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October 2022

Parking garage

Umbrellas keep the LBCC parking garage cool

The Long Beach City College (LBCC) campus, founded in 1927 in Long Beach, California, is undergoing modernization and renovations, including a new four-level parking structure with more than 500 parking spaces. Designers focused on materials that would perform the functional role of sun protection for the garage while maintaining aesthetic appeal.

SAF supplied 529 aluminum fins for the renovated Long Beach City College parking lots.

Working with McCarthy Building Companies, SAF supplied 529 aluminum fins for the exterior of the parking lot, using 3003 1/8-inch aluminum sheet to fabricate fins around extruded tubing. The fins, which range from 12 inches to 20 inches in width extending outward from the building, are designed to provide shade for the garage as well as diminish the intensity of the headlights during the evening hours. For the project, 24,000 square feet of fins were finished in a three-coat XL Kynar® White Ice Metallic color finish and an additional 900 square feet of 1701 brackets were finished in three-coat XL Kynar® Stieglitz Silver.

Structural brackets (3/8 inch wall angle and fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum) were installed with countersunk slots and through holes to allow all brackets to be installed before the fins. It also allowed the installation team to adapt to field conditions on the fly if necessary.

“Our goal was to provide a high performance product that met the aesthetic requirements of the job while minimizing the time spent on site for the installation team,” explains Luke Lynam, Senior Project Manager at SAF. “We pre-drilled holes in the 2x4s and the 1/8 inch aluminum fins because we didn’t want to deal with 2x4s in the field. We pre-engineered everything in our SAF West factory to facilitate on-site labor and streamline the construction schedule.

The architectural fins needed to be fabricated up to 20 feet in height, which required the ingenuity of the SAF West fabrication team. In fact, SAF created custom 20ft bending jigs to ensure consistency and increase throughput during the manufacturing process.

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Parking spaces

A new way to buy parking spaces in residential buildings in Hungary

Significant changes have been introduced in Hungary from May 2, 2022 regarding parking spaces in parking garages.1 Unlike the old regime where a property registered as a “parking garage” included several parking spaces and was co-owned by several co-owners, it is now possible to separately register each parking space in a car park as a separate parking property. The co-owners’ legal right of first refusal will no longer apply to separate parking lots. In the context of sale and purchase transactions where the parking space is located in a co-ownership car park, the notification to the co-owners as beneficiaries of the legal right of pre-emption is also now possible by a simple announcement instead of send separate letters to each individual co-owner. This has already been used sometimes in practice but always with great uncertainty. These changes should facilitate and speed up the process of selling parking spaces.

Problems with previous legislation

To better understand the legal context, three aspects must be considered. From a planning point of view, in case of new residential developments, at least one parking space had to be provided for each apartment (and local municipalities can still prescribe the provision of one space, at most). Since building parking spaces has never been a profitable business, the developers never really intended to build more parking spaces than needed. While the availability of parking spaces in a residential building is limited, people prefer to buy an apartment with a parking space. From the point of view of the cadastre, a separate parking space could not be registered in the cadastre as real estate itself, but only the floor of the parking garage in which it was located; thus all parking spaces on the same level of a garage constituted a single property. This level of parking was the common property of those who owned a parking space in the parking lot. Last but not least, from the owner’s point of view, this made it difficult to sell the parking spaces because each co-owner on the parking level had a legal right of first refusal (ROFR) if one of the other co-owners decided to sell their participation in the parking lot.

One of the common problems in recent years has been the sale of parking spaces in condominium parking lots located in condominiums. As the sale of a parking space generally takes place with the seller’s apartment in the co-ownership, the ROFR legal notification has considerably slowed down the operation of the joint sale of the parking space and the apartment.

To expedite the process, for many joint owners, it has become a market practice to notify each beneficiary of the ROFR by means of a written notice posted on the bulletin board of the joint ownership, without direct notification to each joint owner by mail. recommended. This led to divergent practices in the land registers, as in some cases an attestation from the common representative of the co-ownership of posting such a notice was accepted, while in other cases it was not. .

Possibility of warning by an announcement

Previously, if a co-owner decided to sell his participation (parking space) at the level of the parking lot of the co-ownership, the request for registration of the purchaser’s title on the participation had to be accompanied by the co-owner’s declaration of renunciation. owners as beneficiaries of the ROFR. Or failing that, by the acknowledgment of receipt/delivery receipt proving that the beneficiaries of the ROFR have been informed and have not exercised their ROFR within the time limit. In exceptional cases, it was possible for the seller to substitute the proof when delivering the ROFR notice with a joint declaration of the contracting parties indicating that the place of residence or other circumstances of the beneficiary would make the notification extremely difficult or would cause undue delay. However, this provision has not been consistently interpreted in case law. Sometimes it has been upheld by the courts, but there have been cases where it has been decided that if no separate postal notification had been given to the recipient of the ROFR (referring to “extreme hardship” above), and the ROFR recipient became aware of the sale from any source within three years, they could challenge the sale and exercise the ROFR. This decision has created some uncertainty as to the application of contracts entered into within the dispute period and the application of the parties’ declaration in lieu of ROFR notice.

The new rules specify the practice from May 2, 2022, for covered parking lots in condominiums. If the property to which the ROFR applies is registered in a condominium as separate immovable property and its use is shown on the cadastral sheet as “parking garage”, it is acceptable to submit, instead of a acknowledgment of receipt or a delivery receipt (as indicated above), a statement from the common representative or the chairman of the co-ownership management committee. The declaration must mention that the offer to purchase has been posted on the bulletin board of the co-ownership. The new rules make life easier in several ways. First, the new possibility shortens the process of notifying ROFR beneficiaries, because sellers don’t have to spend months digging up co-owners’ addresses and trying to send notices by registered mail. Second, there is no need to send a separate letter to each individual co-owner, so the seller can reduce their own administrative and financial burden related to the notification requirement.

Introduction of a “parking space” as a separate property

Since May 2, 2022, the law defines “the parking space” as a separate property, that is to say as “an area intended for the reception of a vehicle within the confines of a building intended for the storage of vehicles, one side of which is connected to an access road leading to the parking spaces, and the other three sides of which are delimited by a permanent physical marking on the ground of the premises or by a wall. In addition, the area must also meet the dimensional requirements set by law to be classified as a parking space.

The new legislation helps owners of condominiums developing or developing in the future. It will be possible to register the parking spaces as separate properties in the cadastre during the constitution of the co-ownership, without creating any co-ownership in the parking garage.

In the case of existing and condominium parking lots, it is possible for owners to create real estate (parking spaces) separate from each parking space located in the condominium parking lot if the parking spaces meet the legal requirements. However, to do this, all owners must accept and sign an amendment to the founding deed of the co-ownership. Getting all owners to sign such an amendment can be a difficult task.

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Huge out of character car park for historic main street


If you’re wondering what the hell is up with an eight-story parking structure in the middle of historic downtown Kalispell, you’re not alone. I too have issues with this mammoth project approved by Kalispell City Council at its October 4th meeting.

This project was presented to redevelop the original four storey parking garage previously approved by Council. At that time, it was really a parking lot located on the Eagles property, owned by the city, at the corner of 1st Street West and 1st Avenue West. The structure was to be built by the same developers who were building the Charles Hotel on the city-owned parking lot at 3rd Street and Main Street. With 242 parking spaces and some retail space on the ground floor, the main purpose of the garage was to provide much-needed parking for the city, as well as the parking required for the new Charles Hotel. The hotel was to be owned by the developers, but the four-story garage was to be owned and operated by the city.

These projects have been approved by City Council and enthusiastically supported by the Kalispell community. Of the two parking lots in question, the 3rd and Main Street lot has approximately 60 spaces, while the Eagles lot has 50, so a total of 110 parking spaces currently exist across both lots.

A 242-seat structure, was a 132-seat increase in the four-story design. But, the developer still needed 90 of those spaces for the Charles Hotel’s valet parking services, leaving an additional 42 spaces, for the city, in the four-story garage.

Then the developers came back to the table with a “better plan”. The new plan increased the “parking garage” from four to eight floors, with four additional floors above the parking floors, housing 78 market-priced luxury apartments. People then started wondering how many more parking spots Kalispell was really going to end up with?

With only 42 spaces available and 78 additional apartments added, it is obvious that we are returning to an increasingly pronounced parking shortage. The 42 places available are far from sufficient to accommodate the luxury apartments added, each requiring at least one place, and possibly more. It is no longer a parking garage project but an apartment development, with far fewer parking spaces in Kalispell town center for shopkeepers, office workers, restaurant owners and tourists than we currently have with the two car parks. What was once a much-needed parking garage is now a large luxury apartment complex in the heart of historic downtown Kalispell, offering fewer parking spaces than before.

To make matters worse, the developers persuaded our city council to use the funding from the tax increases to reimburse them, over time, for the full cost of the parking/apartment structure. In addition, they will be reimbursed for the initial land cost for the hotel and parking/apartment structure, courtesy of the City of Kalispell and its ratepayers. What a great deal for the developers, at the expense of Kalispell taxpayers.

Our city government supports these projects 100% for the simple reason that the parking lots around the city do not generate any tax revenue for the city coffers. Now, however, the tax generated from these projects will be used to repay developers over the next 20 years, until they are fully reimbursed for the $9 million structure and land they will own.

In the meantime, our quality of life in downtown Kalispell will be severely degraded.

So beware of Kalispell, you get a massive eight story development in the heart of downtown Kalispell, completely out of character with our historic neighborhood, and ultimately paid for by taxpayers. And beware, other city-owned land is being considered for similar misguided developments.

If you’re not happy with that, raise your voice. Attend council meetings and call your councillor. The character of our downtown and our city for future generations depends on it.

—John Hinchey, Kalispell

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Additional alarm fire tears through Illinois Medical District parking lot; dozens of cars destroyed

CHICAGO (CBS) –An additional alarm fire engulfed a parking garage in the Illinois Medical District in the city’s Near West neighborhood on Tuesday afternoon.

The fire started in a truss-roofed parking garage for Place Garibaldi on the Park townhouse complex at 711 S. Ashland Ave., between Flournoy and Polk streets. One car caught fire and the fire spread to nearly 30 other cars.

The garage roof collapsed onto the vehicles, potentially setting other cars on fire.

A 2-11 alarm has been raised for additional equipment and manpower. Just under 100 firefighters were mobilized to fight the blaze.

The stage is just steps from the campus of Rush University Medical Center. A report from the Citizen app said staff could smell smoke from a hospital building.

The University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center is also nearby. St. Basil’s Greek Orthodox Church is located just south on Ashland Avenue.

The fire was also visible from the Eisenhower Expressway just to the north.

Neither the townhouses in Garibaldi Park nor any other nearby buildings were damaged or threatened.

Firefighter video showed dark orange flames shooting from the single-story brick building as plumes of smoke rose.

The alarm was raised and the fire was brought under control by 4:37 p.m. As night fell, many cars lay in burnt-out ruins.

Under the ashes in a fine rain, the horn of a burnt-out vehicle sounded in the night. Indeed, the losses were enormous for the inhabitants of Place Garibaldi.

“My wife saw from the kitchen that there was smoke,” says Nadim Mahmud.

It soon became apparent that all the cars in the garage were damaged.


Dozens of cars destroyed in Illinois Medical District garage fire

01:38

Some residents of the Garibaldi Park complex told CBS 2’s Jermont Terry that about 40 cars are parked in the garage every day. As it was the middle of the day when the fire broke out, they estimated that around 20 cars were probably in the garage at the time.

As firefighters worked to bring the blaze under control, many people watched in horror as their vehicles burned.

“You don’t expect to see your house, or anything of yours, in flames,” said Garibaldi Square resident Piper Hawkins-Green.

Hawkins-Green was at home when the fire broke out.

“I heard shouting and loud voices,” she said.

The noise she heard was tires and car engines exploding. By the time she got out, firefighters were already on the scene.

“Fortunately, all units were spared,” Hawkins-Green said.

The fire department brought the blaze under control, preventing it from spreading to any of the 42 townhouses surrounding the garage.

“I really appreciate the effort,” said Jitin Srivastava, “because if they weren’t there in time, the fire would have reached our houses – and we would probably have evacuated, or we would have been in danger.”

While it took just under 100 firefighters several hours to douse the flames, residents were unhappy to see their cars reduced to charred shells.

“It’s very sad for me,” Srivastava said. “I lost my car.”

But they’re grateful no one was inside the garage when the roof collapsed – and more importantly, when the first car caught fire.

“It’s devastating to see, but when you think about it, it’s just a car and not lives, it’s okay,” added Hawkins-Green. “But it’s very traumatic to see all this.”

No injuries were reported and everyone was grateful that no one was inside the garage when the first car caught fire or when the roof collapsed.

Many car owners were on the phone with their insurance companies on Tuesday evening to start making claims after their cars were destroyed.

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Parking spaces

What’s up with y’all going back to parking lots?

Shutterstock images.

First of all-

“You guys? I think we all need a home meeting”

Second, I put the above tweet out into the universe this morning after waiting in a parking lot behind two different people to return to their parking spots. Personally, I have no problem with people doing this, I was just curious about the thinking that goes into habit development.

Has it always seemed like a lot of work up front to save some time in the background? Basically a net zero. A wash. Right?

Turns out I was very wrong.

Some of the answers informed me of shit I had no idea.

For instance-

Is it true? Makes sense I guess.

I had no idea.

The newspaper – Backing into a parking spot gives you better control and makes it easier to maneuver out of the space. If you think parking in reverse is difficult, trying to get your car out of a tight spot when you’ve parked in front is much harder.

These days, with most new cars equipped with rear view cameras and parking assistance systems, it’s easier than ever to reverse park.

By the way, I’m talking about inversion in spaces perpendicular to the wall or perimeter. I am clearly not talking about parallel parking which should only be attempted in reverse.

So here are the reasons why reverse parking is the only option:

  1. It’s safer. When you back into a space, you enter a designated space with no vehicular or pedestrian traffic. By parking in reverse, you avoid blindly backing into oncoming traffic or the path of pedestrians. You can see your surroundings more clearly.
  2. In an emergency, it’s much faster to get in your vehicle and get out straight away. It could also be considered a security measure.
  3. Backing up close to a wall can deter thieves from breaking into your trunk because there won’t be enough space for them to work.
  4. Driving into a parking space is a false economy in terms of overall maneuvering time and safety. You’ll spend just as much time (if not more) trying to safely get out of space in traffic, so it only makes sense that you’d do it safely in empty space.
  5. If something were to happen to your engine – say, you leave your headlights on and the battery dies – you’ll have easy access to the hood if you’re in reverse.
  6. It’s more fuel efficient. According to a study by the Institute of Advanced Motorists, reported by Aviva UK, reversing out of a parking space with a cold engine consumes 20 to 25 times more fuel in the first few seconds than a warm engine. Doing this several times a week adds up in terms of fuel costs, not to mention engine wear.

Holy shit. Thanks Bob Max.

Have I been doing this all wrong this whole time or are people like that just badass?

True story.

Also you can never forget the repo man.

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Parking garage

Over a dozen vehicles destroyed in Near West Side parking lot fire

CHICAGO — Firefighters are investigating what started a two-alarm parking garage fire on Chicago’s Near West Side.

According to the Chicago Fire, the a fire broke out in a parking lot of a multi-residential complex in the 700 block of S. Ashland near Rush University Medical Center.

The fire destroyed more than a dozen vehicles. Firefighters said the blaze likely started as a single-vehicle fire, with flames quickly spreading to the roofs of nearby cars.

“Our guys launched an aggressive attack to put out the fire, but it went into the roof of the parking lot, so we had to get our guys out and raise the alarm,” Assistant Deputy Fire Commissioner Donald Walker said.

The parking lot roof collapsed as a result of the fire. Although the parking structure is not attached to neighboring residential units, residents feared the fire would spread to their homes.

Witness Piper Hawkins-Green said she heard an explosion, prompting her to come out of her home.

“I thought the car was recovered and thought it was strange to hear the banging, coupled with the cries of the firefighter,” she said. “When I opened the door, I saw the truck and the flames spitting out.”

Resident Malvika Shree told WGN News she bought a car about three months ago.

“Now it’s all gone,” Shree said.

The fire also destroyed Jitin Srivastava’s vehicle, but he said he was grateful no one was injured.

“The car is gone, but we are safe,” Srivastava said. “The family is safe.”

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Parking garage

How to Comply with NYC Local Law 126 Parking Garage Inspection Rules

Beginning January 1, 2022, New York City requires garage owners to hire a specially designated professional engineer to perform an assessment and file a report at least once every six years. Here are tips and best practices on how to comply with NYC Local Law 126 parking garage inspection rules. (Download a PDF version of this guide from Hoffmann Architects + Engineers.)

Why does New York City require parking lot inspections?

In 2018, New York State enacted a rule requiring periodic condition assessments, performed by a professional engineer, of all parking structures statewide – except in New York City. Exempt from state code, NYC has developed its own rules to keep garages and their outbuildings safe and well maintained. With the passage of Local Law 126 of 2021 and RCNY §103-13, NYC has codified the requirements of this ambitious safety initiative.

Who should perform the parking inspection?

A Qualified Parking Structures Inspector (QPSI) must assess the garage and file the report. A licensed engineer with at least three years of parking structure experience, a QPSI earns New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) parking structure unit certification.

What is required?

Any motor vehicle parking/storage space, other than an unfenced outdoor lot, 1 or 2 car garage, service station or showroom, must be appraised by a QPSI certified.

  1. Document review. The QPSI reviews previous reports, structural designs, repair drawings, violations, and other records.
  2. Condition assessment. The QPSI designs an assessment program specific to the parking structure, based on construction type, age, exposure and other characteristics, as well as maintenance and repair history. The physical examination may include sounding, load testing, noninvasive scanning, and/or core extraction, in addition to visual inspection. When evaluating structural components, waterproofing, fireproofing, and wear surfaces, the QPSI may need to order additional inspections, probes, or tests to identify probable causes of observed defects.
  3. Immediate response to hazardous conditions. Upon identifying an unsafe condition, the QPSI promptly notifies the owner and the DOB and advises on appropriate protective measures.
  4. Documentation of deficiencies. Photos, sketches or other means are used to identify the location and extent of defects.
  5. Annual observation checklist. When assessing condition, the QPSI creates a checklist with items to inspect on an annual basis, tailored to that specific garage.
  6. The final inspection. In a comprehensive tour of each parking level, the QPSI verifies that the reported results reflect actual conditions.
  7. Filing of report. Following a prescribed format, the QPSI prepares a compliance report with findings and recommendations, classifying the garage as safe, unsafe, or “safe with repairs and/or technical oversight” (SREM). The report is filed with the DOB.

What should be included in the report?

According to the code, the report must contain:

  • A summary of conclusions and recommendations.
  • Classification as safe, SREM or dangerous.
  • Building address, block and lot number, building identification number (BIN), landmark status and owner contact details.
  • Description of the building, including size, dimensions, use, age, type of construction, materials and structural systems.
  • Description of any distress, repair or modification.
  • Procedures used to assess conditions.
  • Extent and location of physical examinations, contractor contact information, location diagram and date of assessment.
  • Description, classification and mapping of each significant condition, classifying each as safe, SREM or unsafe.
  • Recommendations for the protection of the public (Hazardous conditions).
  • Photographs of SREM and hazardous conditions, associated with location drawings, as well as photos of each parking elevation and level.
  • Assessment of guardrails and railings for positive securing.
  • Analysis of the causes of observed SREM and unsafe conditions.
  • Up-to-date maintenance work and maintenance plan.
  • An annual observation checklist.
  • SREM parking structure monitoring program project.
  • Recommendations for repairs or maintenance.
  • Time frame within which repairs must be completed.
  • Work permit possibly required.
  • Seal and signature of the supervising QPSI.

Reports describing the same condition at the same location as the SREM cannot be filed for two consecutive filing cycles. If a previous SREM condition remains uncorrected, the QPSI should classify the parking structure as unsafe.

What happens if there is a dangerous condition?

As soon as the QPSI reports an unsafe condition, the owner must take action to protect public safety. This may include cordoning off hazardous areas, erecting sheds and sidewalk fencing, installing safety nets, and starting repair and reinforcement work.

Unsafe conditions must be corrected within 90 days, unless the IQPS determines that it is not possible to do so and indicates a different time frame in the report. Any deviation from this deadline requires supporting documents justifying the change.

Within two weeks of completing the repairs, the QPSI must inspect the garage and file an amended report. The protective measures must remain in place until the report is accepted or the IQPS certifies that the conditions have been corrected and requests the withdrawal.

What about SREM terms?

All conditions described in the report as SREM must be corrected within the time frame recommended by QPSI. Requests for additional time must be accompanied by supporting documents from the IQPS justifying the new time limit.

Within three years of the initial filing, a QPSI must undertake another condition assessment and file an amended report, indicating the extent of ongoing monitoring, the status of conditions identified in the initial report as SREM, and the classification of any new conditions. Prior to the next rating cycle, all SREM conditions must be repaired, as they must be flagged as unsafe if not corrected.

NYC Parking Map Key

When should reports be completed and filed?

Owners are required to file a report at least once every six years, within the staggered filing windows of the diagram. Reports must be filed within 60 days of the condition assessment.

If the garage is located in a building subject to the Facade Safety Inspection Program (FISP), the owner may choose to change the parking structure rating window to align with the FISP rating window . To do this, the owner must notify the date of birth at least 180 days before the end of the subcycle of the assigned parking structure.

Owners of new garages must maintain a QPSI to file a report six years after the first certificate of occupancy or, if this falls outside the applicable filing window, within the window of the next cycle.

In addition to required repairs, what should owners do between deposit cycles?

Each year, car parks must be subject to an “annual observation”, based on the checklist prepared by QPSI in the inspection report. The person performing the annual observation is responsible for informing the owner and the DOB of any potentially unsafe condition. Completed annual compliance checklists should be kept on file and made available to the DOB upon request.

What are the penalties for non-compliance?

Late filing carries a heavy penalty of $1,000 per month. Not filing at all earns an extra $5,000 per year, in addition to the late payment penalty of $1,000 per month. Unsafe conditions not corrected within 90 days result in a penalty of $1,000 per month until the condition is corrected and an amended report is filed (unless an extension has been granted). If an owner lets an SREM condition languish and become unsafe in the next cycle, they will face a $2,000 penalty, plus risk further penalties if the condition continues unresolved.

Waivers may be requested where a change in ownership, state of emergency, bankruptcy or demolition prevents compliance.

What is the main takeaway?

If you own a parking structure west or south of Central Park in Manhattan, you need to take immediate action. Garage owners in these districts only have until December 2023 to retain one of the few professional engineers currently certified by the NYC Department of Buildings as a QPSI, then to schedule the inspection and allow time for the QPSI to file a compliance report.

Garage owners in Upper Manhattan and Brooklyn don’t have much time to waste either, with those districts’ filing period opening in 2024. For all the parking lot owners in the city, it doesn’t hurt plan ahead, as the demand for limited QPSI resources and looming deadlines will likely lead to a last-minute scramble to meet inspection and filing requirements.

Resources
NYC Building Parking Structures Resource Page
Local Law 126 of 2021 – see section 323, p. 229-232
RCNY §103-13: Periodic Inspection of Parking Structures

Hoffmann Architects + Engineers was among the first to have a certified QPSI. We are one of the few currently licensed to perform parking garage inspections under NYC Local Law 126. Contact us at (212) 789-9915 or hoffarch.com/contact-us.

The material provided is for informational purposes. Before acting, consult a design professional.

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Parking garage

BUSD should not build a parking lot on Milvia

If you are a Berkeley taxpayer, have a child in the Berkeley Unified School District (BUSD), or are simply someone who cares about climate change, you should oppose BUSD’s plans to spend $27.5 million. of measurement G to build a parking lot with tennis courts on top, directly across from Berkeley High School (BHS). The measure, passed in 2020, is a $380 million school construction bond.

We support our teachers and the needs of the BHS tennis team, which has not had a home court for 20 years. But, for at least three reasons, it is a serious mistake to pursue this project.

First, there is already an abundance of empty parking spots in downtown Berkeley. And most of the spots belong to the city. In 2018, the city built a 720-space garage on Center Street using borrowed money. Since its opening (even before the pandemic), the Center Street garage has been 40% empty on weekdays. That’s more than 280 free places. Two other private garages close to BHS have 610 and 262 places, of which 250 and 80 are also free. Because Center Street revenues are lower than expected, the city is paying general fund bondholders $3.8 million last year and another $10 million by 2024. In other words, taxpayers have already paid twice for many downtown parking spaces. We don’t need to pay to build more.

Second, we need to stop encouraging car driving and pouring money into an unsustainable transportation system. As climate change ravages our planet, we must take bold action. BUSD already recognizes that “transportation is the number one source of climate emissions in the City of Berkeley” and its sustainability plan aims to cut single-family car trips in half by 2025. BUSD’s important staff must do part of that plan, especially in Berkeley. the richest district in terms of public transport, cycling and walking. Some staff have to drive, but by offering free parking we subsidize driving and sabotage our own climate goals. Instead of building parking lots, BUSD should develop a comprehensive transportation demand management (TDM) program, just like other major employers in Berkeley. CT scans encourage people not to drive. For BUSD, this could mean providing a travel allowance and charging market prices for parking. TDM programs typically reduce parking demand by around 25%.

Finally, improving classrooms and helping students thrive should be a focus of Measure G funds. The proposed site is directly opposite BHS and is a unique opportunity to preserve space for our students. We should not waste this precious resource on permanent car storage when we have other current and future needs that would better serve our students. In 50 years, passenger cars may be a thing of the past. But we will always have children who deserve a world-class education.

Implementing a robust TDM program, opening the court for tennis, and not building that garage is a $25 million gift to our students that preserves our options in the future (assuming tennis courts would cost around $2.5 million). BUSD should instead negotiate with the city and private garages to buy or lease replacement parking for 610 vacant places nearby. It is important to note that these negotiations should not be conducted by the BUSD facilities department. You don’t let the fox guard the chicken coop.

If you agree with any or all of these points, please contact the school board and let them know that you are also against the construction of a garage and that you prefer to use the G measure to improve our rooms class and our support spaces. Our achievement gap is still wide. We should dedicate measure G to its closing, not to the storage of cars. We’re smart at Berkeley. We can understand both equity, environment and economy.


Liza Lutzker is a BUSD parent, public health researcher at UC Berkeley, Safe Routes to School Parent Champion, and member of the Walk Bike Berkley Coordinating Committee. Ken Berland is a parent of BUSD, a software development manager at Amazon Music, and a member of the Citizen’s Bond Oversight Committee for Measure G. Damian Park is a parent of BUSD, a professor of economics at Santa Clara University and president of Citizens’ Bond Oversight. Measurement Committee G. Douglas Legg is a BUSD parent and Deputy City Administrator for the City of San Francisco, overseeing capital planning, assets, and infrastructure. Cielo Rios is a parent of BUSD, Chicana, Vice President of Equity at Emerson PTA, and an advocate for children in our community.

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City gives initial approval for Aggieville parking fees | New

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West New York plans fourth parking lot in town

West New York is moving forward with plans for a fourth parking lot in town.

A direct mail was sent out by the city in September touting the parking spaces that would be created by the garages. The city had previously submitted plans for parking garages at the existing 51st Street, 54th Street and 57th Street parking lots.

The 51st Street Parking Garage will be eight stories high with 495 parking spaces at 51st through 52nd Streets between Bergenline Avenue and Kennedy Avenue. The structure is expected to be fully completed by December 2022 and to open shortly thereafter in January 2023.

The 57th Street Parking Garage will be three stories high and provide 270 parking spaces on the lot located between 57th and 58th Streets behind the former Modell’s off Bergenline Avenue. The city plans to open this garage after the 51st Street Garage opens to the public in January 2023.

The 54th Street parking garage is still in the design phase, but will provide 235 surface parking spaces at the corner of Park Avenue and 54th Street. The city also announced that a new three-story parking garage on the surface lot between 66th Street at 67th Street and Park Avenue is in the design phase and will provide 270 parking spaces.

In total, the municipality will add 1,000 parking spaces, according to Mayor Gabriel Rodriguez. This includes not only garages, but also other parking projects in the city.

“Parking has been a challenge for many years in Western New York and my administration is committed to dramatically increasing the number of parking spaces available by maximizing our existing spaces in creative ways, partnering with private entities and by investing heavily in new parking infrastructure. “Rodriguez said in the post.

“I’m thrilled to report that when complete, our parking plan will have created over a thousand new parking spaces for residents and visitors to Western New York!”

West New York also touted the corner parking lot the city has completed and plans to implement. In December 2021, it completed the transition to corner parking on Broadway from 50th to 52nd Street.

The city continues to explore where it can convert the existing parking lot into corner parking. West New York already has designs for Park Avenue from 62nd Street to 66th Street, Park Avenue from 52nd Street to 54th Street, Dewey Avenue from 62nd Street to 63rd Street, 60th Street from Broadway to Hudson Avenue and Hudson Avenue from 50th Street to 59th Street.

The move comes as Western New York was already implementing corner parking in town. He also followed calls for steeper parking at the August Board of Commissioners meeting by resident Frank Miqueli.

Miqueli is behind a petition calling for steeper parking in town, also including Anthony Valdes, Anthony DeFino, Doeinne Auriemma and Vipul Parekh. Auriemma and Parekh recently ran unsuccessfully for the school board, and Parekh frequently criticizes the current administration at board of commissioner meetings.

Western New York officials did not respond to Hudson Reporter requests for comments on the subject.

For updates on this story and others, visit www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at [email protected]

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Parking facilities

DC Srinagar reviews measures for adequate parking lots and traffic decongestion

Srinagar, December 31: To ensure adequate parking facilities in highly congested areas of Srinagar city, Srinagar Deputy Commissioner Mohammad Aijaz Asad on Friday chaired a joint meeting of all stakeholders at the meeting hall of the office complex of Srinagar. DC here.

During the meeting, a discussion took place on the issue of providing adequate parking space for traders in Lal Chowk, Residency Road, Poloview, Batmaloo, Hari Sing High Street, Goni Khan, Shaheed Gunj and other adjacent areas to overcome traffic congestion. in the city.

The meeting also discussed the measure undertaken to streamline and improve the traffic system, in addition to the measures taken to reduce the nuisances of improper parking and road encroachments in the city.

On occasion, the Deputy Commissioner stressed the need to coordinate the efforts of the district administration, traffic police, SMC, SDA and all stakeholders including traders and customers. , strictly following traffic rules in letter and spirit for the greater good of the public.

DC has also focused on making optimal use of existing parking and simultaneously identifying and developing new parking spaces to accommodate merchant and customer vehicles. He also asked to reserve adequate parking spaces for traders at a reasonable monthly fee.

While interacting with the representatives of various trades, the DC asked them to cooperate with the Administration to ensure smooth regulation of traffic in the city especially on congested and dense traffic lanes to overcome traffic jams.

The DC also asked them to motivate other traders and the general public to use paid parking lots to overcome traffic jams.

Regarding the merchants’ request to provide parking to merchants at preferential rates, the Deputy Commissioner requested the concerned authorities of SDA to consider the merchants’ demand as a matter of priority and review the parking fees for merchants because they must use daily.

The Deputy Commissioner also requested the SDA authorities to submit the land allocation requisitions for new parking sites in the city so that enough parking space is made available to accommodate more vehicles.

The Deputy Chairman of Srinagar Development Authority also addressed the occasion and briefed the Chairman on the current parking capacity available in Srinagar.

Vice President, SDA, Bashir Ahmad, Additional Deputy Commissioner Srinagar, Dr. Syed Hanief Balkhi, SP Traffic, Zaffar Ahmad, Director of Planning, SDA Secretary, Tehsildar South and other concerned persons were present at the meeting.

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Parking spaces

Oldest Brewery in Rochester Adds 20 Parking Spaces – Post Bulletin

ROCHESTER – Kinney Creek has always had a challenge with customer parking in its nearly 10 years in business.

Now parking options for people wanting to sample Med City Seltzer on tap are much easier as the brewery has purchased the land that once housed Zorba’s Greek restaurant, adding 20 more parking spaces for people.

“We have a big parking lot out back, but it’s behind our building and not everyone always sees it or knows about it,” said Lindsay Hendrickson, marketing specialist for Kinney Creek. “We have tried to add a lot of additional signage, so people know where to park and we are also seeing an increase in the number of customers in general. So it was time to finally have more parking spaces and something a little more accessible for all our customers.

Increased business over the past few years has led Kinney Creek to several additions to the brewery, such as the addition of patio seating in front of the main entrance to accommodate COVID-19 distancing during closures.

While parking for Kinney Creek business has always been available behind the building, many beer lovers have had to park on the streets of the residential area off Seventh Avenue. Now, with new parking spaces available, that won’t be a problem for Kinney Creek customers.

To help people get to know the new parking lot better, Hendrickson will repurpose the old Zobra sign into the Kinney Creek logo.

“I’m going to continue with the same kind of stuff that we already have, like some of the signs that we have outside are kind of this maroon red, trying to get the two logos there. I will also try to make sure our seltzers are showcased there as well,” she said. “Because a lot of our signage was done when we were just selling beer and this will be the first big permanent sign that we’re going to have our Med City Seltzers there.

People wishing to stop at Kinney Creek for a beer or seltzer can park in the parking lot of the old Zobra at any time.

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Parking facilities

Vox Pop – The lack of proper parking spaces in the city irritates the inhabitants

Vox Pop – The lack of proper parking spaces in the city irritates the inhabitants

People visiting Srinagar’s Lal Chowk Mall and adjoining areas face a shortage of parking spaces. In the absence of sufficient parking spaces, people park their vehicles on the side of the road and thus risk fines from the traffic police. Kas on the rise

Posted by on Friday June 25th, 2021

People visiting Srinagar’s Lal Chowk Mall and adjoining areas face a shortage of parking spaces. In the absence of sufficient parking spaces, people park their vehicles on the side of the road and thus risk fines from the traffic police. Rising Kashmir spoke with locals to gauge their opinion on the issue and what steps need to be taken to ease the parking situation in the city.

A

Burhan Hussani, Rainawari

Scarcity of parking spaces in the summer capital Srinagar is a concern and people are suffering a lot due to non-availability of parking areas. Due to the non-availability of parking spaces, traffic is interrupted and this creates traffic jams. People also park their vehicles irresponsibly on the side of the road, and the result is that we see traffic jams and traffic jams. Undoubtedly, there are places where Srinagar Municipal Corporation (SMC) has mechanical parking spaces but such plots should be built everywhere to reduce traffic congestion. Authorities should provide parking places everywhere so that people do not face parking problems in the future and valuable time can also be saved.

A

Nisar Hussian, Harwan

The city of Srinagar is experiencing a major problem of parking space with traders as well as the general public parking their vehicles at the roadside leading to frequent traffic jams. The completion of the pending parking lots will bring a lot of relief. This will help reduce traffic jams and random parking on the side of the road. Due to the lack of parking spaces in the city of Srinagar, vehicle owners park on the footpath that borders the roads. Pedestrians must then resort to walking on the edges of the road, which hinders the flow of traffic. This overflow of pedestrians in the streets causes traffic jams.

A

Ateeb Bhat, Batmaloo

Lack of proper parking facilities has been a serious problem in Srinagar. This resulted in a huge traffic mess around the city. People, therefore, park their vehicles on the roads and thus magnify the problem. In the absence of proper management and poor parking, the commercial areas of Srinagar experience massive traffic during office hours. The Srinagar Municipal Corporation has started developing some parking lots in the Srinagar area which are not enough to meet the traffic rush in the city. The authorities claim that they are going to make Srinagar a smart city, but these problems are fundamental and must be solved at the earliest.

A

Shafat Malik, Peerbagh

Car parking is a major problem in the city of Srinagar. People also suffer from the lack of parking spaces in various areas. There is an imbalance between parking supply and demand, which is considered to be the root cause of metropolitan parking problems. This imbalance is partly due to ineffective land use planning and miscalculations of space requirements in the early stages of planning. Lack of parking spaces, high parking prices and traffic jams caused by visitors looking for a parking space are just a few examples of everyday parking problems. Those who come to shop park their vehicles in front of the stores and obstruct others. Common sense should prevail and people should not park their vehicles on the side of the road.

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Parking garage

City Commissioners Consider Parking Fee Structure for Aggieville Parking Garage | New

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Parking garage

Women experience a glitch in the matrix when leaving the parking lot

Have you ever experienced something you couldn’t explain? I mean something that defies the rules of reality. The kind of thing that makes you question everything around you? I had a moment like this leaving work in the apartment building parking lot.

It was like a bug in matrix. I was blown away by what I saw and seriously just wanted to collapse into a fetal position. It made me numb and blew my mind.

Before telling you what happened, I want to make sure that we both agree on what a bug in the matrix means.

What is a bug in matrix sense?

A phrase first coined in the 1999 film The Matrix – which posed the idea that humanity lives in a giant computer simulation – over the years a ‘problem in the Matrix’ has become shorthand for an example unusual occurrence that cannot logically be explained.

I can honestly say that is exactly what happened to me. Here is my story.

A woman experiences a real glitch in the womb as she leaves a parking lot.

When I’m at work, I have to park at the very top of the parking lot on the sixth floor. As I was leaving work the other day, I passed a vehicle with its headlights on. The vehicle was a large white GMC Yukon Denali SUV.

I was afraid he wouldn’t see me and would start pulling back, so I slowed down and looked at the vehicle to see if the driver knew I was there. What I saw were two men in the SUV. The passenger had dark hair and a light-colored button-up shirt and the driver had light hair in a similar light-colored shirt. The driver had one leg in the SUV and one leg out of the SUV with the door open. I couldn’t tell if he was getting in or out of the vehicle.

As I slowly walked past, they both looked at me with no expression on their faces, no movement.

I kept circling around the levels of the parking lot until I approached the second floor. When I got around the corner, I saw the exact same vehicle with the exact same two men, doing the exact same things, wearing the exact same shirts.

There was no way they had passed me. There is no other way out or down in the parking lot. It was the same SUV, facing out, lights on, some passengers, same exact reaction, same parking space on a different floor. It was the exact same scene or vision I had on the second floor that I had on the fifth floor two minutes earlier.

Filled with confusion and disbelief, I slowed down to get a good look because I couldn’t believe what I was seeing.

I couldn’t understand. I could not understand. It was the craziest thing I’ve ever experienced or seen in my entire life, and I’ve seen some crazy stuff.

I saw things that I thought were ghostly apparitions. I heard inexplicable noises and saw things that looked like dead relatives waving at me. I even think I have seen a UFO before. I feel things and feel other people’s emotions and pain all the time. Like I said, I’ve been through some very crazy and inexplicable things.

All this is nothing compared to what I experienced in this parking lot.

To think that there might be some kind of glitch in the matrix of my own reality or your reality was too hard for me to comprehend. I try not to obsess over it. I try not to be obsessed with trying to figure it out and giving up. But, my need to try to find an answer to everything keeps me from accepting it as something strange.

Maybe in time I will, but for now I still carry this weird feeling.

The thought of another reality or an altered state is the subject of a documentary released last year.

Looked.

Have you ever experienced something like this? Have you encountered a problem in the matrix? Please let me know I am not alone. LOL

If so, let me know. Email me HERE.

Celebrities share their personal paranormal stories

READ MORE: Weird and wild UFO sightings throughout history

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Parking spaces

Distribute parking spaces, LDA tells builders

The Chief Town Planner of the Lahore Development Authority (LDA) informed the Lahore High Court on Friday that all new buildings and plazas being constructed in the provincial capital have been given strict orders to specify the areas of parking as part of the new master plan.

The Chief Town Planner revealed that “59 buildings have been parked on the roads, of which 19 buildings have obtained stay orders from local courts for their illegal acts”. He made the revelation before Judge Shahid Karim of the LHC hearing petitions asking for direction from government authorities to take action to overcome the smog problem in the province.

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“LDA took a long time to push the city [Lahore] at this stage of destruction and now it would take time for it to get better, “said Judge Karim, inviting the authorities concerned to provide details on the buildings whose parking facilities have been made on the roads. Judge Karim also remarked that “the situation can only be improved with the improvement of public transport”. The CTP, however, told the court that in the master plan policy documents, builders were instructed to provide enough space for parking.

He said student data from 59 schools that caused traffic problems in the city was also sought. “It is an injustice to the city of Lahore that the plazas have not provided parking areas for people visiting them,” the CTP said, regretting the worsening traffic jam situation and traffic problems. parking. Advocate Syed Muazzam Ali Shah, the petitioner’s lawyer, argued that laws regarding parking lots with public and private buildings already exist, but unfortunately public and private buildings and squares do not provide specific areas for parking. parking.

The lawyer said parking on the roads not only causes traffic problems in the city, but also pollutes the air. He also argued that using the licensed building for “other purposes” also caused environmental problems. During the proceedings, Judge Karim also expressed serious concerns about the failure of the authorities concerned to implement the orders given to prevent farmers from setting fire to crop residues.

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The judge summoned deputy commissioners from four districts in Punjab, including Gujranwala, Kasur, Okara and Hafizabad, where he was told that leftover crops were being burned in the fields. The judge observed that the school education department should step in and conduct an awareness campaign among the children. He also observed that students should be trained through internship programs to deal with environmental issues.

The court also noted that the heat wave was another threat to the security of their cities and expressed serious concerns about the combustion residues in four districts of Punjab, including Gujranwala, Kasur, Okara and Hafizabad. The court also requested an implementation report from the relevant authorities and postponed the rehearing to September 18.

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Parking spaces

Residents welcome new parking spaces

A further £750,000 will be invested over the next two years to improve car parking in borough housing estates.

Plans are currently set to create over 260 additional parking spaces by the end of the project in locations such as Malinslee, Dawley Bank, Brookside and Dawley & Aqueduct, among others.

The team has already delivered over 170 places, with 85 more to come by the end of this year and additional sites are also being assessed by engineers.

The majority of the new spaces were assigned on the recommendation of ward members at the request of residents, in an effort to ease parking restrictions.

Councilor Lee Carter, Cabinet Member for Neighborhood Services, Regeneration and Main Street, said: ‘A number of estates were designed at a time when most households only had one car. This is no longer the case today and feedback from residents indicates that it is a welcome measure to alleviate parking issues.

“While we can never fix the problem on every area, we are doing what we can to invest and balance the need to make things better for residents while preserving green spaces.”

The investment comes as more than £16million is being invested across the borough in projects that will make the borough cleaner, greener, safer and more enjoyable. This is on top of the £50million already allocated to neighborhood and law enforcement services.

The Pride in Our Community program will provide infrastructure improvements including roads, trails, parking, sustainable transportation, street furniture, drains and structures.

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Parking garage

How to Comply with NYC Local Law 126 Parking Garage Inspection Rules | Hoffmann Architects

Beginning January 1, 2022, New York City requires garage owners to hire a specially designated professional engineer to perform an assessment and file a report at least once every six years.

Why does the City require parking inspections?

In 2018, New York State enacted a rule requiring periodic condition assessments, performed by a professional engineer, of all parking structures statewide – except in New York City. Exempt from state code, NYC has developed its own rules to keep garages and their outbuildings safe and well maintained. With the passage of Local Law 126 of 2021 and RCNY §103-13, NYC has codified the requirements of this ambitious safety initiative.

Who should carry out the inspection?

A Qualified Parking Structures Inspector (QPSI) must assess the garage and file the report. A licensed engineer with at least three years of parking structure experience, a QPSI earns New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) parking structure unit certification.

What is required?

Any motor vehicle parking/storage space, other than an unfenced outdoor lot, 1 or 2 car garage, service station or showroom, must be appraised by a QPSI certified.

  1. Document review. The QPSI reviews previous reports, structural designs, repair drawings, violations, and other records.
  2. Condition assessment. The QPSI designs an assessment program specific to the parking structure, based on construction type, age, exposure and other characteristics, as well as maintenance and repair history. The physical examination may include sounding, load testing, noninvasive scanning, and/or core extraction, in addition to visual inspection. When evaluating structural components, waterproofing, fireproofing, and wear surfaces, the QPSI may need to order additional inspections, probes, or tests to identify probable causes of observed defects.
  3. Immediate response to hazardous conditions. Upon identifying an unsafe condition, the QPSI promptly notifies the owner and the DOB and advises on appropriate protective measures.
  4. Documentation of deficiencies. Photos, sketches or other means are used to identify the location and extent of defects.
  5. Annual observation checklist. When assessing condition, the QPSI creates a checklist with items to inspect on an annual basis, tailored to that specific garage.
  6. The final inspection. In a comprehensive tour of each parking level, the QPSI verifies that the reported results reflect actual conditions.
  7. Filing of report. According to a prescribed format, the QPSI prepares a compliance report with conclusions and recommendations, classifying the garage as safe, dangerous, Where “Safe with repairs and/or technical monitoring” (SREM). The report is filed with the DOB.

What should be included in the report?

According to the code, the report must contain:

  • A summary of conclusions and recommendations.
  • Classification as safe, SREM or dangerous.
  • building address, Block and lot number, building identification number (BIN), landmark status and owner contact details.
  • Description of the building, including size, dimensions, use, age, type of construction, materials and structural systems.
  • Description of any distress, repair or modification.
  • Procedures used in the evaluation of the conditions.
  • Extent and location of physical examinations, contact details of the contractor, a diagram of the location and the date of the assessment.
  • Description, classification and mapping of each significant condition, classifying each as Safe, SREM, or Not Secure.
  • Recommendations for the protection of the public (Hazardous conditions).
  • Photographs SREM and hazardous conditions, combined with location drawings, as well as photos of each elevation and parking level.
  • Evaluation of guardrails and railings for positive security.
  • Causes analysis observed SREM and hazardous conditions.
  • maintenance work up-to-date and a maintenance plan.
  • An annual observation checklist.
  • Proposed Monitoring Program for SREM parking lots.
  • Recommendations for repairs or maintenance.
  • Time range by which repairs are to be made.
  • Working license this may be necessary.
  • Seal and signature of the supervising QPSI.

Reports describing the same condition at the same location as the SREM cannot be filed for two consecutive filing cycles. If a previous SREM condition remains uncorrected, the QPSI should classify the parking structure as unsafe.

What happens if there is a dangerous condition?

As soon as the QPSI reports an unsafe condition, the owner must take action to protect public safety. This may include cordoning off hazardous areas, erecting sheds and sidewalk fencing, installing safety nets, and starting repair and reinforcement work.

Unsafe conditions must be corrected within 90 days, unless the IQPS determines that it is not possible to do so and indicates a different time frame in the report. Any deviation from this deadline requires supporting documents justifying the change.

Within two weeks of completing the repairs, the QPSI must inspect the garage and file an amended report. The protective measures must remain in place until the report is accepted or the IQPS certifies that the conditions have been corrected and requests the withdrawal.

What about SREM terms?

All conditions described in the report as SREM must be corrected within the time frame recommended by QPSI. Requests for additional time must be accompanied by supporting documents from the IQPS justifying the new time limit.

Within three years of the initial filing, a QPSI must undertake another condition assessment and file an amended report, indicating the extent of ongoing monitoring, the status of conditions identified in the initial report as SREM, and the classification of any new conditions. Prior to the next rating cycle, all SREM conditions must be repaired, as they must be flagged as unsafe if not corrected.

When should reports be completed and filed?

Owners are required to file a report at least once every six years, in the staggered classification windows of the diagram. Reports must be filed within 60 days of the condition assessment.

If the garage is located in a building subject to the Facade Safety Inspection Program (FISP), the owner may choose to change the parking structure rating window to align with the FISP rating window . To do this, the owner must notify the date of birth at least 180 days before the end of the subcycle of the assigned parking structure.

Owners of new garages must maintain a QPSI to file a report six years after the first certificate of occupancy or, if this falls outside the applicable filing window, within the window of the next cycle.
NYC Parking Garage Map Key - Crop
Map of New York City with community districts color-coded to indicate parking structure inspection times.

In addition to required repairs, what should owners do between deposit cycles?

Each year, car parks must be subject to an “annual observation”, based on the checklist prepared by QPSI in the inspection report. The person performing the annual observation is responsible for informing the owner and the DOB of any potentially unsafe condition. Completed annual compliance checklists should be kept on file and made available to the DOB upon request.

What are the penalties for non-compliance?

Late filing carries a heavy penalty of $1,000 per month. Not filing at all earns an extra $5,000 per year, in addition to the late payment penalty of $1,000 per month. Unsafe conditions not corrected within 90 days result in a penalty of $1,000 per month until the condition is corrected and an amended report is filed (unless an extension has been granted). If an owner lets an SREM condition languish and become unsafe in the next cycle, they will face a $2,000 penalty, plus risk further penalties if the condition continues unresolved.

Waivers may be requested where a change in ownership, state of emergency, bankruptcy or demolition prevents compliance.

What is the main takeaway?

If you own a parking structure west or south of Central Park in Manhattan, you need to take immediate action. Garage owners in these districts only have until December 2023 to retain one of the few professional engineers currently certified by the NYC Department of Buildings as a QPSI, then to schedule the inspection and allow time for the QPSI to submit a compliance report.

Garage owners in Upper Manhattan and Brooklyn don’t have much time to waste either, with those districts’ filing period opening in 2024. For all the parking lot owners in the city, it doesn’t hurt plan ahead, as the demand for limited QPSI resources and looming deadlines will likely lead to a last-minute scramble to meet inspection and filing requirements.

Resources

NYC Building Parking Structures Resource Page

Local Law 126 of 2021 – see section 323, p. 229-232

RCNY §103-13: Periodic Inspection of Parking Structures

Hoffmann Architects + Engineers was among the first to have a certified QPSI. We are one of the few currently licensed to perform parking garage inspections under NYC Local Law 126.

Contact us at (212) 789-9915 or hoffarch.com/contact-us.

The material provided is for informational purposes. Before acting, consult a design professional.

Download a PDF of this newsletter here.

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Parking garage

How to Comply with NYC Local Law 126 Parking Garage Inspection Rules | Hoffmann Architects + Engineers

Beginning January 1, 2022, New York City requires garage owners to hire a specially designated professional engineer to perform an assessment and file a report at least once every six years.

Why does the City require parking inspections?

In 2018, New York State enacted a rule requiring periodic condition assessments, performed by a professional engineer, of all parking structures statewide – except in New York City. Exempt from state code, NYC has developed its own rules to keep garages and their outbuildings safe and well maintained. With the passage of Local Law 126 of 2021 and RCNY §103-13, NYC has codified the requirements of this ambitious safety initiative.

Who should perform the inspection?

A Qualified Parking Structures Inspector (QPSI) must assess the garage and file the report. A licensed engineer with at least three years of parking structure experience, a QPSI earns New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) parking structure unit certification.

What is required?

Any motor vehicle parking/storage space, other than an unfenced outdoor lot, 1 or 2 car garage, service station or showroom, must be appraised by a QPSI certified.

  1. Document review. The QPSI reviews previous reports, structural designs, repair drawings, violations, and other records.
  2. Condition assessment. The QPSI designs an assessment program specific to the parking structure, based on construction type, age, exposure and other characteristics, as well as maintenance and repair history. The physical examination may include sounding, load testing, noninvasive scanning, and/or core extraction, in addition to visual inspection. When evaluating structural components, waterproofing, fireproofing, and wear surfaces, the QPSI may need to order additional inspections, probes, or tests to identify probable causes of observed defects.
  3. Immediate response to hazardous conditions. Upon identifying an unsafe condition, the QPSI promptly notifies the owner and the DOB and advises on appropriate protective measures.
  4. Documentation of deficiencies. Photos, sketches or other means are used to identify the location and extent of defects.
  5. Annual observation checklist. When assessing condition, the QPSI creates a checklist with items to inspect on an annual basis, tailored to that specific garage.
  6. The final inspection. In a comprehensive tour of each parking level, the QPSI verifies that the reported results reflect actual conditions.
  7. Filing of report. According to a prescribed format, the QPSI prepares a compliance report with conclusions and recommendations, classifying the garage as safe, dangerous, Where “Safe with repairs and/or technical monitoring” (SREM). The report is filed with the DOB.

What should be included in the report?

According to the code, the report must contain:

  • A summary of conclusions and recommendations.
  • Classification as safe, SREM or dangerous.
  • building address, Block and lot number, building identification number (BIN), landmark status and owner contact details.
  • Description of the building, including size, dimensions, use, age, type of construction, materials and structural systems.
  • Description of any distress, repair or modification.
  • Procedures used in the evaluation of the conditions.
  • Extent and location of physical examinations, contact details of the contractor, a diagram of the location and the date of the assessment.
  • Description, classification and mapping of each significant condition, classifying each as Safe, SREM, or Not Secure.
  • Recommendations for the protection of the public (Hazardous conditions).
  • Photographs SREM and hazardous conditions, combined with location drawings, as well as photos of each elevation and parking level.
  • Evaluation of guardrails and railings for positive security.
  • Causes analysis observed SREM and hazardous conditions.
  • maintenance work up-to-date and a maintenance plan.
  • An annual observation checklist.
  • Proposed Monitoring Program for SREM parking lots.
  • Recommendations for repairs or maintenance.
  • Time range by which repairs are to be made.
  • Working license this may be necessary.
  • Seal and signature of the supervising QPSI.

Reports describing the same condition at the same location as the SREM cannot be filed for two consecutive filing cycles. If a previous SREM condition remains uncorrected, the QPSI should classify the parking structure as unsafe.

What happens if there is a dangerous condition?

As soon as the QPSI reports an unsafe condition, the owner must take action to protect public safety. This may include cordoning off hazardous areas, erecting sheds and sidewalk fencing, installing safety nets, and starting repair and reinforcement work.

Unsafe conditions must be corrected within 90 days, unless the IQPS determines that it is not possible to do so and indicates a different time frame in the report. Any deviation from this deadline requires supporting documents justifying the change.

Within two weeks of completing the repairs, the QPSI must inspect the garage and file an amended report. The protective measures must remain in place until the report is accepted or the IQPS certifies that the conditions have been corrected and requests the removal.

What about SREM terms?

All conditions described in the report as SREM must be corrected within the time frame recommended by QPSI. Requests for additional time must be accompanied by supporting documents from the IQPS justifying the new time limit.

Within three years of the initial filing, a QPSI must undertake another condition assessment and file an amended report, indicating the extent of ongoing monitoring, the status of conditions identified in the initial report as SREM, and the classification of any new conditions. Prior to the next rating cycle, all SREM conditions must be repaired, as they must be flagged as unsafe if not corrected.

When should reports be completed and filed?

Owners are required to file a report at least once every six years, in the staggered classification windows of the scheme. Reports must be filed within 60 days of the condition assessment.

If the garage is located in a building subject to the Facade Safety Inspection Program (FISP), the owner may choose to change the parking structure rating window to align with the FISP rating window . To do this, the owner must notify the date of birth at least 180 days before the end of the subcycle of the assigned parking structure.

Owners of new garages must maintain a QPSI to file a report six years after the first certificate of occupancy or, if this falls outside the applicable filing window, within the window of the next cycle.
NYC Parking Garage Map Key - Crop
Map of New York City with community districts color-coded to indicate parking structure inspection times.

In addition to required repairs, what should owners do between deposit cycles?

Each year, car parks must be subject to an “annual observation”, based on the checklist prepared by QPSI in the inspection report. The person performing the annual observation is responsible for informing the owner and the DOB of any potentially unsafe condition. Completed annual compliance checklists should be kept on file and made available to the DOB upon request.

What are the penalties for non-compliance?

Late filing carries a heavy penalty of $1,000 per month. Not filing at all earns an extra $5,000 per year, in addition to the late payment penalty of $1,000 per month. Unsafe conditions not corrected within 90 days result in a penalty of $1,000 per month until the condition is corrected and an amended report is filed (unless an extension has been granted). If an owner lets an SREM condition languish and become unsafe in the next cycle, they will face a $2,000 penalty, plus risk further penalties if the condition continues unresolved.

Waivers may be requested where a change in ownership, state of emergency, bankruptcy or demolition prevents compliance.

What is the main takeaway?

If you own a parking structure west or south of Central Park in Manhattan, you need to take immediate action. Garage owners in these districts only have until December 2023 to retain one of the few professional engineers currently certified by the NYC Department of Buildings as a QPSI, then to schedule the inspection and allow time for the QPSI to submit a compliance report.

Garage owners in Upper Manhattan and Brooklyn don’t have much time to waste either, with those districts’ filing period opening in 2024. For all the parking lot owners in the city, it doesn’t hurt plan ahead, as the demand for limited QPSI resources and looming deadlines will likely lead to a last-minute scramble to meet inspection and filing requirements.

Resources

NYC Building Parking Structures Resource Page

Local Law 126 of 2021 – see section 323, p. 229-232

RCNY §103-13: Periodic Inspection of Parking Structures

Hoffmann Architects + Engineers was among the first to have a certified QPSI. We are one of the few currently licensed to perform parking garage inspections under NYC Local Law 126.

Contact us at (212) 789-9915 or hoffarch.com/contact-us.

The material provided is for informational purposes. Before acting, consult a design professional.

Download a PDF of this newsletter here.

read more
Parking garage

Foxwoods Casino parking garage sees fire, several burning cars

Posted on: October 11, 2022, 08:54h.

Last update on: October 11, 2022, 08:54h.

Several vehicles in the Foxwoods Resort Casino parking lot in Connecticut caught fire late Tuesday afternoon. There do not appear to have been any injuries. But vehicles were probably damaged by the flames.

Firefighters extinguish a car fire in the Foxwoods Resorts Casino parking lot
Firefighters extinguish a vehicle fire in the Foxwoods Resort Casino parking lot in Connecticut. No injuries were reported. (Image: Sierra Jerz via WJAR)

It is not known what caused the fire. Staff from a local fire marshal’s office were investigating its origin on Tuesday evening.

It appears less than half a dozen cars or SUVs caught fire, based on initial reports. The fire apparently took place on the second level of the Fox Tower garage, according to local media.

Firefighters were able to extinguish the blaze in about 40 to 45 minutes, Mashantucket Pequot Fire Department Chief Floyd Chaney said. The daya local newspaper.

Several garage floors temporarily closed

Several levels of the garage were closed until the fire was brought under control. Foxwoods officials wanted to keep visitors and employees away from areas where there was a risk of danger.

Several local fire departments responded to the garage fire as part of a mutual aid agreement.

Firefighters arrived on the fire around 4 p.m. At 5:29 p.m., firefighters from one of the response services, the Ledyard Fire Company, left the casino complex.

Initial reports do not say if the parking lot was damaged by the flames. The fire did not spread to other casino structures.

Foxwoods Resort Casino is owned and operated by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation. It is located in Ledyard, Conn. The casino is approximately 47 miles southeast of Hartford, Conn.

Previous casino fires

Casinos in other states have also recently experienced fires. For example, in May, a fire broke out in a computer room at the Bay Mills Resort & Casino in Michigan. This led to the tribal gaming property being closed for several days.

The fire caused smoke coming from the ceiling. Major internal systems were damaged.

The fire broke out in a computer room on the first floor. The sprinklers have been activated. The fire was largely extinguished by water from sprinklers.

The gambling property is located in Brimley, Michigan. It is owned and operated by the Bay Mills Indian community.

Elsewhere, in August, a mattress fire in a 10e The downstairs room of the Fremont Hotel in downtown Las Vegas was quickly battled by responding firefighters. No injuries were reported. It took crews three minutes or less to extinguish the fire.

Also, in April, a Bridger, Mont. a fire killed two people at the Honest Toms Saloon & Casino. The Honest Toms fire found Marla Murray, 71, and John Ahles, 33, inside the building. Both were deceased.

Murray was an employee and she was working at the time. Ahles also worked at the casino. But he was off duty that night, MTN Newsa regional news site, said.

Authorities believe the fire was suspicious and an investigation has focused on a possible homicide. The casino has closed.

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Parking spaces

New twist on parking spaces during pandemic reaps benefits

After Toronto allowed some on-street parking spaces on major roads to be used as patios during the pandemic, analysis suggested it generated far more revenue than when they were originally used.Carlos Osorio/The Globe and Mail

When the creators of SimCity designed their virtual world, they realized they couldn’t represent metropolises accurately: there would have to be so many parking lots that the game wouldn’t be fun.

In real cities, the pandemic has shed new light on those acres of urban land, prompting many places to start using space in more valuable ways. Meanwhile, a growing push for sustainability had already sparked new thinking about the vast swathes of land dedicated to car storage.

In a Montreal arena, children are now playing in a space that was once used as a parking lot. Several parking lots in Winnipeg have been transformed into popular beer gardens. A mid-rise wood building is planned to replace a parking lot in downtown Toronto, where space for 37 vehicles is slated to become 100 rental apartments.

But this trend has sometimes progressed haltingly, where big goals have fallen victim to local backlash.

Opinion: How cities have built way too many parking spaces – and made housing even more expensive

Vancouver’s plan to charge more to park the dirtiest vehicles, as part of the city’s response to climate change, failed in a close vote in council last October. Regina recently approved another downtown parking lot. Calgary has announced plans to bar residents of most tall buildings from obtaining on-street parking permits, but recently backtracked in the face of local opposition and will instead charge a fee of up to $150 a year . And Toronto seems ready to keep most on-street parking when Kensington Market is revampeda downtown district that attracts a large number of pedestrians.

However, the larger pattern is a gradual dismantling of the decades-old assumption that more parking is inherently better.

In 2020, Edmonton became the first Canadian city to remove minimum parking requirements on developments. These rules, which require developers to include fixed amounts of parking, are based on pseudo-science rather than rigorous standards, said academic Donald Shoup, author of the founding book The high cost of free parking.

More than a dozen Canadian cities have followed suit, removing parking minimums in at least part of their area, according to a study by advocacy group Strong Towns.

Perhaps the biggest recent shift in attitudes towards parking has been the recognition of the value that can be foregone by using desirable urban real estate as car storage.

After Toronto allowed some on-street parking spaces on major roads to be used as patios during the pandemic, analysis suggested it generated far more revenue than when they were originally used.

COVID-19 has changed public spaces, but many cities have moved backwards

Researchers for an Association of Local Business Improvement Areas estimates customers spent $181 million in the redesigned parking spaces in the summer of 2021. The same spaces would have generated $3.7 million in parking revenue, depending on local parking authorityand even that modest figure assumed pre-pandemic demand levels.

“Sidewalks have long been one of the most important spaces in cities, and at the same time, in many cities they’ve been kind of forgotten as an afterthought, and there’s been a kind of failure to use them to parking,” said Alex Engel, spokesperson for NACTO, an association of urban transportation officials that counts several Canadian cities as members.

Parking in residential areas tends to pay even less.

In Vancouver, only in the city’s west end is the price of a parking permit allowed to increase at the market rate – with current permit holders being spared the increase. In other areas, an annual residential parking pass costs as little as 14 cents per day. And in much of the city, no permits are required.

“New York City may be the poster child for this, with vast areas of very high density and mixed use, but free street parking,” said Paul Barter, consultant and founder of the blog and podcast. Reinvent parking.

“People are screaming blue murder: ‘You’re stealing our precious parking spaces.’ The irony is that these ‘precious spaces’ are free. If they are so valuable, why are they free?”

Making public space available for much less than the equivalent real estate cost in expensive cities creates perverse incentives: for most residents, it is much cheaper to fill their garage with stuff and leave the car on the street than to rent a storage unit.

And the unrealized value of a parking space can also be measured in a less financial way.

An April council vote in Toronto approving mid-rise wooden apartment buildings in this downtown parking lot – more than half of which will be affordable – was part of a larger campaign to transform the parking lot in places of entertainment, parks and cultural sites.

“Parking continues to play a role, but not like it did in the 1950s, so now is an opportunity to think about other city-building goals,” said former councilor Joe Cressy, who represented the region at the time of the vote.

“The central element here is to determine what is the greatest value for the city, in terms of assets. And affordable housing and sustainability are a more important value than parking. »

This same shift in thinking has taken place in Regina – at least in theory. Restaurants have been allowed to set up patios in the curb lane to help them weather the pandemic. Minimum parking requirements are being waived for downtown development, where the city hopes to encourage density and stimulate anemic population growth.

But parking remains sacred to many Regina council members. At the end of last month, council voted to explore requiring more parking for certain types of development. And earlier in September, council approved without debate a bylaw amendment allowing another parking lot in the city center, where almost half of the private land is already used as parking.

“It still feels like we’re doing 1950s planning,” said Vanessa Mathews, associate professor in the University of Regina’s Department of Geography and Environmental Studies. “You end up with streets made up mostly of parking lots that don’t add any kind of vibrancy or interest. It’s definitely not sustainable.

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Parking garage

Kalispell approves eight-story parking garage project

A proposal to build an eight-story, $9.2 million parking garage with 78 multi-family units and commercial space moves forward in Kalispell after City Council Oct. 3 approved multiple resolutions and a conditional use permit who will support the project, despite the opposition of some residents and merchants.

The board passed a developer agreement and transfer of two city-owned properties on Third Street West and Main Street and the southeast corner of First Street West and First Avenue West to the developer, Montana Hotel Development Partners LLC. He also approved a lease of a parking structure and a conditional use permit that will allow the height of the parking garage to exceed 60 feet.

In an 8-to-1 vote, the Developer’s Agreement and the two Land Transfer Resolutions passed with Councilman Ryan Hunter in opposition. The conditional use permit and the rental contract are adopted unanimously.

The 242-space parking structure will be built in the Eagles’ current parking lot at the southeast corner of West First Street and West First Avenue, part of a multimillion-dollar project by 86,000 square feet called Charles Hotel. which will be built at the corner of Third Street West and Main Street.

The hotel will generate significant tax revenue for the city. While the parking lot will be fully funded and built by the developer, the city will reimburse the cost of the properties using TIF funds generated from hotel revenue.

Although nearly all Councilors supported the project, Councilor Hunter did not support the details of the developer agreement or the land transfers.

“I could support a developer deal, having a new hotel and downtown accommodations is great, but I just can’t support this developer deal because of the amount of unnecessary government subsidies given to the developer,” said Hunter.

Several members of the public, including residents, business owners and employees of nonprofit organizations, spoke out against the project, who said the proposal was rushed, there was little public involvement and that the architectural design would ruin the historic character of Kalispell. Many were also concerned that the additional density of hotels and housing would reduce total parking, despite the addition of the parking garage.

Charles Hotel. Rendered courtesy of A&E Design

Employees of the Community Action Partnership of Northwest Montana (CAPNM) said the construction of the Charles Hotel, which is near the nonprofit, will disrupt services and leave staff and guests nowhere to go. to park.

“We operate a large number of services, we serve more than 5,000 households a year, and many households are disabled and disabled or elderly,” said CAPNM Executive Director Tracy Diaz. “We will lose our disabled parking spaces to the Charles during construction.”

Diaz was also frustrated because she said CAPNM “was never part of the discussion.”

Bill Goldberg, owner of Compass Construction and one of the development partners of Montana Hotel Developers, applauded city staff for their work on the public-private partnership and reiterated that the public has many opportunities to participate in discussions. since the proposal was submitted to the city last year.

“You’ve had these meetings for a while now and hearing some people say they weren’t invited to the meetings shocked me,” Goldberg said.

“It’s an open door,” he added. “Yes, I have a direct interest for my project and for my investors but it is also for the city of Kalispell. The platform has been established for quite some time to have these discussions. We opened the door several times for several groups.

Other members of the public criticized the design of the parking garage.

“Eight stories taller than any other downtown structure and doesn’t match the character of downtown,” said John Hinchey, a Kalispell resident who has restored historic buildings in the city.

“I am also opposed to the use of TIF funds for the benefit of a private developer,” he added.

Principal Planner PJ Sorensen said that although the site is located in the downtown historic district, it is outside the Main Street Historic District and said the design meets architectural review standards.

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Parking garage

Boise Fire puts out a car fire in a downtown parking lot

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The Boise Fire Department responds to a fire in the first floor garage of the CW Moore Apartments in downtown Boise on Thursday.

[email protected]

Boise firefighters extinguished a car fire Thursday night after receiving reports of a structural fire at the CW Moore Apartments building in downtown Boise.

Three fire engines and emergency medical crews were on scene at 5th and Main streets shortly after the blaze was reported around 5:30 p.m. The Boise Fire Department evacuated residents, found the problem and extinguished the fire within an hour.

BOI_1096_02_Carfiredowntown
Residents and their pets return to the CW Moore Apartments in downtown Boise after a car fire in the first floor parking lot was put out by the Boise Fire Department on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Sarah A .Miller [email protected]

Boise Fire Captain Chris Campbell said there were no injuries. He told the Idaho Statesman that an investigation is ongoing and the cause of the car fire is still unknown.

“We are trying to get in touch with the owner. It was an older model Buick sedan,” Campbell said.

BOI_1096_03_Carfiredowntown
Boise Fire Services respond to a burning car in the first floor garage of the CW Moore Apartments in downtown Boise on Thursday, October 6, 2022. Sarah A. Miller [email protected]

Richard Peebly, a resident of the CW Moore Apartments, said he left his residence as soon as he smelled burning rubber and saw smoke outside his window.

“We were upstairs and saw firefighters going door to door, so I grabbed my cats and ran outside,” Peebly said.

Idaho Statesman Related Stories

Mia covers the latest news for the Idaho statesman. She is originally from Idaho and recently graduated from the College of Idaho. Previously, she was an intern at the Idaho Capital Sun where she covered housing issues and minority affairs. She started at Statesman in August 2022.
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Parking garage

An evolving parking garage proposal

Through a public-private partnership between the City of Kalispell and local developers, a proposed $9.2 million eight-story public parking lot that would include 78 multi-family units and 6,200 square feet of commercial space continues to see changes as he works his way through the city council.

If approved, the parking structure will be built on the existing Eagles parking lot property at the southeast corner of First Street West and First Avenue West, which is owned by the City, and will require a transfer of property on which the city council voted after the Beacon was printed on October 3.

Initially, the parking lot was to remain the property of the city, but following changes over the past few months, the development company, Montana Hotel Development Partners, has offered to take ownership of the structure. With the transfer of ownership, the city will no longer be responsible for the maintenance of the garage.

The development of the parking structure is part of a multi-million dollar project in the city called the Charles Hotel, which as proposed is an 86,000 square foot boutique hotel at the corner of Third Street West and Main Street and will generate significant tax revenue. for the city.

While the parking lot will be fully funded and built by the developer, the city is offering to reimburse the cost of the property using TIF funds generated from hotel revenue.

The Charles Hotel and Eagles lot development projects were formally presented to Kalispell City Council last year as part of the Town Center Urban Renewal Plan. In December 2020, city staff announced a request for proposals (RFP) to develop the city parking lot as an avenue to encourage downtown development while adding more parking spaces to the city. After the July 2021 deadline, Montana Hotel Development Partners submitted the only proposal.

“That was the vision set out in the Town Center Urban Renewal Plan,” Kalispell Development Services Director Jarod Nygren told a town council business session in September. “This particular developer brought it to light. I don’t think anyone could have imagined exactly what would happen, but definitely when you start talking about funding parking, you have to get creative. »

Since the company’s original proposal, several changes have been added to the projects, including the transfer of the Eagles lot to private ownership, the addition of a housing component, and the application for a conditional use permit to allow to the height of the building to be greater than 60 feet.

“There have been some changes related to private development funding, which was a requirement of this initial project,” City Manager Doug Russell said. “But without ownership, it was difficult to get funding tied to that.”

Since the parking garage will likely become private property, the city is no longer required to manage or maintain the facility. The developers plan to lease 90 private parking spaces to generate revenue for maintenance.

“It’s no longer a burden on the city,” Russell said. “The changes that are being made make it a better project than what was put on those early development agreements.”

The project has drawn fierce criticism from members of the public and some councillors, who say the project developers should have been more transparent while giving more opportunities for the public to have a say in the parking aspect.

Some local business owners are concerned that the 242-space car park is not managed to meet parking needs for the general public.

“If you look at the lease as it’s currently written, it says there will be public parking, but there’s no guarantee that they will or how it’s going to be administered,” said the owner of the Kalispell Grand Hotel, John Barr. “There needs to be parking provided for all business customers in Kalispell town center or it won’t work. No one will invest money in downtown Kalispell if you don’t have parking.

City staff reiterated that the parking garage would be public and while details surrounding public and private spaces have yet to be determined, the facility would provide additional parking for the city that would not otherwise be possible.

“The parking structure wouldn’t exist without private development,” Russell said.

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Parking spaces

SoMa 23 Memphis residents frustrated with lack of parking

Residents of SoMa 23 apartments say the building’s parking lot is overcapacity and their frustration is growing.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Lease prices are rising everywhere the country and here in Memphis.

In addition to rent, many are paying even more for parking than they all expected to pay because where they live there is not enough space for everyone.

“There’s not enough room. They have to do something,” said Kevius Leonard.

Residents of SoMa 23 apartments say the building’s parking lot is overcapacity and their frustration is growing.

“We get tickets to park on the street for a place we’re staying, and my grandmother has lived here for over 10 years,” said one resident.

Residents have permits to park in the resort lot, but say they often can’t find a space and are forced to park on the street. AAs a result, renters receive lots of tickets and in some cases towing, which can cost up to $160.

RELATED: Remaining emergency rental assistance available in Shelby County

RELATED: Above Ground Garden Coming to North Memphis

Although this is a problem, it may not be the building’s fault. Shelby County Code Enforcement requires that each single-family unit in a complex have at least one parking space and that two-family units have at least two spaces.

However, aapartments built before the rule came into force about a decade ago are exempt.

This would include the nearly 90-unit SoMa 23 apartments which were built in 1947.

Residents say management is working to secure a contract with the University of Tennessee to use their nearby parking lot.

ABC24 has reached out to the building’s management company for comment, but we haven’t heard back yet.

RELATED: ‘Keys to Life’ | New after-school program teaching trades to high school students

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Parking garage

Kalispell Council Approves Town Center Parking Garage Project


After hearing several comments from 11 a.m. that the eight-story building goes against the historic character of the area, Kalispell City Council reached the agreement on a parking lot for the town center on Monday.

The Board approved a slate of agreements with Montana Hotel Development Partners for the parking garage which also includes commercial space and multi-family housing, and approved the associated transfer of a lot to the same company for construction of the Charles hotel.

Prior to the votes, Council heard from about a dozen people expressing concerns about the parking garage proposal, which has been under discussion for several months. Some expressed concern about the parking being moved during construction while others said they were not in favor of including market priced accommodation, but the main objection came from the overall height of the building eight floors.

John Hinchey, who has restored several downtown buildings, said the parking lot exceeds the height of any structure in the neighborhood and is very different from the originally proposed four-story building which only provided parking.

“I’m not opposed to the original four-story parking garage, but I’m opposed to the eight-story residential building,” he said.

Mayre Flowers of Citizens for a Better Flathead told the Council that it would be in Kalispell’s interest to keep the four-storey building.

“Deny [this] will tell those who have invested in historic downtown Kalispell and those who may choose to invest in downtown Kalispell in the future that while building density…may be appropriate in other areas of our community that the downtown historic area is an area where out-of-scale and unnecessary height requests will not be accommodated,” she said.

Laura Reynolds questioned the use of municipal tax increase (TIF) funding funds to reimburse the city for the cost of the land transferred to the developer for the garage and hotel, and the $9.2 million in TIF dollars intended for the construction of the car park.

“It seems like the cost of this project is too high – the land donation, plus the TIF, plus the destroyed historic character of the downtown core, plus the outraged neighbors and outraged public, it all seems like too much of a cost,” she says.

STILL COUNCIL has approved several agreements with Montana Hotel Development Partners to transform the parking lot at First Street West and First Avenue West into a 240-space parking lot, as well as 6,200 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor. The project also includes 78 residential units on the upper four floors.

Council has also approved a conditional use permit for the parking garage and this will allow the building to be built over 60 feet in height. The building is planned to be 88 feet tall.

He also approved the transfer of city-owned land at Third Street West and Main Street to developers for construction of the Charles Hotel.

Councilor Sid Daoud said the project is doing a good job using TIF funds to revitalize the town centre.

“I’m in favor of this because it converts government parking lots that waste us money into entities that are going to fuel the economy,” he said.

Many housing projects come to council and are criticized because people don’t want them in their own neighborhood, he added.

“We have a huge need for housing,” Daoud said. “It may not be low income or low labor, but every available unit helps solve our overall housing problem. The housing component is amazing that the developer put it in there. “

Councilor Ryan Hunter, who voted against several agreements, again expressed his displeasure with parts of the project.

“Having parking and housing downtown is good, but I just can’t support this development because of the amount of public subsidies going into it,” he said.

Several councilors said the height of the building provides an advantage to the city by keeping development at the core and helping to reduce urban sprawl.

The projects resulted from a city request for proposals to redevelop the Main Street lot. Developers submitted plans for the Charles Hotel for the land and since the hotel requires valet parking, the company also proposed building a parking lot approximately two blocks north of First Avenue West and First West Street.

Earlier this year, developers returned with a modification to the parking garage seeking to add accommodation to the project.

The city is ready to reimburse the developer for the construction of the public car park from the TIF funds generated by the Charles Hotel and the development of the car park.

The parking garage will be owned and operated by the developer, but leased to the city.

As part of the parking agreement, the developer will be required to provide a first right of refusal to current parking permit holders for parking in the garage.

Council also approved a resolution that temporarily removes the two-hour parking restrictions on Second Street and Fourth Street in effect when parking permit holders are relocated due to garage and hotel construction.

Managing Editor Heidi Desch can be reached at 758-4421 or [email protected]

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Parking garage

Western Massachusetts firefighters gather at McKay Street parking lot for rescue training | Local News

PITTSFIELD — In the back of the McKay Street parking garage, you might find a few firefighters hanging around Tuesday morning…literally.

Hanging from bungee cords and harnesses that stretch over the side of the building at 55 Depot St., they practice rescue efforts to help them rescue someone from a ledge, a tight spot or a deep hole. Somehow they are learning the ropes now.







Technical ropes practice

Firefighters from four western Massachusetts counties practice rescue techniques Tuesday at the McKay Street parking lot in Pittsfield.



About 30 firefighters from four counties and 20 departments in western Massachusetts participated in the training, including the Pittsfield and North Adams Fire Departments. The members present are part of the Western Massachusetts Technical Rescue Team, a regional group of firefighters trained and equipped for rescue efforts.

This is one of their monthly trainings, each focusing on a different rescue scenario or skill. Their job is to prepare for “low frequency, high risk” scenarios. Part of this includes preparing to use new equipment, such as harnesses and ropes, provided by Department of Homeland Security grants.

Daryl Springman, director of the Western Massachusetts Technical Rescue Team, said the team chose the McKay Street parking lot to practice high-angle rope techniques.

“This location was ideal for us because we can easily walk up and quickly get people to each position,” Springman said.







technical rescue techniques

Firefighters from four western Massachusetts counties practice rescue techniques Tuesday in the McKay Street parking garage in Pittsfield.



“Each post” means having firefighters stationed on the upper floors of the parking lot, all the way to the fourth floor, guiding each other through simulated rescues. One member of the team will deposit in “the basket”, a titanium stretcher for the vertical transport of patients which can be attached to a system of pulleys, while another serves as a “dustbin”.

The litter assistant’s job is to keep the patient calm and help maneuver the basket around any obstacles as they ascend the structure. In one exercise, they strive to keep the basket – and the patient – horizontal as they climb. In another, they are preparing to move it into tight spaces.







truck climbing equipment

A bumper hitch is used as a belay device during technical ropes training in Pittsfield on Tuesday for the Western Massachusetts Technical Rescue Team.



The technical rescue team remains ready for any “large-scale incident,” Springman said. This means preparation for rescue from water, trenches, tightly confined spaces, towers and structural collapse.

A basic skill for any situation, however, is rope handling. Working out in the McKay Street parking lot might not look the same as working out on a skyscraper, but functionally it’s more similar than you might think.

“It doesn’t matter if it’s 20 feet or 100 feet, the technique is always the same,” Springman said.







firefighters train with rescue ropes

Firefighters from four western Massachusetts counties practice rescue techniques Tuesday in the McKay Street parking garage in Pittsfield.



The team also provided training on wind turbines in Florida, Becket’s Quarries, and campus buildings at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Ultimately, the training helps prepare firefighters for the real world. With this knowledge and practice, helping to guide those they rescue through the event goes hand in hand.

“Our members being very proficient in their skills instills confidence in our patients that we are going to get them out safely,” Springman said.

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Parking facilities

Lack of car parks at metro stations dampens commuters

The Metro Rail received a big boost from citizens on Sunday when 45,000 of them made the journey between Thaltej and Kalupur, just for fun. However, the lack of parking infrastructure at metro stations may discourage people from using it daily. BRTS continues to suffer from the lack of car parks near bus stations.
Mirror followed the metro route between Kalupur station and Thaltej and found that there was no parking space for cars or two-wheelers at Stadium Crossroads, Commerce Six Roads, Gurukul, Doordarshan and Thaltej. It is possible to park two-wheelers only at the Kalupur metro station.
Metro Rail chief executive SS Rathore told Mirror: “The very purpose of Metro is to reduce the number of vehicles on the roads. It will be defeated if commuters bring their own vehicles to stations. Globally, the concept of metro is to reduce traffic congestion. We have metro stations every 1-1.2 km and our catchment area is 600 meters from metro stations.
Additionally, there are two points where the route coincides with BRTS that can be used for connectivity.

Kalupur No dedicated parking space

There is enough space for
park the two-wheelers but no
dedicated area. The parked bicycles and scooters mostly belong to metro staff. A Metro staff member at the control room said: ‘There was excitement in the air on Sunday. But on day 2, few people travel by metro because there are no parking spaces near the stations.
Asif Shaikh, 31, who works in Gheekanta and was traveling by metro to experience it for the first time, said: “Without a parking space, people are unlikely to take the metro every day to work. “.

Sardar Patel Stadium No parking
There were only seven commuters at the station, mostly students. The cars parked outside at the roadside belonged to visitors from a local diagnostic center or other businesses. Station manager Pathak said, “There is no parking space at the moment. It can be created later. »
Nirav Patel (49), a civil engineer and resident of Usmanpura, said, “I came by rickshaw from Usmanpura because I wanted to experience the subway ride. Without parking space, it will be difficult for metro authorities to attract commuters in large numbers on a daily basis.

Thaltej No parking space
The metro departure point to the west lacks parking spaces. Vehicles were parked on the road in front of the subway station stairs.
Anurag Malkani (19), a physiotherapy student traveling for the first time by metro, said: “A secure parking space is essential if you want regular commuters. This should have been pre-planned by Metro Rail authorities.

Gujarat Uni No parking space
The security guard pointed to the sidewalk and under the stairs leading to the Metro Rail where several two-wheelers were parked, mostly by Metro employees. He said cars will have to park on the streets.
Maulik Shah (43), a businessman said, “I am residing in Odhav and had taken the metro from Nirat Park station. “There is no parking space either at Nirat Park or Gujarat University. This is a big downside.”

Gurukul No parking space
The path under the station was crowded with two-wheelers and cars. Without dedicated security for parked vehicles, commuters would find it difficult to leave their vehicle behind and take the subway.
Rushank Shah (42), a resident of Naranpura, had come for a ride on the subway. He had parked his vehicle under the station. “Most people will reach the subway station with some type of vehicle. Parking lots should be built with adequate security if they are to be used by office workers on a daily basis.

Commerce Six Roads No Parking Space
The main road in front of the Metro Rail stairs was full of commuter vehicles with no passenger space. The security guard was seen lifting the two-wheelers to make room for people to enter the subway.
There are hospitals, businesses, shops and offices on the road, each competing for road space.
Sandip Desai (25), an Odhav resident whose workplace is at Swastik Crossroads, said, “I took the train from Vastral to Commerce Six Roads. There is open land that can be used at Vastral for parking but it is not for Metro Rail alone. There is no parking space on Commerce Six roads. I will hesitate to park my vehicle here as it is on the road and there is no security.”

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Parking garage

Town center car park subject to Kalispell council vote


Several votes surrounding a planned downtown parking lot are heading to Kalispell City Council on Monday evening.

The city is seeking to enter into agreements with Montana Hotel Development Partners to convert a parking lot at First Street West and First Avenue West into a parking lot with commercial space. The project includes multi-family housing.

The meeting begins at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall, 201 First Avenue East.

Council is also set to vote on transferring city-owned land at Third Street West and Main to developers for construction of the Charles Hotel.

The projects stem from a city request for proposals to redevelop the Main Street lot. Developers submitted plans for the Charles Hotel for the land and since the hotel requires valet parking, the company also proposed building a parking lot about two blocks north on First Avenue West and First West Street. The hotel project requires the provision of parking at its request for 90 places.

The parking garage is expected to have approximately 240 parking spaces on four levels with 6,200 square feet of commercial use on the ground floor. Seventy-eight apartments are planned on the upper floors.

The city proposes to reimburse the developer for the construction of the public parking lot from the tax increase financing funds generated by the Charles Hotel and the development of the parking lot.

The parking component of the project is estimated at $9.2 million. The parking garage will be owned and operated by the developer, but leased to the city.

Council will need to approve the public parking lot development agreement, the public parking structure rental agreement and the land transfer.

In addition, council will vote on an application for a conditional use permit for the parking structure and for an additional height of more than 60 feet for the building. The city has no height limit, but any building over 60 feet requires a CUP.

It is proposed that the parking garage be eight stories or approximately 88 feet high.

In a related move, Council is set to consider a resolution that would temporarily remove two-hour parking restrictions on Second Street and Fourth Street effective when parking permit holders are moved due to construction on the garage and hotel parking lots.

AFTER A LOT debate, Council is finally set to vote on a plan that would open up tax-increase financing (TIF) funds to be made available for projects with workforce housing.

Kalispell plans to update two of its urban renewal plans to allow TIF funds to go to housing projects. Developers could apply for funds to help with labor housing for households earning between 80% and 120% of the region’s average median income.

Currently, a developer could ask the city to have TIF funds directed toward a project’s infrastructure costs, but the change would allow a developer to apply for funds specifically to reduce the cost of rent.

In previous discussions, the Board was split on the issue, with some wanting broader revenue guidance, while others said the change was unnecessary. Last month, Council heard from experts on affordable housing. They told the Council that more help is needed for those earning less than 80% and encouraged the Council to look further into issues surrounding housing.

Now City Manager Doug Russell and Director of Developmental Services Jarod Nygren are recommending that council scrap the changes. In a memo to Council, they note that several comments were received centered on housing affordability issues in the Valley as a whole, but there were no comments in support of the changes currently proposed.

“With the conflict demonstrated and the opinions that have emerged by simply proposing and discussing this amendment, moving forward with the proposal or iterations of the proposal would likely facilitate further unnecessary conflict,” the memo reads. “As such, the recommendation is to suspend discussion of this topic until there is further agreement on the variables and appropriate uses around the provision of tax increment funding in a respective county.”

ALSO ON on the agenda, the council will study two annexation requests for properties wishing to be connected to municipal services.

Loucas Scholer and Sarah Russell are asking to annex two separate but adjacent properties at 2150 and 2152 Airport Road to allow the properties to connect to city water due to a failing well.

Green Acres Cooperative applied to annex the property at 171 South Woodland Drive for the mobile home community. Most of the 32 mobile homes on the property are already connected to the city sewer, and the annexation allows the remaining homes to connect, as well as improving the sewer infrastructure currently serving the site.

Spartan Holdings has submitted a final approval request for Eagle Valley Ranch Phases 2 and 3. The phases contain 67 single-family lots, two multi-family lots and 14 office lots. The subdivision is generally located along US 93 south of the Ponderosa residential subdivision, east of the Northern Pines Golf Course, and north of the Montana National Guard facilities.

Council approved the preliminary flat for the development in February 2019.

Managing Editor Heidi Desch can be reached at 758-4421 or [email protected]

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