes have plummeted and remain at only 60% of what they were before the pandemic. Shoshanah Cohen, who manages the Pricing options for fair mobility (POEM) for PBOT, said the agency had already lost $57 million from projections leading into spring 2020. “There are no more easy things to cut,” she said, before to ask the committee for comments. “We are already having more difficulty advancing the objectives of our strategic plan. It is more difficult to make the system safer, fairer, more climate-friendly, to improve mobility and to preserve our assets…. We work hard and try to accommodate you all, but the reality is that $57 million, you know, matters.

(PBOT slides shown at budget meeting)

Patton then outlined the cuts (in bold) being considered in seven different program categories:

Active transportation and safety – $250,000 (total annual budget of $1.7 million): this reduction would delay PBOT’s work on a “safe systems” plan, reduce the ability to manage partnerships around Sunday walks and other street, and would result in discounts for the Biketown For All program.

Bridges and sidewalk structures – $560,000 (total annual budget of $6.3 million): This reduction would reduce the maintenance of bridges and other structures, as well as the time required to repair major equipment.

On-Street Parking and Parking Enforcement – $976,000 (total annual budget of $9.5 million): This reduction would result in reductions in customer service, reduce parking enforcement capacity, delay implementation of new parking plans, and reduce capacity for potential changes due to the implementation of POEM recommendations.

Streets and signs – $1.4 million (total annual budget of $33.5 million): Would reduce microsurfacing treatments; reduce their ability to maintain pavement markings for lanes, crosswalks and cycle paths; and increase response times for signaling overrides.

Use of right-of-way – $124,000 (total annual budget of $1.5 million): reduced permitting capacity for ephemeral spaces, events, street paintings, etc. ; could jeopardize the healthy business plaza/patio program (unless the PBOT starts charging businesses a fee for these permits).

Transportation Systems – $525,000 (total annual budget of $3.1 million): would reduce engineering capacity to develop a more equitable 823-SAFE awareness system; reduces the number of safety improvements made to the transportation system.

Support Services – $780,000 (total annual budget of $17.5 million): This reduction would reduce PBOT’s ability to support services related to technology and communications, as well as safety training, equity programs, etc.

With this grim task ahead of them, the PBOT staff wanted the committee to give its opinion on three questions: “Should the office increase its revenue in the short term to minimize further cuts? », « Which factors are the most important when we consider the potential reductions? and “How can we communicate with the public about transportation challenges and impacts?” »

Slide presented at the meeting.

(Click for captions)

On that first question, almost everyone on the committee (and at the meeting for that matter) was in favor of the office doing more to increase short-term revenue. Given PBOT’s financial situation and the fact that they have already gone through the POEM process (which was unanimously supported by the city council in October) and came up with a list of recommendations on how to go from Ahead, the city looks set to release a proposal to increase parking fees.

Cohen presented three short-term revenue options that all relate to car parking: cost recovery for parking permit programs (raising the price of permits to cover the cost of administering the program, which he does not currently not done); increase meter tariffs to take account of inflation (the tariff has been the same since 2016); and add a “climate and equity impact” surcharge. The latter is the most interesting. Cohen talked about it as if it was as much a marketing and behavior change as it was a revenue tool. It would be about “helping people think that their decision to drive and park downtown has climate and equity impacts,” she explained. “Kind of like naming that a little more clearly and capturing increased revenue that can also help support those program areas.”

A supplement that helps educate people on the true cost of driving could also set the stage for bigger revenue plans and fees on the horizon. Like congestion pricing, more aggressive meter rates, another gas tax increase, etc. The PBOT has longer term plans to decouple its revenue sources from fossil fuels so that it can move away from that “strange position” (as Cohen put it) of having to encourage driving in order to increase income.

As for the committee’s comments, there was very strong support for the PBOT to come up with short-term revenue ideas to soften the blow of the impending cuts.

“As far as increasing revenue goes, now is a good time to do that,” Matthew Grumm, PBOT’s head of government affairs, said in a focus group report. “In the sense that people know things have changed and we can take advantage of that to say ‘Hey, we know things cost more’. People are aware of that. So it won’t come as a shock if we say that we need to raise some of those rates.”

CORRECTION, 2:50 p.m.: The story originally referred to Shoshana Cohen as Shoshana Oppenheim. The latter works for another office in the city and I confused them. I regret the error and apologize for any confusion. –Jonathan

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Parking spaces

Love’s adds hundreds of truck parking spaces in five new locations

Love’s new location in Fillmore, Utah is shown. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Heflin, Alabama; Kimball, South Dakota; Fillmore, Utah, and Leavenworth, Indiana, thanks to four stores that opened Thursday morning.

A fifth store in Klamath Falls, Oregon, opened on Friday. Together, the stores will add more than 380 truck parking spaces and more than 280 jobs in their respective communities.

“For only the second time in Love’s history, we are opening five new locations in one day that will be ready to help customers get back on the road quickly and safely,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Our team members in Klamath Falls, Heflin, Kimball, Fillmore and Leavenworth will provide customers with the freeway hospitality they expect when they stop at Love’s.”

Pitches are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Equipment is broken down by location below:

Klamath Falls, Oregon

  • Over 13,000 square feet
  • Carl’s Jr. (Opening January 17)
  • 94 truck parking spaces
  • 80 parking spaces
  • Seven diesel bays
  • Five showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories

Heflin, Alabama

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Bojangles. (Opening January 10)
  • 72 truck parking spaces.
  • 57 parking spaces.
  • Four RV parking spaces.
  • Seven RV hookups.
  • Eight diesel bays.
  • Seven showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Speedco. (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Kimball, South Dakota

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Godfather’s Pizza and Subway. (Opening January 10)
  • 68 truck parking spaces.
  • 48 parking spaces.
  • Five RV slots.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Five showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Fillmore, UT

  • Over 11,000 square feet
  • Taco John’s (Opening January 10)
  • 73 truck parking spaces
  • 58 parking spaces
  • Two VR spaces
  • Eight diesel bays
  • Seven showers
  • Laundry room (Opening later)
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories
  • dog park

Leavenworth, Indiana

  • Over 12,000 square feet
  • Hardee’s (Opening February 14)
  • 75 truck parking spaces
  • 50 parking spaces
  • Three RV parking spaces
  • Nine RV hookups
  • Seven diesel bays
  • Five showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories
  • dog park
The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Omnitracs

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Parking garage

Greensburg tax hike to offset losses from parking lot demolition

Greensburg residents will see an additional $1 million charge next year, and city officials will borrow $1 million as they look for ways to bolster public safety funds that have traditionally flowed from the J parking lot. Edward Hutchinson, which is to be demolished.

The charge and loan were part of a flurry of ordinances passed this week, including passing a balanced budget of $12.9 million.

The votes came weeks after city officials made the decision to close the garage, which is attached to Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital. The facility generated approximately $139,000 in the year before the covid-19 pandemic, and those funds were used to purchase police vehicles and fire trucks. However, this is a significant decrease in revenue from 10 years ago when it generated $250,000.

“The parking lot has reached its end of life and must now be permanently closed for safety reasons,” Councilman Randy Finfrock, accounts and finance manager, said last month. “That means revenue doesn’t continue to gradually decrease over time, it drops to zero for the next year. So we have to find another source of funding.

To keep the money flowing into the capital fund used for public safety, the council voted to take out a loan of $1 million. These funds will be used to purchase a new police vehicle each year for the next five years and a fire truck, which could cost over $700,000.

Revenue from the $1 million charge, which is expected to total $125,000, will be used to repay the loan. This equates to between $20 and $25 per owner.

“It was one of those situations where we just couldn’t keep kicking the road,” Mayor Robert Bell said. “If we wanted to maintain the integrity of the fire department and the police department, that was something we had to do. …I think the resident ROI is going to be pretty high, especially with these guys.

Taxpayers will see a separate line on their tax slips showing the 1 mill charge.

Council members intentionally listed it as a separate charge so that future administrations could not use the money for items other than public safety. Bell noted that the money can only be used for vehicles, not for other gear such as gloves and boots.

Officials made the decision to close the garage on December 1 in concert with Excela Health. The garage, built for 475 vehicles, opened in October 1979. It was intended to alleviate parking problems at the hospital. Over the years, however, free parking spaces have appeared around the garage and patients are spending fewer days in the hospital, leading to lower income.

Today, the deteriorated parking garage would cost about $2.5 million to repair, which would only extend its useful life by three to five years.

“If you don’t like paying $1 million for public safety, then you’re really going to hate paying $2.5 million for a garage bill that should be dealt with again in five years,” Finfrock said last month. “So we’ve eliminated that option…and we really don’t want to put that kind of money into it, and it’s not a good business model to follow.”

The budget includes fee increases related to recreation, 3% wage increases for municipal employees not covered by collective agreements and wage increases for seasonal employees. Planning and zoning expenditures will focus on improvements to Spring Avenue Park in the city’s Fifth Ward.

Megan Tomasic is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Megan at 724-850-1203, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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Parking spaces

200 parking spaces to be created in the industrial area of ​​Dorset

An office building in an industrial area in East Dorset will be partially demolished to create more than 200 parking spaces on the site.

The clearance will allow a 26 new light industrial unit project to proceed on the Ferndown industrial area adjacent to the Peartree Business Center site – subject to obtaining planning permission.

Dorset Council has approved the partial demolition of the Peartree Business Center south of Vulcan Way and east of Cobham Road, Ferndown.

The application is the first phase of the redevelopment of the area which is expected to see the construction of new industrial units offering more than 2,500 square meters of space. A preliminary application is currently under consideration and public comment was closed a month ago on November 15.

Consent for the demolition of the one-storey section of the north side office building will result in the loss of over 3,200 square meters of office space – but will leave 6,360 square meters of office space in place. The removal of the building will allow access to the brownfield area beyond and the creation of a larger parking lot.

The application also allows the creation of a new internal road on the site and will be developed in parallel with a separate application for 26 new industrial units north of the Peartree Business Center.

The site is close to the recently completed Porsche garage.

Ferndown and Uddens Business Improvement District supported the changes, as did Ferndown City Council in letters to Dorset Council in support of the planning request.

In total, the consent will create 214 parking spaces and 51 bicycle spaces.

The development will result in the loss of some trees although those on the northern and eastern limits of the site will be retained and will need to be protected during the construction phase.

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Parking garage

Evaluation of the proposed parking garage required

Those of us who survived the Boltwood garage mess will recall that a larger, more robust structure was originally planned and approved for this site.

However, a small, self-proclaimed group thought they knew better and filed a lawsuit, costing the city money in legal fees and reducing the size and scope of the garage. This has resulted in a lot less spaces and questions arise as to whether this can support an expansion.

Until we have a professional assessment of the proposed location behind CVS, we will not know if the concerns that have been raised are valid. To ask our City Council to do otherwise and not to respect this measure is to ask them to violate their fiduciary obligation under penalty of legal sanction.

Indeed, under MGL 40A Sec 1a, Zoning Definitions, zoning shall “to the fullest extent of the independent constitutional powers of towns and villages, protect the health, safety and general welfare of their present inhabitants and future ”. Failure to protect future residents would be seen as a breach of their fiduciary duty. Maybe you would like to live in a city where our elected leaders are not under a fiduciary duty, but we voted for it when we got rid of the town hall.

Maybe a few people can kill that garage too, with another lawsuit, and bring Amherst back to the 20th century. I’m sure some will try and our grandchildren will pay the price. Truth.

Kevin collins

Amherst

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Parking garage

Public Can Submit Parking Suggestions Online | Local news

LACONIA – Members of the public can now submit their ideas online on how to improve downtown parking.

Comments can be submitted using a special form that was posted on the city’s official website on Tuesday.

City authorities want public participation in the parking plan as much as possible, which is why they are soliciting suggestions through the website.

Comments submitted – whether online or through other means – will be reviewed by the City as well as the consulting engineer and architect on the project before the next public meeting to be held in February.

At the first public meeting held last week, the project would involve replacing deteriorating steel brackets in sections of the three-story structure, replacing crumbling concrete on parking lots and ramps between parking levels. , and the construction of a glazed staircase tower with elevator.

The city council asked the city to carry out a full-scale study of the scope and cost of refurbishing the garage that was built 47 years ago during the downtown urban renewal project.

The rough estimate for correcting structural flaws as well as improving lighting, accessibility, and the appearance of the building has been estimated at $ 6.6 million, although the final cost may well increase due to the inflation and other economic factors.

The actual construction will not begin until the city council has approved the necessary funding. Assuming council gives the green light, work could start next fall or spring 2023. The project is expected to last a year.

The public comments page can be accessed by going to www.laconianh.gov, hover over “Your Government” and click on “Public Works” from the drop-down menu to the right. Once on the Public Works page, click on “Parking garage rehabilitation in the left menu.

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Parking garage

Cleveland Hopkins Airport parking garage set to undergo $ 5 million repairs

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is planning nearly $ 5 million in repairs to the facility’s smart parking garage in early 2022.

With 4,240 spaces, the garage is the largest car park at the airport. It has undergone a series of repairs in recent years to consolidate the structure, which was built in the mid-1990s.

Airport manager Robert Kennedy said the project is expected to go to tender early next year. “We decided that we could keep putting a bandage on it, or we could fix it,” he said.

He said the garage is inspected monthly and remains safe to use. About 200 places are currently out of service to prevent further deterioration.

The garage will remain open during repairs next year. The airport has allocated $ 4.9 million for the work.

Airport planning and engineering chief Dennis Kramer said scheduled repairs to the garage are expected to extend its life by about 20 years – that’s when it’s expected to replace it as part of a long-term plan to rebuild much of the airport.

The airport recently completed a federally mandated master plan process, which includes a capital investment of $ 2 billion for the facility over the next 20 years or so. The replacement of the parking garage is described in one of the subsequent phases, which are scheduled to increase the growth in the number of passengers.

The earlier phases of the master plan improvements require a substantial reconstruction of the aging airport terminal. Work on these earlier phases is expected to begin once passenger numbers at the airport recover from the slowdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more: The $ 2 billion plan to rebuild Cleveland Hopkins International Airport includes four new halls, the I-71 interchange, more

Cleveland Hopkins predicts Thanksgiving air traffic will overtake 2019, so get to the airport early

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Parking garage

Lukewarm Grief Falls Board at Parking Garage | Local government

“Very lukewarm” is the best word to describe the village council’s response to the question “Is it time for Chagrin Falls to consider building a parking lot / garage?” “

The common thread expressed by the village chiefs is their concern for the cost and who would pay for the construction of a parking structure and whether this should be a priority topic of discussion.

Of the seven current and incoming council members, only one, Councilor Andrew Rockey, told the Chagrin Valley Times he was “pro-parking, but like everything there are challenges.” , did he declare.

“Funding is going to be the biggest problem with this type of business. Funding it directly from the general fund would mean we wouldn’t be able to do any other necessary work, which would mean it would have to go on the ballot for a bond, or collect to pay it off. “

Current adviser Nancy Rogoff said she can see both sides of the issue, for and against, but is cautious if it is a vote today.

“While I resist the notion of a ‘parking problem’ in the village, the parking problems seemingly continue unabated. . . I don’t think the Village would benefit from the construction of a parking lot.

Its reason is the construction and maintenance costs and the limited space available for a parking structure which “far outweigh any perceived benefit to the village”.

New board member Michael Corkran, who served as citizen chair of the parking committee in 2016, expressed cautious optimism tempered by three concerns.

“Personally, I think that if the constraints, especially economic, location and traffic can be overcome, the village would benefit from a parking structure,” he said.

While there are options that could resolve the location and traffic issues, Corkran adds that cost, funding, and resident support will determine whether such a parking structure would be practical.

The future city councilor reflects that in the end, no one solution will satisfy everyone and real or imagined perceptions regarding the Chagrin Falls parking lot from outside the community are also part of the equation.

“As residents who walk almost everywhere in the village, parking is not a problem for my wife and I and when I drive, like most residents, I know the ‘nooks and crannies’ where parking is almost. always available even if I need to walk a bit. “

For those outside the area unfamiliar with parking in the nooks and crannies, Chagrin Falls can be a challenge, he notes.

As a contribution to the work of the 2016 Parking Commission, Mr Corkran said he conducted an unscientific study by speaking with over 100 people from neighboring communities to ask their opinions on parking in downtown Chagrin Falls. .

There was general agreement that parking in downtown Chagrin Falls is a problem and that the village should be avoided Thursday through Saturday, spring through fall and on holidays.

“In my opinion, the target constituency is not mainly the inhabitants of the village with a parking problem, but the non-residents who are the customers of the businesses in the village and who are discouraged from coming due to the hourly parking problem. peak.”

Future new board member Brian Drum said he was not opposed to talking about a parking structure, but that it might be premature to embark on a project of this magnitude. “Without first addressing the issues that undermine the usefulness of the parking capacity that we already have.”

He explained that in his opinion, the village is giving up almost all of the main parking lot for free without any incentive to use it more efficiently.

“When the last parking commission report was released in 2016, I had just moved to town. So I missed all the discussion and all the research that led to its publication, but I agree with most of its conclusions that existing parking resources are poorly allocated. . “

Mr Drum adds that if the data underlying this report is in dispute, he would like to see the evidence and if the circumstances have changed significantly between them “then maybe we should talk about a new study”.

Ultimately, if there are any objections to the recommendations, he would love to hear what they are, but, he notes, “but not doing anything about the current situation while moving forward with a large-scale project does not seem to be a wise way forward ”.

City Councilor Angela DeBernardo answered the survey question by asking two questions herself.

“Do we have a shortage of parking spaces? No. Are our out-of-town visitors struggling to find the perfect parking spot? Yes.”

“I have objected to adding paid parking lots downtown in the past because I think we are competing with neighboring regional shopping areas that offer free parking options and similar concerns about adding parking lots. ‘a paid garage in the city center,’ she said.

She indicates that the existing, often vacant parking spaces in some city centers prove that “paid” parking is not being used and wonders whether a “paid” parking structure would also be rejected.

“I’m always interested in things that will help Chagrin do well, so I’m open to different options. At the moment, based on information presented to me in the past, I am not in favor of a state-funded parking structure, ”adds City Councilor DeBernardo.

Like her colleagues, she adds that there are more urgent items like improving the safety of pedestrians and lighted crosswalks, upgrading the power grid for constant power, public toilets in parks and a list of infrastructure needs.

To these ends, the city councilor said she wanted to know more about the federal infrastructure funding options for any local needs and what might be available, but, she adds, “I’m sure that the administration has its own wish list “.

Chagrin Falls’s burgeoning restaurant scene is also on City Councilor DeBernardo’s radar and how that could add pressure on parking, especially during the evening hours.

The compact River, West Street and West Orange Street dining district, which is also home to the Chagrin Valley Little Theater, is all its own.

“I would rather see our restaurants working together to form a downtown valet parking service for weekends and evenings rather than investing millions of taxpayer dollars in a parking structure,” she said. declared.

A possible downtown shuttle service as an alternative to a parking structure is another topic of discussion, she concluded.

Council chairwoman Erinn Grube, like Mayor William Tomko, believes council should spend its time focusing on the major infrastructure issues facing the village, such as repairing its water pipes. century-old water and sewer.

She cites the 2023 repair of the Main Street bridge, the completion of improvements to the sewage treatment plant and updates to the police station as other priorities.

“The last time we discussed the change to paid parking, the council decided not to do it and I did not see a parking proposal that does not require us to have paid parking throughout the village”, she declared.

That doesn’t mean she’s not open to further discussion if there are new ideas, she added.

“If a self-governing group of citizens wants to develop a plan and present it to council, I’m always willing to put efforts like this on the agenda (but) I don’t think that’s the role of the council. appoint citizens to form their own advocacy groups. “

Councilor Grube points out that the village has had a parking commission in Chagrin Falls since 1993 consisting of three citizens and a council representative and that there are two vacant citizen positions and suggests that residents interested in serving should contact the Mayor Tomko.

New city councilor Jack Subel said he didn’t have enough information to express an opinion anyway at this point.

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Parking spaces

City Council approves changes to new development car and bicycle parking bylaws – City of Toronto

Press release

December 15, 2021

City Council has passed zoning bylaw amendments that will remove most requirements for new developments to provide a minimum number of parking spaces. At the same time, limits on the number of parking spaces that can be built will be added. With the goal of building healthy and sustainable communities, this change helps to better manage automobile dependency and strikes a balance between too much and too little parking.

Adapted regulations – aligned with the City’s Climate Action Strategy, TransformTO and the Provincial Policy Statement and Growth Plan (2019) as amended – propel Toronto forward as it strives to achieve ambitious goals that address environmental sustainability, including reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving resident livability and creating healthier communities.

These zoning bylaw updates encourage residents to use alternatives to driving such as walking, cycling and public transit, reducing traffic congestion and creating space to improve conditions for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users.

Quote:

“Today the City Council took concrete action for a healthier and more sustainable city. The move means developers will no longer be required to build parking spaces that buyers don’t want, making it easier for residents who live without a car to buy a home.

– Mayor John Tory

“This more strategic and thoughtful management of the parking supply will contribute to the City’s priorities for addressing the climate emergency, improving housing affordability and encouraging alternative forms of mobility for a greater number of people.

– Deputy Mayor Ana Bailão (Davenport), Chair of the Planning and Housing Committee

Toronto is home to more than 2.9 million people whose diversity and experiences make this great city Canada’s main economic engine and one of the most diverse and livable cities in the world. As the fourth largest city in North America, Toronto is a world leader in technology, finance, film, music, culture and innovation, and ranks consistently at the top of international rankings thanks to investments supported by its government, residents and businesses. For more information visit the City website or follow us on Twitter, instagram Where Facebook.

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Interesting building in the parking garage of downtown Kalispell

December 15 — Kalispell City Council plans to vote on a downtown parking structure project at its first meeting of the New Year on January 3.

In a working session Monday, council gathered public comment and discussed a proposal to build a parking structure in the city-owned parking lot at First Street and First Avenue West.

The car park is part of Montana Hotel Dev Partners’ proposal to build a boutique hotel in downtown Kalispell. The Charles Hotel would be set up at Third Street West and Main Street, and the proposed parking structure would replace the parking spaces that would disappear to make way for the hotel.

The city approved Montana Hotel Dev Partners LLC’s proposal for the $ 47 million project in September, but exact plans have yet to be finalized.

The car park, as currently envisaged, would contain 250 spaces in total: 90 rented for hotel guests, 112 to replace the spaces displaced by the hotel and 48 additional spaces.

The parking structure is expected to cost around $ 7 million. Additional tax funding, including funds generated by the hotel, would be used to finance the parking structure.

Once built, the parking lot would belong to the city.

HOWEVER, SOME Board members raised concerns on Monday about the funding mechanism for the proposed project.

Council member Sid Daoud, a staunch opponent of government funding, reiterated his disapproval of the Tax Increment Financing District and the concept of government ownership.

“I’m not a fan of this whole process,” Daoud said.

He came up with a solution that could make the project more “palatable” to critics like himself – by adding housing to the plans for the parking lot structure.

Karlene Kohr, a neighboring landlord, supported Daoud’s suggestion during the public comment period of the working session. Kohr has opposed the project since the developer responded to the city’s request for proposals, and she redoubled her concerns about the impacts of construction on the historic buildings on Main Street during the working session. But she was more supportive of a vision for the parking structure that would include housing.

Further concerns about the plans were raised by board member Tim Kluesner, who suspected the calculations estimating the taxes that would be generated by the hotel were inaccurate. He turned to the example of the Hilton Garden Inn to explain a possible shortfall in the city’s tax generation forecast for the project.

Bill Goldberg, one of the developers behind Montana Hotel Dev Partners LLC, said he’s been told the Charles Hotel will generate around $ 1 million in taxes each year.

In addition, City Manager Doug Russell explained that the city would not be “responsible” for the one-off costs if the hotel underperforms on tax generation. The city would simply agree to pay the additional funding generated by the project to the project developer, regardless of the final amount.

Despite these concerns about the project, there was a lot of support during the working session for a downtown parking structure. Several people spoke of the long-standing interest in developing a parking lot in downtown Kalispell.

“Our biggest problem downtown is long-term employee parking,” said planning director Jarod Nygren.

Journalist Bret Anne Serbin can be reached at 406-758-4459 or [email protected]

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Building of interest in the parking garage of downtown Kalispell


Kalispell City Council plans to vote on a downtown parking structure project at its first meeting of the New Year on January 3.

In a working session Monday, council gathered public comment and discussed a proposal to build a parking structure in the city-owned parking lot at First Street and First Avenue West.

The car park is part of Montana Hotel Dev Partners’ proposal to build a boutique hotel in downtown Kalispell. The Charles Hotel would be set up at Third Street West and Main Street, and the proposed parking structure would replace the parking spaces that would disappear to make way for the hotel.

The city approved Montana Hotel Dev Partners LLC’s proposal for the $ 47 million project in September, but exact plans have yet to be finalized.

The car park, as currently envisaged, would contain 250 spaces in total: 90 rented for hotel guests, 112 to replace the spaces displaced by the hotel and 48 additional spaces.

The parking structure is expected to cost around $ 7 million. Additional tax funding, including funds generated by the hotel, would be used to finance the parking structure.

Once built, the parking lot would belong to the city.

HOWEVER, SOME On Monday, council members raised concerns about the financing mechanism for the proposed project.

Council member Sid Daoud, a staunch opponent of government funding, reiterated his disapproval of the Tax Increment Financing District and the concept of government ownership.

“I’m not a fan of this whole process,” Daoud said.

He came up with a solution that could make the project more “palatable” to critics like himself – by adding housing to the plans for the parking lot structure.

Karlene Kohr, a neighboring landlord, supported Daoud’s suggestion during the public comment period of the working session. Kohr has opposed the project since the developer responded to the city’s request for proposals, and she redoubled her concerns about the construction’s impacts on historic Main Street buildings during the working session. But she was more supportive of a vision for the parking structure that would include housing.

Further concerns about the plans were raised by board member Tim Kluesner, who suspected the calculations estimating the taxes that would be generated by the hotel were inaccurate. He turned to the example of the Hilton Garden Inn to explain a possible shortfall in the city’s tax generation forecast for the project.

Bill Goldberg, one of the developers behind Montana Hotel Dev Partners LLC, said he’s been told the Charles Hotel will generate around $ 1 million in taxes each year.

In addition, City Manager Doug Russell explained that the city would not be “responsible” for the one-off costs if the hotel underperforms on tax generation. The city would simply agree to pay the additional funding generated by the project to the project developer, regardless of the final amount.

Despite these concerns about the project, there was a lot of support during the working session for a downtown parking structure. Several people spoke of the long-standing interest in developing a parking lot in downtown Kalispell.

“Our biggest problem downtown is long-term employee parking,” said planning director Jarod Nygren.

Journalist Bret Anne Serbin can be reached at 406-758-4459 or [email protected]

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Parking garage

Charlottesville’s proposed CIP takes money for West Main, a parking lot

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) – The Charlottesville Planning Commission received the draft five-year capital improvement plan on Tuesday, December 14. The proposal includes a large part of the funds intended for a project deemed essential.

The first dollars for a massive school reconfiguration project could be spent in 2023: $ 2.5 million is expected to be spent on the project that year, with the big dollars in place for fiscal year 2024 – that’s when – where $ 72.5 million is set aside as a placeholder.

To do so, the city would have to abandon two projects: the West Main Streetscape – an expense of $ 18 million – and the 7th Street parking lot – an expense of $ 5.6 million.

The proposed city plan would spend nearly $ 700,000 on repairs to the Market Street garage.

Senior Budget and Management Analyst Krisy Hammill says the plan, while not yet officially approved, is aligned with the city’s leadership values.

“This plan continues to exemplify and put funding where the board has said to be its top priorities,” she said. “Looking at the five-year totals, education would be number 1, affordable housing would be number 2, and transportation and access would be number 3.”

Over the next five years, more than $ 88 million is expected to be spent on education projects, about $ 34 million for affordable housing and about $ 20 million for transportation and access.

Another change in the plan for fiscal 2023 is to add $ 1.2 million to deal with increases in construction costs for the bypass fire hall.

Hammill spoke about the money left in the parking structure account and the deal Charlottesville has with Albemarle County.

“The message and the decision was clear that there likely won’t be a parking structure in the future, which is why funding has been cut,” said Hammill. “However, the final decisions in terms of what will be necessary or required to fulfill our obligations to the county have also not been made. So the money left in this account will give us the flexibility to leave that deal and those conversations take place. If all those dollars weren’t needed, then they would go back to the board for the board to redistribute into the PIC. “

She also discussed the impact of a possible special city-wide sales tax.

Related: Lawmakers Discuss Possibility of Charlottesville Sales Tax Paying for School Reconfiguration

Related: How Charlottesville Plans To Use Taxpayer Money For School Reconfiguration

“We could use all that money to pay for the school reconfiguration project and pay for it using that money over a very short period of time, or certainly to pay all the debt service, and we probably wouldn’t have to increase.” taxes to pay for that, ”she said.

Copyright 2021 WVIR. All rights reserved.

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Security addition for downtown parking lot dominates budget talks

“These people leave trash, used needles, furniture, blood and human waste for city crews to clean up in the morning. It is not uncommon to find strangers using intravenous drugs and sleeping in the facility.

The situation in a downtown municipal parking garage is a microcosm of North Bay’s general social problems.

Parking 150 vehicles has become a common source of these issues for its staff, according to a report from the City of North Bay’s parking department.

“These individuals leave trash, used needles, furniture, blood and human waste for city crews to clean up in the morning. It is not uncommon to find strangers using IV drugs and sleeping in the establishment.”

City staff “have been instructed to move people using the facility as shelter and have expressed safety concerns.”

The security and safety of parking for citizens was also called into question in September when a local woman who parks at the facility had a wheel stolen from her vehicle after it was lifted onto blocks of wood while she was at work.

After the vehicle owner contacted police and the City, he was told that all security cameras were operational on the day of the incident, but the image quality of one of the cameras near the vehicle had an “image quality issue”, and patrols were promised to increase and options were being explored.

During discussions surrounding the 2022 operating budget, a budget item of $42,350 to provide nighttime security at the municipal parking garage on McIntyre Street West sparked a respectful debate among members of North Bay City Council on the whether it should be kept or discarded.

From May to mid-October, the security detachment assigned to the municipal marina patrols the parking lot. The parking service is offering to hire a full-time security guard for $42,350 to patrol the parking garage from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., seven days a week, the other 31 weeks of the year.

Some around the table see this as an example of financial investment in the problem without addressing the root causes.

Com. Scott Robertson called the security option a ‘band-aid solution’ to an upstream problem and Deputy Mayor Tanya Vrebosch agreed, noting that moving people seeking shelter doesn’t solve the underlying issues at play. .

Com. Bill Vrebosch suggested the North Bay Police Department adjust patrols to include the parking garage and cut security spending altogether. This week, Police Chief Scott Tod is scheduled to meet with city staff regarding parking and the SPNB budget.

Com. George Maroosis also questioned Ron Melnyk, the City’s Bylaw Enforcement Officer regarding possible patrols by his staff.

A suggestion from the jerk. Mark King about making the garage “secure” so as not to “allow transient traffic”, was acknowledged by City Engineer John Severino as having met resistance from neighboring businesses for fear of losing two hours of free parking for their clients.

Mayor Al McDonald joined the conversation, observing that increasing parking fees to pay for security might be an option. McDonald noted that indoor parking in the winter often costs more than outdoor parking at other centers.

Meanwhile, the con. Dave Mendicino, who sits on the Downtown North Bay board, has been sharing discussions for months about the parking situation. It is hoped that the downtown outreach program and community organizations will help resolve the situation by providing people with options, rather than finding shelter in the parking lot all winter.

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Miami, Fort Lauderdale Airport Guide to Parking, Cost

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A driver waits at a toll booth to exit the Cypress parking lot at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

School is out, summer is here and it’s time to relax. But first you need to get to the airport.

You have a flight to see relatives. Or maybe you just pick them up after they land to see you.

Whatever your reason for going to Miami or Broward airports, you need to find out about parking. Short term. Long term. Between.

And, of course, what you will pay.

Here’s a survival guide to cut the surprises and get you into a space that suits your needs:

Parking at Miami International Airport

Miami International Airport has two garages and a few charging stations for people with electric vehicles. It also has a cell phone parking lot just off LeJeune Road and Northwest 31st Street where people can park for free while waiting to hear from someone arriving at the airport for pickup. MIA also has valet parking, but it’s temporarily closed, according to the website.

Dolphin Garage serves Concourses D and E. This is the best place to park if you are traveling with American Airlines, Qatar Airways, British Airways or JetBlue, depending on the airport. Flamingo Garage serves the EJ concourses and is the best place to park if you’re flying on all other airlines, including Delta or Southwest.

If you park in one of the garages, expect to pay $2 every 20 minutes. If your car is parked for more than 2 hours and 40 minutes, you will be charged the maximum daily rate of $17, depending on the airport. Your car can stay in the garage for up to 45 days, unless “no overnight” is indicated. After 45 days, your car will be towed.

Payments accepted: cash, credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover), Apple Pay and Samsung Pay. The airport no longer uses SunPass.

To find the car park closest to your terminalvisit the MIA website.

POINT: Look for green lights in garages. Green lights mean there is an available parking space, while a red light means the parking space is taken. Also keep an eye out for digital signs. The signs provide real-time information on the number of parking spaces available on each floor.

READ NEXT: Is your Miami or Fort Lauderdale flight delayed or cancelled? Here’s how to check

Parking at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport has three garages and an overflow lot that opens at peak times during holidays or when the garages are full (signs and workers lead you there). There is a cell phone parking lot where people can park for free while waiting to pick someone up from the airport. FLL also has a curbside valet.

If you park on Level 2 of the Hibiscus Garage or Level 1 of the Palm Garage, it costs $3 per hour, with a maximum of $36 per day. If you park on levels 3-7 of the Hibiscus Garage, levels 2-4 of the Palm Garage, and levels 7-9 of the Cypress Garage, it costs $3 per hour, with a maximum of $15 per day.

If you end up having to park in the overflow parking lot, expect to pay $10.

You can pay for FLL parking with cash, check (starter checks are not accepted), and credit card (MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover, and Diner’s Club). You can also use SunPass Plus.

POINT: Use the FLL app to see real-time parking availability and to help locate your car if you forget where you parked.

To find the car park closest to your terminalvisit the FLL website.

READ MORE: Forgot your phone on the plane? Here’s how lost and found works at Miami and Broward airports

This story was originally published December 13, 2021 06:00.

Miami Herald Related Stories

There’s never a dull moment in Florida – and Michelle covers it as a Realtime/Breaking News reporter for the Miami Herald. She graduated with honors from Florida International University, where she served as editor of Student Media PantherNOW. Previously, she worked as a news editor at WSVN Channel 7 and was a 2020-2021 Poynter-Koch Media & Journalism Fellow.

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Parking garage

Amherst Councilor Holds Vote Authorizing Parking Garage

AMHERST – Decisions on zoning changes to create a parking overlay district in downtown Amherst and to require mixed-use buildings to have a minimum of commercial space on the ground floor, are delayed to the prerogative of a municipal councillor.

At Monday’s city council meeting, where four zoning amendments were being considered, District 5 Councilman Darcy DuMont asked for two of the items to be deferred.

City Manager Paul Bockelman said on Tuesday that the two postponed zoning changes are on the agenda for a meeting of the City Services and Outreach Committee at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, although he added that he there was uncertainty as to whether votes would be held that evening.

Zoning changes are also on the agenda of a ‘four-town’ meeting on Saturday where regional school issues, including the assessment formula that will determine how much each community will pay towards the regional budget next year, are being discussed by representatives of Amherst, Shutesbury, Leveret and Pelham.

To pass the zoning changes, nine of 13 councilors must vote in favor to meet the necessary two-thirds threshold under state law.

The city charter also provides that after an initial request for a deferral, four councilors en bloc can request a second deferral. If that happens, Bockelman said the vote on the zoning changes would take place on December 20.

At-Large Councilor Alisa Brewer said she was frustrated that DuMont’s actions threw the voting process for or against the zoning amendments into chaos.

City Council unanimously approved the first zoning amendment before it, which will extend temporary Section 14 until December 31, 2022. This allows outdoor dining and other pandemic-era protocols to stay in place to support local businesses.

Councilors also voted 12 to 1, with only DuMont voting against, to approve a series of new parking and access requirements for homes.

The delayed regulations generated the most conversation, with residents on North Prospect Street worrying about the new overlapping ward that would apply to city-owned parking between North Pleasant and North Prospect streets to accommodate the second downtown parking lot .

Harry Peltz of North Prospect Street said the rezoning rush, without the support of neighbors, will hurt the city rather than help it.

Ira Bryck of Strong Street said a parking lot would disturb the tranquility of the neighborhood.

Claudia Pazmany, executive director of the Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce, however, spoke out in favor of the need for parking for businesses.

With respect to changes to mixed-use buildings, councilors appeared to favor requiring that 30% of the ground floor area be commercial.

District 1 Councilor Cathy Schoen said having around half of the ground floor non-residential is a good thing, although an amendment to raise the requirement to 40 per cent has narrowly missed, 7-6.

To Grand Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke pointed to an analysis of retail, carried out before the pandemic, which found that too much retail space would create empty storefronts, and these vacancies would prove detrimental to city centers and villages. Hanneke said the analysis showed there is a demand for about 12,000 to 15,000 square feet of retail space across the city.

If the bylaw is approved, District 5 Councilwoman Shalini Bahl-Milne said it would improve on existing rules, which require no minimum percentage of commercial area in mixed-use buildings.

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Driver hospitalized after throwing vehicle out of 8-story parking lot, police say

One person was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after driving from the top of an eight-story car park, police say.

Tavares police are investigating after Jewels Sartin, of Tavares, drove a Ford Mustang over the top floor of the parking lot. The incident happened around 3:30 p.m. Monday.

The vehicle took off about 30 feet and landed in an empty lot between the parking lot and a BB&T bank at 224 N. Sinclair Ave., police said. The driver then fled on foot but was found by officers.

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“The motive/intent is unknown at this time and is under investigation,” Tavares Police Department Detective Courtney Sullivan said.

Dan Flemming lives in Mount Dora and often goes to the parking lot. He said the top two floors of the garage had been chained, blocked off from traffic for years. Still, he said he saw people going through the chains anyway.

“Because I’m doing the stairs, I’m away from everyone. But I’ve heard a lot of ‘vroom vroom’ and how they come across here,” Flemming said.

Police said the investigation is ongoing. No charges have yet been brought against the driver.

Watch FOX 35 Orlando for the latest Central Florida news.

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Parking spaces

Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!

Unscientific parking spaces on Light House Hill Road (LHH) are not a SMART IDEA by the SMART CITY managers of Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL)!

Mangaluru: The good news for the citizens of Mangaluru and tourists to Mangaluru is that the section of Light House Hill Road to Dr Ambedkar Circle (Jyothi Circle) is widening and about 80% of the work is complete, although the project is in progress. a slow pace. Unfortunately, the bad news is that providing unscientific parking spaces for all four wheels of this widening road, which is just a silly idea. Every educated person and common sense person the Mangalorean team interacted with, they all said the parking spots that are being made are nothing but foolish and absolutely a stupid idea, on the part of the officials who are behind the plan.

These parking spaces are prepared near the Ladies Club and in front of Tagore Park, on the section of LHH Road. As the four-wheelers park in these spaces with their bumpers extending out onto the road, imagine what the traffic situation would be like on that road at rush hour. Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces. Apart from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have been ample parking spaces for vehicles rather than taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Traffic delays have multiple reasons: high volume of vehicles, potholes slowing traffic, ineffective coordination of traffic lights, unhealthy driving practices, infrastructure failures, etc. previous section. The presence of a building as a religious institution, or a natural obstacle through trees, are common examples of bottlenecks. Vehicles parked along the road can create a similar bottleneck and sometimes accentuate a pre-existing bottleneck due to the conflict and blockages they create for the flow of traffic.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every now and then the meters can divide the congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.

As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to get people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to provide more convenience for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.

Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more informed for drivers to choose the right mode of transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! .

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A decision looms over the parking lot overlay district in downtown Amherst

AMHERST – City council is expected to decide on a new parking overlay district for the city center at its last meeting in 2021 next week.

The district of superimposed parking lots, as well as a modification of the planning rules for mixed-use buildings and the required commercial space on the ground floor, will be on the agenda for the meeting on December 20. The meeting is the last for Councilors who took office in the fall of 2018. Six new Councilors will join seven alternates following a swearing-in ceremony on January 3rd.

Originally postponed by District 5 Councilor Darcy DuMont at the December 6 council meeting, DuMont at a meeting last Thursday brought forward a motion to further delay zoning changes using a second charter provision of the city. This article reads as follows: “if, at the next vote on the question, 4 members or more object to the taking of the vote, the question is again postponed for at least 5 additional days”.

DuMont was joined in the postponement by District 1 Councilors Cathy Schoen and Sarah Swartz and District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam.

Council Chair Lynn Griesemer said with items pushed back until December 20, residents and others are encouraged to continue providing comments and feedback on the proposals.

The idea of ​​the overlay district is to have the city-owned parking lot between North Pleasant and North Prospect streets house a private parking garage. The site, next to another private CVS property, was recommended in a 1990 study by the city and was heavily considered until 1996, before authorities decided to build a garage on the site owned by the city. the Amherst Redevelopment Authority on Boltwood Walk.

The parking garage overlay neighborhood is supported by many in the business community, but residents, primarily those who live on North Prospect Street, have expressed concerns.

The Amherst Area Chamber of Commerce and Amherst Business Improvement District are advocating for rezoning.

House Executive Director Claudia Pazmany said rezoning is essential as the end piece of a Destination Amherst initiative and is “the most important link to keep people in town, to spend time, money and enjoy our vibrant downtown Amherst, strengthening our economic footprint. ”

A petition launched by the House says that “a parking lot will concentrate personal vehicles in the immediate vicinity of shops, restaurants and public services such as the town hall, the community center, the health center and the Jones library”.

Opponents disagree. Ira Bryck of Strong Street is among those who wrote to city council that the site is not the best location for parking:

“As for the garage, it is far from the best location, it will disrupt the quiet enjoyment of a historic district, go against the advice of experts who have studied the Amherst parking situation , is difficult to find and even more difficult to enter and exit, will need the removal of parking that is already functioning well in a residential area, may have been chosen for special interests rather than for the good of our community, and won’t have the setbacks and other restrictions that could make a garage well-designed.

Both zoning changes require a two-thirds majority of city council to pass.

At the end of the November 29 council meeting, where a first reading on the four zoning changes was taken, Pam expressed concern that so many meetings and long conversations were taking place on the zoning, and proposed a motion not to have such topics. high during the holiday season again.

“It ruined my vacation and I know I’m not the only one. I’m really upset about it, ”Pam said.

Schoen said the board agreed to end meetings before 10 p.m., rather than extending them until almost midnight. “I just think what we do to ourselves and what we do to the staff is wearing us out,” Schoen said.

Griesemer said this December would be unusual. “I would say never again because I don’t like him better than you do,” Griesemer said.

But she said the long meetings were the result of advisers speaking without worrying about time constraints.

“I have to return this to you. Keep control of your time, ”said Griesemer.

District 2 Councilor Pat De Angelis said the zoning changes must be voted on. “I’m a little tired of people saying we don’t need to do this. De Angelis also slammed those who spoke out against District 4 Councilor Evan Ross and District 3 Councilor George Ryan, key supporters of the Overlay District who failed to win new terms.

“We have to respect each other and that starts with respecting each other and limiting what we say to what’s important, not saying the same thing six times because you want to make your point,” De said. Angelis. “I’m sorry, but I needed to say it. ”

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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Parking garage

Parking garage plans fitted out; hard to pinpoint costs | Local news

LACONIA – While plans to rehabilitate the downtown parking lot boil down to hard facts, city officials and consultants stress that the final cost of the project will depend on inflation and the extent of the chain disruption supply.

The rough estimate for correcting structural defects as well as improving lighting, accessibility and appearance of the 47-year-old building has been valued at $ 6.6 million.

But public works manager Wes Anderson stressed that his office will continuously monitor the rising cost of building materials as well as their availability over the next few months in order to come up with a better estimate of the costs of the project.

“The situation is very fluid,” Anderson said at a public meeting Wednesday when plans for the project were discussed in detail.

About 12 people attended the meeting held at the Belknap plant, including Mayor Andrew Hosmer, City Manager Scott Myers and City Councilors Henry Lipman and Bob Hamel, who chairs the council’s land and buildings committee.

The garage is largely unused in part due to structural issues that required the closure of more than half of its 256 spaces and also because the dark interior and other factors made many people worried about the garage. idea to enter, especially after dark.

“The garage is dirty and dingy and nobody wants to be in it,” said Bob Durfee, of planning and engineering firm Dubois & King. “Some people don’t feel safe in there.”

The plans presented on Wednesday involve both major structural repairs, better access for pedestrians and vehicles and improvements to the interior.

Durfee said the most serious deterioration was in the decking under the ramps between the different levels. He said that over the years these areas have suffered a lot of damage due to the salty slush falling from vehicles during the winter, which has caused corrosion to some metal frames and concrete decks. He stated that the structural steel on the second and third levels of the garage, however, is in good condition.

Durfee said the rehabilitation plan includes:

– Repair the metal frame if necessary.

– Remove and replace the decking and walls of the ramps, landings and transition areas if necessary.

– Remove and replace the deteriorated decking.

– Waterproofing and replacement of the second level terrace and sealing of the third level terrace.

– Installation of a new glazed staircase tower with elevator on the north side of the structure.

– Repair of the existing southern stairwell.

– Installation of new doors and windows in the stairwells.

– Clean, paint and install brighter or more energy efficient lighting throughout.

The design aspects of the plan were described by architect Peter Stewart.

Interest in major repairs and upgrades to the facility has grown in recent months due to increased commercial activity in the city center and the recent opening of the restored Colonial Theater.

Wednesday’s public meeting was the first of three such sessions. Further meetings are tentatively scheduled for February and April.

The actual construction will not begin until the city council has approved the necessary funding. Assuming council gives the green light, work could begin next fall or spring 2023. The project is expected to last a year.

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Parking spaces

Love’s opens four new truck stops and adds 280 truck parking spaces

This week, Love’s Travel Stops opened stores in Montana, North Dakota, Iowa and Texas.

On December 9, Love’s opened truck stops in Great Falls, Montana; Drayton, North Dakota; Pacific Junction, Iowa; and Dalhart, Texas. The new stores will add 280 truck parking spaces to the Love’s network.

“Love’s continues to open new locations during the holidays to help get professional drivers and four-wheeled customers to their destination safely and quickly,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Whether it’s fuel, fresh food and drink, or a gift for a loved one – like a toy or today’s latest electronics – customers can get what they need. when they stop at one of our more than 570 locations across the country.”

See below for more details on each new store’s amenities.

Great Falls, Montana

  • Over 9,000 square feet
  • Chester’s Chicken, Godfather’s Pizza and Subway. (Opening December 13)
  • 56 truck parking spaces
  • Five diesel bays
  • Four showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • dog park

Drayton, North Dakota

  • Over 7,000 square feet
  • Taco John’s (Opening December 13)
  • 63 truck parking spaces
  • Six diesel bays
  • Four showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • dog park

Pacific Junction, Iowa

  • Over 10,000 square feet
  • Subway
  • 84 truck parking spaces
  • Six diesel bays
  • Five showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • dog park

Dalhart, TX

  • Over 8,000 square feet
  • Chester’s Chicken and Godfather’s Pizza (Opening December 13)
  • 77 truck parking spaces
  • Five diesel bays
  • Four showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • dog park

In January 2021, Love’s announced plans to open up to 50 new truck stops across the country this year, which would add approximately 3,000 new truck parking spaces to the Love’s network.

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Parking spaces

New Love locations offer 280 parking spaces nationwide

The new Love’s in Pacific Junction, Iowa is introduced. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY — Love’s Travel Stops announced the opening of four new stores Thursday.

Together, the locations will provide 280 large parking spaces and create 190 jobs.

The new stores are in Great Falls, Montana, Drayton, North Dakota, Pacific Junction, Iowa and Dalhart, Texas.

“Love’s continues to open new locations during the holidays to help get professional drivers and four-wheeled customers to their destination safely and quickly,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Whether it’s fuel, fresh food and drink, or a gift for a loved one – like a toy or today’s latest electronics – customers can get what they need. when they stop at one of our more than 570 locations across the country.”

In honor of the grand openings, Love’s will donate $2,000 to nonprofit organizations in each city. The donation will go to CASA-CAN in Great Falls, Montana; the Twilight Fund in Dalhart, Texas; a later chosen organization in Drayton, North Dakota, and it will be split between Glenwood Public Schools and the Glenwood Public Library in Pacific Junction, Iowa.

Here is a breakdown of each location’s amenities:

PACIFIC JUNCTION, IOWA

  • Over 10,000 square feet.
  • Metro.
  • 84 truck parking spaces.
  • 51 parking spaces.
  • Three RV spaces.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Five showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

DALHART, TEXAS

  • Over 8,000 square feet.
  • Chester’s chicken and the godfather’s pizza. (Opening December 13)
  • 77 truck parking spaces.
  • 48 parking spaces.
  • Five RV slots.
  • Five diesel bays.
  • Four showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

DRAYTON, NORTH DAKOTA

  • Over 7,000 square feet.
  • Taco John’s. (Opening December 13)
  • 63 truck parking spaces.
  • 45 parking spaces.
  • Six RV slots.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Four showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA

Omnitracs

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Parking garage

Light rail parking garage, guideway running up Kent’s West Hill

Crews progress on Kent’s West Hill with the construction of the new Sound Transit light rail line and parking garage.

The estimated $3.1 billion project will extend light rail 7.8 miles from the Angle Lake station at SeaTac to the Federal Way Transit Center. Passenger service is expected to start in 2024.

Floors are rising for the Kent Des Moines Station Parking Garage which will include 500 parking spaces and will be located just east of the new elevated light rail station along a new 236th Street South just south from Pacific Highway South and across from Highline College.

Work also continues on the elevated guideway that will run over Kent Des Moines Road, aka State Route 516, and on Interstate 5 where the line will run parallel to the west of the freeway.

Crews are also working on a new parking lot at South 272nd Street, just west of I-5. This facility will accommodate 1,100 vehicles.

The area around the Kent Des Moines train station will eventually be redeveloped by Sound Transit, which is now using the property to stage construction equipment. The City of Kent partners with the agency to ensure a vision for future development focused on the opportunities that can be created through easy access to public transport.

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A look at the Sound Transit elevated light rail guideway and parking garage up Kent’s West Hill along Pacific Highway South. PHOTO COURTESY OF, Town of Kent

The elevated Sound Transit light rail guideway south toward Interstate 5. Pacific Highway South is on the right.  PHOTO COURTESY OF, Town of Kent

The elevated Sound Transit light rail guideway south toward Interstate 5. Pacific Highway South is on the right. PHOTO COURTESY OF, Town of Kent


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Parking garage

Harrison Avenue parking fee set at board meeting – Williston Times

MTA spokesman Aaron Donovan previously said the Harrison Avenue parking lot is expected to open in November. (Photo courtesy of MTA)

Mineola directors approved a resolution at last Wednesday’s board meeting to set the fee at the Harrison Avenue parking garage, a sign that final fixes may soon be made.

Mayor Scott Strauss said the village was trying to complete everything in the long-delayed structure within two weeks.

The new 551-space garage will have monthly cards read by a sensor to allow access and hourly parking.

Two hundred and twenty-five cards will be 2-hour “day” permits, available to residents of Mineola for $ 105 per month. Non-residents can purchase a similar permit for $ 250 per month, and 75 will be created.

For 24 hour permits, 50 cards will be created for residents of Mineola at $ 300 per month. Non-residents will be billed $ 500 per month and 20 cards will be issued.

Hourly parking will be charged for a maximum of 24 hours. Rates start at $ 2 for up to two hours and drop to $ 6 for two to three hours accrued.

The maximum daily rate for the garage is $ 30, which covers 15 hours of parking.

“The village has been in contact with the state throughout this process regarding minor fixes that are currently being worked on,” Strauss said at last Wednesday’s meeting. “We’re doing our best to get this to the finish line so that we can do it over the next two weeks.”

Strauss previously said remaining issues included minor drainage issues in the south side basement and exceptional training for village workers regarding lighting, ventilation and parking systems.

The MTA said the parking lot had belonged to the village since early December and would remain involved until the end of the project. Unlike other projects, any maintenance or problems that arise after leaving the state will have to be managed by the village.

The possible December opening comes after years of delays for the structure, in part linked to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In September Strauss said the village was to get the garage in October, which was then changed in November.

Last Wednesday’s resolution, along with the transfer of ownership to the village, has become the most tangible sign that final stage completion is on the horizon.

The parking garage is one of two being built in conjunction with a Long Island Rail Road project that adds a third track on the main line between Floral Park and Hicksville.

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Parking spaces

More parking spaces for Staveley in a ‘tremendous’ regeneration boost for the town

The scheme will see the number of parking spaces increased opposite the playgrounds on Chantry Road, providing better visibility of the site from the road, better lighting and easier access to the nearby cemetery and Trans Pennine footpath.

“There has been and is so much energy and commitment to the Town Deal from all sides and we would like to thank the Town Deal representatives, Chesterfield Borough Council and their planning department who have guided and helped us in these very difficult times through the pandemic,” said Terry.

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Staveley’s regeneration plans have been further bolstered with plans for more parking spaces.

“Seeing Staveley MWFC receive the first Town Deal funding and lead forward is rather unique and sets the stage for the remaining £25.2m projects with their sponsors knowing they can work towards the reality of seeing their own projects come to life with funding.

Currently there are only 30 parking spaces available at the site, but when completed this number will increase to 84, including several spaces for the disabled.

Preparatory work is expected to start next month and be completed in 2022, ready for the start of work on the improved parking facilities.

The application also includes plans to create a new pedestrian crossing that will make it safer to cross the road to access the playgrounds, cemetery and the Trans Pennine Trail.

Trees beside the road will be removed to increase visibility in the car park, which should limit anti-social behavior.

The works are funded by the Staveley Town Deal.

Ivan Fomin, Chairman of the Staveley Town Deal Board, said: “To go from discussing these projects at board meetings to delivering them so quickly is a testament to the hard work of everyone involved.

“Our plans aim to make Staveley a place to live, work and grow and we have selected a wide range of projects which will benefit the whole community.”

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Parking garage

Freshman brings the Allen Fieldhouse parking lot to life with trumpet music | News

On random nights, musical notes can be heard from the central campus district. On a quiet night, the sounds of the trumpet can be heard faintly echoing down Jayhawk Boulevard at the top of the hill.

The curious students discover that the source of the music is in an unlikely location, the Allen Fieldhouse parking lot.

The music emanating from the garage varies greatly and the genre seems to change from minute to minute. The next riff could be anything, like classical, pop, or jazz.

Caden Dean plays trumpet in the Allen Fieldhouse garage


The combination of jazz riffs with Lawrence’s dreary, rainy autumn weather gives Mount Oread the atmosphere of a film noir, that a detective in a trench coat could be at any corner, ready to grill you on the latest criminal case.

The mysterious performer, Caden Dean, is on the third floor singing riffs to his favorite songs as the parking lot echoes them.

Dean is a freshman from Perry, Kansas, studying physics and astronomy. Dean said his interest in astronomy started watching PBS NOVA second-grade documentaries.

For now, Dean said his goal is to be an astrophysics teacher who plays jazz as a hobby.

As a member of the Jazz II ensemble in JAZZ 408, he gets one hour credit for his hobby. Dean said sets are split into three tiers based on skills. He hopes to join Jazz I, who travels for competitions, next semester if he can improve his performance.

The Jazz II and III ensembles give concerts at the Lied Center.

“The band’s gig turnout is mostly made up of the players’ parents, from what I’ve seen,” Dean said. “And obviously the jazz band is not as big as the Symphonic Band concert. So the turnout was quite low.

Dean wears a white and blue Kansas hoodie and ripped jeans despite the hot September night. The varying grays of concrete warp into a depressing otherworld of endless brutalist hallways in the reflection of Dean’s trumpet. The intimidating reflection contrasts with the bright music Dean plays late into the night.

The main reason Dean chose a parking garage is self-preservation.

“Basically, it’s just that the practice rooms at Murphy Hall are tiny, and the trumpets are pretty loud, and I wanted to save my ears,” Dean said. “So I started training here.”

Dean also says the garage has better acoustics.

“I also like the way it sounds. The reverb is pretty cool. It’s good acoustically,” Dean said. “And, I mean, I could buy some earplugs and then go practice at Murphy Hall. But no, I kind of have to. I’d like to hear my tone.

Allen Fieldhouse and Murphy

Earplugs interfere with the ability to adjust the pitch of the trumpet, Dean said.

Dean says he chose the Allen Fieldhouse parking lot because of its proximity to his locker at Murphy Hall, just off Naismith Drive.

He also cited the condition of Murphy’s practice rooms. “It seems that there is no air conditioning in any of the practice rooms. And people go in there and they blow hot, humid air out of the instruments,” Dean said. “And it gets pretty awful.”

The conditions are comparable to parking and can be just as uncomfortable. “But the sound quality is much better,” Dean said.

Murphy’s fifth floor is cramped and noisy. At all times, students practice the instrument of their choice. The mixture of slightly muffled pianos, trumpets, violins and trombones, along with narrow hallways, feels like exploring the floor like a cartoon fever dream. The rooms are filled with lockers to store instruments when not in use.

Davidson Smith, a pre-dental sophomore from Fredericksburg, Va., studying music, echoed Dean’s complaints about Murphy’s practice rooms.

“I’m actually really hot right now. But I kind of deal with the pain, you know? Smith said.

Despite the noise and humidity, Smith said the practice rooms are perfect for students to build their instruments.

Due to COVID restrictions, Smith said players must wear a mask with a hole cut out and a filter over their instruments when performing in sets outside of a practice room.

Smith is a member of the Jazz I ensemble and will travel to New York in January to compete in a jazz competition hosted by jazz musician Wynton Marsalis. According to the KU School of Music website, the KU Jazz I ensemble won the 2021 Downbeat Student Music Award.

A building showing its age

The School of Music is well aware of the poor ventilation of the aging practice rooms. In an interview, Dean Robert Walzel said, “Murphy Hall’s HVAC system has always been a problem. Murphy Hall was the very first building on campus to have a central HVAC. And that was 1957, and it never really worked out right.

Walzel said Murphy Hall’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system was replaced about six years ago, but failed to fix problems in the practice rooms.

Part of the problem is that the heat rises and migrates to the fifth floor where the practice rooms are.

“It can be stuffy up there in the winter, especially when you’re pumping hot air, and then there’s nowhere to go,” Walzel said. “It is difficult.”

The music school and facilities departments frequently work together to brainstorm ideas on how to improve Murphy Hall, but these ideas rarely result in major improvements.

“At this point, there’s nothing we’ve heard from them that they can do differently,” Walzel said.

“It’s just a tough, tough situation with a system in a 65-year-old building,” Walzel said. “And I wish there was a silver bullet or a magic wand that we could wave to make it better, but that can be difficult. Especially in winter. »

When it comes to noise, Walzel said each student reacts differently. “Unlike a piano keyboard where there are white notes and black notes, it’s a very gray thing.”

Walzel said some students thrive on having things happening around them, while others want to be isolated with their music. For some, it depends on their mood.

To better accommodate students who prefer a quieter practice environment, Walzel said the School of Music increased the number of practice rooms this year by converting former classrooms and offices.

This way, there will be relatively quiet sections on the fifth floor when the practice rooms are busiest.

Walzel said the most common complaint that practice rooms were full has disappeared.

“I haven’t had any complaints about the practice rooms this semester,” Walzel said. “And this is a first.”

“It seems people are, at least based on the non-feedbacks I’ve had, pretty happy,” he said.

End of a season

In the parking lot, Dean rocked anxiously to his feet while worrying about being obnoxious. “I’ve heard some people cringe when a high note is, you know, blasted in their face,” Dean said. “But that’s, I guess, an entirely different thing.”

Dean seemed reassured by the students’ cheers from Irving Hill Road and said that almost every night he plays someone will come and talk to him.

A group of five or six students put money in his case, Dean said. Another time, a trombone player started an impromptu jam session.

While hiding his face behind his trumpet, Dean said he didn’t care about the attention. He said if he wanted to avoid it, he would go to the back of the parking lot.

As autumn progresses, the Central District will become quiet again. Dean said cold air can flatten a trumpet’s pitch, making it harder to play.

“Also, your mouthpiece gets so cold that you might freeze your lips on the trumpet,” Dean said.

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Parking spaces

Township revises laws on parking spaces and accessory buildings

LOWER POTTSGROVE PA – Two recent land use concerns in Lower Pottsgrove – regarding the future size of parking spaces or “stalls” for routable vehicles, and increased interest by landowners in building construction “Accessories” to house small workshops or leisure equipment – were addressed on Monday (6 December 2021) in a change of law approved by the Council of cantonal commissioners.

Parking space sizes

For future land use planning proposals only, the minimum size of parking spaces created in the township will increase by 6 inches in width, from 9 1/2 feet wide by 18 feet deep to 10 feet wide by 18 feet wide. feet deep. The additional width, determined after research and comparison with the standards of other municipalities, was found to be sufficient to accommodate the larger size of newly manufactured pickup trucks and vans.

The parking spaces must be reasonably level, limited to a single vehicle and cannot include an area reserved for passages, aisles or other means of circulation or access, specifies the law. Its adoption was recommended by the chairman of the board of directors Bruce Foltz, himself the owner of a large pick-up.

Additions to the accessory building

Seeing the change in parking space as an opportunity to resolve another issue of subdivision law and land use planning, the commissioners agreed to also amend related parts of the township code dealing with accessory buildings.

A growing number of landowners have told the township, mainly by submitting new land use plans and building permit applications, that they are interested in adding free-standing structures. Many are intended for storing trailers, RVs, lawn equipment, or pool supplies. Some are used as workshops or tool sheds. Commercial and agricultural home uses are also permitted.

Their use and size are governed by the zoning code of the municipality, and generally require the approval of the Zoning Hearing Panel as a special exception.

The commissioners agreed to amend the code to expand the permitted area for accessory buildings eligible for exceptions from more than a minimum area of ​​600 square feet to a minimum of 600 to 1,000 square feet or less. Structures are also subject to setback requirements, determination by the zoning hearing panel of neighborhood suitability, a building’s “visual impact” and landscaping.

The intention, said township manager Ed Wagner, was to avoid a proliferation of pole barn-sized buildings that could have benefited from special exceptions under the previous section of the ordinance.

The commissioners unanimously agreed to the changes at the first board meeting of the month. He was preceded by a 6.45 p.m. public hearing, during which no one spoke to oppose the measure.

photo by Vitalik radko Going through Photo submission, used under license

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Amherst council assaulted as parking garage moves forward

AMHERST – A series of zoning changes, including one that could provide the opportunity for a private developer to build the second parking garage in downtown Amherst, continues to move forward.

Despite numerous oral and written calls for city council to stop the rezoning process – one resident comparing the scheduling of many public meetings during the holiday season to Chicago-style politics ‘shenanigans’ – councilors held the premieres readings on zoning changes Monday.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said when voters adopted the city’s new charter in 2018, they wanted full-time, year-round government. The council, Griesemer said, has an obligation to put each of the zoning changes to positive or negative votes, and not wait for the new council to sit in January.

During the public comment period, which lasted approximately 90 minutes, many residents of the North Prospect Street neighborhood objected to a proposed overlay neighborhood for the construction of a parking lot in the parking lot between North Pleasant and North Pleasant Streets. North Prospect, adjacent to the private CVS Pharmacy lot.

Critics have argued that the rezoning is sponsored by District 3 Councilor George Ryan and District 4 Councilor Evan Ross, whose terms will end in January after being defeated in nominations for re-election. Councilors put forward the idea of ​​a second garage to join the Boltwood parking garage as part of a Destination Amherst plan in coordination with the Amherst Business Improvement District and the Area Chamber of Commerce. ‘Amherst.

Griesemer said there was no evidence the community was against the parking lot.

“The argument that people have spoken needs further consideration,” said Griesemer, observing that Ross and Ryan were only 50 votes combined to win a second term.

The parking facility overlay district would not change the underlying general zoning district from the residence to the business headquarters, but would establish specific guidelines for the use of the site only for a parking garage. Other zoning changes under discussion include extending alfresco dining and other pandemic-related initiatives until 2022, lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space, and lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space and have specific parking requirements for all dwellings.

Senior planner Nathaniel Malloy said that with the parking lot rezoning, a 270-space garage could fit on the site and be similar in size to the one in downtown Greenfield.

General Councilor Andy Steinberg said the rezoning was only to allow the site to be used for a garage. Steinberg said if other sites for a garage were looked at it would be the responsibility of a future council.

Centralizing parking is a concept supported by At Large Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke, who said she wants protections for the city and neighborhoods as well. These could be subject to conditions in the call for tenders for the new car park.

District 4 Councilor Steve Schreiber said a well-designed parking garage could be nicer than a deteriorating paved lot.

But District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam said she would never accept a parking garage built in front of 19th-century homes.

“There is no way to make a parking structure compatible with a historic district,” Pam said, adding that she saw a flawed process. “It’s ruinous for the adjacent residential neighborhood.”

District 1 Councilor Sarah Swartz said councilors must listen to neighbors and moving parking near homes is hypocritical action after councilors voted to eliminate parking in front of town hall as part of the move. the restoration of North Common.

Many who spoke criticized the council for pursuing zoning changes after the election. Barbara Pearson of Paige Street said the busy schedule of meetings reminded her of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s boss-style Chicago politics. “I can’t think of a good reason why this is happening,” Pearson said.

“It doesn’t have to be,” said Rani Parker of 24 North Prospect, who requested a community impact assessment before the zoning change.

Harry Peltz of 32 North Prospect called the zoning changes “hasty judgment” and said too little research was being done. Likewise, Suzannah Muspratt of 38 North Prospect said the board is shortening normal procedures. and Jay Silverstein of 32 North Prospect said the residents were “cheated”.

Ira Bryck of Strong Street said council is making zoning changes without transparency and should take a break until new councilors are sworn in. He was joined by Ken Rosenthal of Sunset Avenue, who said any action should be delayed until January.

Defenders of the parking lot, including Sharon Povinelli, a North Amherst resident who co-owns AJ Hastings, called on councilors to act. “Businesses need destination parking,” Povinelli said.

BID Executive Director Gabrielle Gould said the zoning change was meant to look to the future and more parking could lead to the success of restaurants, performing arts venues, including the relaunched future Drake. and an expanded Jones library.

At Large Councilor Alisa Brewer said one of the lingering questions was whether the Boltwood Parking Garage, opened in September 2002 with a surface level and a basement level, could easily have additional parking floors . It is understood that the garage was built in such a way that it could accommodate such an extension. Planning director Christine Brestrup said the city would likely need to hire a structural engineer to determine the feasibility of adding floors.

Brewer also noted that the idea of ​​building a parking lot in the Amity Street parking lot across from the Jones Library, where the Amherst Academy once stood, is often mentioned. Brewer said it is possible that the deed restrictions prohibit building a garage there. The poet Emily Dickinson and the founder of Mount Holyoke College, Mary Lyon, were both taught at this school.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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New Pittsburgh Legislation Says Designated Bike Lanes Are Not Potential Parking Spaces

Pittsburgh has more than 60 miles of designated bike pathsa number that officials hope increase considerably in the next few years, because helping more people find car-free ways to get where they need to go is a long-term the objective of elected municipal officials. However, it’s not uncommon to find a car or truck – or several – parked in lanes meant for people on bikes and other low-speed modes of travel like stand-up scooters.

Vehicles parked or idling in bike lanes are “a clear problem and a clear safety concern,” said Eric Boerer, advocacy director for Bike Pittsburgh.

But solving the problem turned out to be more obscure.

“I’m like, ‘OK, well, we’ll just contact law enforcement and it’ll be easy, and that’s okay,'” Councilor Bobby Wilson said. “Turns out it’s a bigger lift than we think.”

Pennsylvania law prohibits blocking a lane of traffic, which includes bike lanes, but the rule simply isn’t in Pittsburgh’s municipal code.

“Right now, if the police are going to cite [someone parked in a bike lane] they would like to see a no parking sign right next to the bike path,” Wilson said.

Instead of spending taxpayers’ money installing hundreds of new no-parking signs, Wilson decided to simply add “in a bike lane” to the list of places drivers can’t stop, stand or park under applicable municipal regulations.

Road safety depends on predictability; bike lanes are designed so that drivers and cyclists can reliably anticipate the movements of others, Boerer said. But when someone blocks a bike lane, “it forces cyclists out of the bike lane into traffic, and people don’t expect that,” he said. “It kind of screws up the whole system.”

This is especially true in recently installed bike lanes that travel against the current, such as on Forbes Avenue in Oakland, Boerer said. If cyclists have to exit a bike lane to avoid a vehicle, they face oncoming traffic.

Boerer added that when people park vehicles in bike lanes, it leads to negative feelings and confrontations, “and we just want to get away from that.” He hopes that, if passed, the legislation will clear up confusion about where people can and cannot park. The organization has conducted bike lane assessments and found that some lanes are blocked 25-50% of the time.

“It doesn’t make sense to go and spend taxpayers’ money investing in bike lanes if we don’t make sure the people who use them have access to them,” Wilson said.

The legislation, which the council passed unanimously on Tuesday, would not apply to paratransit vehicles that pick up or drop off passengers. If there is a section of the street where parking in a bike lane is sometimes critical, people can ask the Ministry of Mobility and Infrastructure for an exception and signage.

Wilson said the city generally relies heavily on police to enforce traffic rules, but parking violations really should be the Pittsburgh Parking Authority’s responsibility. Wilson said he’s had conversations with agency management that agree that if agents issue tickets for expired meters, then “we want you to follow up and do everything,” and cite others violations, such as parking in crosswalks or in cycle lanes. .

“Parking in a bike lane is dangerous, don’t do it, cut it off,” Wilson said. “Do better. And everything will be fine.”

Updated: December 7, 2021 at 3:05 p.m. EST

This story has been updated to reflect the passing of the proposal at City Council on Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

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Vulcan Parking Garage reopens in Cal U

(December 6, 2021) The Vulcan parking garage at the University of California, Pennsylvania reopened on Monday after being closed for more than five years when a large chunk of concrete fell on move-in day, Aug. 26, 2016 .

According to an article on the Observer-Reporter website, on December 4, Fawn Petrosky, vice president of finance, said the garage had been under repair since the fall of 2020.

“These repairs have been completed and the facility has been inspected, tested and found safe to use,” Petrosky said.

The five-story garage — also known as Lot 22 in Cal U.’s managed parking system — was scheduled to reopen on Monday, Dec. 6, with new “pay in lane” stations accepting credit cards and a parking station. cash payment on the third floor, according to the published report.

A limited number of student parking permits will be available and students may put their names on a waiting list to reserve a space. Faculty and staff can also request parking at the facility. The garage has approximately 660 spaces, some of which are reserved for campus visitors.

Source: Observer-Rapporteur, 4 December 2021

The Vulcan Garage has reopened with new “pay in lane” stations that accept credit cards and a cash payment station on the third floor. (Jeff Hellsel)
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Parking facilities

Car parks remain a pipe dream – The New Indian Express

Express news service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: It has been more than two years since multi-level parking was offered at Putharikandam Maidan and Medical College Hospital (MCH) as part of the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) program. With the deadline for using AMRUT funds fast approaching, the civic body is on guard to find a way to complete the project one way or another.

Deputy mayor and chairman of the standing committee on works, Dr Anil, said the civic body has decided to cancel the current contract awarded for the projects.

“We tendered and awarded both projects. Due to the pandemic and the lockdowns, the contractors were unable to start the work. It has been almost two years and now the cost of steel has increased exponentially and they cannot undertake the work according to current estimates.

There is no way in front of us because AMRUT cannot grant more funds without the permission of the state government. Therefore, we have decided to cancel the contracts and take new estimates to implement the project, ”said Anil.

The civic organization plans to launch new calls for tenders with new estimates soon. However, the delay in obtaining permission from the state government is likely to further delay the project and could cause the AMRUT funds to expire, the deadline for which would end in March 2022. “We cannot launch a new call for tenders without obtaining authorization. We hope that the government will give the green light soon to avoid further delays, ”said a senior official from the engineering wing. The Putharikandam project is expected to cost 12 crore and would be the largest car park that can provide parking space for 210 cars and 240 two-wheelers.

“Some of the mandatory components of the MLCP were missing from the old estimates. Fire safety devices are a mandatory item and without them we will not get the NoC from the fire department to operate these facilities, ”the official said.

The MCH implantation project was also launched almost two years ago. The plan was to set up the facility in the field in front of the super specialized block.

Collection of unauthorized parking fees continues

Complaints are growing about the levying of huge parking fees in shopping malls, hospitals and other commercial establishments in the capital. According to officials, charging parking fees for using legal parking spaces in shops, malls and hospitals is against Kerala Municipal Law. However, despite the complaints, the civic body has yet to take concrete action. Some malls and other commercial establishments impose huge user fees on customers.

“It is illegal to charge parking fees in statutory parking areas of commercial establishments and if a commercial organization provides a private parking area other than the statutory parking space, it should obtain a license from the civic body.” , said a senior company official. Recently, the civic body issued licenses to around 15 establishments. “It is not practical to introduce unified parking fees. In the central area of ​​the city, parking fees could be higher than in other areas, ”added the official.

Deputy mayor and chairman of the standing committee on work, Dr Anil, said the civic body noticed the problem. He admitted that people are being robbed in the name of user fees and that the civic body would take adequate intervention to prevent such violations. He said the civic body is in the process of developing a regulation.

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Dadeland Mall Parking Garage Alarm Buyer Support Beams – CBS Miami

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Some shoppers at Dadeland Mall say they are alarmed by a striking site inside a parking garage near the JC Penny store.

The cause of concern is the support beams located on several levels.

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The Miami-Dade Building Department told CBS4’s Peter D’Oench that the garage was safe during construction, but said there were separate Building Department and Code Enforcement investigations, which were checking to see if the buildings were dangerous structures.

An exclusive video obtained by CBS4, shows dozens of multi-level support beams as we walked through the building and saw work in progress.

The county has stepped up its building inspections and re-certifications in the past 5 and a half months since the tragic collapse of Champlain Towers South in Surfside that has left 98 people dead.

Watch: Jessica Vallejo’s 11pm report

A client has a special connection with Surfside.

Andrea Loeb from Pinecrest, who was shopping at the mall, said: “I was here last week. My mom is in Champlain Towers North, the building next door, and my family and I were here last week and said we were wondering if it was safe. It doesn’t sound sure. I wonder if there is a problem? And the first thing I thought about was the building, the structure because of what happened and the question arises, is there. Something wrong with it? I think I have a mixture of worrying and maybe they’re trying to consolidate things that they weren’t doing before.

READ MORE: Florida farmers grapple with transportation challenges

Customer Amanda Perez said, “I feel like these support beams have been around for as long as I can remember. Hope it is safe. I am here all the time. I park on the first floor so I hope it’s safe. If they fix something hopefully they block some areas and do it in pieces so no one parked in the middle.

The building department said it opened an investigation after filing a complaint over the summer.

According to the records, a man wrote: “There is a major concrete beam supporting the 2nd level parking garage deck which deteriorated with exposed reinforcing steel which corroded us considerably. This is repeated at the second level. I’m a structural engineer and wanted to bring this to someone’s attention.

Dadeland Shopping Center opened on October 1, 1962.

The building department said it should be re-certified for 60 years this year.

A spokeswoman said the oldest garages are due to be recertified for 40 years in 2023 and 2024.

NO MORE NEWS: Plantation Teen accused of extorting book from Florida Senator Lauren with explicit photos

On Thursday afternoon, the mall released a statement that the mall was doing standard restoration work inside that parking lot.

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Public meeting on parking improvements scheduled for Wednesday | Local news

LACONIA – The public will have the opportunity next week to view and comment on plans for the reconstruction and improvement of the city’s parking lot in the city center.

A public information session is scheduled for Wednesday, December 8, starting at 7 p.m. The forum will take place at the Rose Chertok Gallery in Belknap Mill, on the third floor.

The consultants, Dubois and King, and Stewart Associates Architects, will present the scope of the project based on their most recent design, including representations of the proposed improvements to the exterior of the parking garage.

After the presentation, members of the public will have the opportunity to comment on the improvements they would like to see included in the scope of the project, explained the city’s public works director, Wes Anderson.

The cost of any improvement suggestions will be worked out by Public Works and Consultants for future presentation to City Council for consideration for inclusion in the project.

The 50-year-old structure was built to accommodate 250 vehicles. But only around 110 places are currently usable for security reasons. Repairing the parking garage has become a priority recently due to the need to provide more parking downtown for those attending the restored Colonial Theater events or frequenting the growing number of downtown businesses.

An initial estimate for rebuilding the facility, correcting structural flaws and improving safety was estimated to be around $ 6.5 million.

The Lake District Public Access will record the meeting for broadcast on dates and times set by the station.

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Parking spaces

Sunflower parking spaces ‘make life easier’ for people with hidden disabilities – Clarke

Deputy Sorca Clarke wants the council to introduce Sunflower parking spaces in Blackhall and other public car parks in the county.

Longford Westmeath Sinn Féin TD Sorca Clarke has asked Westmeath County Council to introduce Sunflower parking spaces in all major towns and villages.

The purpose of Sunflower Spaces, Deputy Clarke explained, is to “make life a little easier for people living with hidden disabilities and have them available in parking lots for people who don’t have a license. blue badge, making local facilities and amenities more accessible.”

“Hidden disabilities can include learning disabilities, mental health issues as well as mobility, speech, sight or hearing impairments. They can also include conditions such as asthma, COPD and other debilitating lung conditions as well as chronic conditions such as kidney failure, diabetes and sleep disturbances, all of which can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life.

“Living with these types of conditions can make everyday life more demanding for many people. They affect each person in different ways and can be painful, exhausting and isolating. Without visible evidence of a hidden disability, it is often difficult for others to recognize the challenges people face, which means that sympathy and understanding can often be in short supply.

“Similar pilot projects are underway in other local authorities across the country and there is no reason why, at very little cost, it cannot be implemented in Westmeath,” the report concluded. Deputy Clarke.

Sinn Féin local representative for the town of Mullingar, Hazel Behan, echoed Deputy Clarke’s calls for the council to introduce sunflower spaces across the county.

“I think it is imperative that Westmeath recognize people living in our community with hidden disabilities and follow the progressive example of other local authorities who have successfully implemented this system in public car parks.

“Having Sunflower Spaces raises awareness and greatly helps people with hidden disabilities who may face significant challenges in their daily lives. Making sure everyone knows what the sunflower means shows that someone who has chosen to park in this type of designated space may need extra support and lead to understanding and tolerance additional.

“I look forward to Westmeath County Council taking the necessary steps to make our communities more inclusive and the lives of hidden disabled people more tolerable by implementing this relatively cheap and sensible measure,” Ms Behan said.

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Parking spaces

According to recent accounts, many parking spaces are not in use

Submitted photo

Many of those who drive to campus every day may not be aware of some parking options that aren’t as crowded as those closer to the heart of campus.

During the first days of November, Transit and Parking counted empty parking spaces in specific areas of the campus that included student lots, commuter parking, and faculty and staff lots. The tally revealed that of the more than 14,000 parking spaces on campus, more than 2,000 spaces are open during the busiest times.

Students may find plenty of space available in Lot 56, while faculty and staff will find open parking in areas such as Lots 54, 78 and 78A.

Lot 99, with 1,100 parking spaces, also has many spaces open every day. It is located south of the main part of the campus and is open to any current holder of a parking permit.

Razorback Transit serves lots 56 and 99, as well as several other parking areas on campus. You can see the campus parking plan for details.

The recent tally reminds us that the numbers don’t exactly support the claim that there isn’t enough parking at the university.

In order to determine a minimum number of available parking spaces, the count was made on Monday and Tuesday mornings (when the largest number of classes meet and the campus is most crowded).

Obviously, more parking is available at other times when fewer people are on campus.

Specifically, the count of vacant parking spaces showed that 1,638 parking spaces were not used in the student parking lot and in the commuter parking lots.

During the same period, 438 parking spaces for professors and staff were available (in the yellow lots on campus).

This means that during the busiest times, 35% of parking lots for students and commuters and 24% of parking lots for teachers and staff are vacant.

They finished the count on the mornings of November 1, 2, 8 and 9. It included the count of vacant spaces in lots 1, 15, 15A, 36, 36B, 37, 38, 41, 42, 44, 45A, 45B, 45C. , 46E, 47N, 47W, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 56D, 57, 57A, 58, 62, 62A, 69, 74, 75, 78, 78A, 78B, 80, 83 and 99. Vacant Spaces for teachers and staff have also been counted in the Meadow Street parking garage. You can see them on the campus parking plan.

Naturally, most of the open parking spaces are in the parking lots farthest from the center of the campus.

This does not mean that some parking lots are not full, as some are. This also does not mean that the covered car park and the reserved car park are never close to their capacity because they are (the count does not include the main garages and the reserved car park).

Those who park further away often take the Razorback Transit buses that go to the parking lot. For more information, you can consult the bus lines schedule or use the Go GO! application.

Transit and Parking understands the unique logistical issues that affect the parking and morning commutes of thousands of people, and is always open to feedback from motorists on campus. Slight changes are made every year. The university regularly reviews parking availability, along with ideas and suggestions, and if a change is warranted and feasible, it can be implemented.

For more information on campus parking issues, you can check out Transit and Parking’s Frequently Asked Questions.

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Amherst council assaulted as parking lot moves forward

AMHERST – A series of zoning changes, including one that could provide the opportunity for a private developer to build the second parking garage in downtown Amherst, continues to move forward.

Despite numerous oral and written calls for city council to stop the rezoning process – one resident comparing the scheduling of many public meetings during the holiday season to Chicago-style politics ‘shenanigans’ – councilors held the premieres readings on zoning changes Monday.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said when voters adopted the city’s new charter in 2018, they wanted full-time, year-round government. The council, Griesemer said, has an obligation to put each of the zoning changes to positive or negative votes, and not wait for the new council to sit in January.

During the public comment period, which lasted approximately 90 minutes, many residents of the North Prospect Street neighborhood objected to a proposed overlay neighborhood for the construction of a parking lot in the parking lot between North Pleasant and North Pleasant Streets. North Prospect, adjacent to the private CVS Pharmacy lot.

Critics have argued that the rezoning is sponsored by District 3 Councilor George Ryan and District 4 Councilor Evan Ross, whose terms will end in January after being defeated in nominations for re-election. Councilors put forward the idea of ​​a second garage to join the Boltwood parking garage as part of a Destination Amherst plan in coordination with the Amherst Business Improvement District and the Area Chamber of Commerce. ‘Amherst.

Griesemer said there was no evidence the community was against the parking lot.

“The argument that people have spoken needs further consideration,” said Griesemer, observing that Ross and Ryan were only 50 votes combined to win a second term.

The parking facility overlay district would not change the underlying general zoning district from the residence to the business headquarters, but would establish specific guidelines for the use of the site only for a parking garage. Other zoning changes under discussion include extending alfresco dining and other pandemic-related initiatives until 2022, lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space, and lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space and have specific parking requirements for all dwellings.

Senior planner Nathaniel Malloy said that with the parking lot rezoning, a 270-space garage could fit on the site and be similar in size to the one in downtown Greenfield.

General Councilor Andy Steinberg said the rezoning was only to allow the site to be used for a garage. Steinberg said if other sites for a garage were looked at it would be the responsibility of a future council.

Centralizing parking is a concept supported by At Large Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke, who said she wants protections for the city and neighborhoods as well. These could be subject to conditions in the call for tenders for the new car park.

District 4 Councilor Steve Schreiber said a well-designed parking garage could be nicer than a deteriorating paved lot.

But District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam said she would never accept a parking garage built in front of 19th-century homes.

“There is no way to make a parking structure compatible with a historic district,” Pam said, adding that she saw a flawed process. “It’s ruinous for the adjacent residential neighborhood.”

District 1 Councilor Sarah Swartz said councilors must listen to neighbors and moving parking near homes is hypocritical action after councilors voted to eliminate parking in front of town hall as part of the move. the restoration of North Common.

Many who spoke criticized the council for pursuing zoning changes after the election. Barbara Pearson of Paige Street said the busy schedule of meetings reminded her of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s boss-style Chicago politics. “I can’t think of a good reason why this is happening,” Pearson said.

“It doesn’t have to be,” said Rani Parker of 24 North Prospect, who requested a community impact assessment before the zoning change.

Harry Peltz of 32 North Prospect called the zoning changes “hasty judgment” and said too little research was being done. Likewise, Suzannah Muspratt of 38 North Prospect said the board is shortening normal procedures. and Jay Silverstein of 32 North Prospect said the residents were “cheated”.

Ira Bryck of Strong Street said council is making zoning changes without transparency and should take a break until new councilors are sworn in. He was joined by Ken Rosenthal of Sunset Avenue, who said any action should be delayed until January.

Defenders of the parking lot, including Sharon Povinelli, a North Amherst resident who co-owns AJ Hastings, called on councilors to act. “Businesses need destination parking,” Povinelli said.

BID Executive Director Gabrielle Gould said the zoning change was meant to look to the future and more parking could lead to the success of restaurants, performing arts venues, including the relaunched future Drake. and an expanded Jones library.

At Large Councilor Alisa Brewer said one of the lingering questions was whether the Boltwood Parking Garage, opened in September 2002 with a surface level and a basement level, could easily have additional parking floors . It is understood that the garage was built in such a way that it could accommodate such an extension. Planning director Christine Brestrup said the city would likely need to hire a structural engineer to determine the feasibility of adding floors.

Brewer also noted that the idea of ​​building a parking lot in the Amity Street parking lot across from the Jones Library, where the Amherst Academy once stood, is often mentioned. Brewer said it is possible that the deed restrictions prohibit building a garage there. The poet Emily Dickinson and the founder of Mount Holyoke College, Mary Lyon, were both taught at this school.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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