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May 2022

Parking garage

Missoula Parking Commission to Explore Citywide Expansion, New Parking Lot

Parking in downtown Missoula can be difficult depending on the time of day. The Missoula Parking Commission may seek to implement parking requirements beyond current working hours to include other peak times of the week. (Current Martin Kidston/Missoula file)

This is the first in a three-part series about the Missoula Parking Commission and its recommendations to the city for a new garage and expanded parking district.

Part 2: The logic behind a city-wide parking district

Part 3: Where to build a new parking garage?

Expanding its jurisdiction beyond the downtown district and funding a new parking structure are among the goals the Missoula Parking Commission is exploring as it seeks to manage parking in the future.

The parking commission hasn’t grown in 30 years, and members have likened its current approach to parking to a tail wagging a dog. The commission is now looking to take a more proactive approach to dealing with housing growth and costs, and finding the funding needed to align its goals with those of the city.

On Tuesday, the commission instructed staff to take the first steps to hire a consultant to review parking management, strategy and implementation for a citywide parking district, which could initially include the Hip Strip and the Riverfront Triangle, as well as some surrounding neighborhoods.

Wherever expansion occurs, city officials challenged the commission to think outside the box and prepare for the challenges that come with a growing city and its need for more housing.

“Management is going to mean a lot of different things in a lot of different areas,” said Dale Bickell, the city’s chief executive. “As we grow and become denser and denser, parking is going to become an interesting issue, and how we deal with that.”

Bickell asked the commission to consider an operation that is not funded entirely by parking revenue and enforcement fees. The expansion of the parking area also does not mean that a parking meter will appear in every neighborhood.

Still, Bickell said, expanding the parking district is something the city would like to see happen sooner rather than later.

“There is new interest through code reform for the parking commission to expand the boundaries to the entire city,” he said. “As our policy of growth forces us to look inward for housing – and our code reform bill sees parking as a tool to increase housing – we will need better tools to enforce parking in the neighborhoods.

This year, the city is set to begin reforming its building and zoning codes to streamline a number of goals and create a smoother, simpler building process. This should include changes to city codes regarding parking and the amount required for certain projects.

Last week, the city council got its first look at potential incentives designed to entice developers to include more affordable housing in their projects. Incentives could include a 50% reduction in parking in exchange for a set number of units held at an affordable price for a set number of years.

“The city already has a fairly progressive parking standard related to residential development. But we’re talking more about parking than housing,” Bickell said. “It would be nice to have more of this conversation about housing. Having a good, efficient system to manage this (parking) would help us achieve our housing goals.

Based on the findings of the consultant’s study, the commission would be the first to recommend the expansion of the parking area. This would be considered alongside other transportation plans. The final decision would rest with the city council.

While the whole city is at stake, commission members said the Riverfront Triangle, the Hip Strip and the Old Sawmill District would likely be considered first.

Parking garages have also been suggested for the Riverfront Triangle, the Hip Strip, the Old Mill District, and even Caras Park and City Hall. Funding for any of them has not been identified.

“The commission should take a holistic approach to looking at all of these things,” Bickell said. “If managed parking happens on the Hip Strip, it could push parking into neighborhoods. Being able to take a holistic approach to this would be smart.

The current parking district is relatively isolated from downtown Missoula, and although an expanded district has been mentioned in the past, it has only now been set in motion. In a vote on Tuesday, the committee agreed that its aim was “to prepare for future opportunities that reflect and align with the city’s mission and goals,” including housing, climate, equity, and other issues.

While public on-street parking will be in play if the neighborhood is expanded, exploring partnerships with private parking could also be part of the equation.

“Looking at our mission, it has a very reactionary tone. I wish it was more proactive and more interconnected with the city and what’s going on there,” said Ian Ortlieb, director of the Missoula Parking Commission. “It’s being able to spot things that are happening and being more active, or proactive, in dealing with things that may arise.”

In 2021, Ortlieb said the Missoula Parking Commission brought in $2.4 million in overall revenue. In the first three quarters of this fiscal year, it has already grossed over $2.1 million.

Expanding the neighborhood could generate more revenue and relieve some of the challenges that will come with increased density and congestion. Commission members said they were up to the challenge.

“I’m glad the mayor’s office is open to management. It seems their priorities overlap with ours,” commission chair Joe Easton said. “There is an opportunity for us to advance some calculated risks – to advance on initiatives from the mayor’s office and city council.”

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Parking spaces

Hereford Old Market shopping center could lose parking spaces

MORE than 100 parking spaces could be lost at the Old Market shopping center in Hereford if MandM Direct is allowed to move into the former Debenhams store.

Planning documents reveal that 119 of the 606 parking spaces at the mall, which opened in 2014, could be reserved for MandM employees and exempt from charges.

British Land revealed last week that it wanted to turn the upper floors of the former Debenhams store into offices for MandM Direct, with other parties interested in ground floor space.

Mike Tomkins, chairman of MandM Direct, said the business was a major local success story and that, should Herefordshire Council grant planning permission, the move would “support the next phase of the business’ journey”.

That planning application has now gone to council, which sees British Land, the centre’s owner, amending a condition of the shopping centre’s consent.

RELATED NEWS:

And this condition is pre-requisite to occupation of any part of the development, details of the operation, management and charging rates of the proposed car park should be sent to council.

Documents reveal that employees of the clothing retailer, with offices in Leominster and a warehouse in Moreton-on-Lugg, would be allowed to park for free on weekdays, so 119 spaces would be for this purpose – 19.6% of the total number of the spaces.

A survey carried out by consultants reveals that during the peak demand period, at 1 p.m. on Thursday May 12, there were 195 standard spaces and 16 disabled spaces available in the car park.

RELATED NEWS:

The vast majority of them were on the upper deck of the multi-storey car park, where the majority of MandM Direct staff are expected to park.

“It is therefore not considered that the removal of a load on 119 spaces on weekdays will have a significant impact on the current operation of the car park,” consultants said.

There would also be 40 bicycle parking spaces on the ground floor.

Planning documents also say that if planners granted permission, it would give surrounding downtown businesses a boost, with around 250 workers using shops, services and other facilities during their working day.

Comments on planning request 221678 can be made until June 25, with planners setting July 15 as a target date for a decision.

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California’s War on Drivers, Driving and Parking – Orange County Register

In the 1970s, when an energy crisis held the nation hostage to the whims of OPEC, politicians and planners thought it would be a great idea for Americans to carpool. The idea never caught on, perhaps because politicians and planners had seen too many episodes of “The Flintstones” and had the false impression that everyone was working in the same career, going to the same whistle and went home to the same suburb.

Nonetheless, politicians liked the fact that they could paint diamonds on an existing lane, ban single-passenger vehicles from using it, and claim they were reducing reliance on foreign oil because of carpooling.

So began the government’s scowl on car driving, which paved the way for an orgy of spending on public transport projects in the name of “getting people out of their cars”. Los Angeles County residents are paying a total of four sales tax increases, half a percent each, to fund public transit. Billions of dollars have been invested in subway and rail line projects, but public transit ridership is lower than it was in the 1980s, when Metro was just a bus service .

Why is attendance so low? This may be because the county has allowed trains and buses to become rolling homeless encampments, or because people don’t feel safe standing on a platform or at a bus stop for a while. time, or because of sexual harassment on buses and trains. , or because it is not practical.

A public transit trip can be a long ordeal. Recently I had to be at a 43 mile engagement. Google Maps helpfully informed me that I could take public transit and be there in five hours and 51 minutes. The route included a bus that makes 34 stops, another bus that makes 7 stops, a train that makes 12 stops, a bus rapid transit line that makes 14 stops, another bus that makes 25 stops, a final bus that makes three stops, and a total of about 2 miles of walking.

Or I could drive there in a little over an hour.

It is a fact that there are more job opportunities for people who have a car and are not limited by public transport routes. And of course, people need transportation for reasons other than employment. People are running errands, shopping, picking up their children, watching over their parents. Even commuters who use public transport are also likely to have a car.

That’s why you should know that in California, the war on cars has turned into a war on parking spaces.

Assembly Bill 2097 would abolish minimum parking requirements. Cities and other local government entities would be prohibited from requiring developers to provide parking spaces in any residential, commercial or other development located within half a mile of public transit, defined as a line of bus with frequent service during peak hours. Developers could voluntarily include parking spaces, but if they do, local agencies could restrict their use. A number of spaces may need to be reserved for electric charging stations or carpooling vehicles, or reserved for use by the general public. Local agencies might even require parking lot owners to charge for parking.

All of this makes it likely that people with cars who live, work or shop in these new developments will drive around the neighborhood in search of increasingly scarce on-street parking, negatively impacting all other residents of the region.

Incidentally, the war against cars is no longer a question of energy supply. Now it’s about housing and climate.

“Eliminating parking minimums in our transit priority areas – places with convenient access to transit – has been effective in spurring the development of more affordable, accessible and inclusive housing and also supports changes that help address the climate crisis,” San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria wrote. in an op-ed for CalMatters. Calling for “statewide parking reforms,” ​​he said California needed to build on “the successful efforts of cities like San Diego, Sacramento and San Francisco.”

You’ll notice he didn’t mention Los Angeles, where it can take five hours and 51 minutes to cover 43 miles and you’ll need an extra pair of shoes.

Politicians’ passion for apartment buildings close to public transport has taken on an almost religious fervor. Governor Gavin Newsom told the editorial board of the San Francisco Chronicle, “We’re going to demand more from our cities and counties,” promising to hold them “accountable.” Newsom’s appointed Attorney General Rob Bonta has previously threatened legal action against cities that try to evade the state’s latest density-building law, Senate Bill 9, which authorizes construction of two houses and at least two granny flats on land zoned for a single family home.

In fact, the state does not need to sue cities or force density into existing single-family neighborhoods because there is no need to block new suburban housing developments.

If you honestly want to solve California’s housing crisis, support an end to the “vehicle miles traveled” calculation required by law that stops new home development in outlying areas. This silly policy is based on the belief that suburban homes in California are causing climate change. The state as a whole accounts for only 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A little more driving in California is a negligible fraction of a negligible fraction on a global scale, and it certainly shouldn’t be a reason to keep new homes from being built in the midst of a housing shortage.

Gavin Newsom lives in a mansion on a sprawling estate. All Californians value their space.

Email Susan at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @Susan_Shelley.

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Parking spaces

California’s War on Drivers, Driving and Parking Spaces – Press Enterprise

In the 1970s, when an energy crisis held the nation hostage to the whims of OPEC, politicians and planners thought it would be a great idea for Americans to carpool. The idea never caught on, perhaps because politicians and planners had seen too many episodes of “The Flintstones” and had the false impression that everyone was working in the same career, going to the same whistle and went home to the same suburb.

Nonetheless, politicians liked the fact that they could paint diamonds on an existing lane, ban single-passenger vehicles from using it, and claim they were reducing reliance on foreign oil because of carpooling.

So began the government’s scowl on driving, which paved the way for an orgy of spending on public transport projects in the name of “getting people out of their cars”. Los Angeles County residents are paying a total of four sales tax increases, half a percent each, to fund public transit. Billions of dollars have been poured into subway and rail line projects, but public transit ridership is lower than it was in the 1980s, when Metro was just a bus service.

Why is attendance so low? This may be because the county has allowed trains and buses to become rolling homeless encampments, or because people don’t feel safe standing on a platform or at a bus stop for a while. time, or because of sexual harassment on buses and trains. , or because it is not practical.

A public transit trip can be a long ordeal. Recently I had to be at a 43 mile engagement. Google Maps helpfully informed me that I could take public transit and be there in five hours and 51 minutes. The route included a bus that makes 34 stops, another bus that makes 7 stops, a train that makes 12 stops, a bus rapid transit line that makes 14 stops, another bus that makes 25 stops, a final bus that makes three stops, and a total of about 2 miles of walking.

Or I could drive there in a little over an hour.

It is a fact that there are more job opportunities for people who have a car and are not limited by public transport routes. And of course, people need transportation for reasons other than employment. People are running errands, shopping, picking up their children, watching over their parents. Even commuters who use public transport are also likely to have a car.

That’s why you should know that in California, the war on cars has turned into a war on parking spaces.

Assembly Bill 2097 would abolish minimum parking requirements. Cities and other local government entities would be prohibited from requiring developers to provide parking spaces in any residential, commercial or other development located within half a mile of public transit, defined as a line of bus with frequent service during peak hours. Developers could voluntarily include parking spaces, but if they do, local agencies could restrict their use. A number of spaces may need to be reserved for electric charging stations or carpooling vehicles, or reserved for use by the general public. Local agencies might even require parking lot owners to charge for parking.

All of this makes it likely that people with cars who live, work or shop in these new developments will drive around the neighborhood in search of increasingly scarce on-street parking, negatively impacting all other residents of the region.

Incidentally, the war against cars is no longer a question of energy supply. Now it’s about housing and climate.

“Removing parking minimums in our transit priority areas – places with convenient access to transit – has been effective in spurring the development of more affordable, accessible and inclusive housing and also supports changes that help address the climate crisis,” San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria wrote. in an op-ed for CalMatters. Calling for “statewide parking reforms,” ​​he said California needed to build on “the successful efforts of cities like San Diego, Sacramento and San Francisco.”

You’ll notice he didn’t mention Los Angeles, where it can take five hours and 51 minutes to cover 43 miles and you’ll need an extra pair of shoes.

Politicians’ passion for apartment buildings close to public transport has taken on an almost religious fervor. Governor Gavin Newsom told the editorial board of the San Francisco Chronicle, “We’re going to demand more from our cities and counties,” promising to hold them “accountable.” Newsom’s appointed Attorney General Rob Bonta has previously threatened legal action against cities that try to evade the state’s latest density-building law, Senate Bill 9, which authorizes construction of two houses and at least two granny flats on land zoned for a single family home.

In fact, the state doesn’t need to sue cities or force density into existing single-family neighborhoods because there’s no need to block new suburban housing developments.

If you honestly want to solve California’s housing crisis, support an end to the “vehicle miles traveled” calculation required by law that stops new home development in outlying areas. This silly policy is based on the belief that suburban homes in California are causing climate change. The state as a whole accounts for only 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A little more driving in California is a negligible fraction of a negligible fraction on a global scale, and it certainly shouldn’t be a reason to keep new homes from being built in the midst of a housing shortage.

Gavin Newsom lives in a mansion on a sprawling estate. All Californians value their space.

Email Susan at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @Susan_Shelley.

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Parking garage

Troy works with the owner of Uncle Sam’s parking garage on demolishing the structure

TROY – The city and Bryce Companies are working on details for the demolition of Uncle Sam’s gated garage. Officials anticipate it will take four months to raze and clean up the site on the north side of Fulton Street between Third and Fourth downtown streets.

Originally built by the city in 1974, the now privately owned garage is nearly 50 years old and has been closed since last year as unsafe.

Bryce Companies had planned to eventually redevelop the 1,715-acre site when it proposed in 2021 to redevelop the south end of Troy’s atrium along Broadway, but that proposal fell through.

The company has not yet obtained a demolition permit to demolish the aging structure, said John Salka, spokesman for Mayor Patrick Madden. Salka added that the city and Bryce are developing plans to deal with the impact on local streets and surrounding areas when the garage is demolished.

The current proposal for the spot calls for the construction of 170 temporary surface parking spaces after the demolition of the existing parking garage, according to plans submitted by the company for review and approved by the Planning Commission. This would represent a loss of 630 out of the 800 spaces in the condemned garage.

David Bryce, owner of the Bryce Companies, which controls several prominent downtown buildings, including the Atrium and the historic Frear Building, could not be reached for comment Friday.

Bryce bought the garage from the city in 2010 for $2.4 million. He expanded the three-storey garage by two stories to add more parking. The structure provided parking for its downtown tenants and was used by the public as a parking lot to attend downtown events. The garage has been estimated to provide up to 18% of available off-street parking downtown.

The city has become more aggressive in enforcing on-street parking downtown to keep spaces rotating for visitors and shoppers. The city has garages on Fifth Avenue and State Street downtown, as well as parking lots on Front Street in Riverfront Park and First Street. There are also smaller city-owned lots.

The city ordered Uncle Sam’s garage closed in July 2021 after determining it was unsafe to use. An earlier technical study determined that the garage was structurally damaged and should be replaced within 10 years.

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Parking garage

Legislative parking garage OKd, accompanying a watered down housing bill

(Dave Cummings/New Hampshire Bulletin)

“If we don’t move on this, I don’t know where you’re going to park,” Rep. Steven Smith, R-Charlestown, said, urging NH House members to pass a bill that included some of the remnants. tattered. of a major labor housing bill. The House responded by passing House Bill 1661 on a vote of 244-99.

The bill was one of the last bills challenged on the last day of the legislative session, a day when the Senate and House approved or rejected agreements reached by conference committee negotiators last week.

There was virtually no debate about the corporate tax cuts contained in HB 1221. Some Senate Democrats have complained about the reduction in the corporate income tax rate from 7.6 to 7.5 %, but ended up voting for it because it also provided $28 million to municipalities that they hope will be passed on to be used for property tax relief. There was no debate on the measure in the House.

There was also no objection to Senate Bill 401, which provides $70 million to support municipal road and bridge projects as well as $4 million to build a road to support the redevelopment of the Balsams station in Dixville.

The two chambers also approved the agreement on HB 355, extending keno from bars and restaurants to convenience stores, without screens, as well as HB 1503, which provides a regulatory framework for cryptocurrency, without obliging state contractors. to use domestic steel, language that had previously been added to the bill.

And no one opposed SB 271, which means electric taxpayers will subsidize the Burgess BioPower plant in Berlin for another year.

‘Monster of a Bill’

The big kahuna was HB 1661, the 36-page, 80-section omnibus bill that includes legislation covering regional vocational technical schools, lead paint testing, special education grants for schools, the funding for opioid treatment, licensing criteria for recreation camps, rules for releasing defendants pending trial, and most importantly for lawmakers, a new garage for lawmakers’ cars, and laws that will encourage affordable housing.

Rep. Mark Warden, R-Manchester, came out calling the measure a “monster bill” because it merged so many other bills, including what was left of SB 400, the Bill on the Workforce Housing “Community Toolkit”, which developers saw as crucial to encouraging the construction of affordable housing in New Hampshire.

But in order for the House to pass the bill, the Senate removed a number of key tools from the bill. The House managed to get rid of “60 percent” of the SB 400, estimated Rep. Rick Ladd, R-Haverhill, who negotiated the bill on the conference committee and was one of the few to defend HB 1661 on the floor of the House.

What’s gone include provisions for a “Housing Champions” program that would reward cities that encourage affordable housing, as well as a provision to automatically extend local tax breaks typically provided for commercial development to housing and also extend the term of these tax breaks. Requirements to put labor housing on an equal footing with housing for the elderly have also been watered down.

A few transparency measures remain: Land-use boards will actually have to give a written reason for rejecting a developer’s plans and disclose municipal fees, as well as certain timelines, to speed up the approval process.

Warden particularly took issue with a provision that expanded the term “public use” to allow cities to acquire land, not only for a public service or to remove dilapidated structures, but also for the housing of the workforce ( but in this case not via eminent domain).

“Getting into building apartments is a very bad idea,” Warden said. “Why the hell do they think government is the answer to the housing problem? The government is causing problems in many cases with onerous zoning regulations, unreasonable restrictions on wetlands, requiring expensive fire sprinklers, and a lengthy approval and permitting process.

Warden didn’t mention any provisions in the bill that actually address the local approvals process, but he thought the best solution was the free market.

“’Workforce housing’ is a misnomer. It’s just housing. If high-end, luxury housing is built, high-income tenants will leave noisy, noisy old buildings for chic, stylish new buildings, providing more available and affordable housing in vacated units.

Rep. Michael Sylvia, R-Belmont, challenged the lead paint provision — not in Bill SB 400 — that would have removed the requirement for two children’s lead tests to trigger an investigation into whether the accommodation in which the family resides must be remedied.

“Now the assumption is that the apartment has to be reduced. We are going to increase rental prices. Some buildings are going to be taken off the market.

Others attacked the sheer size of the bill, calling it a “smorgasbord,” while others criticized the $9.35 million outlay to demolish the Justice Department building in Concord to make way for a garage estimated at over $35 million, “to save two blocks of walking.

Ladd defended the bill. He argued that the original bill as presented – which he said would double the number of students leaving vocational technical secondary schools – was one of the most important pieces of legislation on education adopted this year.

But overall, it was the garage that was the biggest selling point.

“If we don’t move today, we’ll be without a garage when the one on Storrs Street falls, which will probably happen in the next 10 minutes,” joked Rep. Karen Umberger, R-Kearsarge, who then added, ” the next years. »

“I know I hate it when concrete falls on the hood of my car,” added Smith, the Charlestown rep.

The bill, like the others, now goes to Governor Chris Sununu for his signature.

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Parking garage

Lexington KY Library parking garage closed; lots available

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The Lexington Public Library in downtown Lexington.

The Lexington Central Library downtown parking lot will be closed for maintenance for approximately three weeks beginning June 1.

According to Anne Donworth, director of development, marketing and communications at the Lexington Public Library, routine repairs will include membrane maintenance and other “minor maintenance issues”. The job is expected to take around three weeks, although Donworth said the timeline is largely dependent on the weather.

“Hopefully we can get things done quickly, but we’ll see how the Kentucky weather cooperates,” she said.

In the meantime, library patrons are encouraged to park on the street or at nearby structures like the Helix On Main Garage on E Main Street. The library is unable to validate parking for those other locations, she said.

Library parking lot
A screenshot from Google Maps shows the Central Library, Helix on Main and the Lextran Transit Center in downtown Lexington, Ky.

Some tenants in Park Plaza apartments and other surrounding buildings also park in the garage, and Donworth said the library is working with LexPark to move their parking to the Helix Garage or the Lextran Transit Center on E Vine Street.

Donworth said the parking lot predates the library building, which was built in the mid-1980s. According to the library’s website, the structure contains 428 parking spaces with 10 spaces accessible to people with disabilities or vans.

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Parking garage

Parking Wars: City Commission Votes to Approve Donation of Parking Garage | New

ASHLAND After an equally divided public comment session and over the objections of a commissioner, the Ashland Board of Commissioners voted 4 to 1 to approve the Community Trust Bank’s donation of a parking lot to the city.

With an initial cost of around $455,000, the donation was fiercely opposed by Commissioner Cheryl Spriggs, who decided to drop the ballot in order to do a parking study.

Spriggs argued that if opening the garage to the public was a good idea, why isn’t the bank doing it themselves?

During public comments, Chief Commissioner and Solicitor Roger Hall said he was not there to represent anyone or any organization, but as a private citizen.

“It’s nice to be in front of a public forum with an agenda,” he said.

Hall questioned the commission about the discrepancy between the property’s PVA appraisal ($884,000) and appraised value ($1.575 million) saying it would result in a nice tax deduction for the bank. He also questioned the terms of the lease (50 years) as well as the number of parking spaces that will still be kept by the bank.

“There is no liability for the bathroom, for insurance and structural assessment,” Hall said. “They will keep all the signage there. All the city gets is partial use of the parking spaces.

After Mayor Matt Perkins informed Hall he had reached his five minutes to comment, Hall asked two questions: What will the city get from the 50-year deal and which party approached whom?

“I just think we’re in a rush here,” Hall said.

After a brief intermission where Hillcrest Bruce apartment manager Mike Maynard reported on the number of people who have found employment or education through the mission, Ashland City Commission nominee David Williams, stepped onto the podium.

Right off the bat, Williams asked the commission why they commented on Maynard’s report, but did not respond to Hall’s questions.

“We can choose to comment here or we can choose to wait until the end to address questions and concerns,” Perkins replied.

Williams first posed questions and criticism regarding the entertainment district proposal (allowing open containers at special events with special regulations in downtown), to which City Attorney Jim Moore pointed out answered.

“We’re not reinventing the wheel here,” Moore said. “It’s been done in 11 or 12 other cities in Kentucky and I haven’t heard of any problems.”

Williams’ comments then made their way to the parking lot, where he asked the city not to rush into this deal. Moore, along with Commissioner Amanda Clark and City Manager Mike Graese, said the deal lasted three years.

Moore also addressed concerns about the gap between the PVA’s valuation and the appraisal – he said the PVA was generally low in its real estate appraisals.

“Well, what if the public doesn’t want to take it on?” Aren’t we supposed to have parking at the convention center if you build it? said Williams.

“When we build it,” Clark said.

“Well, we don’t know if that’s going to happen – a lot can happen between now and then,” Williams said.

By this point, Williams’ time had expired – Perkins stepped in to let him know.

“While Mr. Hall here has said he likes being somewhere where they have an agenda, I like being somewhere where I can adequately voice my concerns,” he said. “As long as people don’t babble.”

Whit’s Frozen Custard owner Richard Ritchie took to the podium, saying that as a business owner, the potential for a parking garage could help alleviate parking problems downtown.

“The main problem is that my employees, myself included, have to park on Winchester,” he said. “There are a lot of older customers who may need to park elsewhere and won’t come in unless there’s an open parking space in front of my store.”

Ritchie said the parking lot could be used by downtown business owners as a place to park their employees, freeing up space for customers.

“It’s here, it’s built and it’s available,” Ritchie said. “I don’t know how we would do this, but we need to figure out how business owners can come together to make this our employees.”

Clark said she would help facilitate this through her connections with Summer Motion.

David Willey, restaurateur at Billy Bare, said customer perception is key – while there may be plenty of space available, they are not available directly across from Sal’s Italian Eatery.

“We employ 50 workers, we have 25 workers per shift,” he said. “That’s 25 occupied spaces during our busiest hours.”

Willey said customers knew there was a parking problem.

Perkins thanked the two businessmen for their support of Ashland.

When it came time to vote, Spriggs raised concerns about upfront costs, saying she felt there was no benefit to taxpayers.

“I don’t know if we have to shoulder this burden when 25% of our citizens live in poverty,” Spriggs said. “We install lighting. I feel pressured to vote for this and I can’t.

Commissioner Josh Blanton said Spriggs made a lot of good points, but he said his informal study of downtown parking – from when he lived downtown – showed he didn’t. There was no problem with the number of spaces, and the problem is the placement of the spaces.

He said the upfront costs were worth it in order to support the downtown’s future growth.

Clark said acquiring the parking garage does two things – it provides public restrooms for people downtown and it will be open later for downtown events. Currently, the garage closes at 7 p.m., Clark said.

She said that while another garage is under construction in tandem with the convention center, this garage will strictly serve the hotel and the conference center.

Spriggs said the misfortunes of downtown business owners are of their own making.

“They park in front of the business and then complain that their customers don’t have parking,” Spriggs said.

Spriggs also said the city’s losses after taking over the cemetery show that taking over a parking lot probably won’t work either.

“We’re not doing a good job there, so why would we accept that?” said Spriggs. “Like I said before, if it’s such a good idea, why doesn’t the bank do it?”

Before voting, Perkins said the heated discussion showed how much the City Commission cares about the use of its tax dollars.

“Whether it’s $1 or $2 of taxpayers’ money, we’ll always treat it seriously,” Perkins said.

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Parking spaces

Wyndham Street gets new corner parking spaces

Corner parking came from one side of Wyndham Street North.

The change sees 34 corner parking spaces on the west side of the street between Woolwich Street and Quebec Street, rising to 41 when patio season ends and on-street patios in the Wyndham section are removed.

This is an addition of 21 new spaces to the previous 20 spaces on the west side of Wyndham Street.

Previously, the street had parallel parking on both sides of the street. Wyndham Street will be reconfigured into two lanes, one lane in each direction with corner parking to the west and the original parallel parking remaining to the east.

This is only a temporary parking solution, as parking will return to parallel and there will again be four lanes, two in each direction, in late summer 2023.

“In order to implement the inclined parking bays, we had to reduce the width of the lanes just to accommodate the width required for the inclined parking bays and to make everything work,” said Paul Hutchison, supervisor of city ​​traffic engineering and transportation services.

He said the corner parking on both sides of the street would be too tight, even with the space of the lane setback.

The usual two-hour limit remains in place.

“There’s definitely a desire for more parking in the area, especially with the Baker Street project going on, so we’re really trying to add parking spaces where we can help manage that,” he said. said Hutchison.

Baker Street previously had a municipal parking lot and there was the Wyndham Street parking lot, both closed October 1, 2021. There is now a construction site on the old parking lots to build the Baker District. In an article previously reported by GuelphToday, businesses in the area expressed concerns about the lack of parking spaces for their customers once the parking lots have closed.

The Baker District development will include a new main library, two buildings for 371 residential units, commercial and public spaces.

The site will also have 156 parking spaces.

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Parking spaces

Neighbors protest against plans for 45 flats with 12 parking spaces in Malvern Road, Dover

Plans of 45 apartments have been proposed for a residential area with only 12 parking spaces.

Those who already live on Malvern Road in Dover have raised concerns that the building could add around 80 cars to an already busy area.

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An artist’s impression view of Malvern Road Flats, Pictured: Dover District Council planning portal view

The development is planned for an empty plot of overgrown land on an estate already filled with parked cars.

Residents find that there is hardly any space left in the evening when most people come home from work.

But developers say new residents would have little need for cars as the site is close to the city center and public transport

Christina Stephens, who lives on the corner of Clarendon Street, told KentOnline: “When I had to get home late at night I had to park on Folkestone Road and drive through an unlit area.

“There are already too few places around here.”

Christina Stephens: had to park on the main road.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Christina Stephens: had to park on the main road. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Hailey Drake with the planned apartment site behind her.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Hailey Drake with the planned apartment site behind her. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

Hailey Drake, who lives a short walk from Clarendon Place, told KentOnline: “I don’t have a car but my mum who is also on this estate does, I know the parking here is already horrible .

“Apart from that, the new apartments would tower over people’s homes.

“I don’t think there should be any apartments there. It would be better to turn this land into a children’s play park.”

Sian Crossland, of Malvern Road, is one of those who registered an objection on Dover District Council’s planning portal.

She told KentOnline: “If the flats will have room for 12 cars, drivers of probably 33 cars will have to find somewhere else.

Malvern Road in Dover, where 45 new apartments are planned.  Photo: Sam Lennon
Malvern Road in Dover, where 45 new apartments are planned. Photo: Sam Lennon

“Yet people are already coming here and leaving their cars here to catch a train to London.”

In the portal she said she had a five month old and had to park near her house to bring her in her car seat and then bring the buggy.

Another resident on the portal said: “These apartments are completely impractical: 45 apartments and 12 parking spaces do not help local residents in this area to park and will only add to other problems.

“If 45 apartments have two occupants each with a car, that could represent 88 more vehicles parked in the local area.”

The site of the planned apartments in Malvern Road.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
The site of the planned apartments in Malvern Road. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

The plan provides space for 48 bike spaces, but the resident said: “Dover is not a college town full of students and I don’t see locals buying a flat and moving in with just their bikes.

He added: “The artist’s impression makes it look like a hospital at best, a detention center at worst and certainly not up to par with Victorian housing in the area.”

The preliminary project concerns seven-storey houses on a vacant lot near the junction with Clarendon Street. There would also be 48 bicycle spaces.

The civic group Dover Society accepts that the brownfield site needs redevelopment and that the housing on offer is of good quality but goes against the scale of the development.

Graham Margery, acting chairman of the planning committee, wrote: “We consider this to be completely unacceptable as it is an incongruous structure, which does not correspond to the much smaller houses in the area.

“It has a dominating effect in the neighborhood in addition to obstructing light from adjacent properties. The limitation of parking supply for 45 units is also completely insufficient.”

The development would span three blocks and consist of 13 one-bedroom apartments, 25 two-bedroom apartments, five three-bedroom apartments and one four- and five-bedroom apartment each.

Kent and Medway Clinical Commissioning Group estimate that 108 people would live in the new development, an average of 2.4 per apartment.

There is already a limited number of parking spaces on Malvern Road due to some yellow lines and junctions. Clarendon Street and adjoining Clarendon Place are also regularly lined with vehicles.

The app is by David Andrew from Leyton, East London.

Clarendon Street, a few meters from the planned site of the flats, filled with vehicles on Sunday evening.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Clarendon Street, a few meters from the planned site of the flats, filled with vehicles on Sunday evening. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

A report by its THaT (Transport, Highways and Traffic) Consultancy said the area is so close to downtown and public transport that new residents would have little need for cars.

The literature states: “The site is in one of the most accessible locations, in terms of transport, in Dover. It provides easy access by car-free travel to a wide range of schools and education, healthcare, retail, recreation, employment and other services and facilities.

“Most of the daily needs of residents can be met with a 15 to 20 minute walk or a five to seven minute bike ride.

“The site is located just meters from a high quality bus route and Dover train station.”

He added that this application was to provide low-carbon development and that the few car spaces in the apartments would be exclusively reserved for fully electric cars.

An entire section of the site is now overgrown.  Photo: Sam Lennon KM
An entire section of the site is now overgrown. Photo: Sam Lennon KM

A planning statement also on behalf of Mr Andrew said the flats would be placed so that there was no effect on the light for surrounding homes and set back enough so as not to overlook homes further away. close to Folkestone Road.

It also states that the land was left abandoned for 20-25 years, destroyed the area and is now overgrown.

The report said: “Its poor condition adversely affects the character and appearance of Malvern Road and the lives of its inhabitants.”

Highways England said the project would not affect the wider road network, even during construction.

Network Rail had no objections and Kent County Council’s Rights of Way department said it did not need to comment.

For all application details Click here.

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Parking spaces

Food trucks or their parking spaces? Select Board Mulls which is most valuable

CHATHAM – The select council is further refining rules that will allow food trucks to operate in town this summer, including parts of downtown Chatham. But where lorries are allowed in public car parks, there is a corresponding loss of valuable parking spaces, which the council tackled last week.

The latest revision to the draft regulations for mobile food vendors specifies six pre-approved locations for food trucks, each with different hours of operation. The Route 137 crossing would be available year-round from 11 a.m. until sunset, and the Harding’s Beach and Oyster Pond Beach lot would be available June 1 through September 30 from 5 p.m. until sunset. But due to conflicts with other food providers and parking shortages during visitor season, the proposed rules are different for the three downtown locations.

At the city offices at 549 Main Street, a food truck would be permitted to occupy two spaces currently reserved for city employees and would be permitted to operate daily from 11 a.m. until sunset or 8 p.m., depending on the last possibility, from January 1st. to May 15. The community center parking lot would be available to accommodate a food truck on the same dates and times. Finally, reserved spaces at the Eldredge Garage parking lot would be available from 11 a.m. until sunset between June 1 and September 30.

Executive Secretary Shanna Nealy said city staff members visited all six lots to determine the best location for food trucks in each and found that due to recent drainage work on the lot from the Eldredge garage, the floor surface at the preferred location was uneven. Because of this, staff recommended waiting until the summer of 2023 to make this land available for food trucks, she said.

“I know the Eldredge Garage was the only place where businesses in the area were really interested in a mobile food truck,” said board member Shareen Davis. Board member Jeffrey Dykens agreed.

“If we could find flat ground there, I would like it to be open in 22, not 23,” he said.

“I think it might even encourage people to park at the Eldredge Garage, and that’s a bit of money in the city’s pocket,” board member Dean Nicastro said. The Eldredge lot is the only paid parking lot downtown.

The location at the municipal office parking lot, in the middle of downtown, was proposed to be open only between January and May 15. Why not in summer?

“It’s just the worry of taking up spaces in the parking lot during the season,” Nealy said. The loss of two spaces from the area reserved for city employees could create a challenge, she said.

“We know parking is an issue in Chatham, obviously,” Davis said. “Does this contradict the idea of ​​bringing mobile food trucks downtown?”

Dykens said he would be willing to sacrifice those two spaces as part of this summer’s pilot program.

“Otherwise, we are not going to know what the demand really is or not, whether it meets the needs of visitors or employees,” he said.

Board member Cory Metters agreed it’s important to provide a food truck option for downtown employees who leave work late and find they can’t get a table at a restaurant from the city center or that the restaurant does not offer take-out. The fact that brick-and-mortar restaurants are busy is good for them, but “bad for employees looking for a bite to eat,” Metters said.

It has also been proposed that the nearby food truck site in the Community Center car park be open off-season only, out of respect for the food stand near Veterans Field, which raises money for the Chatham Anglers. But Dykens said the city should consider allowing a food truck to operate there at certain times in the summer.

“I know the Anglers will have a crisis. But what is the demand? If we don’t test it, we won’t know,” he said.

The Anglers don’t play every day and most of their games start at 7 p.m., Davis noted. She suggested changing the hours so the food trucks aren’t serving at the same time the concession stand is open. A food truck could provide a healthy option for youth in the community center’s recreation department summer program, she noted.

“Their food options, if they haven’t brought anything, are vending machines in the community center,” she said.

By allowing service only until about 4 p.m., the city can allow food trucks to serve the public without encroaching on the Anglers’ concession, Dykens said. “I think we can find a way to coexist,” he said.

Tom Deegan, owner of Mom and Pop’s Burgers in Chatham, which operates a food truck, cautioned the board against restricting operating dates to the low season.

“With food trucks, you need volume. They are expensive to run, just like a restaurant,” he said. Although his truck is profitable when operating on the day of the first night or Oktoberfest, he would have lost money operating the day before or after these special events, he noted.

Deegan also encouraged the board to consider installing electrical service at food truck locations, which would allow the trucks to operate without the use of noisy generators, which may be unpopular with neighbors.

While there are more and more food trucks in the area, there are good ones and bad ones, just like restaurants, Deegan said. “The greats are wanted,” he said. To encourage them to come, the city needs to set reasonable minimum rules that offer the best chance of profitability, he said.

City staff needed to provide further revisions to the draft bylaw in time for council to consider and possibly adopt them at a future meeting.

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Parking spaces

Annapolis City Council expands outdoor dining, allows restaurants to rent parking spots – Capital Gazette

Outdoor dining will expand in Annapolis this weekend thanks to an expedited ordinance that allows restaurants to lease city-owned parking spaces.

The city council approved the rental procedures at a meeting on Monday evening after a long and sometimes heated discussion. The new ordinance O-16-22, restores for free the privileges that many restaurants have enjoyed during the pandemic. Businesses will now be required to reimburse the city for lost parking revenue, pay extra for facilities and comply with various other approval measures.

The program allowing restaurants to set up tables in parking lots, called “parklets”, is separate from legislation passed in April that extended outdoor dining in parking lots – another pandemic pivot that has proven popular – until the end of October. Unlike the April order, the new one does not have an expiration date.

Mayor Gavin Buckley has urged council to quickly pass the ‘parklet’ measure so that four restaurants ready to sign leases can accommodate more diners during commissioning week.

“It’s the busiest weekend of the season,” Buckley said. “They wish they could do it tomorrow.”

But two aldermen accused the mayor of rushing the process and expressed concern about giving city employees the power to approve leases, rather than having every candidate appear before council. Alderman DaJuan Gay, a Ward 6 Democrat, pointed out that the Annapolis Law Office failed to share the lease template with council members before the meeting, prompting the mayor to declare a break while the staff made photocopies of the 20-page document.

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When called back into session, Alderman Ross Arnett, a Ward 8 Democrat, asked more than a dozen questions, some of them rhetorical, about the rental of parking spaces and the process put in place by the employees of the city ​​and council rules committee.

“Any restaurant can enter and be automatically approved,” Arnett said. “It’s letting the genie out of the bottle.”

Other council members supported the program, which council had previously approved the concept of and city staff spent months codifying.

“Candidates will go through a pretty thorough check,” said Ellie Tierney, a Ward 1 Democrat, who read the steps aloud on the city’s website.

Alderman Rhonda Pindell-Charles, a Democrat representing Ward 3, noted that the lease requires restaurants to install security gates and hold proper insurance policies, requirements she said would weed out nonchalant applicants. “I’m comfortable with it,” she said.

Rental rates for “parklets” start at $16.60 and go up to $50 per day for parking spots on Main Street.

The measure passed unanimously after the council suspended rules to pass the bill at the same meeting at which it was introduced. Arnett asked that the council receive updates when leases are signed and for what rates. City Manager David Jarrell agreed to this request.

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Parking spaces

Community council says new street parking is not needed in Lanarkshire town

Concerns have been raised over work to create additional parking spaces on a Wishaw street.

John Carr says he is ‘appalled’ that North Lanarkshire Council is ‘wasting money’ on an unnecessary project while making cuts elsewhere.

John, the chairman of Coltness Community Council, says new spaces on the street where he lives are not needed.

He insists that this type of work would be more appropriate on other nearby streets that have long-standing parking issues.



The Lanarkshire Live app is available to download now.

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Mr Carr asked: ‘Who actually sanctioned this and what is the thought process behind this?

“They’re not needed at Newark Drive; there is tons of space.

“There is already a large parking space on the street. There are also driveways, waypoints and another area with garages that has more space to park, if needed.

“There are parking issues that need to be addressed on other streets in Coltness such as North Dryburgh Road, Lauder Crescent and Buchan Street. There is a grassed area on North Dryburgh Road which could be turned into additional parking spaces, but instead there is a complete disregard for what the public needs.



More parking spaces are needed on North Dryburgh Road

“There was a three-car accident recently in North Kilmeny Crescent, where there are cars parked on both sides of the street. This is another path where there are problems.

‘There are potholes to fix, the council is cutting back on road repairs, salt pans and grass cutting to save money so how can they justify the expense?

“How does this benefit the Coltness community?”

Although he has inquired about who in the local authority sanctioned the work and why, John says he is getting nowhere.

“I have a feeling that something is wrong here. These berries seem to have appeared overnight and the council is hiding my requests.



John Carr pictured in Newark Drive which he says already has enough parking spaces

“There have been eight letters sent to residents on the street that indicate this has something to do with the Shotts Housing Office,” John said. “But why would it be like this?

“I called there because it had their email address on the letter but the woman whose name is on it couldn’t tell me anything.”

North Lanarkshire Council has been approached for comment.

** Don’t miss the latest headlines from Lanarkshire. Sign up for our newsletters here.

And did you know that Lanarkshire Live is on Facebook? Go ahead and give us a like and share!

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Parking garage

Watch SC Police Dogpile on 9ft Alligator in Parking Garage

A 9-foot alligator snuck into the parking lot of an apartment complex in South Carolina on Friday, May 20, but it’s what happened next that has people talking on social media.

A video shared May 23 by the Charleston Police Department shows Animal Control Supervisor Courtney Bayles subduing the reptile by literally jumping on its back like a professional wrestler.

Two guys then jumped on Bayles to stop the alligator from knocking her down.

It was then that two other people grabbed the alligator by the snout and began to tape its mouth shut.

All this happens in just 30 seconds.

The video got more than 20,000 views on Facebook in less than a day, and many commenters are praising Bayles for allowing herself to be crushed in the name of animal control.


RELATED:


“I feel like that woman in the front pulled a straw,” Matchew Allean wrote on Facebook.

“Kudos to the female officer at the bottom of the pile for supporting the weight (over 400 pds.) of male officers on her while trying to restrain the suspect!” said Matt Dailey.

“Charleston PD gator wrestling team, where I sign up,” Joshua Perryman said.

A resident of the apartment complex is credited with finding the alligator. The tenant was walking a dog around 3 p.m. Friday, got out of an elevator in the garage, and sat there, police said. The resident alerted the apartment staff and they called the police dispatchers.

After being captured, the alligator was carried “a short distance” from the apartments and released unharmed into a pond, police officials said.

Spring is mating season for alligators in the southeast, which means males stray from familiar territory in search of females. This is the second time this month that an alligator has turned up in the wrong place on Daniel Island, including one stuck at the Daniel Island school.

A 9-foot alligator counts as an adult, but it grows much larger in the state, reaching up to 13 feet, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

How the alligator entered a parking lot has not been revealed, but some commentators have admitted the possibilities are frightening.

“Imagine parking your car next to this guy,” Ben Marks wrote on Facebook.

_____

©2022 The Charlotte Observer.

Visit charlotteobserver.com.

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Parking Spaces Market 2022 Report Covers Profiling Key Players – Parkopedia, Stashbee, Spothero, Parklet, Parkingforme, Appyparking

The recent report on Market for finding and booking parking spaces » Offered by Credible markets, includes an in-depth survey of the geographical landscape, industry size as well as the revenue estimation of the company. In addition, the report also highlights challenges hindering market growth and expansion strategies employed by leading companies in the “Parking space search and reservation market”.

A comprehensive competitive analysis that covers relevant data on industry leaders is intended to help potential market entrants and existing players competing with the right direction to arrive at their decisions. Market structure analysis discusses in detail Find and reserve parking spaces companies with their profiles, market revenue shares, full portfolio of their offerings, networking and distribution strategies, regional market footprints, and much more.

Parking Search and Reservation Market: Segmentation

Key players in the Find and Book Parking Spots Market are:

Parkopedia
hiding place
Spot-hero
Parklet
parkingform
appyparking
Bestparking
RingGo
Your parking space
Parkme
Parkhound
Just Park

Major Types of Parking Search and Reservation Products covered in this report are:

Provide a reservation
Search only

The most widely used downstream areas of the Find and Book Parking Spots Market covered in this report are:

Users
Parking owners

Click the link for a free sample report @ https://crediblemarkets.com/sample-request/find-and-reserve-parking-spaces-market-309787?utm_source=AkshayT&utm_medium=SatPR

Main points covered in the table of contents:

1 Finding and Booking Parking Spaces Introduction and Market Overview

2 Industry Chain Analysis

3 Global Parking Finder and Reservation Market, by Type

4 Find and Reserve Parking Space Market, by Application

5 Global Car Parking Consumption, Revenue ($) by Region (2016-2021)

6 Global Car Parking Finder Production by Major Regions (2016-2021)

7 Global Car Parking Consumption by Region (2016-2021)

8 Competitive Landscape

9 Global Find and Book Parking Spots Market Analysis and Forecast by Type and Application

10 Finding and Booking Parking Spaces Market Supply and Demand Forecast by Regions

11 New Project Feasibility Analysis

12 Expert interview file

13 Research finding and conclusion

14 Appendix

Directly Buy This Market Research Report [email protected] https://crediblemarkets.com/reports/purchase/find-and-reserve-parking-spaces-market-309787?license_type=single_user;utm_source=AkshayT&utm_medium=SatPR

Answers to key questions in the report:

  • What will be the market development pace of Find and Book Parking Spaces market?
  • What are the key factors driving the Global Find and Book Parking Spaces Market?
  • Who are the main manufacturers on the market?
  • What are the market openings, market risks and market outline?
  • What are sales volume, revenue, and price analysis of top manufacturers of Find and Book Parking Spaces market?
  • Who are the distributors, traders and dealers of Find and Reserve Parking Spaces Market?
  • What are the Find and Book Parking Spots market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the global Find and Book Parking Spots Industries?
  • What are the deals, revenue, and value review by market types and uses?
  • What are the transactions, revenue and value review by business areas?

About Us

Credible Markets has become a trusted source for business market research needs in a short period of time. We’ve partnered with leading market intelligence publishers and our report pool coverage spans all key industry verticals and thousands of micro-markets. The massive repository allows our clients to choose from recently released reports from a range of publishers who also provide in-depth analysis by region and country. Moreover, pre-booked research reports are among our best offers.

The collection of market intelligence reports is regularly updated to provide visitors with quick access to the latest market information. We provide round-the-clock support to help you reuse search parameters and benefit from a full range of reserved reports. After all, it’s about helping you make an informed strategic decision on purchasing the right report that meets all your market research demands.

Credible Markets’ benchmark reports use predictive analytical models to study the performance of critical market segments. We believe that business demands depend on a range of parameters and therefore adhere to providing industry-specific search solutions. Our clientele, ranging from thriving start-ups to some of the Fortune 500 companies, is testament to our expertise in providing in-depth insights on any desired industry sector.

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Parking garage

San Diego will build a parking garage, at $188,000 per space – NBC 7 San Diego

Help is on the way for people looking for parking and green space in San Diego’s East Village, but if the city’s plan to build a new garage and park comes to fruition, it will not be cheap for taxpayers.

Photos: East Village Park approved with an $80 million price tag, 16 years after the original design

Sixteen years after the East Village Green park project was considered as part of the updated Downtown Community Plan in April 2006, the San Diego City Council recently approved an addition to its budget, which has swelled to nearly 80 million dollars for its construction.

Much of the overall cost of the project will be for a two-level, 185-space underground structure that will be built at an estimated cost of just under $35 million, or a cost of $188,374.49 per parking space.

The park, originally described as a 4.1-acre multi-block park, would span the area between F and G streets, bordered by 13th Street on the west and 15th Street on the east. is. The park would be divided by 14th Street, which could be closed on weekends and during special events in the park.

City of San Diego/Civic of San Diego

Phase 1 construction will begin in the areas delineated by red squares.

The original design, which was part of the 2006 downtown community plan, included large grassy recreation areas with an informal amphitheater as well as the possibility of a café, playground, area for farmers’ markets and a neighborhood center.

After years of delays, the project was approved by the San Diego City Council in December 2019, then estimated at just over $52 million and expected to include a 14,000 square foot two-story recreation and community center. , a playground with a paddling pool, off-leash dog parks and a passive play/reading area.

However, city council members this month approved an additional $27.3 million for the budget, due to rising construction costs, etc., bringing the project’s total to almost $80 million. . This amount also takes into account what the city will pay to move two homes currently on F Street, designated by the city as historic structures.

Several of the amenities originally planned for the park – the West Park Cafe building and the East Park Bark Bar, as well as a decorative shade structure above the performance pavilion – were, however, highlighted in the final proposal, and the decorative fence that was proposed has now, unfortunately, been downgraded to chain link. Downgrades save city more than $2.5 million

Approval of additional funds effectively serves as the city’s green light for the project; The city’s independent nonprofit planning agency, Civic San Diego, has invited bids to build Phase 1 of the project in the summer of 2021.

The project is expected to take shape in several phases, with construction of phase 1 expected to start in August 2022, provided the project is awarded by the end of the month.

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Parking garage

Urban search and rescue team simulate parking lot collapse during test

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – Dozens of Lowcountry firefighters who make up South Carolina’s Task Force 3 put their skills to the test and proved their operational readiness by simulating a parking lot collapse in Charleston.

The annual Urban Search and Rescue Task Force Operational Readiness Exercise was held at the Charleston Fire Training Center on Saturday morning.

Task Force 3 is one of five urban search and rescue task forces in South Carolina. It is made up of members from the Charleston, North Charleston, Summerville, Saint Andrews, James Island, Johns Island and Mount Pleasant Fire Departments.

For hours, the members dug the heap, used the Jaws of Life, and pulled the victims out of the pile of rubble.

The task force was previously called in to help after flooding swept through Georgetown in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian and put on hold after tornadoes ripped through the Midlands two months ago.

The commander says the majority of his members have been with the task force for over 10 years.

“Any storm, hurricane, structural collapse, any technical hazard that is beyond the realm of normal firefighter operations, this team is capable of handling and performing at a higher level to get the job done and help our citizens,” the commander said. of Task Force 3 Kyle. said the bishop.

Task force members said training like this not only helps them hone their skills, but prepares them in case their help is needed.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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Parking garage

Two teenagers cited for vandalizing city parking lot | Local News

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Parking garage

2 teenagers cited for vandalizing city parking lot | Local News

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Parking garage

Yorktown parking garage access restricted after beam cracks form – Daily Press

YORKTOWN — Parts of the parking deck at Riverwalk Landing in Yorktown are temporarily closed after a crack was recently discovered in one of the structure’s support beams.

The crack, which was first spotted on Wednesday, happened “very suddenly,” York County spokeswoman Gail Whittaker said.

“We have people coming in and out of this garage all the time and there was nothing wrong, and then a citizen noticed it,” Whittaker said.

When the crack was discovered, authorities closed off the terrace to allow a structural engineer to inspect it, while firefighters were called in to shore up the beam. Officials still don’t know what caused the crack to appear.

Currently, the upper level of the garage is closed, while parts of the lower level are restricted. According to a recent update on York County’s Facebook page, officials anticipate that use of the parking deck will be restricted for at least 90 days.

With the parking deck partially out of service, Yorktown lost about 100 to 120 parking spaces, though Whittaker doesn’t expect that to make too much of a difference to visitors.

“We actually have 1,000 hard surfaces [parking] spaces,” she said. “That’s one of the reasons we have our wonderful streetcar system here in Yorktown that stops at parking lots around town to transport people to the waterfront or to the various historic attractions. … Some people may park in another space that they are not as familiar with and then get the cart down.

The Yorktown Trolley, which is air-conditioned, operates seven days a week. From May 27, hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Sian Wilkerson, [email protected], 757-342-6616

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Parking spaces

111 additional parking spaces created as Radcliffe Metrolink Park & ​​Ride reopens

Radcliffe Metrolink Park & ​​Ride is open again after completion of work which saw the installation of a new parking platform on the site and increased the number of parking spaces from 369 to 480.

The extension of the car park will allow more people to access the Metrolink network and use public transport as part of their journey.

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, said:

“Park & ​​Ride programs like this are essential to developing the Greater Manchester Bee Network’s vision of providing a truly integrated public transport system, making travel around our city-region easier, more accessible and affordable. .

“This latest project means that we have now created nearly 600 new Park & ​​Ride spaces at three different tram stops across the city-region over the past 18 months, in addition to thousands of Park & ​​Ride spaces. Ride already available on the Metrolink network.

“By allowing people to get out of their vehicles and use public transport – even if only for part of their journey – we can help reduce traffic congestion and reduce harmful emissions that harm our air quality.

Radcliffe Park & ​​Ride // Credit: TfGM

Finishing ahead of schedule, the project also includes a brand new electric vehicle (EV) charging point and also denotes the finalization of Metrolink Park & ​​Ride’s wider expansion works programme, which also saw the placement of a new bridge and the creation of 123 additional spaces in Whitefield alongside a 360-seater Park & ​​Ride venue being built at Parkway on the Trafford Park line.

Plans for the future will see a brand new Park & ​​Ride for Walkden station, which will start later in 2022 and will include over 100 parking spaces, fourth motorbike spaces, electric vehicle charging facilities and a bicycle room.

Chris Barnes, Projects Group Manager at Transport for Greater Manchester, said:
“We are delighted to have successfully completed the Metrolink Park & ​​Ride expansion, increasing parking capacity at Radcliffe and Whitefield stops.

“Before the pandemic, the car parks at both sites were at capacity at 8 a.m., so the additional spaces will allow even more people to travel sustainably on the 99-stop Metrolink network and all the many locations that he serves.

To find out more about Park & ​​Ride, please visit the Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) website: http://www.tfgm.com/park-and-ride

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces, oil drilling and university debt

Doubling the parking spaces is a bad move

City of Oyster Bay is considering a zoning change that will double the number of parking lots required for industrial facilities [“Code change reservations,” News, May 17]. As a director of one of Long Island’s largest and busiest commercial brokerage firms specializing solely in industrial facilities, I consider this not only unnecessary but highly restrictive for new developments and redevelopments. This would have a very negative economic impact on the surrounding businesses of the city. Just walk past any industrial warehouse and you’ll quickly see how underutilized the parking lots are. If the city believes there is a potential parking problem, perhaps they should consider a more reasonable increase (10% to 20%) in the parking requirement. Increasing the parking requirement by 100% is like trying to kill a mosquito with a hammer.

Jeff Schwartzberg, Massapequa

Biden has OKd more drilling than Trump

A reader accused President Joe Biden of ‘stopping various means of domestic oil production’ [“Clean energy is part of LI’s best future,” Letters, May 16]. In fact, Biden has approved more national drilling permits than former President Donald Trump. Due to an expected drop in oil prices, oil companies, like those in Texas, are refusing to restart full oil drilling production for fear of losing money.

Pete Scott, Central Harbor

Mull alternatives to college

I have a unique view of student loans and the university in general [“Dealing with student loan debt,” Letters, May 6]. We need to stop obsessing over college – it’s being touted as a panacea. We also need to advocate for alternatives to college, such as trade school, and — I know this sounds strange — maybe the military.

Joe Domhan, West Babylon

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Parking spaces

Additional approved parking spaces at Bramley Ambulance Station

Additional staff and ambulance parking at Bramley Ambulance Station has been approved by council planners.

The proposals, by West Yorkshire Ambulance Service, will help solve parking problems at the Stanningley Road site, which has 50 staff working there but only enough parking space for 30.

Grassed areas on site are to be removed to increase the number of emergency ambulance bays from two to 12, and increase the number of personnel bays from 30 to 52.

The existing fuel tank and bay would be relocated, and new lighting and electric car charging points would be installed.

A planning statement accompanying the application stated:

“In addition to this, the entire site needs to be redone to remove potholes and ripples that damage emergency vehicles. Finally, the site will integrate the infrastructure for future electric car charging facilities for emergency and personnel vehicles.

“The proposed development will provide sufficient parking spaces for staff to address current parking issues at the site, creating a safer and smoother parking area and working environment for staff.”

Bramley Ambulance Station is based on Railsford Rise on the corner of Stanningley Road.

The plans view in full here.

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Parking garage

Lakewood Parking Garage Collapse Fee

LAKEWOOD, Ohio (WJW) — A grand jury has returned an indictment charging a construction company and its owner and foreman in the collapse of a parking lot in Lakewood late last year, the court said. Cuyahoga County District Attorney’s Office.

Atlas Masonry Restoration and Maintenance, owner Elmer Mekker and foreman Charles Hawley are accused of causing panic.

According to the indictment, jurors found that the defendants “caused the evacuation of a public place, or otherwise caused serious inconvenience or public alarm by committing an offence, without regard to the likelihood that its commission would cause serious public inconvenience or alarm and resulted in economic damage of $150,000 or more.

The collapse took place on December 23, resulting in major damage to the two-level underground parking structure at Marine Towers West, as well as the crushing of dozens of cars. However, no one was reported injured in the incident.

The district attorney’s office confirmed to FOX 8 that damages are estimated at more than $1 million and those charged face up to 36 months in prison.

FOX 8 Picture

The company had been hired to perform concrete repairs to the structure. The prosecutor’s office said Hawley and another employee removed concrete around some of the support pillars on the lower level of the garage, leaving only rebar. About 18 hours later, the structure began to shake, which led to the collapse.

Lakewood Police discovered in an investigation that plans to fully secure the pillars were non-existent.

The building, which was built in 1963 and has 171 units, was evacuated at the time of the incident, with residents allowed to return the next day.

Marine Towers West has been owned and operated by Burton Carol Management for over 25 years.

Joy Anzalone, chief operating officer, says they are still appalled at what happened because they have worked with the contractor several times over the years.

“The owner has always done a great job,” she said, “However, you’re only as good as your last job and it was horrible for everyone.”

When asked what they thought of the indictments, she replied: “Relieved, we were confident that the Town of Lakewood and the entire investigation team were incredibly thorough and would uncover the truth. and background of what had happened.”

The contractor’s actions also led Burton Carol to pay a $250 fine and plead no contest to a misdemeanor for failing to obtain a work permit.

“It is a miracle that the recklessness displayed, not only by Atlas Masonry but also by the owner and foreman in charge, did not result in serious injury or death,” prosecutor Michael O’Malley said in a statement. communicated. “Their poor decisions put hundreds of lives at risk, and they must be held accountable.”

The construction company was also found guilty last month of failing to obtain a permit before working on the Lakewood municipal yard garage.

No arraignment date has yet been set in this new indictment.

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Charges filed for Lakewood Marine Towers West parking lot collapse

CLEVELAND — The Cuyahoga County District Attorney’s Office announced charges for last year’s parking lot collapse at Marine Towers West in Lakewood.

In November 2021, a month before the collapse, Marine Towers contracted with Atlas Masonry Restoration and Maintenance to perform concrete repairs on the property.

On December 22, 2021, the project foreman and another worker removed two support pillars on the lower level of the parking garage. Only the reinforcing bars remained to support the structure.

That evening, a tenant took photos of the exposed rebar after spotting it while taking out the trash. The tenant said he was in the garage hauling trash into the dumpster when he noticed the concrete collars forming the exterior of two support columns appeared to have been cut. The support columns were on the lower level of the garage and located on the left side, precisely in the area that collapsed, he said.

Courtesy of Stephen Myers

The previous month, the tenant said he noticed that the concrete at the bottom of the pillars had started to deteriorate and large cracks had started to form. The construction crew, which the city said was working without a permit, worked at the parking lot, which was built in 1963, in the two weeks before the collapse.

Tenant: Missing concrete, exposed rebar structure found night before parking deck collapse

On December 23, the garage collapsed. Residents of Marine Towers West, which is the adjacent building next to the collapsed garage, have been asked to vacate their residences while authorities investigate the collapse.

Emergency crews at the scene of the parking garage collapse on Edgewater Drive in Lakewood

“It is a miracle that the recklessness displayed, not only by Atlas Masonry but also by the owner and foreman in charge, did not result in serious injury or death,” said prosecutor Michael C. O’Malley. . “Their poor decisions put hundreds of lives at risk, and they must be held accountable.”

Lakewood parking garage collapse 1.jpg

News 5

According to the prosecutor’s office, “An investigation by the LPD (Lakewood Police Department) revealed that there were no plans to brace or shore up the pillars during the repair work. In addition, no planning permission was given. ‘was obtained through the town of Lakewood by Atlas Masonry for the job.’

Charges have been laid against the company, its owner and the foreman involved. All three were each charged with one count of inciting panic, all third-degree felonies. Last month, the company was found guilty of a county for failing to obtain a permit for work carried out in the garage, authorities said.

Lakewood parking garage collapse 3.jpg

News 5

“On the day of the collapse, I pledged that the town of Lakewood will not rest until we find out what happened,” said Lakewood Mayor Meghan F. George. . “Our thorough investigation revealed that the collapse was no accident. In fact, it was caused by the outrageous conduct of Atlas Construction and its executives, who had no regard for the safety of Marine residents. Towers West. Once the facts involved became clear, I requested that the county attorney re-examine the case to determine if felony charges could be pursued. On behalf of the Town of Lakewood, I would like to thank the Attorney O’Malley and his team for their work, and we look forward to its resolution in the justice system.

Both the business owner and the foreman will be arraigned at a later date.

RELATED: Tenant: Missing concrete, exposed rebar structure found night before parking deck collapse

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City Approves Equipment Purchases for Aggieville Parking Lot | News

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Investigation continues into Parma underground car park collapse: Photos

PARMA, Ohio — Two weeks after the partial collapse of an underground parking garage at 5800 Laurent Drive, Fire Chief Michael Lasky said the investigation is continuing.

“Two cars, for lack of a better term, were trapped and simply restrained by their bumpers,” Lasky said. “We were able to get all the cars off the bridge, so there’s nothing else on it now and there’s nothing under it.

“The structural engineer is currently assessing the incident. We hope to have a report by next week.

At 11:45 p.m. on May 3, a tenant parked his car in the above ground parking garage. Moments later, the vehicle was hanging precariously.

“The guy was smoking when all the cement under his car fell apart,” Lasky said. “It was a shock. He couldn’t believe what he was seeing. Then the same thing happened to the car next to it in the same 20ft by 20ft area.

“When we got there we were afraid there would be more, so we evacuated all the cars on the top of the bridge and got as many cars out of that area as we could.”

Parma firefighters and police removed all vehicles from the immediate parking area to reduce the load on the structure. No injuries were reported in the incident.

The fire chief estimated the Laurent Drive facility could hold more than 150 cars underground.

The Parma incident comes more than five months after the Marine Towers West parking lot collapsed in Lakewood.

“It’s a bit ironic because in January the building manager emailed his inspectors saying in light of what happened in Lakewood to make sure they look at all the underground parking lots “, said Lasky.

“It’s the only one we have that’s underground in Parma, so they were already looking at that and paying attention to things that needed to be done by (the management company) Regency to deal with it.”

According to the fire chief, there had been previous reports of water leaks inside the underground portion of the garage.

“It’s always wet out there,” Lasky said. “The biggest thing we try to tell anyone else, if you see anything – even if it’s minor – report it, because maybe we could have stopped it.”

Read more news from the Parma Sun Post.

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Parking garage

Redding’s new car park closed, for now

A new private parking lot in downtown Redding that held its grand opening earlier this month was temporarily closed on Saturday so its owners could stop people from hanging out there and leaving trash behind.

There are two exceptions to the temporary closure: The California Street Parking Garage at 1451 California St. will be open for free parking during the annual Asphalt Cowboys Pancake Breakfast, which runs from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Friday and usually attracts around 10,000 diners. .

The community breakfast will be held outside the new Market Center building, 1551 Market St., near the garage, which is located at California and Tehama streets.

The garage will also be open for free parking during the Rodeo Parade on Saturday. The parking garage’s hours on both days will be from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., said Rocky Slaughter, operations manager for garage owner K2 Development Companies.

The buzz: 3 steam whistles in downtown Redding as a tribute to the town’s past, a hip future

On weekdays starting May 23, the garage will also be open to the public, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., free of charge, Slaughter said.

Starting June 1, the garage should start charging a $1 hourly fee.

In a press release on Tuesday, K2 said it would use garage downtime “to adjust hours of operation, enforcement of parking regulations and additional security measures to ensure safety. of all users of the new car park”.

In an interview, Slaughter said K2 didn’t expect to find dawdling and littering the six-story structure that has 400 spaces and replaced a public car park.

“We thought people would park in the parking structure,” Slaughter said, not “hang around and eat and drink and leave things behind.”

Parking rates: How much are downtown Redding parking rates going up?

Looting and litter seem to be a problem primarily on the top floor of the six-story garage, which Slaughter says has “pretty incredible” views of downtown.

“Obviously we totally encourage people to climb to the top, take a look, take it and then go out to a restaurant or something,” he said. “At the end of the day, we’re just trying to provide the most positive experience for people going downtown. The whole point of all this recent development is to help these businesses thrive.”

ACE Parking Co. of San Diego, which operates parking garages in the United States and Europe, will be responsible for hiring security, waste management, the proper operation of the garage’s mechanical entrance doors and distributing parking tickets.

ACE Parking employees will arrive June 1, the same day the $1-per-hour parking fee begins, Slaughter said.

The parking garage has no trash cans, with cleaning of the garage and elevator taking place once a week, as recommended by parking consultants K2 Dixon Resources Unlimited, Slaughter said.

Michele Chandler covers municipal government and housing issues for the Redding Record Searchlight/USA Today Network. Follow her on Twitter at @MChandler_RS, call her at 530-225-8344 or email her at [email protected] Please Support our entire newsroom’s commitment to public service journalism by subscribing today.

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3 arrested, 1 wanted in Greenville parking lot assault, police say

GREENVILLE, SC (WSPA) – Four people have been charged with assaulting three other people in a Greenville parking lot early Sunday morning, the Greenville Police Department said.

7News previously reported that witnesses told police that two women attacked one of the victims on the second floor before following her to the fourth floor of the Richardson Street parking lot, according to the incident report.

Witnesses also told police that three men, who were in the same group as the women, attacked another person. Once police arrived on the scene, they located the third victim who said he was punched in the face, according to the incident report.

Greenville police said Jennifer D. Pace, 26, Hannah B. Poole, 21, and Johnny A. Holcombe Jr., 24, were arrested. They face the following charges:

  • Jennifer D. Pace – two counts of assault and one count of malicious damage
  • Hannah B. Poole – three counts of assault and one count of malicious damage
  • Johnny A. Holcombe Jr. – an assault and battery chief

The Greenville County Detention Center told 7News Pace and Poole they were released on bail on Tuesday for $1,087.50. Holcombe was released on Tuesday “on his own recognizance”.

Officers said Trenston Leavell Simpson, 33, remains wanted for aggravated assault.

According to warrants, police obtained surveillance and cellphone footage of the assaults. The warrants said the four suspects had admitted to the assaults in interviews with police

A victim’s phone was smashed and their vehicle was damaged in the assault, according to warrants.

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3 assaulted in Greenville parking lot, police say

GREENVILLE, SC (WSPA) – Police say three people were assaulted early Sunday morning in a parking lot in Greenville.

The Greenville Police Department said the incident happened in the parking lot on Richardson Street.

According to the incident report, witnesses told police that two women attacked one of the victims on the second floor before following her to the fourth floor of the garage.

Witnesses told police that three men, who were in the same group as the women, attacked another person.

Once police arrived on the scene, they located the third victim who said he was punched in the face, according to the incident report.

Recent attacks are leaving people who use the garage a lot on edge.

“It’s actually quite concerning because this is a very commonly used parking lot where, you know, people are taking advantage of this free parking,” Jamal Session said.

“It’s very scary and as someone who uses it often, this is the first I’ve heard of something like this. So I think I’ll definitely be on my guard,” said Bailey Verault.

Verrault said she constantly uses the Richardson Street garage.

” Several times a week. Nights, weekends, mornings,” she said.

She said she would continue to use it, but she would be on high alert.

“Yeah, I’m still going to keep going, but I think I just have that on my mind from now on,” Verrault said.

Savanna Neeley said she uses the garage several times a month, but she makes it a point never to go there alone.

“I make sure that if I go, if I’m alone, I’m right at the entrance, but if not, I always make sure I have someone. I don’t like going alone,” Neeley said.

She said that whenever she was in a parking lot, she always looked around.

“Oh, you think of everything. You’re like checking your back, looking at your purse. You just make sure you can get into your car and lock it as soon as you get there,” she said.

Even with the attacks, people 7NEWS spoke to said it was still a convenient place to park.

“I mean, it’s free on the weekends and stuff and I still feel like I can get a spot here. And it’s really close and central to everything, but I would really like to be with someone,” Neeley said.

“I think we’ll continue to use it, but just with a little more awareness of our surroundings and just trying to be vigilant about when we stay outside,” Session said.

Police have not released information about the suspects. They said they were still taking statements from victims and witnesses.

7NEWS will update this story when more information becomes available.

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Parking spaces

A labor councilor calls for the creation of parking spaces for people with autism

A Labor Party councilor has asked the council to provide an update on progress on providing autistic parking spaces at Fingal.

In its response to Cllr Robert O’Donoghue, the council said its operations department had agreed to review the arrangements, if any, in place in other local authorities.

Following liaison with two of Dublin’s local authorities, it has been determined that there is currently no specific provision for autistic parking in the allocation of state-run car parks in the area, and there is also no provision in Fingal’s current parking regulations.

According to the council, there are only courtesy parking spaces – however, these are not enforceable under current or Gardaí regulations.

The council said Blue Badge disabled parking permits are available to people living in Ireland with certain disabilities and registered blind people, whether they are drivers or passengers.

These are the only authorizations recognized by Fingal Parking regulations.

The council confirmed that the introduction of ‘autism-friendly’ parking is in place at various locations across Ireland by ASD Ireland in conjunction with retail businesses where the need is greatest, and the majority of these locations are controlled by management companies in commercial and retail parks. facilities.

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Stoke-on-Trent supermarket with 487 parking spaces for sale for £150,000

A mothballed supermarket that once housed Tesco and Go Outdoors is up for sale – for as little as £150,000. The unit – which has 487 parking spaces – will be auctioned on Wednesday, May 18.

The site – on New Hall Street, Hanley – has been empty since Go Outdoors mysteriously closed its shop and car park before the coronavirus pandemic began. It then moved to Festival Park and has now moved to a new unit on the same retail park.

Go Outdoors had opened there after Tesco closed its old supermarket to make way for its new store on nearby Potteries Way.

READ MORE: Shopping center with 13 empty units for sale for £650,000

Auctioneer Acquitus says: “The property comprises a substantial retail warehouse in the town center benefiting from three levels of underground parking with space for 487 cars. The property may be suitable for a sub-division and/or alternative uses. alternatives including warehouse, leisure and self-storage, subject to agreements.

“The property may also be suitable for redevelopment, subject to permissions. There are some structural flaws in the parking lot.”

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Liberty-James Parking Garage Reaches Critical Point

ROME — It’s at the crucial point where something needs to be done — much like the status of the city’s Liberty-James car park, engineers told city officials.

Architect Steven Kushner of Bergmann Architects, Engineers, Planners of Rochester outlined four options for the city regarding the future of the downtown garage, built during the city’s urban renewal efforts in the 1990s. 1970 and now showing significant wear from its more than 50 years of existence.

But whatever plan they choose, Kushner told city officials and Common Council members on Wednesday that they needed to act quickly, given the unsafe and deteriorating conditions at the garage.

Among Kushner’s development options: rehabilitation, replacement, removal or partial construction.

“We’ve been working on it for a number of years – it’s been a process to see where you’re at over the repairs,” Kushner said. “If you decide not to repair, dismantle or do anything else, we cannot take responsibility knowing what we know about the garage. Over time, it does not improve or repair itself. You have to do something with where we are today.

Wednesday’s presentation began with a guided tour of the Liberty James Garage. My council members, Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development Matthew Andrews, City Planners, Chief Codes Enforcement Officer Mark Domenico and City Engineer II Joseph Guiliano.

Professional engineer Christopher N. Latreille led the walking tour, pointing out the rusting rebar running across the garage deck and the deterioration of the supporting concrete from water and salt corrosion. He said that in some areas the concrete is at the point of breaking and falling.

As for the parking surface, a “membrane” was applied around 2006, but it had “not been maintained lately,” Guiliano said, saying that in recent years only “band-aids” had been applied. applied to problem areas.

Latreille warned city officials that Rome would have to invest in an “aggressive” repair program if council members decided to retain and repair the current garage, but strongly recommended demolition.

“There’s no immediate threat of collapse, but this garage is so badly in need of work that you’re at the point where you need a new garage,” Latreille said. “It’s either” expensive aggressive repair program or teardown, that’s where we are right now.

During the presentation in the boardroom after the tour, Kushner said that some structural issues with the garage “may not be obvious, but we’re at the point where the next step could be the concrete drop, which that we want to avoid. The electrical engineers said all the electrical components needed to be replaced, period,” adding that Bergmann began his evaluation of the garage following the submission of the Downtown Revitalization Initiative of the city ​​in 2018.

Kushner said some of the garage exits had exposed wires coming out of cable boxes in stairway areas that needed to be closed off. He said the plumbing was going through (the walls) and the conduit was rusty to the point that you could see the wires inside.

“DRI’s original expectation, we thought it would take little structural and lighting repairs, but we can’t even meet that,” Kushner said. “Previous repairs have been ineffective, which is a major concern.”

The architect said if the city is leaning towards rehabilitating the garage, officials should consider whether the cost is worth the expected life of the structure. If fixed, Kushner said it would only extend the life of the garage by 10 to 15 years.

“We could remove the garage and put the same thing in its place, but does it need it?” he asked. “There hasn’t been a time when the garage has seen cars across the board. The size doesn’t seem necessary. The quickest (and cheapest) option would be to demolish the garage and replace it by surface land to meet parking demands, then you could develop the site in the future” if the demand warranted it.

Instead of simply replacing the garage with surface land, Kushner said the city could also choose to build a smaller, one-level garage on a smaller footprint.

And while the repairs would only extend the life of the current garage by 10 to 15 years, Kushner described this as the “high-risk solution”.

“Once we start opening things up, are there more issues in the concrete that we’re not aware of?” Kushner asked. “It would be something that would have to be addressed at that time if things happened beyond what we anticipate.”

Kushner also warned that since the presentation of initial work estimates in 2019, construction, materials and construction management have increased significantly and continue to intensify since the COVID-19 pandemic.

“From 2019 to 2022 you had three years of escalating 2 1/2 to 3% inflation every year, but now everything is even higher in the construction industry, and it’s hard to get materials,” he said.

Repair and rehabilitation

Kushner presented a breakdown of expected costs for each option:

• Option 1 — Garage repair and rehabilitation for continuous service in one construction phase: $7.4 million;

• Option 2 — Repair and Rehabilitation as a five-year multi-phase construction project: $8.1 million;

• Option 3 — Partial demolition and repair: $8.4 million and more.

Replacement in kind

Includes a 50-year long-term solution; would reconsider office space for state offices in a less vulnerable location; code updates and facade improvements. However, Bergmann representatives said the option would require ongoing maintenance and there is no demand for a garage of this size at present, with much of the garage sitting unused.

• Estimated cost: $23,600,000

Replace with surface land

Long-term solution that meets the anticipated parking demand (135 spaces and green space); forces state offices to move; can consider covered parking areas with photovoltaic panels above the parking area for buses and motorhomes; requires less maintenance; least risky solution — no more unknowns to cause future damage and no vertical structures to maintain; preferred concept development.

• Estimated cost: $3 million

Replace with a smaller garage

Long-term solution that adapts to future growth; the raised terrace probably has a useful life of 50 years (with 200 seats); allows for a more open site; forces state offices to move; requires ongoing maintenance; moderate risk solution — high initial cost with uncertain parking demand; and high cost/parking spot option.

Total estimated cost: $11 million

To advance

Councilors asked if the results of a parking study were available in order to know the demand for spaces needed downtown before a final decision is made. Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development Andrews said his office is awaiting the latest round of updates on the study, but does not expect the projected numbers to change dramatically. With around 550 spaces scratched in the garage currently, Andrews said that in 2019, garage utilization was around 28% and “garage utilization is down (compared to that) this year.”

Andrews added that the city currently has about $1.28 million in DRI funding for the garage, which “puts us in the demolition cost range.” City officials said Mayor Jacqueline M. Izzo was also interested in an American Rescue Plan Act funding commitment to the garage project.

Andrews said once a decision is made on which option to take and the project is approved, the city has until the end of 2024 to spend the allocated DRI funding, and ARPA funding must be committed. by 2024 and in use by 2026.

Council chair Stephanie Viscelli said she would prefer the council see the traffic study before deciding “yes” or “no” on either option. She said that once the traffic study is available, the council could act quickly. City officials said they would work to get the numbers to councilors as soon as possible so parking legislation could be on the May 25 city council agenda.

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News in Clarksville: School bus zone changes, $14 million arena parking garage and other top stories this week

CLARKSVILLE, TN – Here’s a look at some of the best local reporting from Clarksville Now this week.

Narrower bus zones next year will force children to walk on busy roads: CMCSS simply does not have enough drivers and needs to reduce bus zones. But Clarksville Now tried to hike one of those expected hiking routes on Sango Road. Here’s what we faced. READ MORE

Troops of the 101st Airborne Division going to Europe: Troops from the 101st are back in Europe to support NATO’s response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. READ MORE

$14 million from the state to build a new parking lot: The new public garage will be directly across from the F&M Bank Arena under construction. READ MORE

F&M Bank Arena will include the new Ford Ice Center: The arena will house a new Ford Ice Center, like those in Bellevue and Antioch. Check out this video tour of the center’s progress, along with photos. READ MORE

3 men killed in single-vehicle crash on Needmore Road: The three were killed when the vehicle hit a utility pole. READ MORE

Rezoning of Killebrew on Rossview Road approved by County Commission: With final county approval, the 1,300 units on 300 acres can begin next to the Kirkwood School under construction. READ MORE

House destroyed by fire at Stones Manor: A family of seven has been displaced by the Collins View Way fire. READ MORE

The council selects the next principal of schools, Jean Luna-Vedder: The school board voted to nominate the head of TDOE as the next CMCSS Principal of Schools. READ MORE

Woman charged with second degree murder in fentanyl overdose death: Tennessee state law makes the sale of fentanyl resulting in a person’s death second-degree murder. READ MORE

Inmate dies in county jail, cause under investigation: He had been booked the day before for drunk driving. When deputies conducted a security check the following morning, they found him unconscious in his cell. READ MORE

Prom evening 2022: Discover the photos of Clarksville Raised and Kenwood high.

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Second BNA Parking Garage Receives Coveted Parksmart Certification

The new Terminal Garage 1 at Nashville® International Airport (BNA) has achieved Parksmart Silver certification for its sustainable design, construction and operation. This is BNA’s second garage to achieve Parksmart certification, and BNA is home to two of the 42 certified parking structures worldwide.

BNA’s Terminal Garage 1 is a $174 million state-of-the-art facility opening in 2021 with six levels of public parking, 2,800 parking spaces, a variety of traveler amenities and a new and improved valet center with dedicated entrance. The structure was designed by Moody Nolan and built by Messer Construction using Parksmart protocols, the world’s only rating system designed to advance sustainable mobility through smarter design and operation of parking structures. In October 2019, BNA’s Terminal Garage 2 obtained Bronze certification.

“We have a long-standing commitment to sustainability here at Nashville International Airport. As we continue to expand our airport with BNA Vision, we are also focusing on ‘green’ design, construction and operation,” said BNA’s Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. “We are proud that another garage has achieved Parksmart certification. This is a huge achievement, and it speaks to the intentional effort of our entire team to prioritize sustainability.

Terminal 1 Garage Facts:

  • 224 million pounds of concrete used
  • 1,500+ workers
  • 807,000+ working hours
  • 93% of the workforce was local
  • $41 million in contracts for minority and women-owned small businesses (SMWBE)

Parksmart is the world’s only rating system designed to advance sustainable mobility through smarter design and operation of parking structures. Administered by Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), the Parksmart Framework provides a roadmap for employing innovative, solution-focused strategies. With guidance from the Parksmart Protocols, BNA has implemented an integrated design process that helps maximize the value of the structure throughout its life by reducing operating costs, reducing environmental impact and increasing energy efficiency.

Sustainability was a guiding principle in the development of Terminal Garage. Examples of “green” practices and components considered in the Parksmart certification of the installation:

  • Energy-efficient LED lighting, which is programmed to dim when no movement is detected, cutting energy consumption in half
  • A parking space guidance system to help travelers quickly find parking spaces, reducing unnecessary driving time, fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Walk-in pay stations, reducing vehicle downtime and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Charging stations for electric vehicles, promoting the use of an alternative energy source
  • Tire inflation station, helping travelers keep their tires properly inflated, enabling better gas mileage and reducing fossil fuel consumption
  • Recycling receptacles at all levels to encourage travelers to keep recyclable materials out of landfills
  • Environmentally friendly practices, such as using ionized water instead of chemical cleaners to clean the garage
  • Designed for durability, which increases the life of the garage through quality construction parameters, providing long-lasting structural and finishing elements
  • Emphasize regional labor and locally sourced materials, support the local economy, and reduce travel time, fossil fuel use, and greenhouse gas emissions

BNA Terminal Garages are major components of BNA® Vision, Nashville International Airport’s aggressive growth and expansion plan. In addition to terminal garages #1 and #2, BNA® Vision will include additional parking, a renovated central terminal, an expanded security checkpoint, a state-of-the-art international arrivals facility, an upscale hotel and continued. Take a 360 degree virtual tour, view renderings and watch the BNA® Vision video on BNAVision.com.

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Parking garage

New parking garage seeks to unlock growth potential in Salt Lake neighborhood

Ellen Winkler, co-founder of Industry, picks up gravel to mark the start of a new parking lot in Salt Lake City’s Granary District Thursday afternoon. The car park is expected to add 1,000 spaces in a growing part of town. (Carter Williams, KSL.com)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — As mayor of Salt Lake City, Erin Mendenhall is invited to attend many groundbreaking events.

These are ceremonies to celebrate the start of some kind of major structure that will one day play a vital role in the community, such as a new office building or facility. But as she stood in front of a crowd gathered outside Industry on Thursday afternoon, she admitted she was generally not enthusiastic about parking lots. Whoever will fill the floor she stood on might be the exception.

Moments after speaking, Industry co-founder Ellen Winkler jumped into an excavator and took the first scoop from the ground to signal the start of a parking garage project that will bring nearly 1,000 spaces parking lot at the Granary District, located directly to the southwest. from downtown Salt Lake City.

“What’s happening in the Granary (district) is really, really unique,” the mayor said. “For those of us who are long-time Salt Lakers, we might not understand how cool that is. There aren’t many capital cities…that have such a giant neighborhood that’s so ready for redevelopment, which have overlay qualified opportunity areas and is right next to the town center.”

The seven-story parking lot itself is located across from Industry, 650 S. 500 West. The company essentially laid the groundwork for the neighborhood’s future a few years ago, turning a former silver smelter into a co-working space for around 500 jobs from different companies that rent space in the building.

However, the neighborhood’s growth in recent years has led to an abundance of on-street parking and crowded parking lots that simply cannot accommodate everyone trying to get around. Jason Winkler, co-founder of Industry, said the project had been in the works for about four years, but had been delayed by a few hurdles, including COVID-19.

A rendering of the seven-story parking structure to be built in the Granary District of Salt Lake City.  The structure will add 998 parking spaces and more than 12,000 square feet of new retail space when completed in 2023.
A rendering of the seven-story parking structure to be built in the Granary District of Salt Lake City. The structure will add 998 parking spaces and more than 12,000 square feet of new retail space when completed in 2023. (Picture: Q Factor)

However, the project has not changed much since. The structure is expected to be 350,000 square feet, including 12,280 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. Construction is expected to take 16 months before being completed in the third quarter of 2023. Construction company Makers Line, one of a dozen companies assigned to the project, lists it as a project costing more than $25 million. .

“We all care so deeply about this neighborhood and its future,” added Tami Door, CEO of Denver-based Q Factor, the developer of the structure. “This next step with this parking lot is actually going to be an incredible benefit to the community, supporting the people who live and work here, and will be another great way to connect the different neighborhoods of our downtown and downtown neighborhoods. city.”

Although the neighborhood hasn’t been much to see in the past, Mendenhall said the success of the industry has inspired tech startups to reuse old buildings as well, which she says helps maintain the affordable neighborhood and keep its character intact. It is also more environmentally friendly to reuse old buildings than to tear them down and build something new in their place. She hopes this will help keep businesses that have been in the area for decades.

The parking garage will reduce the need for smaller car parks spread throughout the district so that the land can be used for other purposes.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall joined business executives, employees and others on Thursday to paint a mural in a space that will house a new parking lot in the Granary District.
Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall joined business executives, employees and others on Thursday to paint a mural in a space that will house a new parking lot in the Granary District. (Photo: Carter Williams, KSL.com)

It also plays into the future of the Granary district, which is at the center of the city’s major redevelopment plans. For example, it is located a few blocks from the large Fleet Block project that city leaders are currently trying to piece together.

With the growth of the state and city and the increase in new buildings downtown, the mayor says it’s really only a matter of time before the district of Granary becomes an extension of the city centre. Well, the city center with a different character.

“The technical definition of what downtown Salt Lake City is is outdated. I think we’re all aware of that,” she said. “Downtown is growing and what will be the Granary district will, over time, be a natural continuing extension of downtown, but a more creative, artistic, creative space that’s teeming with people living here, working here, tech companies from start-up to full-scale operation.

“It’s something we can incorporate into our downtown,” she added, “and it’s something that already defines who we are as a city.”

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Latest Salt Lake County Articles

Carter Williams is an award-winning journalist who covers general news, the outdoors, history and sports for KSL.com. He previously worked for the Deseret News. He is a transplant from Utah via Rochester, New York.

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Uncategorized

Ann Arbor will install 80 electric vehicle charging stations in seven parking structures

ANN ARBOR — The City of Ann Arbor’s Office of Sustainability and Innovations, in conjunction with the Downtown Development Authority, is working to expand public electric vehicle charging in downtown parking lots.

“We are thrilled to see this significant expansion of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in our city center and are grateful for the collaboration with the DDA,” said Missy Stults, Director of Sustainability and Innovations at Ann Tree. “We know the importance of having a widely available electric vehicle charging infrastructure to facilitate the transition to vehicle electrification and view this effort, and others the office is undertaking, as essential to help the community to reduce vehicle emissions.”

As part of this work, the city and the DDA are supporting the installation of 80 electric vehicle charging stations in seven parking structures, doubling the number of public charging stations in the public parking system. Parking structures receiving new or additional chargers include:

  • Anne/Ashley.
  • Fourth and William.
  • Library aisle.
  • Maynard.
  • Liberty Square.
  • Forest.

Over the next few weeks, as installations take place in a staggered fashion, the installation team will do their best to ensure that downtime of chargers in garages is limited, and signage will be posted to communicate any downtime. During the installation process, the use of the charger will remain free, however, once installation is complete, users will be charged for the energy they use to power their vehicles.

The city and the DDA are working together to define rules of use and tariffs in order to maximize the availability of these spaces. Pricing information will be available as soon as it is finalized.

For more information about A2ZERO, the City of Ann Arbor’s climate and equity plan, visit www.a2zero.org.​

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Parking garage

$14 million from the state to build a new parking lot next to the F&M Bank Arena

CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) – A new downtown parking lot will be built adjacent to the F&M Bank Arena with $14 million in state funding.

Among the funding approved in this year’s Tennessee state budget was the $14 million grant for Montgomery County to build the public garage, which will be directly across from the under-construction F&M Bank Arena. , according to Vice President Curtis Johnson, R-Clarksville.

The Hand family donated the land for the garage at the corner of College and First streets, Johnson told Clarksville Now.

The garage will help alleviate parking problems downtown, especially with the 6,000-seat arena being built next door. “We need it in the worst possible way,” Johnson said.

The garage will be located on the same block as the Hand family’s Riverview Inn and adjacent to their planned Riverview plaza. The parking garage is shown in the plans for this project, which show it as a 724-space garage. These plans also call for the inn to become a Hilton DoubleTree.

Rendering of the proposed mixed-use development at the corner of Main and Second Streets between Riverview Inn and the F&M Bank Arena.

Sen. Bill Powers, R-Clarksville, lobbied for funding for the garage. He told Clarksville Now that having this garage on one side of downtown with the city’s planned new garage on the other will go a long way to improving parking in Clarksville.

“The geography of these two parking lots is optimal, with one being next to the Roxy and the other next to the arena,” Powers said. “This makes it a perfect fit for emerging downtown Clarksville.”

County Mayor Jim Durrett thanked lawmakers — Johnson, Powers and Rep. Jason Hodges — for bringing the funding home.

“This is another important step in revitalizing our community,” Durrett said.

Details for the public parking lot are still being worked out, but Montgomery County spokeswoman Michelle Newell said there are no plans to provide additional funding there or for the county to manage the parking lot. garage.

Oliver Hospitality, which handles communications for Riverview Square, said it was not yet ready to release details.

Other Clarksville Funding

Other Clarksville and Montgomery County specific projects that received funding were:

  • $43.5 million in additional education funding to the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System as a result of TISA.
  • $35 million to support the expansion of Nashville State Community College facilities in Clarksville.
  • $20 million for the Wings of Liberty museum.
  • $12.2 million in capital funding for Austin Peay State University.
  • $800,000 for Centerstone Military Services Inc.
  • $750,000 for the second year of a three-year cybersecurity program at Austin Peay State University.

“Montgomery County had a good year,” Johnson said.

Both Powers and Johnson supported Tennessee’s new Investing in Student Success Act (TISA). This new funding formula takes effect in 2023 and includes an additional investment of $1 billion in K-12 funding, focused on individual student needs, rather than relying on ratio components. and district averages, as the state’s Basic Education Program (BEP) did, according to a press release from their legislative offices.

“This new funding formula will transform students’ academic trajectories and enhance Tennessee’s recent progress in improving overall educational outcomes,” Johnson said in the release. “By focusing on the needs of each student, we will ensure that all children have the resources they need for a prosperous future.”

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Parking spaces

Love’s opens stops in four states adding 330 truck parking spaces

Oklahoma City, OK – Love’s Travel Stops opened four new locations in April 2022, adding 330 truck parking spaces across the United States

The new store locations are Waterloo, NY; Pageland, South Carolina; Moses Lake, WA; and Rockville, MN.

All locations will be open 24/7, Love’s confirmed.

The company also boasted of creating 260 jobs in the respective fields through the new travel centers.

Amenities offered at the Waterloo, NY location include:

• Over 11,000 square feet.
• Subway and Wendy’s.
• 78 truck parking spaces.
• 60 parking spaces.
• Seven RV parking spaces.
• Eight diesel bays.
• Seven showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Speedco.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.

“We are excited to serve customers at our fifth location in New York and help them get back on the road quickly and safely,” Love co-CEO Greg Love said after the truck stop opened on April 14.

Amenities offered at the Pageland, SC location include:

• Over 9,000 square feet.
• Hardee’s.
• 70 truck parking spaces.
• 58 parking spaces.
• Five diesel bays.
• Two RV parking spaces.
• Four showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Pageland Travel Center marks Love’s 12th location in South Carolina.

Amenities offered at the Moses Lake, WA location include:

• Over 11,000 square feet.
• Taco John’s.
• 80 truck parking spaces.
• 92 parking spaces.
• Nine diesel bays.
• Seven showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Moses Lake Travel Center marks Love’s sixth location in Washington State.

Amenities offered at the Rockville, MN location include:

• Over 13,000 square feet.
• Hardee’s.
• 102 truck parking spaces.
• 71 parking spaces.
• Six RV parking spaces.
• Nine diesel bays.
• Ten showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Speedco.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Rockville Travel Center marks Love’s third location in Minnesota.


MORE NEWS ON TRUCK STOPS
Two truck drivers arrested after road rage dispute turns into shooting at truck stop
Budding country music artist raises $11,000 for elderly truck stop employee battling cancer
Love’s Travel Stop in Indiana ‘closed indefinitely’ after truck stop fire
Love’s opens stops in Tennessee and New York, adding more than 160 truck parking spaces

read more
Parking facilities

Year 2022-2027 and its detailed analysis by Focusing on Top Key Players – Queen Anne and Mangolia News

USA (2022):- the Automated Bike Parking Market report makes available current and upcoming technical and financial details of the industry. This is one of the most comprehensive and significant additions to the Prudent Markets market research archive. It offers detailed research and analysis of key aspects of the global Automated Bicycle Parking market. This report explores all the key factors affecting the growth of the global Automated Bicycle Parking market, including demand-supply scenario, price structure, profit margins, production and value chain analysis.

The report ends with the profiles of the main players of the Automated Bicycle Parking Market: GIKEN, JFE Engineering, Klausner Velo Parksysteme, ma-SISTEMAS, sl, Mazdas, Falco, Taechang ENP, Hangzhou OS Parking Facilities, TAE Chang Enp, WHR

The Global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market study is an understanding report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the correct and significant information offering a comprehensive study of the impact of COVID-19 on the Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market, industry outlook, opportunities in the market, and the expansion of by 2027 and also taking into account key factors such as drivers, challenges, recent trends, opportunities, advances and competitive landscape. Research techniques like PESTLE and SWOT analysis are made available by researchers.

Find out who you really compete with in the market, get a free sample PDF report now! https://www.prudentmarkets.com/sample-request/111782/

Type segmentation: Above ground, underground

Industry Segmentation: The mall, school, community, park, other

Automated Bike Parking Market

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In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Automated Bicycle Parking Market are:
Historical year: 2015 – 2020
Year of reference : 2021
Estimated year: 2022
Forecast year: 2022 – 2027

The report covers the competitive analysis of the market. As the demand is determined by a buyer’s ability to pay and the development rate of the items, the report shows the important regions which will guide the growth. This section exclusively shares an overview of budget reports of major league members of the market, helping key players and new entrants understand the potential for investments in the global Automated Bicycle Parking Market. It can be best utilized by traditional and new industry players for complete market know-how.

Regional Analysis For Automated Bicycle Parking Market:
North America (US and Canada)
Europe (UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and Rest of Europe)
Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Australia, Southeast Asia and Rest of Asia Pacific)
Latin America (Brazil, Mexico and rest of Latin America)
Middle East and Africa (South Africa, GCC and Rest of Middle East and Africa)

The report provides information about the following pointers:
1. Market penetration: Comprehensive information on product portfolios of major Automated Bicycle Parking market players.
2. Product Development/Innovation: Detailed information on upcoming technologies, R&D activities and product launches in the market.
3. Competitive Evaluation: In-depth assessment of market strategies, geographic and business segments of major market players.
4. Market development: Comprehensive information on emerging markets. This report analyzes the market for various segments across geographies.
5. Market Diversification: Exhaustive information about new products, untapped geographies, recent developments, and investments in the Automated Bicycle Parking Market.

Questions? Do not hesitate to inquire here. Well put you on the right path @ https://www.prudentmarkets.com/enquiry-request/111782/

Free customization based on customer requirements when buying it now:
1- Free country-level breakdown of 5 countries you are interested in.
2- Competitive segment revenue distribution by market players.

Report customization:
This report can be customized to meet customer requirements. Please connect with our sales team ([email protected]), which will ensure that you get a report that suits your needs. You can also get in touch with our leaders on +91 83560 50278 || USA/Canada (toll free): 1800-601-6071 to share your research needs.

Prepare to recognize the pros and cons of the regulatory framework, local reforms and their effects on the industry. Find out how smart grid leaders are staying ahead with our latest survey analysis.

In conclusion, the Automated Bicycle Parking Market report is a veritable source for accessing research data that is expected to grow your business exponentially. The report provides information such as economic scenarios, benefits, limitations, trends, market growth rates, and figures. SWOT analysis and PESTLE analysis is also included in the report.

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Parking spaces

Union Station redesign removes parking bays and adds underground facility

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The Federal Railroad Administration overhauled major aspects of Washington’s Union Station redevelopment project, eliminating a parking garage as part of the redesign.

Revised plan for multibillion-dollar station expansion eliminates six-story garage, drastically reducing parking and moving parking area to new underground facility that would also serve as passenger location pickups and drop-offs. The new details were unveiled at a recent meeting of the National Capital Planning Commission.

The changes also include a major reconfiguration of the station’s bus terminal to align with a new train concourse, the Federal Railroad Administration confirmed this week.

The changes come more than a year after the FRA paused its environmental review of the project to modify the design, which was widely criticized for keeping the station too car-centric. The revisions are a victory for the district, which chastised the design favored by the federal agency as not matching the city’s vision for Union Station.

Amtrak’s faster, high-tech Acela trains are delayed again

Few details of the revisions have been made available, but the FRA is expected to unveil the plan in the coming weeks. The agency said the revised plan is the result of two years of working with Amtrak project developers and the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation, which manages and operates Union Station.

The Union Station expansion project — a $10 billion private and public investment — envisions a transformation of the nation’s second-largest rail hub by 2040. The project would add a new train concourse and lobbies, as well as tracks and retail options.

“With these core elements retained and these new modifications, the project is on a much stronger footing to progress into 2022 and beyond,” the FRA said in a statement.

The agency is leading the federal review of the project, which is at least two years behind schedule. The revised plan could be published this summer for public comment, with a final decision next year. After that, the project could enter the design phase, possibly followed by a over a decade of construction.

The new changes respond to criticism from federal planners, district officials and nearby residents who said the FRA’s preferred building option – unveiled two years ago as part of a draft declaration of environmental impact – was too car-oriented, lacked good pedestrian and cycle links, and did not provide adequate access. Residents and city leaders have called for less parking and better traffic management. vehicle traffic, including a space dedicated to taxi and VTC services.

Project officials for months hinted at a resolution that addressed the concerns. Beverley Swaim-Staley, president and CEO of the USRC, said in February that the group had been working for 18 months to incorporate “valuable feedback”.

“All of these changes will allow the station to accommodate the next century of growth in a multi-modal transportation route, which includes intercity rail, metro, commuter rail and intercity bus,” she said during the talk. a meeting sponsored by DC Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (RE).

DC to Prioritize Equity in Preparations for $3 Billion in Federal Infrastructure Funds

DC Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), who led the effort against the parking structure, said he welcomed the reduced option, adding that the move would leave more space above soil for development.

“Taking back valuable parking space to provide bus service, train service and shared spaces will restore Union Station to its glory as one of the nation’s most iconic and important stations,” it said. he said in a statement. “We are rebuilding a major public transit hub in the center of our city that will last for the next 100 years, and basically as busy every day as any of our regional airports.”

Union Station, which opened in 1907, was designated a historic landmark by the district in 1964 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.

Amtrak takes control of Union Station

The station hasn’t seen a major rehabilitation in decades, and rail and local authorities say refurbishment is needed to meet future demand. Many station facilities are outdated, do not meet federal accessibility requirements, and do not meet modern transportation standards. Amtrak estimates that about $75 million in deferred maintenance is needed at Union Station, which houses the passenger railroad, Metro, Maryland and Virginia commuter trains, as well as intercity and local buses. It is also the terminus of the DC Streetcar.

Amtrak filed a petition last month to use eminent domain to take control of the station from a private company that holds sublease rights to the station through 2084. Amtrak said the move was necessary to ensure a smooth expansion process.

The proposed expansion is one of several major station projects on Amtrak’s list of capital priorities, ranking among the top candidates for federal funds through the infrastructure package signed by President Biden l ‘last year. About $66 billion is earmarked for rail transportation five years, while the project could also use millions of additional dollars available for public transit and other infrastructure projects.

Baltimore station redesign will help trains speed through nation’s busiest rail corridor

The last revisions are likely to increase the price of the project. In his draft environmental impact statement, the FRA waived concepts that included underground parking or other underground facilities, in part because it would add millions of dollars and years of construction. He chose a plan that included “minimal excavation below lobby level”, the quickest and least expensive option.

The federal review estimated that the construction of this shorter plan would be done in phases and could take up to 11 and a half years. It was unclear how much the schedule would change with the latest revisions.

The FRA said its incorporation of an underground facility would better manage pick-up and drop-off activities at the station while relieving traffic from surrounding streets.

“While this change will have an initial cost impact, it addresses many of the challenges of expanding regional access to central Washington DC, and we believe the impacts of this new strategy will benefit the community and to the many citizens using this historic multimodal transportation hub in the long term,” the agency said in a statement.

The FRA’s initial plan called for 1,575 parking spaces, compared to the current 2,200. This would have been consistent with what is available at Philadelphia and Boston stations, according to project documents. However, New York’s Penn Station and many other stations in the United States and around the world do not have on-site parking.

City leaders said the multi-level replacement garage runs counter to the city’s efforts to reduce car travel. Among those who sent letters of opposition to the federal agency were Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and Norton. The National Capital Planning Commission, which oversees project zoning and provides planning guidance for federal land and buildings in the Washington area, also asked the FRA to include a parking program that “significantly reduces parking “.

The revised concept is expected to reduce parking by nearly 50% of nearly 1,600 spaces, planning commission officials said.

Anita Cozart, acting director of the DC Office of Planning, recently welcomed the city’s response to feedback, saying the FRA, Amtrak and USRC had listened to the plans for review, particularly in regards to improving the parking, bus installation and vehicle access to the station.

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Uncategorized

Ann Arbor will add 80 electric vehicle charging stations to downtown parking structures

ANN ARBOR – The city’s Office of Sustainability and Innovations and the Downtown Development Authority are partnering to expand the network of public electric vehicle charging ports downtown.

The effort will more than double the number of charging stations in the city center, with 80 new ports to be installed in seven parking structures.

According to a press release, access to public electric vehicle charging supports the city’s sustainability goals.

The following parking structures will receive new or additional ports:

  • Anne/Ashley

  • Fourth and William

  • library aisle

  • Maynard

  • Liberty Square

  • Forest

“We are thrilled to see this significant expansion of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in our downtown area and are grateful for the collaboration with the DDA,” said Missy Stults, director of sustainability and innovations for Ann Arbor. , in a press release.

“We know the importance of having a widely available electric vehicle charging infrastructure to facilitate the transition to vehicle electrification and view this effort, and others the office is undertaking, as essential to help the community to reduce vehicle emissions.”

Installations will be staggered over the next few weeks and signage will be posted to indicate when there may be charger downtime.

The use of the charger will be free throughout the installation process, but once complete, users will be charged for port usage.

The city and DDA will announce pricing information closer to project completion.

For more information on the city’s climate and equity plan, visit www.a2zero.org.

Copyright 2022 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All Rights Reserved.

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Parking spaces

Union Station overhaul removes parking bays and adds underground facility

Comment

The Federal Railroad Administration overhauled major aspects of Washington’s Union Station redevelopment project, eliminating a parking garage as part of the redesign.

Revised plan for multi-billion dollar station expansion eliminates six-story garage, drastically reducing parking and moving parking area to new underground facility that would also serve as passenger location pickups and drop-offs. The new details were unveiled at a recent meeting of the National Capital Planning Commission.

The changes also include a major reconfiguration of the station’s bus terminal to align with a new train concourse, the Federal Railroad Administration confirmed this week.

The changes come more than a year after the FRA put its environmental review for the project on hold change the design, which was widely criticized for keeping the station too car-centric. The revisions are a victory for the district, which reprimanded design favored by the federal agency as not matching the city’s vision for Union Station.

Amtrak’s faster, high-tech Acela trains are delayed again

Few details of the revisions have been made available, but the FRA is expected to unveil the plan in the coming weeks. The agency said the revised plan is the result of two years of working with Amtrak project developers and the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation, which manages and operates Union Station.

The Union Station expansion project — a $10 billion private and public investment — envisions a transformation of the nation’s second-largest rail hub by 2040. The project would add a new train concourse and lobbies, as well as tracks and retail options.

“With these core elements retained and these new modifications, the project is on a much stronger footing to progress into 2022 and beyond,” the FRA said in a statement.

The agency is leading the federal review of the project, which is at least two years behind schedule. The revised plan could be published this summer for public comment, with a final decision next year. After that, the project could enter the design phase, possibly followed by a over a decade of construction.

The new changes respond to criticism federal planners, district officials and nearby residents who said the FRA’s preferred construction option – unveiled two years ago as part of a draft environmental impact statement – was too focused on cars, lacked good pedestrian and cycle connections and did not provide adequate access. Residents and city leaders have called for less parking and better traffic management. vehicle traffic, including a space dedicated to taxi and VTC services.

Project officials for months hinted at a resolution that addressed the concerns. Beverley Swaim-Staley, president and CEO of the USRC, said in February that the group had been working for 18 months to incorporate “valuable feedback”.

“All of these changes will allow the station to accommodate the next century of growth in a multimodal mode of transportation, which includes intercity rail, metro, commuter rail and intercity bus,” she said during the talk. a meeting sponsored by DC Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (RE).

DC to Prioritize Equity in Preparations for $3 Billion in Federal Infrastructure Funds

DC Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), who led the effort against the parking structure, said he welcomed the reduced option, adding that the move would leave more space above soil for development.

“Taking back valuable parking space to provide bus service, train service and shared spaces will restore Union Station to its glory as one of the nation’s iconic and great stations,” he said. in a press release. “We are rebuilding a major public transit hub in the center of our city that will last for the next 100 years, and basically as busy every day as any of our regional airports.”

Union Station, which opened in 1907, was designated a historic landmark by the district in 1964 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.

Amtrak takes control of Union Station

The station hasn’t seen a major rehabilitation in decades, and rail and local authorities say refurbishment is needed to meet future demand. Many station facilities are outdated, do not meet federal accessibility requirements, and do not meet modern transportation standards. Amtrak estimates that about $75 million in deferred maintenance is needed at Union Station, which houses the passenger railroad, Metro, Maryland and Virginia commuter trains, as well as intercity and local buses. It is also the terminus of the DC Streetcar.

Amtrak last month filed a request to use eminent domain for take control of the station from a private company that holds sublease rights to the station through 2084. Amtrak said the move was necessary to ensure a smooth expansion process.

The proposed expansion is one of several major station projects on Amtrak’s list of capital priorities, ranking among the top contenders for federal money thanks to the infrastructure package signed by the president. Biden last year. About $66 billion is earmarked for rail transportation five years, while the project could also use millions of additional dollars available for public transit and other infrastructure projects.

Baltimore station redesign will help trains speed through nation’s busiest rail corridor

The last revisions are likely to increase the price of the project. In his draft environmental impact statement, the FRA waived concepts that included underground parking or other underground facilities, in part because it would add millions of dollars and years of construction. He chose a plan that included “minimal excavation below lobby level”, the quickest and least expensive option.

The federal review estimated that the construction of this shorter plan would be done in phases and could take up to 11 and a half years. It was unclear how much the schedule would change with the latest revisions.

The FRA said its incorporation of an underground facility would better manage pick-up and drop-off activities at the station while relieving traffic from surrounding streets.

“While this change will impact the upfront cost, it resolves many of the challenges associated with expanding regional access to central Washington DC, and we believe the impacts of this new strategy will benefit the community and many citizens using this historic multimodal transportation hub in the long term,” the agency said in a statement.

The FRA’s initial plan called for 1,575 parking spaces, compared to the current 2,200. This would have been consistent with what is available at Philadelphia and Boston stations, according to project documents. However, New York’s Penn Station and many other stations in the United States and around the world do not have on-site parking.

City leaders said the multi-level replacement garage runs counter to the city’s efforts to reduce car travel. Among those who sent letters of opposition to the federal agency were Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and Norton. The National Capital Planning Commission, which oversees project zoning and provides planning guidance for federal land and buildings in the Washington area, also asked the FRA to include a parking program that “significantly reduces parking “.

The revised concept is expected to reduce parking by nearly 50% of nearly 1,600 spaces, planning commission officials said.

Anita Cozart, acting director of the DC Office of Planning, recently welcomed the response to the city’s comments, saying the FRA, Amtrak and USRC had listened to the plans for review, particularly in regards to improving the parking, bus installation and vehicle access to the station.

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Parking garage

City Council Approves Plaza Building Parking Lot Consolidation | News

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Parking garage

News | Gaithersburg, MD

The Department of Public Works announces that routine maintenance work will be carried out at the Olde Towne parking garage at 112 Olde Towne Avenue. The work will consist of sealing the concrete deck and covering the lines of the parking spaces. Work is expected to begin in June and continue through September, weather permitting.

A limited number of parking spaces will be available for the duration of this project. Some aisles will be temporarily staggered and up to one entrance will be closed. Parking reserved for tenants will be moved to a designated area inside the garage. Due to the large area that will be covered and the nature of this ‘rolling site’, progress will be variable and subject to weather conditions. The City is unable to confirm the exact dates of the work carried out at each level of the garage.

No Parking signs will be posted at least 48 hours prior to construction activity. These signs will be marked with the dates and times of the parking restrictions. If you plan to be away from your home for any length of time during this time, please arrange to have your vehicles parked elsewhere.

A list of additional car parks in Olde Towne can be found here.

Work will take place on weekdays between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

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Parking spaces

City Department wants to lease parking spots for Lucid Motors test cars – Pasadena Now

The Pasadena Department of Transportation is asking the city council for permission to execute a contract with Lucid Group USA, which manufactures the much-vaunted new electric vehicle Lucid Air, to lease nine reserved parking spaces in the school’s garage owned by the city to use as a location to park and charge the vehicles the company uses for test drives.

Published reports describe the Luicid Air as the automotive industry’s first serious challenger to Tesla’s dominance in the high-end luxury electric vehicle market.

Schoolhouse Garage was identified as the most feasible location due to its proximity to the planned Lucid Motors showroom on Colorado Blvd. in Old Pasadena and the amount of space available in the garage.

The contract will be for an initial term of five years at $24,784 per year, or $123,930 for five years. The annual amount will be recalculated at the start of each additional five-year period, the Department for Transportation said in a preliminary report.

The recommendation has been approved by the city council’s finance committee and will be taken up as an action item at Monday’s city council meeting.

In January, the city approved a Minor Use Conditional Use Permit (MCUP) allowing Lucid Motors to open a sales office in Old Pasadena. The new office would be located on the first floor of a three-story, 4,386 square foot commercial building previously occupied by a fast food restaurant at 32 West Colorado Blvd.

The MCUP is required for vehicle sales and rental service land uses in Old Pasadena and is intended to maintain and enhance the historic character of the area and support the long-term viability of the area as an attraction. regional retail and entertainment industry.

The city began negotiations with Lucid Motors in April to seek a suitable parking lot and electric vehicle charging garage.

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Parking facilities

2022 Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market Size Analysis by 2029

This comprehensive report on Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities provides real insights into the statistics and status of the global market. Its scoping study ranges from market situation to comparative pricing among major players, spending in specific market areas, and profit. It represents a comprehensive and succinct analysis report of major competitors and price statistics to help newbies establish their place and survive in the market. Additionally, it also focuses on the market overview for the upcoming period of 2021 to 2028. This has proven to be of great help for entrepreneurs. This detailed market research is heavily based on insights received through interviews with key executives, research, and innovative resources.

In addition to the information presented in this Automated Bicycle Parking market report, it includes financial loss incurred as a result of COVID-19. It also explains how the most important business sectors in the market are coping with the epidemic and how to get out of it. This market report is a way to present accurate information about company profiles and competitiveness analyzes in an orderly manner. It anticipates the competition in the market for the predicted period of 2021 to 2027. This Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities market study also examines industry channels and performance rates to help key players maintain a length ahead of the competition.

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Introduction

The report highlights the latest revenue trends and market progress along with all the realistic business statistics. It provides pre-planned prevention and management, and highlights a summary of the global Automated Bicycle Parking Market along with classification, definition, and market chain structure. Global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities report highlights issues affecting the global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities market including gross margin, cost, market share, capacity utilization, revenue , capacity and supply. It also highlights the future scope of the global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market over the coming period.

Marketing statistics

The Global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market report estimates initial data and statistics which makes the report a highly valuable guideline for those dealing with advertising, advisors and industry decision-making processes in the global market sales of automated bicycle parking facilities. Provides regional analysis for the Automated Bicycle Parking Market. This report provides essential Automated Bicycle Parking industry data to guide new entrants into the global Automated Bicycle Parking market.

Market dynamics

The global report presents details related to the most dominant players in the global Automated Bicycle Parking Market, along with contact information, sales and accurate figures of the global market. Various detailed data and analysis collected from various trusted institutions of the global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market are portrayed in the global Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities research report.

Major Players Covered in Automated Bicycle Parking Facilities Market:

  • GIKEN
  • W?RH
  • JFE Engineering
  • my-SISTEMAS
  • sl
  • Mazdis
  • Klausner Velo Parksystem
  • Hangzhou OS Parking Facilities
  • Falcon
  • TAE Chang Enp
  • Taechang ENP

Market Segmentation of Automated Bicycle Parking Market:

Automated Bicycle Parking market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2021-2028, Intersegment Growth provides accurate calculations and forecasts of sales by Type and Application in terms of volume and value. This analysis can help you grow your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

Automated Bicycle Parking Market Split By Type:

Automated Bicycle Parking Market Split By Application:

  • The shopping center
  • school
  • Community
  • Park
  • Others

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The regional analysis covers:

North America (US and Canada)

Latin America (Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile and others)

Western Europe (Germany, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Italy, Nordic countries, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg)

Eastern Europe (Poland and Russia)

Asia Pacific (China, India, Japan, ASEAN, Australia and New Zealand)

Middle East and Africa (GCC, Southern Africa and North Africa)

The study accurately predicts the market size and volume in the present and future. The report offers a comprehensive study of the Bass Mandolin industry and information about the foreseeable future trends which will have a significant impact on the development of the market. The weekly then looks at the main global players in the industry.

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The study thoroughly explores the profiles of major market players and their major financial aspects. This comprehensive business analyst report is useful for all existing and new entrants when designing their business strategies. This report covers the Automated Bicycle Parking market production, revenue, market share, and growth rate for each key company, and covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue, and market share) by regions, type. and apps. Historical distribution data for automated bicycle parking facilities from 2016 to 2020 and forecast to 2021-2029.

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Market Research Intellect provides syndicated and custom research reports to clients across various industries and organizations, in addition to the goal of providing custom and in-depth research studies.

We’re talking about finding logical research solutions, personalized consulting and in-depth data analysis covering a range of industries including energy, technology, manufacturing and construction, chemicals and materials, food and drink. Etc. Our research studies help our clients to make decisions based on higher data, to admit deep forecasts, to grossly capitalize with opportunities and to optimize efficiency by activating as their belt in crime to adopt a mention precise and essential without compromise.

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Parking garage

Redding Town Center Parking Officially Open | News

REDDING, Calif.- The Redding Town Center Parking Lot is now officially open after the Redding Chamber of Commerce hosted it with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The new five-story structure has 400 parking spaces, double what the McConnell Foundation thought it could build.

It also has electric vehicle charging stations on several levels, access by stairs and elevator and solar panels on the top floor.








Action News Now has spoken to several companies who are delighted the structure is complete after 19 months of construction.

Jay Abraham owns Abe’s Mercerie downtown and hopes the new parking lot will make it easier for his customers to enjoy downtown.

“Overall, I think it’s a benefit for all small businesses,” Abraham said. “The city has invested a lot of money in the development of this downtown area, so we are delighted. He can’t do anything but help us.

In recognition of the community’s patience, parking is free until June 1st.

After the free parking period ends, people will have to pay $1 an hour, a rate the Redding Chamber of Commerce says is comparable to towns like Chico.

Redding Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Jake Mangas told Action News Now that paid parking will help open up more spaces in the downtown core.

“One of the things we heard from downtown businesses, especially first-floor businesses, is that they were concerned about the lack of turnover because people could park for free anywhere in a downtown surface street and stay there all day,” Mangas said. . “So creating paid parking alternatives helps create that revenue and gets people around so they can get in and out of that business or restaurant.”

Construction around the parking lot is not yet complete, so people cannot walk from the parking lot to downtown at this time.

People will have to walk on a blocked off portion of California Street before reaching businesses at the Placer Street intersection.

The McConnel Foundation hopes to have a gateway open in the near future.

Some companies have told Action News Now they are not concerned about the current march.

Many business owners, like Amber Treat, owner of Shop Around the Corner Books, have said that parking is one of the biggest problems downtown and that this garage should be a big help.

“Construction is still ongoing, so access from the parking lot to Butte St. where I am is not direct,” Treat said. “I just can’t wait to get all the construction done so people can walk straight from the garage to my store.”

“Walking a few blocks to get where you need to go isn’t insurmountable,” Mangas said. “We know there are options for people to park closer to the businesses they want to go to, and paid parking helps facilitate that. We recognize that not everyone has the physical ability to walk a few blocks.

Action News Now asked Abraham if this new structure would make a difference to his business.

“We all hope so. I think so, absolutely. The more people we can bring into town and have an easier parking situation, which will definitely increase traffic,” Abraham said.

You can now enter the California Street parking lot near Yuba Street.

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Parking spaces

TA opens new travel center with 103 truck parking spaces in Texas

TravelCenters of America Inc., national operator of the TA Travel Center Network, Petro Stopping Centers and TA Express, has opened a new TA Express Travel Center in Fairfield, Texas located off Interstate 45, Exit 198.

WESTLAKE, Ohio – TravelCenters of America Inc., national operator of the TA Travel Center Network, Petro Stopping Centers and TA Express, has opened a new TA Express Travel Center in Fairfield, Texas located at Interstate 45, Exit 198 .

The new TA Express is a franchise location and expands TA’s total national travel center network to 276 locations, including 45 franchise locations.

TA Express Fairfield offers refueling services, convenience items, dining options and other services for professional drivers and motorists, according to a press release.

“The new 17,000 square foot facility sits on a 19 acre property and provides a convenient stopover for those traveling between Dallas and Houston,” the press release reads.

Amenities include:

  • Quick-service restaurants, including Whataburger, Original Fried Pie Shop, and The Deli, with hot and cold options available
  • Shop with coffee, drinks, snacks and merchandise
  • 103 truck parking spaces
  • 74 parking spaces
  • Eight diesel fueling stations with Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) on all lanes
  • 20 fueling stations
  • Nine showers
  • Driver lounge
  • laundry room

“As we continue to expand our footprint across the country, we are strategically opening travel centers in locations where our services are needed by both professional drivers and motorists,” said Jon Pertchik, managing director of TravelCenters of America.

“In partnership with our franchisee, we are proud to join the Fairfield community and look forward to serving travelers and residents along Interstate 45.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking garage

Parma apartment tenants face gas cut after parking lot collapses

PARMA, Ohio (WOIO) – Tenants of Regency apartments in Parma are frustrated that their building’s gas was shut off after a gas line was likely damaged when the parking lot collapsed.

“I believe they are working on it today, but there are no more cold showers and no kitchen,” tenant Nicholas Schultz said.

Schultz faced many problems related to the collapse of this parking lot. His car is now snagged by the bumpers where the structure fell.

“It’s kind of frustrating in that management didn’t do anything but, ‘hey, so you know we have an emergency stop,'” Schultz said.

In an email to tenants on Wednesday, management said the gas would be turned off for an emergency repair for the next 72 hours in the building next to the parking lot.

“We apologize for any inconvenience as we go through this difficult time and will update you once the gas is restored,” Regency Apartments management said.

Late Thursday evening, 19 News learned that the tenants had received an email stating that the emergency repair was almost complete and that gas would be restored.

Raina Hill, a tenant in a nearby building, was awakened by the sound of fire alarms when this happened. She said she was not surprised, but hopes management will take action to prevent something like this from happening again.

“I knew something was going to happen,” Hill said. “They don’t really care about anything that happens here.”

Copyright 2022 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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Parking garage

California mom sentenced for pushing baby out of parking lot

LA HABRA, Calif. (KTLA) — A mother was sentenced to 25 years to life on Wednesday for pushing her 7-month-old son out of an Orange County hospital parking lot, killing him more ten years old.

Sonia Hermosillo, 42, told the judge she was sorry for killing Noe Medina Jr. in 2011 and tearfully asked to be reunited with her family, the Orange County Register reported.

“I’m asking for an opportunity to be with my daughters,” she said through a Spanish translator. “Please, your honor, I know what I did was wrong, but I regret doing it from the bottom of my heart.”

Hermosillo was found guilty by a jury last August of one count of first-degree murder and one count of assault on a child causing death. She had pleaded not guilty and not guilty by reason of insanity, triggering a separate trial to determine whether she was legally insane at the time of the incident.

A month later, the same jury that found Hermosillo guilty of first-degree murder also found her sane at the time of the murder.

OC Superior Court Judge Kimberly Menninger said Wednesday her only sentencing options were either probation or 25 years to life behind bars, adding that a probation sentence for killing a baby was not a good option, reported the OC Register.

“There is no winner here,” Menninger told Hermosillo’s family. “It just became a tragedy and I’m so sorry for what you went through.”

On August 22, 2011, Hermosillo drove her 7-month-old son, Noe, to Orange County Children’s Hospital in the city of Orange and parked her car in the fourth floor of her parking lot.

Baby Noe was born with congenital muscular torticollis and wore a medical helmet to correct his plagiocephaly. His condition required him to receive regular treatment at the hospital, but the infant did not have an appointment scheduled that day.

Hermosillo removed Noe’s helmet and pushed him out of the parking lot, the prosecutor’s office said. Prosecutors say she intended to murder him.

The mother then walked inside the hospital, validated her parking lot and left.

A witness who saw the baby fall through the air called 911 and police responded to the scene.

Noe was taken to the trauma center at UC Irvine Medical Center in critical condition and died two days later.

Shortly after Noe was kicked out of the parking lot, Hermosillo’s husband, Noe Medina, called law enforcement to report that his wife and son were missing.

Medina told police at the time that his wife had recently been hospitalized with depression and was not allowed to be alone with the baby. He said she took Noe while he watched the couple’s other two children at their home in La Habra. He hadn’t been immediately aware of what had happened, but when he realized they were gone he called the police to report them missing.

That night, an Orange police officer saw Hermosillo drive past Main Street Hospital and arrested her, officials said.

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Parking spaces

I-26 ‘Luxury’ rest area with over 100 parking spaces opens May 6

FLETCHER – A “luxurious” rest area with more than 100 parking spaces is set to open on May 6, featuring high ceilings, wood finishes, energy-efficient plumbing, windows for natural light and open space for pets, according to a press release from the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

The rest area is off Interstate 26 East near the Buncombe-Henderson County line at Mile 41. A corresponding westbound rest area is scheduled to open in June, according to the release.

Archer/Wright Joint Venture crews and contractors built the rest areas for about $5 million each as part of the $271 million project to widen the freeway in Henderson County, according to the press release.

Construction of the rest area began in October 2019, said NCDOT spokesman David Uchiyama.

An old rest area was demolished to make way for the new one, he said.

“It is certainly the newest and has all the features to ensure that decades of drivers have a safe, welcoming and comfortable place to simply use the facilities or rest on a long road trip,” the statement read. . “On average, 64,000 people per day drove this stretch of I-26 in 2019.”

“NCDOT takes great pride in its rest areas, not just in the mountains, but across the state,” Division 13 highway environmental engineer Jeff Wait said in the statement. “Some of the best rest areas in the country are located here in western North Carolina. And depending on who you ask, that may be the best.

“I jokingly call it the Taj Mahal of rest stops, but I’m just joking,” Division 14 resident engineer Mike Patton said in the statement. “We hope drivers in our region and across the country will take a break from driving and enjoy this wonderful rest area.”

The Ministry of Transport indicates that the rest area has the following characteristics:

• 90 parking spaces for passenger cars

• 30 parking spaces for semi-trailers

• 4 parking spaces for disabled people

• Full ADA compliance

• High efficiency lighting

• Low flow water systems

• Family toilets with changing table

• Picnic area on the terrace

• a separate building for vending machines

• an area reserved for pets with fire hydrant

Ryan Oehrli is the breaking news and social justice reporter for the Asheville Citizen Times. Email [email protected] or call/text 252-944-6816 for guidance.

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Parking spaces

Love’s opens Missouri truck stop with 120 truck parking spaces, reopens fire-damaged Indiana store

This week, Stops on the journey of love opened a new truck stop in Clinton County, Missouri, and announced the reopening of the store in Gary, Indiana, following a major fire.

Love’s opens truck stop in Cameron, Missouri

The new 12,000 square foot Love’s store is located at 1601 East Evergreen Street in Cameron, Missouri.

Amenities at the new truck stop include:

  • Arby’s (opening May 9)
  • 120 truck parking spaces
  • Eight diesel bays
  • Ten showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (opening May 23)
  • dog park

“Love’s is thrilled to open its 20th branch in Missouri and create 85 jobs in Clinton County,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Our Cameron location will provide plenty of fresh food and beverage options, clean bathrooms and more for customers ready to get back on the road quickly and safely.”

Gary, Indiana, Love’s reopens with limited services

On Thursday, May 5, Love’s announced that the Gary, Indiana store, damaged by a fire at an adjacent Denny’s restaurant in February, had reopened with limited services and amenities.

Love’s says diesel, DEF and limited snacks and beverages are now available at the Gary Store 24 hours a day. Drivers can also access temporary restrooms, parking, Wi-Fi and the Boss Shop. Gasoline is not currently available.

“Thank you for your patience and support as we rebuild this location. Our team members are ready to get professional drivers back on the road quickly and safely! Love is spoken.

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Parking spaces

‘The Marquis’ secures agreement to bring 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces to Easton | Lehigh Valley Regional News

EASTON, Pa. — The Easton Planning Commission gave approval on Wednesday to the development plan for “The Marquis,” a planned seven-story mixed-use building at 27 S. Third St.

The structure will replace the current Pine Street Garage and occupy the block between Pine and Ferry Streets.

According to Robert DiLorenzo, senior project manager for the developer, City Center Investment Corporation, the project is on track to begin work next spring, with the first units going on sale by the end of 2024.

DiLorenzo said planning and approvals for the project are on track, but Downtown wants to wait until the new Fourth Street garage is finished later this year before closing the Pine Street garage to begin construction. works.

DiLorenzo revealed a new rendering of the project that adds design elements recommended by the city’s Historic District Commission. The new design divides the facade into sections, intended to evoke a row of townhouses rather than a continuous structure.

The facade at the corner of Third and Pine Streets in particular was designed to pay homage to the Drake Building, a seven-story building with a cast-iron facade that stood on this site until its demolition in 1972 at the far end. back of Easton. phase of “urban renewal”.

“One of the things that got us excited about working with HDC was exploring Easton’s story,” DiLorenzo said. He said the designers were happy “to try to give a little homage, a little nod, to the Drake building”.






The ground floor of the Marquis will include commercial space, while the overall development will have approximately 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces.




The ground floor of the Marquis will have commercial space, which DiLorenzo says would be perfect for something like a small cafe, a fitness room, and a retail store.

The first two levels behind the storefronts will be dedicated to parking. The plan calls for 305 spaces, many of which DiLorenzo said would likely be empty on weekdays and available for public parking.

The third floor will have two courtyards, one with a swimming pool and picnic area for residents and the other with a dog park. The roof of the building will include a residents’ deck and a 20,000 square foot green roof, which will aid in the structure’s stormwater management plan.

The overall development will have between 270 and 280 apartments, depending on the eventual mix between one- and two-bedroom units, DiLorenzo said, and rents will likely start around $1,300 per month.

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Parking garage

What caused the collapse of a parking lot in Parma?

PARMA, Ohio (WJW) — What caused a section of a parking lot to collapse in an underground garage at a Parma apartment complex late Tuesday night?

A team of investigators from the city of Parma is now trying to answer this troubling question. It happened at 11:45 p.m. at the Regency Apartments in the 5800 block of Laurent Drive.

Nicholas Schultz lives in the complex and says he heard a crumbling noise in the parking lot and decided to get out and investigate. He saw that a car had just stopped and parked next to his car, but he couldn’t believe what he saw next.

“Within about a minute I saw the garage collapse and both vehicles were then hung from the parking lot,” he said.

Shultz told FOX 8 that the only thing preventing his car and the other vehicle from falling into the underground garage below was the fact that the front and rear bumpers rested on the garage’s steel ceiling beams.

Luckily no one was in danger when the parking lot collapsed and no one was hurt.

“That was my first thought was to make sure no one was down, I was listening for the screams or something, I was making sure people who had just gotten out of their vehicles were okay too,” Schultz said.

The Parma Fire Department is currently investigating the cause of the failure of the supports holding the parking lot together, which looks suspiciously like the parking lot collapse at the Marine Towers West apartment complex in Lakewood in December 2021.

Picture WJW

“Each part of the parking structure has a cement deck between it and then it’s held up by metal beams, there was a failure in there. It could be a force of the weight of the vehicles themselves, the weight of the bridge itself, and then the age that always plays a role in everything,” Parma Fire Department spokesman TJ Martin said.

Firefighters say the parking lot foundation and building foundation are separate and they maintain the apartment complex itself is structurally sound. What is interesting about the parking terrace above the underground car park is that at some point the operators of the complex decided to permanently close a large part of the terrace.

“The engineering models at the time these buildings were constructed were not as polished as they are now, and I believe at some point they determined that it would not support the weight what it was designed for, and on an abundance of attention, the management company said ‘we’re not going to park there anymore,’” Martin said.

Residents say there have been a number of issues with parking over the years and they have made formal complaints to the management company that owns the resort.

A tenant, who asked not to be identified, told FOX 8, “There’s been water running through that ceiling for a while now, and there’s also cracks all over the floor, on the walls, and a part of the ground is raised.”

The resident says the parking lot collapse was an imminent accident.

“I mean you can’t walk into the garage without knowing something is wrong, you see puddles on the floor caused by water running off, like I said, you see this building, on the ceiling, people’s cars are covered in limestone deposits because of this, there’s no way they don’t know about it,” he said.

Investigators are checking the building’s inspection history, operated by the owner’s Bedford Heights-based management company. The company did not respond to our request for an interview or statement.

“It’s something you never thought would happen, so they don’t get inspected on a regular basis, the management companies themselves do it. And with the failure of a component, it’s not necessarily something which is going to be noticed at some point,” said TJ Martin.

Authorities are now making arrangements to remove the two cars which are hanging by their bumpers over the large hole in the parking lot, so they can do a more thorough assessment of the damage and identify the exact cause of the collapse .

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Parking Spaces Market Size 2022 Demand, Global Trend, News, Business Growth – Instant Interview

A report on Parking Finder and Reservation has been released which provides an overview of the global Parking Finder and Reservation industry along with a detailed explanation that provides a lot of insights. The definition of the product/service as well as the different applications of this product/service in different end-user sectors of finding and booking parking spaces can be found in the overview. There is also a considerable amount of information that highlights the growth trajectory of the global Find and Book Parking Spots Market. The information provides a solid basis for Find and reserve parking spaces segmentation of the market into different segments. In fact, the information also displays the maximum market share during the forecast period by 2030.

In addition to the above, the information is based on the highly competitive partners, key players along with their market revenue during the forecast years from 2021 to 2030. Emphasis is also on product revenue, sales, product categories, and even which products are seeing the most traction. In this way, the Find and Reserve Parking Spots report also speaks about the effectiveness of the Find and Reserve Parking Spots Market along with its growth during the forecast period of 2030. Other major attributes of the market Finding and reserving parking spaces have been studied and analyzed through numerous developments. This paints a picture of a strong market grip for the period ahead.

The main players covered in this Find and reserve parking spaces study

Parkopedia, Appyparking, Yourparkingspace, Stashbee, Parkingforme, Spothero, Parklet, Parkhound, Bestparking, Parkme, JustPark, RingGo

By typeProvide a reservationSearch onlyBy applicationTo usersTo parking owners

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Segmentation in the Find and Book Parking Spaces Market:-

The global parking space search and reservation market has been segmented on the basis of different aspects. The market is also segmented by region. This segmentation has been followed with the aim of extracting insights into the parking space search and reservation market that is both detailed and accurate. The global parking space search and reservation market has been segmented into Latin America, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Middle East & Africa on the basis of region

Research Methodology

The Find and Book Parking Spots report definitely has its roots in in-depth strategies provided by knowledgeable data analysts. The research methodology involves the collection of information by analysts only to study and filter it thoroughly with the aim of providing significant predictions about the parking space search and reservation market during the period of review. The Find and Reserve Parking Spaces research process further includes interviews with key market influencers, which makes the primary research relevant and practical. The secondary method gives a direct insight into the connection of demand and supply in the Find and Book Parking Spaces market. the Find and reserve parking spaces The market methodologies adopted in the report offer pin-point analysis of the data and provide a tour of the entire Find and Book Parking Spots market. Both primary and secondary data collection approaches were used. In addition to this, publicly available sources such as SEC filings, annual reports, and white papers have been utilized by data analysts for an in-depth understanding of the Find and Reserve Parking Spots market. The research methodology clearly reflects an intention to extract a comprehensive view of the Find and Book Parking Spots market by analyzing it against numerous parameters. Valued entries improve the Find and Book Parking ratio and provide a peer advantage.

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Drivers and Constraints

The global parking space search and reservation market is driven by the impact of major players who continue to fund the growth of the market significantly every year. The Find and Book Parking Spots report studies the value, volume trends, and pricing structure of the Find and Book Parking Spots Market so that it can predict maximum growth in the future. Additionally, various suppressed growth factors, restraints, and opportunities are also estimated for the advanced study and suggestions of the market during the evaluation period.

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Parking spaces

United Arab Emirates: More than 1,400 paid parking spaces introduced this year – News

Fees can be paid using designated machines onsite, or via app or text



File photo

Published: Wed, May 4, 2022, 4:21 PM

Last update: Wed, May 4, 2022, 6:03 PM

More than 1,400 new parking spaces in Sharjah were converted to paid spaces in the first quarter of this year after the municipality provided signs indicating that the lots were subject to charges, a senior official said on Wednesday.

Hamed Al Qaed, director of the public parking service, said parking lots have been equipped with smart payment devices using touchscreen technology. Motorists can also use coins for payment. Parking fees can also be paid through the app or by sending an SMS.

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The total number of paid parking spaces in the emirate has risen to 55,300 and more than 1,210 smart parking meters have been installed in various areas, al-Qaid said.

Sharjah Municipality will continue its campaign to ensure there is no violation of parking spaces, he added.

The creation of new parking spaces was based on an in-depth study of different areas in the emirate, especially places where motorists violate parking rules, Al-Qaed said.

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Parking spaces

Chick-Fil-A wants to add a 3rd lane and remove 15 parking spaces to solve traffic problems | Local News

The owners of the beleaguered Chick-fil-A restaurant on State Street want to eliminate 15 parking spaces, add a third lane of traffic, build a metal awning and cut down five trees at its popular downtown location.

This proposal was its response to ongoing traffic congestion issues that threatened the company’s ability to have drive-thru at the restaurant at 3707 State St.

Chick-fil-A, and its Santa Ana architecture firm CHROappeared before the Santa Barbara Architectural Review Board on Monday night — and faced strong opposition to his proposal.

“It seems like what’s happening here is we’re bringing a lot of cars to the site, more cars to the site, and making that allowed, but we’re not opening it up to let them out of the site,” said the board. member Leon Olson. “I think it creates a kind of congestion that, I don’t know, plays by all the rules.”

The ABR voted 5-0 on Tuesday to proceed with the project indefinitely, telling Chick-fil-A it didn’t like the canopy, or the removal of the landscaping to accommodate a third lane of cars. The hearing was a concept review, so the restaurant can revise the plan and come back to the board.

Traffic was not under the jurisdiction of ABR, which is responsible for an aesthetic review of the proposal. The project must also be submitted to the planning commission and the city council for review of the functionality and circulation of the proposal.

Chick-fil-A is popular with customers, but has clashed with some locals in the San Roque area.

The restaurant can get so busy that sometimes motorists back onto State Street, creating problems for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, and people trying to get out of nearby Rusty’s.

Chick-fil-A has until June 7 to remedy the issue, or the city’s legal team will prepare submissions for the city council to declare the restaurant a “public nuisance,” which could mean loss of service to the flying.

Chick-fil-A, known for its thick, meaty chicken breasts and waffle fries, is a popular destination for locals, sometimes attracting up to 2,500 people a day. The restaurant replaced Burger King, which was not as popular and did not experience the same congestion problems.

Decades ago, Santa Barbara banned all new drive-thru restaurants, so Chick-Fil-A runs the risk of losing drive-thru if he can’t work out a solution with the city.

However, the restaurant may have created a new problem while trying to solve its traffic congestion problem.

Under the proposed plan, Chick-fil-A would create a third lane, including two used by motorists to order food. The third lane would allow cars to enter the site and park, rather than backing into the street.

“It will help with backing to the street,” said Carlos De la Vega, architect at CRHO.

The restaurant would widen the entrance to the site, eliminating some landscaping at the front. The driveway entrance is 32 feet and should be extended to 42 feet. This would also involve moving the disabled parking spaces to the other side of the restaurant.

To add the third lane, Chick-fil-A would need to reduce the number of parking spaces from 45 to 30 and remove five trees. Part of the remaining parking lot would become parallel instead of sloped.

Board members told Chick-fil-A that he should find a way to add a “finger planter, and maybe more trees, to provide more vegetation to the site. Council members were also unhappy with the look, color and design of the metal canopy over the drive-thru lane.

“In terms of the aesthetics and the structure itself that you’ve come up with, I don’t know if I would be in favor of its design,” said board member Steve Nuhn. “Just this big metal canopy. It has nothing to do with the building. I think it needs to be reworked.”

Council chairman Kevin Moore said more landscaping was needed.

“I encourage you to look carefully at the layout and see where you might find planting areas,” Moore said.

– Noozhawk writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Login with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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Parking garage

City OKs 7 story downtown apartment complex, parking garage

For seven years, the City of Lakeland has been looking for a builder to purchase the city-owned 1.5-acre parking lot on Oak Street downtown and replace it with a multi-use development. And now he has a deal with a company that wants to build a seven-story apartment complex with a 424-space parking lot.

The Lakeland City Commission on Monday approved a 21-page development agreement with Tampa-based ONICX Group to build at least 200 apartments, 2,000 square feet of street-level retail and multi-story parking. The vote was 6 to 1, with Commissioner Bill Read voting against.

But after months of negotiations, time is running out. The whole deal could fall apart if, or when, the US Federal Reserve raises interest rates and puts funding for the $53.6 million project out of Onicx’s reach.

As part of the pact, Onicx will buy the property for $1.836 million and the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency (ARC) will contribute up to $1.1 million towards the construction of the multi-storey parking lot.

The agreement includes several stipulations that allow the developer and the city to withdraw at different times from the project.

Onicx has a 90-day “inspection period” to determine the “suitability of the property for its project”.

If the company determines that the project is not feasible as planned, it may “terminate the agreement for any reason before the expiration of the inspection period and receive a refund of its $25,000 deposit. “, states the agreement. Onicx may request two 30-day extensions to the inspection period.

Under the pact, Onicx must complete the purchase of the property within one year of signing the agreement. He can request 30-day extensions, but they will cost the company $10,000 each.

Site plan for floors 5 to 7; see the plans of the other floors here or in the document at the end of this article.

Other stipulations include a $736,000 cap on the amount the city will waive fees related to site plan reviews, building permits, inspections, impact fees and offsite utility improvements.

“If these costs are expected to exceed this amount, Onicx will notify the City of the additional costs and the City will notify Onicx whether or not it agrees to pay, waive, or otherwise satisfy the additional costs,” the agreement reads. “If the city chooses not to bear the additional costs, Onicx may choose to pay the additional costs and move forward with the project or terminate the agreement.”

There is also a 36 month time frame to complete the project once it has started.

The terms are tied to lengthy negotiations with Onicx since winning the bid in September with a proposed $40 million, 153-unit apartment complex that has been drastically altered since October at the behest of the commission. , adding expense and complication.

“We and everyone involved in the process need to get it started,” Onicx Group Vice Chairman Arjun Choudhary told the commissioners. “Interest rates are rising” and the company is scrambling to secure financing before that happens.

The project has “already done the rounds”, he said. Onicx expects to have “answers” regarding funding within 30-45 days.

Choudhary said the Oak Street project is a pivotal project for Onicx, “the first of three that I’m trying to do” which will be introduced in the next six months and which will “catalyze” the downtown real estate market “for the success in the future; these will be the first projects of their kind” in Lakeland.

But first, the Oak Street project must get underway, agreed Choudhary, commissioners and planners.

On April 8, the Lakeland CRA Advisory Board unanimously approved Onicx Group’s proposed 40-page development plan for Oak Street for the block-sized lot on the north side of Oak Street. , between North Kentucky and North Tennessee avenues.

City Attorney Parker Davis told the commission that the plan calls for Onicx to build the seven-story apartment building and integrated parking lot, that the ARC will help build $1.1 million. dollars.

Onyx originally submitted a proposal for a six-story, 153-unit apartment building on the site. The original pact called for 10% of housing units to be set aside for affordable housing for households earning 80% or less of Polk County’s average median income (AMI) of $47,000.

With 153 apartments, that affordable housing “unit count” was 15. Under the proposed new agreement, the number of affordable housing units will remain at 15, with Onicx committing to build “at least” 200 units.

“We understand that affordable housing is a huge need for the community,” said Alis Drumgo, Lakeland CRA’s deputy director and deputy director of community development, noting that ideally the city is aiming for 20% affordable housing in new developments. , but, in this case, the commission’s request to add more units and build a parking lot changed the scenario for Onicx.

Because of this, he said, project costs have gone from an initial estimate of $36 million to now over $50 million.

“What we didn’t want to do was penalize the developer for responding to the commission’s request,” Drumgo said, so the affordable housing requirement would remain at 15 units.

Even then, “roughly calculating, (Onicx) ‘leaves about $2 million on the table’ over the 15 years, all 15 units should qualify as affordable housing.”

The proposed deal includes 10 years of tax increment financing (TIF) that reduces 80% of property taxes in the first five years, a 60% abatement of property taxes for years six through 10 and waives up to to $736,000 in impact fee permit credits.

The ARC has been planning to develop the Oak Street plot since 2015. In 2018, a private developer expressed interest in developing the site as a “dense urban multi-family residential project with the potential to incorporate some mixed-use elements” .

ARC began soliciting submissions in March 2019 for the project. A selection committee chose the plan from Tampa-based Catalyst Asset Management Inc. over the one submitted by Lakeland’s Broadway Real Estate Services.

Catalyst’s 2019 proposal called for a six-story structure with 173 apartments, 38 of which would be reserved for affordable housing. Their proposal also included 10,000 square feet for retail and a four-story parking garage. But after a year of negotiations, Catalyst pulled out of the project in September 2020, citing COVID impacts and “investor apprehension.”

ARC solicited a new round of bids in July 2021. The selection committee unanimously chose the plan submitted by Onicx Group. At its October 18 meeting, the city commission agreed and agreed to begin negotiations with a deadline to seal the deal within six months — no later than April.

An October development document submitted by Onicx lists potential monthly rents for apartments at market price at $1,196 for a studio, $1,350 for a T1, $1,932 for a T2 and $2,100 for a T2. .

Comparing rates to downtown competitors Mirrorton, eBay and The Gardens, the document notes: “Given the superior location and design type of 200 Oak Street compared to current market offerings, we have chose to set rents slightly higher than those of the competition.

Onicx Group has completed over $500 million in real estate projects over the past five years, with over 900 multi-family units in mixed-use projects currently under development. Projects in the area include the Marriott Residence Inn Downtown Winter Haven.

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Parking garage

Old Town Automated Parking Returns to City Review | ALXnow

Parking garage for 116 South Henry Street, image via City of Alexandria

Two years after plans for converting 116 South Henry Street into an automated parking garage were first submitted for city review, the garage is resubmitted to the Board of Architectural Review on Thursday, May 5 with some changes in mind.

The plan remains to build a 50ft garage just off King Street, but the entrance is undergoing some sort of overhaul after earlier designs were deemed too ‘monolithic’ in previous hearings.

“The lower levels of the garage will be clad in black brick and the upper levels will be clad in EIFS/Dryvit synthetic stucco,” the staff report states. “Entrances on the first level will consist of two rolling garage doors, an aluminum and glass storefront door system and two pedestrian doors. Large backlit letters spelling “PARKING” will be on the west end of the north elevation, above the entrances. »

The report contains some potential changes to the visuals of the building facade as well as options for different lighting, although to the untrained eye they all look roughly the same.

Construction was approved in April for all three buildings on the site. The parking structure will adjoin a four-story residential building and a four-story mixed-use building.

Staff recommend approval of the parking garage design, with a preference expressed for the fourth option.

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Parking facilities

The importance of accessibility for parking lots



Trying to find accessible parking for someone with physical limitations is more common than you might think. According to BraunAbility, 74% of people have witnessed misuse of an accessible parking area. The same time, 2 out of 3 individuals will avoid visiting a place if they do not know if it is accessible. More facilities across North America need to invest in parking systems to accommodate diverse drivers while combating the misuse of accessible parking spaces for those who need it most.

The importance of being able to park

Under the Motor Vehicle Act,accessible parkingrefers to people with reduced mobility due to a permanent or temporary impairment that affects or challenges their ability to walk. people with reduced mobility and health issues must have free and safe access to buildings and institutions without fear of non-accessible persons parking spaces. These designated locations provide additional space for people to get in and out of their vehicle quickly and safely, with room for mobility aids including crutches, wheelchairs, canes and more. equipment.

Accessible parking rules and requirements

According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, there are key requirements that public and commercial establishments must meet in order to ensure accessibility and functionality for all. For example, there should be a minimum number number of accessible parking spaces required based on the size of a given lot. For example, 1 in 6 accessible parking spaces must be accessible to vans. Businesses are required to have readily available and accessible parking for drivers. It is essential that lots maintain, maintain and repair any infrastructure that may cause harm to the individual or their vehicle. Signage must also be visible to all drivers and enforcement officers.

Improve accessibility with smart parking technology

It is essential for parking operators implement systems that mitigate the misuse of accessible parking spaces. For example, enforcement officers should closely monitor unlicensed drivers, expired licenses, and those who illegally use another person’s license, as this may lead to instances where those with legal licenses are robbed of parking access accessible. Leaders must do more to meet the needs of people with disabilities and ensure their voices are heard.

Smart parking technology is a great tool to solve this problem and improve accessibility in any car park. With the implementation of smart parking software, parking lots and law enforcement officials can regularly monitor drivers and review key data to gain visibility into any ongoing violations and maintain compliance. . At the same time, it is an essential step that organizations can take to show solidarity with people with disabilities and let them know that their needs are valid and taken into consideration.

At ROKER, our innovation parking platform allows your installations to create parking strategies that meet the needs of your land by offering intelligent solutions. To learn more about how you can improve the parking experience with smart technology, contact us here.

About ROKER, Inc.

Roker logotype

ROKER provides technology solutions for urban space management, including parking and enforcement, to enable higher revenue recovery for public security institutions and the commercial market. The company is creating an ecosystem for smart parking that will converge with smart city initiatives around the world. ROKER is powered by the proprietary intellectual property of Rekor Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: REKR), a Maryland-based company that provides real-time traffic information through AI-based decisions, and Cygnet Infotech, a leading product engineering services and application development company. ROKER was founded in 2020.

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