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A car park close to becoming a reality in Fondren

The developers of a 500-space parking lot, 200 apartments, and possibly some retail and dining spaces in Jackson’s Fondren neighborhood have taken a small step forward in their mixed-use project.

Jason Watkins, one of the developers involved, said the project will strengthen the economic center of Fondren.

The plan addresses parking and housing, which are important to the continued success of Fondren’s business district, and does more, said Rebecca Garrison, executive director of Fondren Renaissance.

“It extends the footprint of the business district to the west where there are more opportunities for residential and mixed-use redevelopment,” she said.

The City of Jackson Planning Board recommended at its July 27 meeting that City Council approve the rezoning of 3012, 3016, 3024, 3032, 3038, and 3046 Oxford Ave. and 510, 518 and 524 Mitchell Ave. in Urban Town Center. Current zoning ranges from R-4 to Village Urbain.

The planning board also recommended that the council grant a special use permit for the nine parcels on Oxford Avenue and Mitchell Avenue plus 3009 N. State Street.

City Council will vote on the planning board’s recommendation at its August 15 meeting.

Watkins, one of the developers who is part of Whitney Place LLC, said the zoning change would align this stretch along Oxford Avenue and Mitchell Avenue with the Urban Downtown zoning designation for the rest of the center. – town of Fondren. “It would give us a set of (zoning) rules to follow,” he said.

Whitney Place LLC owns or has all nine buildings under contract, Watkins said. All are currently rental duplexes, some vacant and some rented. Rental duplexes represent a change from the days when structures were owner-occupied and primarily single-family dwellings.

Architects are still determining where the apartments would be located on the site, but some of those duplexes could be demolished, Watkins said.

“It really depends on what architects and apartment developers come up with as the best layout,” he said.

The apartments, which would be on par with the District Lofts, The Quarter House and the Meridian, will be built by an as-yet-unnamed developer, he said. “I think we should be able to announce apartment details shortly after the city council vote on rezoning,” Watkins said.

The Planning Board also recommended that a use permit be granted for a parking garage which the developers, consisting of Watkins, David Pharr and several others, plan to build behind the Fondren Strip on North State Street. The strip includes the Capri Theatre, Pearl tiki bar and Highball Lanes and other businesses.

Construction is expected to begin at the parking lot in late fall, assuming materials are available, Watkins said. It is expected to be partially open by spring 2023 and complete by next summer.

The parking lot, whose construction is estimated at 13 million dollars, is in the design phase.

Senate Bill 3150 authorized up to $20 million in bonds to be issued by the Hinds County Development Project Loan Fund “to assist in the development and construction of infrastructure improvements, including structured parking , and other enhancements associated with an entertainment development project”.

“The leadership of the state — the governor and the speaker of the House of Representatives — led it that way,” Watkins said. “They saw the need for this garage. It was their choice to help him in this way.

In February, the Hinds County Board of Supervisors approved the garage’s general concept and voted to move forward with the legislation.

“We have a few loose ends with the county regarding the structure of the loan agreement,” he said. “After that, the design phase will begin, and then construction, which will take six to nine months.”

Hinds County will own the garage once it is completed, Watkins said.

“It will be the county’s long-term asset,” he said. “We have no interest in owning the garage.”

Plans call for a professional management company to lease and operate the garage, Watkins said. As is the case in many cities, drivers will pay a fee to park in the garage.

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Demolition approved for Amsterdam Riverfront Center car park – The Daily Gazette

AMSTERDAM – Plans to demolish the Amsterdam Riverfront Center parking garage to make way for ground floor parking and storefront entrances have been approved by the Planning Commission despite concerns over the unknown condition of the walls of the shopping center which will be exposed.

Plans call for the demolition of the 48,000 square foot parking garage at the southwest corner of the mall owned by Cranesville Properties and managing member Joseph Tesiero. The basement of the existing three-storey structure will be filled in to create the surface for an 80-space level parking lot.

The parking area will span approximately 36,200 square feet, covering approximately 75% of the just over one acre space. The lot will be accessible by car from Washington Street, which winds its way around the back of the mall.

Landscaping will be installed around the perimeter of the land with several patches of grass within. A sidewalk from the south end of the mall will cross the center of the lot and connect to an existing public walkway behind the property.

The concrete corner parking lot slated for demolition is a separate structure from the rest of the mall, Owen Speulstra, lead site civil engineer for CT Male Associates, told the Planning Commission on Wednesday.

The surrounding mall rooftop parking areas will remain intact, including the section carrying the walkway to Riverlink Park. A sloping driveway leading from the new parking lot to the southernmost rooftop parking area will be installed.

The project aims to help attract new tenants to the southwest section of the mall by allowing the installation of individual storefront entrances on the ground floor along the exterior walls that will be exposed. The shopping center is mainly used for medical premises and offices.

The timing and specific design of entries would depend on the needs of individual tenants as leases are secured, Speulstra acknowledged.

‘There are no particular tenants now, so a doctor might not want a front bay window and a shop would. There might be different considerations for different tenants,” Speulstra said.

Plans to initially paint the uncovered masonry walls to match the colors of the surrounding shopping center until the available spaces are gradually filled and individual storefronts are installed created unease within the Planning Commission.

“I’m concerned about the aesthetics of it,” said chairman Paul Gavry.

Amanda Bearcroft, director of Amsterdam’s community and economic development department, pointed out that the tentative plans to simply paint the walls without any other treatment fell short of the design standards of the city’s form-based code.

The city could trade one horror for another since the condition of the walls will not be known until the parking lot is demolished, Bearcroft added.

“Now we don’t have to look at an abandoned parking lot when you come to town, but now we might be looking at an even worse wall,” Bearcroft said.

The parking lot was closed to the public after it was declared unsafe due to failing structural components by former Amsterdam Fire Chief Michael Whitty on January 3, 2019. Cranesville Properties were commissioned to repair or remove the structure, but the demolition plans are the first steps. taken to finally remedy the unhealthy structure.

Housing inspector Grant Egelston pointed out that council approval of the plans would technically give the owners a year to complete the demolition and update the building’s facade with the planned entrances. The approval would simply expire if none of the work is done or code violations could be issued if the facade work is only partially done.

Recognizing the varied needs of future tenants, Egelston suggested the commission could allow housing inspectors to internally review individual driveway plans when building permits are sought to ensure they are up to code.

“I can see some flexibility with showcases because things change,” he said.

If the project with the facade work is not completed within a year, Egelston said Cranesville Properties could potentially request a one-year extension to avoid receiving violations from the city.

“I could see it becoming a problem if it all came to a halt, but as long as there’s progress and it’s being actively worked on, we shouldn’t see a problem,” Egelston said.

The Planning Commission unanimously approved the site plan application for the demolition of the parking garage at the Riverfront Center and the installation of surface parking provided that the improvements to the facade of the building comply to the form-based code under review by city housing inspectors. Tesiero indicated earlier this week that the demolition could be carried out later this year.

Contact Ashley Onyon at [email protected] or @AshleyOnyon on Twitter.

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Categories: Fulton Montgomery Schoharie, News, Other

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Vail Village Parking Lot Gets New Art Installations

Visitors admire the myriad of nest boxes in “We All Build Nests,” one of four works donated by the Logans.
Ben Roof/Daily Special

Four new art sculptures were installed in Vail Village this summer, thanks to a generous donation from local art collectors Kent and Vicki Logan. Each of the sculptures was hand-selected by the Logans from their extensive private art collection, which specializes in contemporary works by modern artists.

The pieces celebrate a connection to nature, with a strong focus on indigenous artists and art forms.

All of the new sculptures have been installed around the Vail Village parking lot, where visitors will encounter them as they enter and exit the village. Molly Eppard, coordinator of Art in Public Places, said these new works by the Logans help Vail elevate its collection and expand its artistic presence beyond what is normally expected of a ski resort.



Art in Public Places recently installed descriptive plaques at the base of each sculpture to help provide context about the artists and their works, and will add the latest acquisitions to the interactive ART in Vail map on ArtInVail.com soon.

We all build nests

The most significant new installation is a sculpture by Jason Middlebrook entitled “We All Build Nests”, created in 2014-2015. Middlebrook conceptualized the piece while staying in Vail with the Logans and noticing the many species of birds that inhabit the valley.



The sculpture is made up of dozens of birdhouses, each matching the sizing specifications of a local bird species so they can be used as living spaces. Each birdhouse is designed to mimic an iconic architectural structure, and those viewing the artwork can spend time identifying sites from around the world such as the Egyptian pyramids, the Roman Pantheon, an Arctic igloo, a Native American teepee and many more. others.

The grouping of birdhouses atop a pole-like base is meant to mimic the shape of an aspen tree, giving the whimsical concept a root in a natural environment.

“We All Build Nests” is set up directly in front of the Vail Village parking lot, across from the covered bridge bus stop. Eppard said he chose the location because it allows viewers to view the work from all angles and heights, thanks to the staircase that wraps around the work. With so many separate birdhouses in one piece, each angle reveals a different collection of houses, and seeing the work from above, below, and at eye level makes it easy to notice and appreciate them.



“Killer Whale Totem”

Looking at the parking lot from East Meadow Drive, if you go up the left side of the stairs you will come across the “Killer Whale Totem”, a bronze sculpture by Native American sculptor Preston Singletary.

Singletary, a Seattle-based artist, is a member of the Pacific Northwest Tlingit tribe. His eight-foot-tall “Killer Whale Totem” depicts his clan’s crest, the killer whale, in the center. The eagle at the top of the totem is the symbol of Singletary’s half or family group, and the red thunderbird in the center represents David Svenson, one of his mentors. At the bottom is a drawing of a wolf, which was the original half of the Tlingit tribe before being replaced by the Eagle.

“Killer Whale Totem” replaced Robert Tully’s sculpture, which is now moved across the street.
Ben Roof/Daily Special

The Logans are among the leading patrons of contemporary Native American art and help local museums and curators, including the Denver Art Museum, place greater emphasis on modern ingenious artists.

The ‘Killer Whale Totem’ replaced the Robert Tully sculpture that stood in its place, which is now moved across the street, right next to the bus stop. Eppard said Tully’s 1999 sculpture, “Branching Pattern,” blended into the rocky background and could be best appreciated in its new location.

‘Waqui Totem USA (Urban Class Mark V)

Directly in front, on the right side of the central staircase, is another totem created by Brad Kahlhamer.

Kahlhamer is of Native American descent, but was adopted by German-American parents. Kahlamer’s birth records were sealed, which cut him off from information about his Native American ancestry, and he uses art as an exploration of what he calls the “third place” – the meeting point of his two personal stories.

“Waqui Totem USA (Urban Class Mark V)” is one of many milestones Kahlamer has taken on this journey of self-discovery, a milestone that can be mirrored in Vail and all Western communities on ancient native lands.

Kahlamer’s work explores his personal history as a Native American adopted by German-American parents.
Ben Roof/Daily Special

The totem, made in 2008, was originally made of cardboard, but is now cast in bronze and stands 10 feet tall next to the staircase. Eppard said the location was chosen because it creates a natural triangulation with the works of Singletary and Middlebrook, but also because the totem had to face west as part of its spiritual essence.

The sculpture was commissioned as an original piece by the Logans, who have become close friends with Kahlamer, and are now finding a permanent home in the city of Vail.

“Two Ships (Unpacked)”

The fourth and final piece in the Logans’ donation is a large bronze sculpture by Durango-born artist Nathan Mabry, located on the far left of the parking lot, next to Solaris Vail.

Mabry draws his influence for his characters from archaeological and historical sources, ranging from ancient civilization to popular culture. The figure of “Two Vessels” comes from those used in the fertility rites of Jalisco in Mexico, placed in a position that instantly evokes links with “The Thinker” by Auguste Rodin.

The sculptural, totem-like style and intense facial expression contrast with the minimalist base of the box, and Kent Logan said he wanted the contemplative nature of the piece to make people stop and think.

“It defies the senses,” Kent Logan told the Vail Daily after finalizing the donation in December. “I like a lot of different decorative arts, but they don’t make you think. You can have a great sculpture of a bear or a mountain, and you can admire the technique and the representation, but all of a sudden somebody bumps into this piece of Mabry, and they say, “What is- he ?”

The ‘Two Vessels’ of Mabry contemplate the village.
Ben Roof/Daily Special

The sculpture is placed alone in an enclave at the side of the staircase, with a tree growing above the figure which reinforces the contemplative nature of the piece. There’s also a natural connection between the new Mabry and an old donation from the Logans, “As Far as the Depth of the Valley At One Time” by Lawrence Weiner, located on the same side of the parking lot.

For those who want more information about new works, Art in Public Places is running free guided art tours every Wednesday through August 31. Tours are held at the Vail Visitor Center at 11 a.m. and cover many works in Vail Village. area within an hour, including the last four pieces. For more information, visit ArtInVail.com or contact Molly Eppard at [email protected].

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Lycoming County Commissioners Accept $1 Million for Old Town Project Parking Lot | News, Sports, Jobs


RALPH WILSON/Sun-Gazette Correspondent A groundbreaking ceremony for the next phase of the Old Town development project was held Tuesday, July 26, 2022 in Williamsport. The college-owned property at Basin and E. Third Streets will see the construction of a mixed-use building that will house retail, office and residential units.

The revitalization of Williamsport’s Old Town neighborhood took another step forward when Lycoming County Commissioners approved a grant application totaling $1,012,240 to support the construction of a parking structure there.

The request was made by Old City Williamsport LLC, a limited liability partnership between Lycoming College and Pine Ridge Construction Management.

The parking structure is 165 spaces which could support the commercial building, which is 40,000 square feet, and

12 residential townhouses with 60,000 square feet of retail space, according to Jerry Lariviere of Pine Ridge Construction.

Speaking at the weekly commissioners’ meeting, Dr Kent Trachte, president of Lycoming College, said the parking structure will help build the mixed-use development planned for this area.

“What we’re asking you to do is not support our building or not support the mixed-use structure, but support a parking structure that will be needed to keep this development going,” said Trachte.

The more than $20 million development will be built in the area between Basin and Third Streets and Fourth and Academy Streets.

Trachte said he was first approached by business and public community leaders about the college’s partnership with private and public entities to advance the vision for the Old City area where is the college.

Following the formation of a commission and the formulation of a plan, things appear to be stalling, Trachte said.

“It was clear that for the action to actually happen, the college had to move forward,” he said.

By then, the college had embarked on a comprehensive master plan and strategic plan. Part of that, Trachte said, was the vision for a new college entrance along Basin Street.

“From a college perspective, we made the decision to start locating some of our new buildings in this particular area,” said Trachte.

“The college has invested approximately $20 million in donations that we have raised or funds from our endowment, so the college has stepped forward and made a substantial investment to bring this vision of a revitalized Old Town to fruition. “, he said.

During this time, the college worked with the city, county, and PennDot to secure grants to improve infrastructure in that area, which Trachte said was the government’s role in economic development.

“The job of the college is to buy buildings for learning and to bring students to the area and to have our employees use things,” he said, adding that they found a private developer for “Bring in the investment dollars to put the mixed-use structure in there.”

“The college has taken the next step of bringing in a private developer to complete a mixed-use project that will anchor the revitalization of this neighborhood and utilize our land. So we are forming two limited liability companies together and the college will continue to be a partner going forward with Pine Ridge,” he explained.

The county will have 42 spaces in the parking structure that it will be permitted to use or rent, Commissioner Rick Mirabito said.

“I want the public to understand that the commissioners are not proposing to use property tax money for this,” said Mirabito.

Other funding such as Act 13 funds will be allocated. The total amount of city, county, and state funding is 11%, with the county contributing approximately 3.9% specifically.

“This means that 89% of the funds come from private entities, with the college or Pine Ridge”, said Mirabito.

“I think it’s important for the public to understand that it’s not like we’re making a 30% investment in this,” he added.

One of the objectives of the Old Town project is to improve the economic vitality as well as the appearance of the district.

“The quality of life at Williamsport impacts our ability to recruit students,” said Trachte.

“There is a personal interest in the college, which when we were doing our strategic planning, we determined that the environment was a negative factor in terms of our ability to attract students,” He continued.

“So, yes, the board is happy to invest in Williamsport, but they are happy to invest in Williamsport because they understand that the vitality of Williamsport is integral to maintaining both fiscal integrity and the vitality of Lycoming College as a center of learning community,” Trachte added.

The county will also benefit from the project as it seeks to repopulate.

“We have to grow” said Commissioner Tony Mussare. “We need to increase our population and this will be one of the mechanisms we use to do that.”

In other cases, commissioners have approved the following:

• A sub-recipient agreement with STEP, Inc. for the 2019 Community Development Block Grant funds for $96,000.

• An amendment to a sub-recipient agreement with YWCA Northcentral PA for the 2019-20 PA Housing Affordability Funds program to extend the grant until November 30 for their Liberty House program.

• A rental contract with LAMAR companies for a payment of $900 per month to the county.

• A grant from 902 Developing and Implementing Municipal Recycling Programs of $233,918 for the replacement container truck and reimbursement for a skid steer loader. This grant is 90% from the Department of Environmental Protection and the county will take the remaining 10%, or approximately $23,000.

The next meeting of Commissioners will be at 10 a.m. on August 4 in the Board of Commissioners Room, 1st Floor Executive Plaza, 330 Pine St.



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The demolition of the parking lot should not start before September | New

QUINCY — The president of the architectural design firm that’s leading the redevelopment of the vacant parking lot at 123 S. Fifth said Wednesday that demolition of the structure isn’t expected to begin until Sept. 1.

Todd Moore, managing partner and president of Architechnics, said Marschel Wrecking of suburban St. Louis submitted the lowest of four bids for the project.

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Parking garage next to Bridgeport Arena in need of repairs

But a damaged and closed stairwell in a state-owned parking garage on South Frontage Road, used by patrons of the amphitheater, entertainment arena and other visitors, makes a bad impression.

Built in 2000 by the city, the state took over ownership of the structure in question – known as the Bridgeport Transportation Center garage and located next to the Total Mortgage Arena – in 2012.

In January, city officials notified the state Department of Transportation that some of the concrete on the West Staircase was crumbling, prompting the closure that lasted a few months.

Hartford HealthCare Amphitheater officials said they also contacted DOT about complaints shared earlier this month on a fan-created Facebook page.

Some ticket holders complained online about the situation on the Friends of the Hartford HealthCare Amphitheater Facebook page, posting a photo of the closed stairwell doors, blocked with orange netting and a sign to use the lifts.

Complaints ranged from long elevator lines to questions about security.

“And if there is a fire?” one person wrote.

A few people said they saw frustrated members of the public remove the netting and risk using the stairs. Others worried about the general condition of the garage and how long it took to fix the problem.

The DOT, in a statement emailed to Hearst Connecticut Media on Monday, said that “upon being alerted to concerns regarding the West Staircase by the city,” the agency “took immediate action,” inspecting the site and closing it “indefinitely in the interest of public safety.”

“Due to the structural issues, CT DOT will be performing a complete replacement of the West Staircase,” the statement continued. “The design will start soon. The overall parking lot structure and inspection of the east stairway revealed no other structural issues. »

Additionally, the DOT pointed out in the email, elevators on the west and east sides and an open staircase on the east allow “multiple points of entry and exit.”

Amphitheater officials, in a statement to Hearst Connecticut Media, urged state officials to act more quickly.

“This is one of the first impressions you get of the amphitheater and we, unfortunately, have no control over it,” read the venue’s statement. “We appreciate that they are working to get it done, but time is running out.”

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Manatee and Holmes Beach County leaders remain at odds over beach parking lot and garage

HOLMES BEACH, Fla. (WFLA) — Manatee County and City of Holmes Beach leaders have been at odds over beach parking for two years.

That was in 2020, when city officials reduced on-street parking on residential streets by around 1,100 spaces, police said. City officials said they have received complaints from residents saying their front yards are turning into parking lots.

Manatee County Commissioner Kevin Van Ostenbridge urged the city to bring the spaces back, arguing that ratepayers who live off the island are losing access to the beach. However, the city has not moved and on-street parking remains as it was in 2020.

In a meeting with state and local officials, Commissioner Van Ostenbridge said the city’s mayor had signaled support for the possibility of parking.

“During the meeting, the mayor said she thought building a parking lot was something she could support and was ready to bring it to council for a vote. She asked me to talk to the commission, make a proposal and bring it to Holmes Beach Before we can start planning for parking, Holmes Beach proactively decided to ban parking lots in town, eliminating the possibility to build a garage,” Van Ostenbridge said. “It looks like Holmes Beach basically doesn’t want any visitors. It’s concerning because a lot of those visitors, most of them, are from Manatee County. residents and taxpayers of the county who own these beaches and they have the right to go to the beaches,” he continued.

The first reading of the ordinance took place last week. The proposed local law, which would prohibit multi-level parking structures, states that the commission wishes to “maintain the residential character of the Town of Holmes Beach” and “finds that multi-level parking facilities are not supported by the vision” throughout the city. to plan.

“It will not solve the parking problem. We have a traffic problem and until the county recognizes the traffic, the horrible traffic that has been created by the promotion over the years, we will never be able to fix these problems. Whatever a three storey car park would have created would not solve the problem as there is just a lack of infrastructure on the island to support the traffic we are now receiving,” said the Commissioner of Holmes Beach , Terry Schaefer. “I think it’s pretty well established that people come here because they feel like they’re in a very welcoming community. Without residential integrity to sustain the residents who stay here, this is where we see a long-term problem that continues to exist. We are trying to shape our ordinances to find a balance to accommodate everyone we can who wishes to be here, but we have not had the cooperation of Manatee County, acknowledging that the problem has always been the over-promotion of this island “, he continued.

The parking battle reached new heights in 2021, when Manatee County leaders denied Holmes Beach nearly $300,000 in tourist dollars. Commissioner Van Ostenbridge told 8 On Your Side that he plans to propose that less money go to Holmes Beach due to the ongoing parking dispute.

“I am not comfortable allocating tax dollars from outside Holmes Beach to enter Holmes Beach when they are so unwelcoming to visitors,” said the Commissioner of the county.

“I think a lot of us really didn’t appreciate the threat, that’s what home rule is. Thank goodness we have a domestic regime in the State of Florida and we intend to handle our issues and do so in accordance with the statutes, but also to protect both our residents and visitors who come to our city” , said Commissioner Schaefer.

The second reading of the order is scheduled for next month.

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Further safety improvements are planned for the parking lot known for its suicides

Following the addition of a fence in January in an effort to prevent suicides on the upper level of the Fifth and Walnut municipal parking garage, further glazed space safety upgrades are planned for the downtown structure this fall. .

The City of Columbia is working to finalize a contract to install steel screens on the lower levels. Although a contractor has been selected, City staff could not reveal which company as a notice to proceed has not yet been issued.

The Columbia City Council in March authorized the public works department to solicit bids for the screens.

The staff had originally aimed for a summer start date, the Tribune previously reported.

Previously: What the Fifth and Walnut downtown Columbia parking lot window screens might look like

The screens will cover 150 openings of varying lengths.

The project is expected to cost $504,000 from the city’s general fund.

Action has been taken by the city following more than half a dozen suicides at the parking lot since its construction in 2011. The city also received a citizen petition asking for safety improvements.

After: New security barriers under construction at Columbia at the Fifth and Walnut parking garage

The National Suicide Hotline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 and is always open. The Mid-Missouri Crisis Line is 1-800-395-2132. The Missouri Suicide/Crisis hotline is 314-469-6644.

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Runaway man jumps 60 feet from parking lot, Georgia cops say

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A man jumped 60 feet from a parking lot as he ran from officers, Georgia police said.

A man has been hospitalized after jumping 60 feet from a parking lot while fleeing police, Georgia officials said.

Officers responded to the parking lot just before 3 a.m. July 22 to a report of vehicle break-ins, according to the Atlanta Police Department.

Officers found three men, who attempted to flee in a car but crashed. The driver was arrested on the spot, but the two passengers fled on foot, police said.

One of the men jumped from the fifth level of the garage, falling 60 feet and injuring himself, police said. The other man fled.

Officers took the 20-year-old driver to Fulton County Jail. The 19-year-old who jumped was taken to hospital and was in stable condition, police said. He will be taken to prison once released from the hospital.

Both men are charged with aggravated assault, attempted theft of a car and possession of a firearm while committing a crime, according to the police department.

Madeleine List is a McClatchy National Real-Time reporter. She has reported for the Cape Cod Times and the Providence Journal.

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Jeffco’s parking lot is a ‘public building’, appeals court says in green light trial | Courts

Although Jefferson County insisted its parking lot was not a “public building” and therefore the county could not be sued under Colorado law for a woman’s injuries. , the state’s second-highest court denied those claims on Thursday.

Colorado’s Governmental Immunity Act generally protects public entities from civil liability to prevent taxpayer dollars from being diverted to lawsuits and to ensure that government officials can continue to provide services. There is an exception, however, if a person is injured due to an “unsafe condition of any public building”.

A three-judge Court of Appeals panel determined that a two-level parking garage in the Jefferson County Courts and Administration Building is itself a building under ordinary and statutory definitions of the word.

“More fundamentally, while we accept the county’s position that a public parking structure — such as a public parking lot — may be a ‘public facility,'” Judge Anthony J. Navarro wrote in the July 21 opinion, “We reject the idea that a public parking structure cannot also be a ‘public building’.”

The appeal ruling allows Beverly Stickle to continue her lawsuit against Jeffco for injuries she sustained in the garage.

On February 6, 2018, Stickle went to the courthouse to serve a ticket. She used the north parking structure, a triangle-shaped garage with parking on the second level. Drivers can then descend the stairs to the campus, which also houses the sheriff’s department, jail, and other government buildings.

When Stickle returned to her car, she walked up the stairs to the second level. On the upper landing was a dark gray walkway, with a descent to the car park – painted the same color of gray. The elevation change was marked with yellow paint, which was more evident when looking from the field towards the landing.

From the catwalk, however, the identical grays created an illusion obscuring the descent. Stickle fell and suffered an open fracture to her right arm.






The catwalk, on the left, over the north parking structure, with a descent to the parking lot. Photo of district court order in Stickle v. County of Jefferson








Top of Jeffco North Parking Structure

A view from the north parking structure walkway, in the foreground, towards the parking area. The yellow line is the dividing point, with a descent. Photo of district court order in Stickle v. County of Jefferson


She sued Jefferson County, which countered that it was immune from liability under Colorado’s governmental immunity law. He disputed that the parking lot meets the law’s definition of a “public building” or that the descent is an unsafe condition.

After a hearing, during which there was testimony about others falling into the garage because of the delusion of resignation, District Court Judge Russell B. Klein sided with Jeffco.

“Defendants argue that the rooftop is just another parking lot,” he wrote in March 2021. “However, decisions about how to use rooftop space should not be determinative of whether a structure is a “building” any more than the construction of a roof terrace or a roof garden would prevent a structure from being a building.”

To demonstrate that the garage exhibited an unsafe condition, Stickle had to show that the descent hazard resulted from the county’s actions or inability to act during the construction or maintenance of the facility. Although Klein ruled out that the hazard stemmed from the maintenance of the garage, he suggested that building the walkway and parking lot using the same paint color met the criteria for an unsafe condition.

The county turned to the Court of Appeals, arguing that the coloring obscuring the reduction was the result of design, not construction. Jeffco also disputed Klein’s conclusion that the north parking structure was a building.

“None of the distinguishing characteristics that make a structure a building exist in this case. The north parking structure is simply one level of an open parking lot stacked on top of another level of a parking lot – and nothing more,” the county attorney wrote. Desk.

Stickle’s attorneys observed that Jefferson County witnesses testified in district court that the resurfacing of the garage’s second level was in fact part of a maintenance project.

“These same witnesses confirmed that the purpose of resurfacing the parking structure was to prevent water and chemical ingress from damaging the parking structure. This falls squarely within the definition of maintenance under the CGIA,” wrote Thomas A. Bulger.

The appeal panel agreed with Klein’s reasoning that the garage was a public building. He differed slightly in finding, as argued by Stickle’s attorney, an unsafe condition existed due to the maintenance of the garage. The evidence, Navarro wrote, showed the county chose the surfacing material for the walkway and parking lot to prevent further decline or failure of the material — which fell under the category of maintenance.

The case is Stickle c. Jefferson County.

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50 vehicles remain stuck in a condemned parking lot in Baltimore; cause of ramp collapse still under investigation – Baltimore Sun

Fifty vehicles remain stuck in a downtown Baltimore parking lot on Monday after the garage’s second-story ramp partially collapsed on Friday and blocked the entrance with concrete debris.

The cause of the collapse is still under investigation. When and how the vehicles will be removed from the Inner Harbor condemned garage at 1 E. Pratt St. is unknown.

The 45-year-old garage is owned by Banyan Street Capital, a Miami-based real estate firm, which said via its public relations firm Monday that it plans to remove the vehicles “as soon as the structure is deemed safe by the City of Baltimore. .”

The company contacted a demolition crew to begin shoring up the garage deck – the first step towards removing the vehicle.

City of Baltimore structural engineers oversaw the temporary shoring of the three-story garage immediately after the collapse. Jason Hessler, deputy commissioner of permits and litigation for the Department of Housing and Community Development, said the garage will need to be stabilized before motorists can collect their belongings. They will not be allowed to take their vehicle out of the garage.

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Until then, no one is allowed inside the garage except engineers assessing the property or construction workers stabilizing the garage.

“Debris removal, shoring and further assessment will be required before it can be determined how and when the vehicles can be removed,” Hessler said in a statement.

The right lane of South Charles Street will be closed indefinitely between West Conway and Pratt streets while the garage undergoes repairs.

No one was injured when a section of a concrete ramp crashed to ground level around 10 a.m. Friday. A driver had just entered the garage a few minutes before and had witnessed its collapse. No vehicle was damaged.

Baltimore City Fire Deputy Chief Dante Stewart said Friday that most of the garage remains stable and is not expected to collapse again. The fire department last inspected the garage in July 2017 and determined it met the city’s fire code.

The garage is managed by SP Plus Corp., a Chicago-based parking facility management company, which has directed questions to Banyan Street Capital.

“Most importantly, we are relieved that no one was injured and no vehicles were damaged,” said Jill Nagel, SP+ spokesperson.

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The importance of restoring a parking garage

Why consider a car park restoration project?

A common misconception in building construction is that concrete lasts forever. However, car parks – especially underground car parks – face many problems during use that can cause structural damage and affect the life of concrete. These can include delamination due to salt, chemicals, vehicle fluids, general wear and tear, as well as damaged columns and soffits, and other outside factors such as erosion and ground shifts all of which negatively affect the life of your parking structure and can lead to large, costly repairs if left unaddressed.

Commercial business owners and property managers often fear the high costs associated with parking garage restoration projects and tend to wait until damage becomes a serious issue before contacting a professional for repairs. However, a comprehensive and proactive maintenance plan that detects initial damage and problems within the parking structure is essential to prevent aggravating problems.

Why consider a car park restoration project?

When people enter your building or establishment, one of the first things they notice is the condition of the parking structure. This provides a representation of your business or building that potential customers and tenants use to judge the quality of your establishment, either positively or negatively. In fact, CBRE found that 93% of respondents believe that a business’s amenities, such as a parking structure, are a big contributor to the company’s bottom line. If people notice more consistent issues, they may eventually choose to go elsewhere, regardless of your products, services, or other amenities.

Any parking garage restoration project requires experience and attention to detail. Hiring a team of professional engineers ensures that the project is carried out efficiently, with the right materials, methods, technology and a focus on delivering a comprehensive restoration strategy that increases the value and extends the life of the structure.

Click the link for more RJC projects and information https://www.rjc.ca/

30-50 Hillsboro Avenue Parking Garage Rehabilitation Project

Located in one of Toronto’s most desirable neighborhoods, 30 & 50 Hillsboro Avenue was built in the mid to late 1960s and consists of two 24-storey high-rise residential buildings on a 4-storey underground parking lot. levels. The footprint of the underground parking structure was much larger than the buildings above, and an assessment determined that the parking structure was in poor condition due to exposure to de-icing salts and moisture , which justified the need for major concrete repairs and replacement of the waterproofing system.

(See the Hillsboro Avenue project here: https://www.rjc.ca/project-details/30-50-hillsboro-avenue-building-rehabilitation.html)

RJC Engineers acted as prime consultant on this project, which involved large-scale concrete and waterproofing repairs to the underground structure, as well as complete demolition and reconstruction of the podium landscape around the perimeter of the two buildings. The podium landscaping was replaced with new hard and soft landscaping elements to meet the requirements and criteria of a high profile property and included repairs to the building facade to improve its aesthetics and appeal outside.

RJC engineers are focused on a comprehensive restoration strategy. Contact us today to get started https://www.rjc.ca/locations.html

Media Contact
Company Name: RJC – Read Jones Christoffersen ltd
Contact person: RJC
E-mail: Send an email
Country: Canada
Website: https://www.rjc.ca/

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Simcoe parking garage in downtown Peterborough reopens July 18

The Simcoe Parking Garage is located above the Peterborough Transit Terminal at 190 Simcoe Street in downtown Peterborough. (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)

After nearly 13 months of closure, Simcoe’s parking garage in downtown Peterborough will reopen at 6 a.m. Monday (July 18).

As part of the garage rehabilitation work, the City of Peterborough has installed a new automated parking control system, which is expected to be operational on August 2. Parking at the 190 Simcoe Street structure will be free for all customers between July 18 and August 2. .

The new automated parking control system includes barriers controlling entry and exit from the garage. Customers will receive their ticket at the entrance and must have it validated before leaving the car park. Validated tickets inserted into the machine on exit will raise the gate arm for the vehicle to exit the parking lot.

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Customers have several options for paying for parking and having their ticket validated.

They can pay by debit or credit card at the exit machine by inserting their ticket at the exit door. They can also pay before going to the exit gate using the automatic pay stations located in the car park (there is a 15-minute period after a ticket has been validated for customers to return to their vehicle and proceed towards the exit door). New signs are installed to guide customers to payment terminals, which are fully accessible.

Customers paying in cash can insert their ticket at the new cash desk located on the lower level near the elevators and the walkway leading to the transit platform (the cash desk also accepts payment by debit or credit). There is also a new payment terminal on level 2A, near the rear stairwell, which only accepts debit or credit for parking payment and validation of parking tickets before exiting.

Customers can also pay for their parking using their HotSpot account. HotSpot readers are provided on all pay stations so customers can activate the portals using their phone.

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Monthly pass holders will be given a new proximity card or can get an RFID tag to put on their windshield, which will automatically open the gates when entering and exiting the garage, as long as their monthly pass is active and renewed before the beginning of the following month.

A deposit will be required for new proximity cards or RFID tags, which will be refunded when the customer no longer requires a monthly pass. Parking staff will contact current monthly pass holders to arrange for new passes to be issued or customers can call the Parking Division at 705-742-7777 ext. 2802 to purchase a monthly pass.

After the free parking period between July 18 and August 2, parking rates remain unchanged and the first hour of parking is free.

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Work began in June 2021 for a full rehabilitation of Simcoe’s parking garage and the culvert that supports Jackson Creek below the garage.

Work on the garage included replacing the waterproofing system at all levels, repairing deteriorated concrete, painting the entire garage, replacing the asphalt on the ground floor east of the structure parking lots, replacement of damaged parking ramps and completion of contrast painting of stairwells for better accessibility.

The Simcoe parking garage was built in 1974 and underwent a major rehabilitation program between 2002 and 2005. A structural review in 2013 identified the need for repairs, and the first phase was completed in 2016 An updated structural review in 2017 confirmed the second phase of rehabilitation work to replace the waterproofing system and repair deteriorated concrete.

The project has been postponed to 2021 to allow the project to be coordinated with work on the Jackson Creek culvert under the parking garage to provide cost savings and minimize disruption to the parking garage.

Work on the garage and culvert was carried out by Brook Restoration Ltd. at a cost of $4.5 million.

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Structural inspections underway after parking lot collapse in downtown Baltimore

A parking lot in downtown Baltimore collapsed Friday morning, according to firefighters.

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The Baltimore Fire Department said crews arrived at the garage, located at 1 E. Pratt Street, just before 10 a.m. Friday to find a partial structural collapse near the rear of the garage.

Crews say no cars or people were trapped by the collapsed structure after sweeping the scene multiple times.

Officials say there are several cars that remain parked in the intact parts of the garage and they will endeavor to return these cars to their owners.

They ask anyone who might have a car inside the garage to call the garage management company Standard Parking Plus.

Building inspectors and engineers remain at the scene of the collapse Friday. Officials say they will conduct structural integrity assessments.

As a result of these assessments, Charles Street will be closed indefinitely between Pratt and Conway streets.

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Motorists are urged to avoid the area.

This is a developing story. Stick with FOX 5 for updates as they become available.

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Airport moves forward with $76 million parking garage expansion – Inside Indiana Business

(photo courtesy of IBJ)

Plans to expand the $76.6 million parking garage at Indianapolis International Airport are moving forward again, after the project was delayed more than two years by the COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

The Indianapolis Airport Authority’s Board of Directors in June approved funding for a five-story, 1,500-space addition to the north side of its existing parking structure. About 1,000 of the spaces will be used by car rental companies while the rest will be reserved for daily or hourly parking.

Jarod Klaas, senior director of planning and development at the airport authority, told IBJ that the project would benefit both automakers and general users.

“The benefits are really two-fold,” Klaas said. “Our desire to continue to deliver a world-class experience and convenience really played into” the decision to move the project forward.

Indeed, many car rental companies are expanding their fleets and moving towards more electric vehicles (the airport is separately planning to add chargers to support more electric vehicles). Additionally, the airport faces a shortage of garage space, with at least two floors at or near capacity most days of any given week.

The garage expansion will be connected to the existing facility and designed in a similar fashion, allowing it to blend into the current structure. Because of this, some disruption is expected to occur in the existing facility, such as unavailable spaces in part of the structure during construction, Klaas said.

The addition includes a $14.4 million fifth-level canopy with solar panels that will power the parking lot. In terms of electric vehicles, the airport already has some available for users, but more are expected to be added as part of future improvement projects.

Klaas said long-term conversations about airport parking facilities are underway as part of a master plan, including whether more garages could be added. The airport’s existing car park has 7,100 parking spaces on five floors: 1,200 for rental car fleets and 5,900 for public paid parking.

The airport’s board of directors first approved contracts for the new garage in August 2019, allocating $2.34 million to Indianapolis architectural firm CSO Inc. to design the project. The company was also involved in the construction of the airport terminal, which opened in 2008. Around this time, the airport also contracted with Cincinnati-based Messer Construction Co. for construction services. project management.

But the project – originally slated for completion in early 2021 – was put on hold in early 2020 when the pandemic brought the travel industry to a halt. The companies were re-engaged by the airport in late 2021 to complete construction documents and prepare for the start of work, Klaas said.

The garage expansion will be covered by debt service through municipal bonds, which will be repaid using parking fees, which constitute a significant portion of the airport’s revenue. In 2019, the airport generated approximately $59.4 million in parking fees.

Work on the garage is expected to begin by the end of this year and be completed in the first quarter of 2024.

The garage project comes as the airport continues work to completely rebuild one of the airport’s three runways. The $73 million project, which is expected to be completed by late fall, will be the first since the runway was built in 1989. About three-quarters of the $56 million project is funded by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program. Program.

The concrete for the reconstructed runway and taxiway will be approximately 22 inches thick and expected to last approximately 40 years. Plans for rebuilding the other two runways, including one of a similar age, will likely come in the next few years, Klaas said.

“We have already started the…capital program to reflect the likely need to make the northern parallel [runway] the same way,” he said.

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Councilor Stroud challenges restoration of $579,000 single-bid parking garage – Kingston News

If you’re someone who regularly parks in downtown Kingston, you’ll probably agree that the Robert Bruce Memorial Parking Garage near Bagot Street is in desperate need of some serious restoration.

A van navigates the narrow entrance to the Robert Bruce Memorial parking garage near Bagot Street in downtown Kingston, where emergency shoring is currently in place pending restoration of the parking structure. Photo by Josie Vallier.

Councilor Peter Stroud for Sydenham District – the district that adjoins King’s Town District one block from where the parking lot is – doesn’t disagree with that. The self-proclaimed ‘downtown guy’ however challenged the awarding of the recommended contract for this restoration work which was presented to Council in a report at its meeting on Tuesday July 13, 2022.

The request for proposals (RFP) for the restoration project, which sought to address the deterioration of the parking structure of this lot, originally closed on Thursday, June 16, 2022, according to the report by Neil Carbone, Commissioner of Corporate Services for the Kingston city. Two bids were received from contractors, one of which “did not exceed the minimum threshold and therefore did not proceed with the evaluation process”, the report said.

The other bid, from Brook Restoration Ltd., scored above the minimum threshold as stated in the original RFP. A bid must score a minimum of 34/45 in the non-price criteria, with Brook Restoration scoring 18% on “experience and qualifications”, 24% on “proposed methodology” and 3% on “accessibility”. . On price criteria, the company scored 55% on “pricing and related costs,” with the final bid being $579,000, and a score of 81% for city staff . To be clear, the City of Kingston’s tender score is over 100%, which is not the case with all tender scoring systems.

“Much of the deterioration to be addressed by this project is progressing, which means that a delay in reissuing this RFP would result in increased repair quantities and overall project costs. As much of the work requires good weather to be completed, reissue of RFP would delay work to summer 2023,” the report said, noting that City staff “consulted with contractors on the lack of bids received on requests proposals such as this,” and that due to the large amount of work available to local contractors, many are not currently seeking additional work. 27 companies have uploaded the tender documents in question, however, only two were submitted, and only Brook Restoration’s offer was considered.

“Ministry staff are satisfied with the bid and it is recommended that this contract be awarded to Brook Restoration Ltd. who submitted a bid with a high score. The mandatory submission and technical requirements of the RFP were met, and their submitted proposal articulated an acceptable methodology to meet the requirements outlined in the RFP,” the report concludes.

Councilor Stroud was the only member of council to request that the item on the recommended contract be separated from the rest of the report, in order to discuss it on the floor of the council chamber.

“If you read the report, you will see the large sum of money that is needed for this restoration. And you might be thinking…that’s a maintenance cost we can’t avoid. But I think before committing this amount of public funds, we need to have a good understanding of the pros and cons,” Stroud began.

The actual age of the structure was not stated in the report to Council, however, the RFP for the project includes “original construction drawings from 1966”. Acknowledging that parking has been around “for a long time,” Stroud explained that with parking systems there are capital costs, operating costs and maintenance costs, and they also have revenue from parking. , which enter every day.

“It’s not in the report, but is there a way to see the cost-benefit analysis, or even at a very high level of what this work accomplishes…rather than considering that it’s about necessary repairs? Obviously the alternative would be to downgrade the garage and go in a different direction with that money… So maybe the staff could talk about… what’s the income of that garage on an annual basis and then we can compare to cost? he posed.

Paige Agnew, Community Services Commissioner for the City of Kingston, responded first, indicating that she did not have this information in front of her at the time of the meeting.

“We certainly have that broken down by structure in terms of overall parking revenue. I just don’t have that information available to me right now,” she said.

“It’s a shame; it’s hard to make a decision without it,” Stroud replied before quickly moving on to her next question. (Agnew later said she was able to extract the numbers and that “c is approximately $250,000 per year associated that comes from the parking reserve fund”.)

Councilor Peter Stroud asks questions to City of Kingston staff regarding the contract to restore the Robert Bruce Memorial Parking Garage during the Tuesday July 12, 2022 City Council meeting. Paige Agnew, Community Services Commissioner for the City of Kingston (left) and Councilman Jim Neill inset. Image captured on screen.

Pointing out that there was only one bid on the RFP, Stroud asked if the City was able to keep the RFP open or resubmit a new RFP for bids, noting how the work in question is urgent.

Agnew noted that the RFP was actually issued by the facilities department, not her (community services) department, so she couldn’t answer her questions “with 100% certainty,” but said that to receive further bids, the first bidding would have to be canceled and reissued, the caveats being price and time.

After more back and forth between Stroud and Agnew, Jeff Rempel, Director of Facilities and Building Services for the City of Kingston, joined the conversation.

“We only got one responsive bid, the second bidder,” he said, noting that, compared to the estimate the City received from a consultant, “we were very pleased of that number, based on the extended scope they are that we ask them to play.

“[It was u]below what was expected,” Rempel noted, referring to the size of Brook Restoration’s offer. “The price that was received for the breadth of services they provide is a very good price in this market. We could definitely cancel [the RFP, but] we would run the risk of prices going up from what we have now.

Finally, Stroud wondered if this should be a “warning sign” that the bid was lower than expected, thinking, “you wonder if they’ll be able to finish the job with the level of quality you would expect.”

Rempel said city staff interviewed Brook Restoration as part of the negotiation process, asking similar questions of the contractor regarding quality, scope and risk mitigation. “We were very pleased with their responses to this interview,” Rempel concluded.

Currently under emergency construction, the Robert Bruce Memorial Parking Garage shows a clear need for repair, as emergency shoring has been put in place to ensure structural integrity until the on-site restoration project begins. Photo by Josie Vallier.

Councilor Bridget Doherty, representing the Portsmouth Borough, also asked about the contractor’s reputation and ability, wanting to know if the town has worked with Brook Restoration in the past. Rempel explained that the City has indeed worked with this company in the past, and that the contractor is actually the one currently working on the structure of the Robert Bruce Memorial parking garage, performing “emergency shoring” to maintain the stability of the structure pending complete restoration. .

The only other Council member to speak on the issue was Simon Chapelle of the Loyalist-Cataraqui District, who asked if the RFP had only been advertised on Biddingo.com, a popular online bidding platform. He also asked if work on the parking structure in question should take place this year, or if it could be postponed until next year in the hope of obtaining “more competitive offers” afterwards.

Desiree Kennedy, the city’s chief financial officer and treasurer, confirmed that the RFP was only posted on Biddingo.com. Chapelle’s second question remained momentarily unanswered.

“There have been repeated questions from me about the bidding processes and the procurement processes used, which suggests that we are considering using other sources of bidding,” said continued Chapelle. “When you stop ‘Mom and Pop’s Fish and Chips’ for a construction project, I don’t think they’re capable of doing the job,” he said, apparently implying that major municipal projects shouldn’t not be attributed to smaller or less important projects. -experienced companies. “So I think we need to expand our network or just say no to these kinds of projects.”

At that time the vote was called and the recommendation passed by a vote of 11 to 1, Councilor Stroud opposing it. No official timeline for the construction project was provided at the meeting, however, City of Kingston staff said work would begin this summer.

The full meeting can be viewed on the Kingston City Council YouTube channel.

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Airport Moves Forward With $76 Million Parking Garage Expansion – Indianapolis Business Journal

Plans to expand the $76.6 million parking garage at Indianapolis International Airport are moving forward again, after the project was delayed more than two years by the COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

The Indianapolis Airport Authority Board in June approved funding for a five-story, 1,500-space addition to the north side of its existing parking structure. About 1,000 of the spaces will be used by car rental companies while the rest will be reserved for daily or hourly parking.

Jarod Klaas, senior director of planning and development at the airport authority, told IBJ that the project would benefit both automakers and general users.

“The benefits are really two-fold,” Klaas said. “Our desire to continue to deliver a world-class experience and convenience really played into” the decision to move the project forward.

Indeed, many car rental companies are expanding their fleets and moving towards more electric vehicles (the airport is separately planning to add chargers to support more electric vehicles). Additionally, the airport faces a shortage of garage space, with at least two floors at or near capacity most days of any given week.

The garage expansion will be connected to the existing facility and designed in a similar fashion, allowing it to blend into the current structure. Because of this, some disruption is expected to occur in the existing facility, such as unavailable spaces in part of the structure during construction, Klaas said.

The addition includes a $14.4 million fifth-level canopy with solar panels that will power the parking lot. In terms of electric vehicles, the airport already has some available for users, but more are expected to be added as part of future improvement projects.

Klaas said long-term conversations about airport parking facilities are underway as part of a master plan, including whether more garages could be added. The airport’s existing car park has 7,100 parking spaces on five floors: 1,200 for rental car fleets and 5,900 for public paid parking.

The airport’s board of directors first approved contracts for the new garage in August 2019, allocating $2.34 million to Indianapolis architectural firm CSO Inc. to design the project. The company also participated in the construction of the airport terminal, which opened in 2008. Around this time, the airport also engaged with Cincinnati-based Messer Construction Co. for project management services.

But the project – originally slated for completion in early 2021 – was put on hold in early 2020 when the pandemic brought the travel industry to a halt. The companies were re-engaged by the airport in late 2021 to complete construction documents and prepare for the start of work, Klaas said.

The garage expansion will be covered by debt service through municipal bonds, which will be repaid using parking fees, which constitute a significant portion of the airport’s revenue. In 2019, the airport generated approximately $59.4 million in parking fees.

Work on the garage is expected to begin by the end of this year and be completed in the first quarter of 2024.

The garage project comes as the airport continues work to completely rebuild one of the airport’s three runways. The $73 million project, which is expected to be completed by late fall, will be the first since the runway was built in 1989. About three-quarters of the $56 million project is funded by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program. Program.

The concrete for the rebuilt runway and taxiway will be approximately 22 inches thick and expected to last approximately 40 years. Plans for rebuilding the other two runways, including one of a similar age, will likely come in the next few years, Klaas said.

“We have already started the…capital program to reflect the probable need to make the parallel north [runway] the same way,” he said.

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Man pleads guilty after fatally injuring wife in Salt Lake City International Airport parking lot

Photo: Salt Lake City Police Department

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, July 13, 2022 (Gephardt Daily) — A man pleaded guilty to reduced charges after fatally injuring his wife in a parking lot at Salt Lake International Airport on April 4 of this year.

Shawn Christopher Sturgeon, 38, pleaded guilty to:

  • Homicide/motor vehicle homicide, a second-degree felony
  • Domestic violence in the presence of a child, a third degree crime

An additional charge of manslaughter, a second-degree felony, was dropped as part of the plea deal.

The victim was Charlotte Marie Dalton-Sturgeon, 29.

Charlotte Marie Dalton-Sturgeon. Photo: Obituary

The Incident

At 2:39 p.m. on April 4, Salt Lake City police were called to the airport.

“The details were that a woman was run over by a vehicle,” Sturgeon’s probable cause statement reads. “Shawn Sturgeon, his wife Charlotte and their small child were returning to town after a vacation. The incident happened in the short-term parking lot.

“When officers arrived at the scene, they found Charlotte sitting in the front seat of a vehicle near the toll plaza. She was unresponsive but breathing. Charlotte was taken to hospital where she was later treated. declared dead.

Photo: Salt Lake City Police Department

Video surveillance obtained from the airport garage showed that prior to the crash, the statement said, Sturgeon placed the child on the right passenger side of the vehicle. Sturgeon then got into the driver’s seat, and then the vehicle’s brake lights came on.

“Charlotte appeared to be sitting in the front passenger seat and then she is seen exiting the vehicle,” Sturgeon’s probable cause statement reads. “She walked to the rear passenger side seat of the vehicle and opened the door as Sturgeon began to reverse. He accelerated sharply and then stopped the car. Charlotte lost her balance during this sudden movement. The vehicle door was still open. Within seconds, Sturgeon slammed on the gas again and backed up quickly.

“You could see Charlotte’s legs flailing as Sturgeon continued to step back. Being dragged caused Charlotte to fall to the ground under the vehicle. Sturgeon then put the vehicle into gear, accelerated forward rapidly and pushed the throttle and quickly onto Charlotte’s body with the right rear passenger tire, leaving a tire print on her body and the weight of the vehicle. causing serious bodily harm to its internal organs. .

“Sturgeon then exited the vehicle screaming and waving his arms and told Charlotte to get into the vehicle, which she did shortly before succumbing to her injuries,” Sturgeon’s probable cause statement reads. .

Officers who arrived noted that Sturgeon appeared drunk and had glassy bloodshot eyes and the smell of alcohol.

As he was transported to the Utilities Building for an interview, “Sturgeon made several off-the-cuff statements including ‘I ran my wife over’, ‘I killed my wife’ and ‘I accidentally ran her over’. .

Photo: Salt Lake City Police Department

Views of Witnesses

Witness statements also revealed that Sturgeon appeared angry with his wife.

A witness “heard screaming and arguing between a man and a woman, later identified as Charlotte and Sturgeon, before observing the vehicle above Charlotte and driving over her. The witness said he “ yelled at Sturgeon not to go anywhere as he filmed what was happening. Sturgeon ignored pleas to stay there and instead left the scene.

A second witness told investigators she was in her car getting ready to leave when she heard a loud noise. She turned around and saw a woman on the ground and saw the car go over her. The witness said he heard Charlotte scream and scream as Charlotte was on the ground.

“The driver then got out of the car and asked the woman (victim) why she had just done this. The man then said, “Now I have to take you to the emergency room,” then he aggressively picked her up and pushed her into the front passenger seat.

“The second witness explained that she saw a woman lying on the ground and then observed a vehicle drive over the body. (Witness 2) heard crying and moaning from the woman. The driver stopped abruptly, then got out of the car yelling at the woman saying, “Are you fucking crazy”, and continued yelling at the woman. The driver then said to the woman (victim): “Get up right now. Get off the ground and get in the car. The woman got up and limped towards the vehicle and the vehicle drove off.

A preliminary toxicology examination showed Sturgeon had a blood alcohol level of 0.13. In Utah, the legal limit for intoxication is 0.05.

An autopsy performed on 29-year-old Charlotte Sturgeon revealed that her death was caused by blunt trauma, the statement said, adding that “Charlotte’s pulmonary artery had been severed and her liver lacerated.”

Conviction

The felony/vehicular homicide conviction carries a maximum penalty of 1 to 15 years (with no minimum penalty) in prison and a fine of $10,000.

Domestic violence in the presence of a child carries a maximum penalty of zero to 5 years in prison with a fine of $5,000.

Thus, during his conviction, not yet planned, Sturgeon risks zero to 20 years in prison.

Photo: Salt Lake City Police Department
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4th Street parking garage has unused capacity, based on midway through 2022 data – The B Square

The new public parking lot at 4th and Walnut streets, which opened in late August 2021, has a lot of unused capacity.

This is based on entry/exit and occupancy data for the first half of 2022, which was provided to The B Square by the City of Bloomington in response to a registration request.

For the first six months of 2022, peak garage occupancy occurred on June 22 between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m., when 315 cars were parked in the garage, based on numbers provided by the city. The most typical peak occupancy for a weekday is around 150 cars.

Reports generated by the parking system software show the capacity of the garage at 500 spaces, but during the design and approval phase of the garage, the number was set at 537 spaces. A manual count by B Square this week put the total number of seats at 560.

Based on 560 seats, a typical peak occupancy of 150 people on any given day equates to around 27%. A conventional parking industry benchmark is that an occupancy rate of 85% is perceived as full.

The garage replaced by the newly built structure, because it was structurally failing, had 352 spaces.

The figures confirm some expected trends.

In the morning, the garage starts to fill up mainly with customers who have a monthly permit (contracted parking lots), as opposed to people who pay to park on an hourly basis. The cost is $0.50 per hour, half the cost of powering a meter to park on the street. The cost of a permit depends on whether the space is reserved, but it’s at least $107 per month.

After 5:00 p.m., people who park by the hour (or “transient parkers”) outnumber those who use a permit to enter the garage. This is consistent with the idea that during the day, it is people who drive to work who park in the garage, and in the evening, people who park there do so on an ad hoc basis.

Many monthly permit holders work at businesses located in the Fountain Square Mall, which is connected to the garage to the north by an overhead walkway.

According to Bloomington Parking Services, the number of monthly permit holders for each of the first six months of 2022 averaged about 280: (Per month: 262, 264, 320, 292, 279, and 280.)

Measured by week, the garage shows slightly higher figures from the end of March. This would be consistent with the closure of certain sections of Kirkwood Avenue at this time, to allow more dining out. But that doesn’t necessarily mean drivers who parked on Kirkwood Avenue until it closed now choose to park in the 4th Street garage.

Duration data – how long each vehicle has been in the garage – was not part of the records requested by The B Square.

Entry/exit reports extracted from Amano McGann’s parking lot equipment were provided to The B Square in the form of 180 separate Excel spreadsheets, one for each day in the first half of the year. The B Square has confirmed with a representative of Evens Time Parking Control, which is the Amano McGann Inc. service provider for the Bloomington portion of the country, that there is no standard way to extract a single set of data for input/output data.

The B Square counts among its readers some who have the technical skills to quickly combine 180 spreadsheets into a single table. Here is a link to this table: 4th Street Garage Parking Data Excel Table.

[The fields t_entry and t_exit are for transient parkers. The fields c_entry and c_exit are for contract parkers. Fields with the word “total” indicate occupancy.]

Posted

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The Santa Cruz Parking Lot Mistake: It Would Undermine the Library Project and Make Affordable Housing More Difficult

Santa Cruz City voters deviated from historic election trends in June by defeating Measure F, which sought to add a half cent to the municipal sales tax. This is the first sales or property tax to fail in the past 40 years. By comparison, in 2018, 72% of Santa Cruz voters passed a sales tax increase.

What explains this change?

Rick Longinotti, Chair of the Campaign for Sustainable Transportation

Rick Longinotti, Chairman of Campaign for sustainable transport

(courtesy of Rick Longinotti)

A survey commissioned by the city before the city council that placed the sales tax on the June ballot says, “33% [of respondents] said they would be much more likely to oppose the measure because “we can’t trust the city council to deliver on its promise to use the money properly unless the tax measure specifically says how the ‘money must be used’.

A Santa Cruz Sentinel editorial endorsed the No to Vote F vote, stating, “Many voters and residents are still angry about the 2016 Measure S County tax that led to the planned multi-project library for the downtown. We called for a follow-up vote on this draft, as the original measure said nothing about such a plan and many residents remain convinced that they were misled by the measure.

The Sentinel refers to the city’s proposal for a new downtown library with a 310-space parking structure and potentially more than 100 affordable housing units.

I agree with Sentinel’s assessment.

The City’s promotion of parking does not meet good governance standards.

In December 2016, city staff presented a proposal for a new parking structure to city council without key information. Specifically, they presented a plan for a five-level parking structure without waiting for the results of the Strategic downtown parking plan – which NelsonNygaard Consultants conducted under a $100,000 contract with the city.

When NelsonNygaard submitted his report, city staff never presented it to city council for consideration. The contract called for a presentation to the board. It never happened. The report was also never on the board’s agenda.

I believe it is because the report did not recommend a new parking structure. Instead, it says, “The most fiscally prudent approach to meeting the additional demand: modernize parking management and better align parking prices with the cost of building and maintaining the system. »

On a 4-2 vote, council approved the concept of a parking structure, without the benefit of this crucial information.

The lack of transparency on the garage continues.

The city ​​reports council could approve mixed-use project in 2023, which will begin construction in 2024. However, there will be no construction unless the garage can obtain bond financing. And there are no bond agencies that will extend credit to the city’s downtown parking district if it cannot show annual revenue to pay the bond debt.

The city budget shows that in fiscal year 2022, the pandemic-affected downtown parking district’s deficit was $4 million, which is huge compared to the size of its expenditures of just over $8 million.

For 2023, the City forecasts a deficit of $2.6 million. There is no estimate of when the parking district will make ends meet, let alone generate the $2.9 million surplus according to city staff is required to make bond payments.

This surplus may never occur, because parking demand tends to decline in urban areas due, in part, to Uber and Lyft. Santa Cruz is no exception.

In 2019, parking advisor Patrick Siegmann told City Council, “Downtown Santa Cruz parking demand is down 10% from its 2008 peak.” The city council has already doubled parking rates from 2019. There is no quick fix to make city center parking profitable.

I believe that our community’s best hope for the upcoming construction of downtown housing is the Our Downtown, Our Future election measure, which modify the general plan to “require, where possible, that certain designated parcels within the Downtown Plan Area of ​​the City of Santa Cruz…be developed with affordable housing at all times, with parking permitted on the ground floor …”

These plots are currently municipal parking lots. The general plan would also recognize City Lot 4 (Cedar St. where the Farmers’ Market meets) as “the preferred long-term location of the downtown Farmers’ Market as well as other public fairs and events… This policy priority will not specifically prevent the development of affordable housing and associated uses on Lot 4.”

Without the cornerstone of funding a parking garage, the process of developing city housing on these downtown lots becomes simpler.

Opponents of the Our Town Center initiative embrace the false premise that we cannot have affordable housing while creating a permanent home for our beloved Farmer’s Market on an enhanced community commons on Cedar Street.

Fortunately, we can do both.

Rick Longinotti is Chairman of the Campaign for sustainable transport, which aims to reduce our community’s reliance on car travel by making it safe and convenient to get around without a private car. Rick is a marriage and family therapist and a former electrical contractor. He has lived in Santa Cruz for 33 years.

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Government Center Parking Garage Demolition to Resume – NECN

Demolition of the Government Center parking lot in downtown Boston is set to resume on Monday, nearly four months after a deadly collapse.

Road closures at the demolition site are expected to be in effect until Labor Day.

“It seems to be some kind of cursed project,” said Mike Werner, who usually walks under the Congress Street garage on his way to work.

Demolition of the Government Center parking lot in downtown Boston is set to resume on Monday, nearly four months after a deadly collapse.

The garage was being demolished as part of a $1.5 billion development project. Work was suspended after part of the ninth floor collapsed on March 26, killing Peter Monsini, a 51-year-old wrecker who was driving a construction vehicle.

“In my mind, the sooner they can get rid of this thing and have it demolished, get all the dodgy beams out of the tunnels,” Werner said, “the better.”

Crews will return to Boston’s Government Center Garage to resume demolition months after a deadly collapse.

As work continued on Monday, a spokesman for Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden said the investigation is continuing as prosecutors await a final report from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. For its part, OSHA said Monday it is continuing to investigate and has no timeline for when it will complete its investigation.

“I think it’s a big mess,” Orlando Abreu said Monday as he left work. “I grew up here, I saw this building, it’s a mess, it’s a big mess.”

The collapse that killed Monsini reportedly caused structural damage to rail tunnels under the garage, prompting the MBTA to announce a temporary suspension of rail service in June.

Extent of demolition work, starting July 11. (Courtesy of HYM Investment Group LLC)

HYM Investment Group, the company behind the Bullfinch Crossing project, said it was ready to resume operations on Monday.

Project-related road closures began on Sunday, leaving drivers and pedestrians to experience the new routes.

Temporary routes for vehicles and pedestrians, from July 10. (Courtesy of HYM Investment Group LLC)

The section of Congress and Merrimack streets that runs under the garage will be closed for about two months, diverting traffic around the block.

“It’s pretty new. I’ve been walking under it for a while,” said Julian Rossello. “It’s definitely embarrassing, but I understand, with what’s going on with the demolition of the parking lot.”

“Maybe that [will] take me five more minutes,” said LingXi Yen. “It’s a small inconvenience, not a lot.”

A call for a “dangerous and unstable work site” was issued at this same construction site at the Government Center garage in January 2022.

In addition to the road closure, a section of Sudbury Street will be changed from a one-way street to a two-way street until the demolition is complete.

With respect to the MBTA, no impact to bus and train service at Haymarket station is anticipated.

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Dealing with parking problems | News, Sports, Jobs


It’s been more than two months since the Center Wheeling parking garage closed due to structural issues that surfaced during work on the adjacent Valley Professional building, which will soon be the new home of the Wheeling Police Department.

The garage, which once served as the main parking spot for workers and visitors to the Ohio Valley Medical Center, needed to undergo much-needed repairs before its closure, estimated to be worth millions of dollars. Plans for the structure are currently unknown, meaning it will likely remain closed for the foreseeable future.

“We don’t have all the numbers yet,” City Manager Robert Herron told our reporter last week when asked for an update.

Leaving the structure closed adds to the concern that many in Wheeling have over a number of issues. It adds to the feeling that when things break in Wheeling — downtown streets and the Market Street Bridge are two examples — they’re never fixed.

Let the public know the status of the garage and what will be done. It’s the least the city should do for a taxpayer-owned structure.



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Demolition of Government Center parking lot to resume – NBC Boston

Demolition of Boston’s Government Center garage is set to resume next week, shutting down part of Congress Street for the rest of the summer.

The portion of Congress Street below the garage will be closed from July 10 through Labor Day to allow demolition of the garage to safely resume, developer HYM Construction said in a statement on Tuesday.

Extent of demolition work, from July 11. (Courtesy of HYM Investment Group LLC)

The closure is part of previously planned work, HYM said. Demolition work is expected to resume on July 11.

While this section of Congress Street is closed, Sudbury Street will change from a one-way street to a two-way street to alleviate traffic issues.

No impact to MBTA service in the region is expected.

Temporary roads for vehicles and pedestrians, from July 10. (Courtesy of HYM Investment Group LLC)

HYM said the demolition plans had been reviewed by inspectors and engineers and the company had been cleared to resume work. They said there was no fear that the columns under the garage could pose a safety hazard as they had recently been reinforced.

“The resumption of work on the Government Center Garage is being conducted with the utmost respect for strict industry protocol, ensuring the safety of our workers and the public is a priority at all times,” the company said.

At this stage, no night work is planned.

Congress Street is expected to reopen to the public after Labor Day, but HYM said future demolition work will be required.

Demolition of the garage has been on hold since March 26, when several floors collapsed, killing a construction worker.

Peter Monsini, 51, from Easton, was completing demolition work in a construction vehicle which rolled over the side of the barn when the structure collapsed, falling from a significant height. He was found under a pile of rubble and pronounced dead at the scene by authorities.

Monsini was the single father of a 17-year-old son, his family said.

The Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Suffolk District Attorney’s Office continue to investigate his death.

A call for a “dangerous and unstable work site” was issued at this same construction site at the Government Center garage in January 2022.

Less than two weeks ago, the MBTA was forced to suspend Green Line and Orange Line service after it discovered that at least one support column under the Government Center garage was “severely deteriorated” due to years of water damage.

Service was allowed to resume a few days later after the support column was reinforced.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Parking is a problem for commissioners

HOLMES BEACH — Parking always creates problems for city commissioners.

Commissioners reignited a conversation about banning parking garages in the city during a June 28 business session. Unfortunately for them, that conversation got a little murky when they started looking at offsite and business parking regulations that force drivers to back up on busy roads.

At the urging of Mayor Judy Titsworth, commissioners agreed to move the ordinance to first reading for further discussion and review due to a shortened meeting schedule for the summer.

The discussion began with a discussion about banning multi-level parking structures, or garages, in the city. Multi-level parking garages are not currently an approved use in any Holmes Beach zoning district, but may be approved through a special exception. If the proposed settlement is enacted, the special exceptions approval pathway would be lost. While the commissioners are not opposed to covered parking, the draft ordinance states that parking can only take place on the ground floor. It does not prohibit housing or business on the second floor.

If it passes two public hearings and votes by commissioners, the proposed ban on parking garages would derail Manatee County Commissioner Kevin Van Ostenbridge’s plans to sue a parking garage.

When the subject was previously raised at a Holmes Beach commission working session, Van Ostenbridge took to the podium during public comments to warn city commissioners of the proposed ban, saying he planned to submit a proposal for parking in the county. -owned public beach. He left before the discussion started but told Titsworth he was listening to the meeting on Zoom.

While the commissioners were able to agree on the issue of parking, the discussion got a bit derailed when they ventured into other points, including how and where to allow off-site parking for businesses. City Attorney Erica Augello warned commissioners that any changes to current offsite parking regulations will affect existing businesses and commercial properties if those properties undergo major renovations or need to be rebuilt.

Augello noted that paid parking is already banned in all areas of the city.

In an additional discussion about parking, Police Chief Bill Tokajer said city leaders have spoken with representatives from Hancock Whitney Bank. During this conversation, he said that while bank officials were willing to pursue the beach parking deal with the city, they were unhappy with the arrangement, causing problems for bank customers.

He said the tow zone signs placed on the grounds by the bank were causing confusion for bathers and the parking lot was not well used by visitors. Tokajer recommended against attempting to re-establish a beach parking arrangement with the bank.

“I can’t find a compelling reason to reopen it,” commissioner Terry Schaefer said of the lot. He added that the city does not benefit Manatee County by opening the lot to after-hours beachgoers and that insurance for parking costs the city money.

“I think the bank has done a very good public service to our island and our visitors,” Commissioner Jayne Christenson said. “I congratulate them.”

The Stewards elected not to proceed with the attempt to renew the parking contract.

Related coverage

The gloves come off during a discussion in the parking lot

Parking changes at Holmes Beach planned

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Fire in North West London car park deemed suspicious



Police believe a fire in an underground car park that filled the north-west London air with thick smoke may have been deliberately started.

Fire crews were called to the parking lot of an apartment building at 50 Capulet Lane near Beaverbrook Avenue just before 7:30 a.m. Saturday. Several people had called 911 to report heavy smoke visible over several blocks.

Firefighters quickly extinguished the blaze and no injuries were reported.

A damage estimate has not yet been released.

“The fire has been deemed suspicious in nature and the investigation has been entrusted to members of the London Police Service’s Street Crime Unit, with assistance from the London Fire Service and the Office of the fire marshal,” London police said.

Anyone with information about the fire is asked to call police at 519-661-5670 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

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How should Norwalk redesign the Yankee Doodle parking lot?

NORWALK — The city is seeking public comment on the Yankee Doodle Garage renovation designs.

The city held a public event this week at the Wall Street District parking lot for community members to view the proposed paint colors and remodeling of the structure and discuss what they want to see done with the area.

Nearly two dozen people attended the event with various stations showcasing design options, including a virtual reality headset allowing attendees to view potential garage designs, said Jim Travers, transportation manager, Norwalk mobility and parking.

“We got good guidelines from people who were there to set up. We’re going through some of the notes tonight,” Travers said Wednesday morning. “We really heard the desire to have it look nicer and the lower level brighter. We are looking at putting a canopy over the entrance and exits and seeing how to increase the lighting there. We have heard a lot about lighting.

Two main designs offered to public opinion are to cut the concrete ribs of the first floor of the garage, brighten and open up the space. Both designs paint the exterior of the garage in different shades of blue or paint the building in rainbow colors, Travers said.

With both designs, the garage will receive a pressure wash before work begins and the removal of the first floor ribs, Travers said. There is no cost difference between the two models, he said.

Both designs also plan to paint the interior of each level a different color, which will make it easier for people to remember where they parked, Travers said. The project is expected to cost between $1.2 million and $1.3 million, he said.

“It was the most profitable. the others we were hiding the ribs,” Travers said. “We avoid long-term maintenance costs for the ribs and take advantage of what’s here instead of hiding.”

Since the garage, which was built in 1975, is somewhat underutilized, closing several parts at once for construction does not pose a major problem for operations, Travers said.

After gathering feedback on potential garage upgrades, the city intends to post an online survey next week to finalize design plans, Travers said.

The survey will remain open for several weeks, depending on the response rate from the public, and along with the two paint options, different landscaping and lighting designs will be chosen, Travers said.

“I think our wish is that we go through the design process towards the end of this year, and we would go out to bid, choosing a contractor to start in the spring,” Travers said. “With any luck, we’ll start construction in the spring and finish in the fall of next year. This brings us in line with what we see to intersect Belden and Mott.

The garage design plans are part of a larger project, presented to the public in mid-June, reinvigorating the Wall Street district, including rebuilding the intersection outside the Wall Street Library and Theater , widening the neighborhood’s sidewalks and improving the neighborhood’s appearance.

The Yankee Doodle and Wall Street events were designed to involve the public in the decision-making process, city spokeswoman Michelle Woods Matthews said.

“Wall Street’s launch goal was to be interactive with the community, transparent, and to really engage with it right away,” Woods Matthews said. “So we had the same goals for this event.”

Flyers for the public inquiry will be posted in the Wall Street area in the coming weeks, along with online outreach related to the inquiry.

[email protected]

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SLO to build new parking lot, update structure security

More than two years after a man died in a San Luis Obispo parking lot, the city is looking to improve the safety of its existing parking lots and the planned future garage in the Cultural Arts District.

The San Luis Obispo City Council voted unanimously at its June 21 meeting to approve the parking expense. They include $1.4 million for the new structure and $200,000 for the existing buildings.

“We have three people who have died falling out of these parking lots in San Luis Obispo, and I really wish this didn’t happen to anyone else,” Atascadero resident Mary Jane Jodry told The Tribune. “The last was my son two and a half years ago.”

Her son, Thomas Jodry, 21, died after falling from the third floor of the Marsh Street parking lot in San Luis Obispo in September 2019.

Jodry’s cause of death was ultimately ruled “undetermined”, but his family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against David Allen Knight, who had been drinking with Jodry before his death.

Mary Jane Jodry believes there are several areas where the city can improve the safety of its downtown parking structures, and has attended council meetings and met with city staff to talk about safety.

SLO_ThomasJodryfamilyandfri
Thomas Jodry (known as Tommy) died in a fall from the Marsh Street parking lot in San Luis Obispo on September 14, 2019. David Middlecamp [email protected]

Do SLO parking structures have to meet new safety standards?

The parking structure at the corner of Palm and Morro streets opened in 1988, while the Marsh Street garage opened in 1990 and expanded in 2002. The city’s third parking structure, also located on Palm Street, opened in 2006.

The report presented a maintenance project plan for these structures, which included repairing cracked concrete, loose barrier cables and deteriorated concrete joint sealants.

But renovating old garages is difficult, said Gaven Hussey, the city’s parking program manager.

Because the structures were built before many safety standards were in place, he said, the city is not required to update them under state and federal laws.

SLO_22251
The old section of the Marsh Street parking garage has open windows, the new annex on the right has many screened windows. Mary Jane Jodry calls for safety improvements in city parking lots on May 10, 2022; his son Thomas died in a fall from the Marsh Street structure. David Middlecamp [email protected]

The city council recently approved funding to consider adding security features such as phone booths to older structures, Hussey said, but it’s unclear when those additional security upgrades will be in place. The city is currently evaluating which security features are most feasible to add.

Phone booths are concentrated in the expanded portion of the Marsh Street structure and the Palm 2006 structure.

Hussey said phone booths allow people to connect with law enforcement, especially when alone.

In order to prevent fatal falls, Hussey said San Luis Obispo is considering adding wiring and netting to its parking structures.

The city recently added barriers around heating and cooling units on upper floors of structures, he said, as well as signs displaying the phone number of a suicide prevention hotline. .

“We understand things are going to happen, but anything we can do to help mitigate these incidents in our parking structures is our goal,” Hussey said.

SLO_22221 (2)
Signs are posted on parking structures in San Luis Obispo offering help for depression on May 10, 2022; Thomas Jodry died in a fall from the third level of the Marsh Street structure. David Middlecamp [email protected]

Cameras in parking lots are a tough job, city says

One of the main changes Jodry would like to see in parking structures in San Luis Obispo is more security cameras.

Security cameras currently only cover pay stations, so when an incident occurs, it’s hard to know what happened.

“If people saw cameras, they wouldn’t even hang around here,” Jodry said, adding that cameras could also help prevent vagrancy and crime.

According to Jodry, the presence of more cameras could have given more answers to his family. The circumstances surrounding her son’s death remain a mystery as there is little documentation of what happened, she said.

Hussey said San Luis Obispo is studying the possibility of adding security cameras to parking lots, but added that the city does not currently have the online storage capacity needed for more video footage.

He noted that the presence of cameras does not necessarily prevent a crime from occurring.

According to Hussey, the new garage to be built near Palm and Nipomo streets will have security cameras on each floor that will both help with security and also calculate the structure’s occupancy rate.

The new structure will also have a taller barrier and more fencing in areas with larger windows.

Additionally, Hussey said, the city is considering adding more daytime staff and nighttime security to parking structures. The city currently has one security guard to patrol all three parking lots, but hopes to have more by the end of July.

Jodry hopes that the efforts of his family and other members of the community will improve safety inside the city’s parking lots.

“It won’t bring my son back. There’s a lot at stake in our case,” Jodry said. “That’s just one aspect that I really want taken care of.”

This story was originally published June 28, 2022 9:39 a.m.

San Luis Obispo Tribune related stories

Chloe Jones is a forensic and crime reporter at the San Luis Obispo Tribune. She is originally from Phoenix, where she received her bachelor’s degree in journalism and her master’s degree in investigative journalism from Arizona State University. When she’s not reporting, she loves exploring the outdoors and spoiling her two rescue dogs, Camilla and Bugsy Malone.

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Rome will spend ARPA money to demolish a parking lot

Rome’s Common Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to use nearly $3.5 million in American Restoration Plan Act (ARPA) funding to demolish the James Street parking lot and replace it with surface land with green spaces.

Using ARPA funds to demolish the parking lot was one of the ideas floated in March by the Common Council’s ARPA Committee, a group created to help influence where the city spends the nearly $25 million. dollars of ARPA funding it received earlier this year.

The ARPA funding will be in addition to the $1,046,000 in Downtown Revitalization (DRI) funding the city has already allocated for the demolition of the garage. This brings the project total to $4.5 million.

At the March ARPA committee meeting, there were three possible scenarios for the use of ARPA funding:

  • Repair the garage, which would cost around $8 million.
  • Demolish the garage and retain a parking area only at ground level, which would cost approximately $1.2 million.
  • Demolish the garage and install a one-story garage, which would cost approximately $8 million.

Rome City Council president Stephanie Viscelli said the city opted to demolish the current garage and provide a surface parking area, complete with green space.

“The cost of demolition and resurfacing was significantly less than repair or replacement, which could each cost upwards of $10 million, with repairs resulting in approximately 15 years of use and a new garage with 50 years,” Viscelli said. . “A parking study indicated that our current parking lot is underutilized, and even with only surface land, we will have enough parking spaces downtown, even during peak hours.”

Rome Mayor Jacqueline Izzo agreed to use the combination of DRI and ARPA funding to demolish the parking lot.

She said the garage was carefully assessed by structural engineers and architects who determined that even major repairs would only give the garage another decade of life.

It’s in the city’s best interest to demolish the structure and go with the surface lot, Izzo said.

“The garage has been identified as a DRI priority project and as such the city is required to provide gap funding at the DRI award to complete the project,” Izzo said. “Fortunately, US bailout (ARPA) funds are available and the cost to our taxpayers will be nil, while fulfilling the city’s obligation to provide the best and most used parking lot for those who work and visit the downtown.”

Possible expenses of the town hall

The city has also talked about spending ARPA money on renovations to City Hall. This was another main topic at the March ARPA committee meeting.

As with the parking lot, the city is also already using DRI funding for the project.

As described in the DRI, City Hall is in need of replacement windows, has leaks, roof issues, and electrical and ventilation issues. There was also talk of including a public area in City Hall that would allow residents access to certain parts of the building when it was closed.

Although not yet finalized, a possible price for ARPA funding for the renovation of City Hall was estimated at $1.8 million in March.

Viscelli said the city has yet to make a decision on whether to use ARPA funding for the City Hall rehabilitation.

Izzo said the town hall is almost 50 years old and has many shortcomings.

The possible use of ARPA money would help provide needed renovations at no cost to the taxpayer.

“Looking ahead to the next 50 years, the building requires substantial renovation,” Izzo said. “We are working on these issues with our consulting team of architects and engineers to come up with the best possible solution to fortify the building for the next 50 years.”

Expenses already known

The city has already spent approximately $2 million in ARPA funding to support the Rome Fire Department with the purchase of a new 100ft tower truck and engine 1 replacement.

On March 9, City Council passed a resolution authorizing the transfer of $343,500 in ARPA funding to a capital account. These funds will be used for the contract with Dodson and Associates to prepare the design and layout of the new water infrastructure at the Woodhaven site.

Overall, the city plans to use nearly $4 million in total ARPA funding for various infrastructure works in the residential Woodhaven neighborhood on Park Drive.

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Never mind traffic backups or fewer drivers. This parking lot owner buys in major cities.

Gregg Reuben, CEO and founder of parking lot owner and operator Centerpark, credited the first company he started when he was 19 and a student at UCLA for his 30-year career. For a gig hosting a weekend car show, he rented a 100,000 square foot space on a development site off Interstate 405 in Los Angeles and turned it into a public parking lot during the week when not needed for the event.

It was a risk because no one knew “if there was a need for parking,” Reuben said in an interview. “It became a hit. During the week we filled the lot. This really sets the theme for my business going forward: you want to have as much control over your underlying property as possible. You want to diversify your revenue and maximizing usage. Over the next 30 years, that will become my theme.

Gregg Reuben has worked in the parking industry for 30 years. (Center Park)

Fast forward, after stints with what he said were America’s three largest parking lot operators – ABM Parking, Laz Parking and SP Plus – graduating from Harvard Business School, and founding another management company parking lot before selling it, now Centerpark is his answer to applying everything he’s learned to capitalize on what he calls a “niche” space in New York City. He also sees similar opportunities in other hub cities, including Boston and Washington, D.C.

Reuben is bullish on parking despite a drop in ridership as more people work from home and shop online, reducing the need to travel to urban centers.

“I started Centerpark with the intention of building a business that is primarily focused on real estate ownership,” Reuben told CoStar News. He adds that he learned working for these parking companies that most owners don’t operate and that there are “very few” who both own and operate. “There is a misalignment of interests between operators and owners.”

Here’s the supply and demand formula behind parking in the heart of New York: From 2015 to 2022, the number of off-street parking lots and licensed garages in Manhattan has declined by more than 14%, while vehicles registered to households have increased. more than 27% during the same period, according to Reuben.

“There continues to be a significant loss of parking in Manhattan as vehicle ownership and use continues to grow,” he said.


Against this backdrop, Centerpark spent approximately $100 million to purchase a portfolio of 20 parking properties, primarily in or around midtown Manhattan. This includes the recent purchase of two parking condominiums totaling 40,000 sq. units. residential tower, respectively – from Muss Development for $8.25 million.

Icon Parking leases and operates space at both properties, with Centerpark becoming the operator after Icon’s lease at one of the properties expires next year. Icon still has 15 years left in his lease on the other property.

Centerpark is still actively seeking and expects to have 25 or 26 properties by the end of the year, Reuben said. He declined to identify his source of funding, except to say that one of his former Harvard professors is an investor and also sits on the company’s advisory board.

“We believe the parking fundamentals in Manhattan remain strong,” he said. “It is unlike any other market. When you look at demand versus supply, it’s very unique. … The challenge for anyone else is that it’s an esoteric asset class. This requires specific industry knowledge.

Even though data shows that only about two-fifths of New York City employees have returned to their desks, the Centerpark study citing various research shows that the total number of vehicles entering Manhattan has returned to pre-pandemic levels while that safety and other concerns reduce transit ridership.

A case in point: The number of cars in Manhattan’s Centerpark garages was up about 10% last year from pre-pandemic levels in 2019, Reuben told CoStar.

Reuben admits there are market challenges. On the one hand, supply is an issue. “There aren’t a lot of buying opportunities,” he said, adding that there were only more than 1,050 parking lots in Manhattan compared to 60,000 buildings. Centerpark often proactively contacts sellers, many of whom have “multi-generational ownership,” he said.


Then there are traffic jams.

“The biggest threat to the industry is slow traffic,” he said. “Congestion is our biggest threat. … The convenience of driving and parking in Manhattan is at the heart of our value proposition. Congestion can deteriorate this part of the parking proposal.

Meanwhile, despite inbound traffic recovering after the pandemic, there have actually been fewer cars entering Manhattan over the past decade, according to Reuben. Still, he believes there are “significant opportunities for growth”.

“There are always challenges in the market. We see it more as a contrarian strategy,” Reuben said. “We identify properties where we believe we still have the opportunity to improve performance by owning and operating them. … We invest heavily in technology. Car park [operators] slow to adopt the technology. They have been slow to take sophisticated approaches to parking.

Centerpark is one of the first companies in the industry to create and use mobile booking functionality, he said, adding that it is also continuing its “technology efforts” including ticketless transactions and digital payments.

As the owner of parking properties, Centerpark has also created spaces for other uses, including self-storage, restaurants, gyms and newsstands, according to Reuben. The company said it has developed a full-service private parking condominium at 301 E. 69th St., where spaces sell for at least $199,000 each.

“It’s an advantage to be an owner-operator,” said Reuben, whose penchant for entrepreneurship dates back to age 7, when he was delivering newspapers. “We are profitable. Our investors are happy.

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Construction of the Connecticut parking garage at the new station on the rails: CEG

(Courtesy of City of Stamford website)

One week, there was little to see of the parking lot waiting near the Stamford Transportation Center in southwestern Connecticut.

The next, the shell of a building jutted into the horizon.

This is on purpose, according to officials of the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CTDOT).

Contractors working on the site are on track to complete the second stage of the 928-space parking lot by September to serve one of the busiest stations in the state, said CTDOT spokesman Josh Morgan. , at the Stamford Advocate.

Every day, items are “brought in and dropped on site, much like building a puzzle,” he said.

City and state leaders opened the $81.7 million parking lot in October 2021 to much fanfare. The building is intended to replace a crumbling garage on Station Place, just across the street.

Both CTDOT and Stamford characterize the new garage as part of a plan to reorganize an area near the station plagued by wider transport problems.

With precast concrete slabs, work progresses quickly

The state agency launched a master planning process earlier this year for the Stamford Transportation Hub, which included floating options for a dedicated carpool area and pedestrian improvements, the lawyer reported on 15 June.

Morgan explained that the first year of the project involved a lot of work out of the public eye, such as drainage improvements and foundation work. At the same time, “hundreds and hundreds” of the necessary precast concrete slabs were created offsite, he said.

When preliminary work on South State Street was completed, the concrete slabs were moved into place and construction could begin.

And quick.

Using prefabricated elements, such as prefabricated construction, tends to speed up a project’s construction time by reducing common obstacles such as weather-related delays, Morgan said.

“So if you walk past today and again this time…next week, it’s probably [going to] a little bit different,” he added. “After a year without much, everything is [now] happens all of a sudden.”

Prefabricated products aren’t the only reason the structure will be built by September.

According to Morgan, the agreement with the parking lot contractors states that construction “should be completed in approximately five months” and that part of the work began in May.

But once the building is complete, there is still work to be done, he said. From late 2022 through summer 2023 – when CTDOT plans to unveil the garage – contractors will work on interior finishes.

Next, CTDOT will connect the garage to the Stamford transport hub via an enclosed pedestrian bridge. Morgan said the term should be in place “by the end of the year.”

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Hotel owner challenges potential for nearby eight-story parking garage


A Kalispell business owner said adding a proposed eight-story building downtown would detract from the town’s aesthetic.

John Barr, owner of the Grand Hotel on Main Street, told City Council on Monday he was concerned about details surrounding a planned car park west of his hotel.

“We purchased a historic building downtown and were concerned about an eight-story structure right next to the hotel,” he said. “If we do that here, it’s going to be the most prominent architectural feature of the downtown district when you drive downtown – you’re going to see a large cement structure even though it’s covered in brick.”

“It certainly won’t look like an 1890s western town like it does right now,” he added. “It is clear that the development of this will affect the downtown district for decades to come. It requires thought.

The developers behind the Charles Hotel and associated parking garage at the intersection of First Avenue and First Street West recently approached the city to redesign the parking structure to include approximately 70 housing units . The move would make the parking structure approximately eight stories tall.

The council held a work session on June 13 to discuss the concept. He appeared to favor adding housing – noting the shortage of housing in the city – but wanted more details on the plans, including where residents would park.

The hotel, planned at the corner of Third Street West and Main Street, would replace an existing surface parking lot. Construction of the nearby parking garage would then provide parking for the hotel and the public.

Barr said he thinks the addition of the Charles Hotel downtown will improve business for everyone. Although he agreed that “affordable housing is a crisis” in the community, he questioned whether this was the best location, noting that parking would be needed to support this housing.

“We have a very strong interest in this as owners of this hotel,” he said. “To keep the hotel running we need parking and will we have enough parking as we currently have. We need enough parking nearby as we have a lot of elderly guests.

DURING THE MEETING, the Board held a public hearing on changes to the Eagle Valley Ranch development on US 93 North, but heard no comments on the matter.

Spartan Holdings is requesting a Zoning Map Amendment, Growth Policy Map Amendment and Annexation with initial zoning for the property at 3201 US 93.

The Eagle Valley Ranch PUD was established in 2018. The developer acquired the adjacent land containing the former Homefitters building and the neighboring vacant property currently in the county that he would like to incorporate into the subdivision.

The Board approved the draft budget for FY23 and set a public hearing for July 5 on the budget. Then, on August 15, the city council must adopt the final budget.

The city’s preliminary budget is just over $111 million compared to last year’s budget of $104 million. The General Fund is expected to be $14.1 million, approximately $550,000 less than last year’s budget, primarily because the General Fund budget does not include as many capital expenditures.

In a related matter, Council approved a wage adjustment for non-unionized City employees with an adjustment based on 3.5%.

As part of the budget process, the Board is considering the recommendation to adjust the wages of employees not represented by one of the three collective bargaining units in an effort to maintain consistency among employees.

Managing Editor Heidi Desch can be reached at 758-4421 or [email protected]

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Batteries explode in Milwaukee hospital parking lot

A battery explosion Tuesday morning in a hospital parking lot injured two people. It happened just after 8:30 a.m. at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in the west parking structure. The Milwaukee Fire Department said a battery explosion injured two workers and caused an acid spill. Fire dispatched their Hazmat team to clean up this spill. We don’t know what their injuries are. Aurora Health Care released a statement saying, “This morning, a container of recycled batteries burned in a waste collection area outside Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center. Milwaukee HAZMAT crews have contained the scene. and there is no impact on our patients, visitors and team members.”

A battery explosion Tuesday morning in a hospital parking lot injured two people.

It happened just after 8:30 a.m. at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center in the west parking structure.

The Milwaukee Fire Department said a battery explosion injured two workers and caused an acid spill.

Fire sent their Hazmat team to clean up this spill.

We don’t know what their injuries are.

Aurora Health Care released a statement saying, “This morning, a container of recycled batteries burned in a waste collection area outside Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center. Milwaukee HAZMAT crews have contained the scene. and there is no impact on our patients, visitors and team members.

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Planned Replacement of Manatee County Parking Garage






MANATEE COUNTY – After recent engineering investigations revealed structural issues in the county’s parking structure, Manatee County officials are taking action to mitigate risk while continuing to keep employees and citizens safe.

“The garage is safe to park,” County Administrator Scott Hopes said. “Technical studies have confirmed this.”

But these studies also confirmed that the concrete and steel car park – built in the late 1980s in a very wet and humid environment – began to weaken from the inside.

“There may have been a period of deferred maintenance,” he explained. This resulted in water intrusion into the concrete, causing the steel to deteriorate. Dr Hopes went on to say that the problem now is the estimated costs to carry out several repairs. recommended by the technical study and the duration of these repairs over the now limited lifetime of the structure.

“It would only save us five to seven years of useful life,” he said. The decision to replace the garage with a new one – designed to last 50 years or more – was therefore made.

“It will be safe today,” county commission chairman Kevin Van Ostenbridge said. “It will be safe tomorrow.”

But he says that by taking decisive action and moving quickly to put contingencies in place, all sorts of potential disasters are averted.

“We allocate funds in advance so that even if the situation changes and we need to act quickly, we will have the funds to do so,” he said.

Although there is no timeline for demolition or construction, plans and schedules are being developed, and these details will be shared with employees and other stakeholders as they unfold. progress of the garage replacement process.

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Readers’ comments

George Mendez
JUNE 22, 2022 • Every parking garage in Florida is built in an environment of humidity, rain, storms, and the occasional “nameless storm” or hurricane. Factors that MUST BE considered during design and construction. Contractors bid for the project, with the winner bringing in subcontractors who may or may not be familiar with building parking garages. The government entity responsible for oversight should ensure that building inspectors should be trained for this type of construction. This idea of ​​allowing self-inspections has been the downfall of several condominium buildings built on the river. Taxpayers’ money is used and must be accountable to them.
Paul Finner
JUNE 19, 2022 • Figures. Farewell library. Farewell Btown Town Hall. Farewell to the old little theater where they said there was no room to build a new theater so they built a giant hotel. Rename Manatee County “Builders County”.

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Van Ostenbridge opposes Holmes Beach parking ban

Readers’ comments

paul reed
JUNE 22, 2022 • Leave AMI alone. stop the 5 million which is 5 million to be spent on the kingfisher boat launch and cutting down 61 trees there. After 27 years on AMI, we are ready to go. Too many people in a small space.
David Levin
JUNE 20, 2022 • Just corporate wellness for developers. They’re posing as Republicans, but it’s just a Halloween cosplay. I will say this, Little Kevy looks like Lord Varys the eunuch from Game of Thrones – meme coming soon! Buck gets ten jobs from Kathy and Ray for the developers one way or another.
Kathy T.
JUNE 20, 2022 • I agree with Ray, we need to keep up with and develop the growing population and their rights as beachgoers. Whether tourists or residents. Also, parking garages are no different from the huge rental condominiums that are allowed to build. Just a suggestion, but instead of just the builder making a profit, maybe a certain percentage of the profit should be spent on beach preservation to even be allowed to build parking lots. Something to discuss that would benefit the earth as well as the people.
Carol Ann Felt Pens
JUNE 19, 2022 • No matter how we try to stretch it, the islands can only handle so many people and traffic before they ruin what people want to go there in the first place. Island cities have formed to protect their communities and the citizens who live there, with a decent respect for their guests as rendered, and reliance on funds from this and other sources to maintain their environment for all . The art of being a statesman is to reach an honorable compromise and solutions, without denying the inevitable or inflicting new unproductive conflicts.
hong kong
JUNE 19, 2022 • The island is as big as the island. They can put 5 parking garages there and as soon as the county approves building east there will still never be enough parking. It looks like an exercise in futility that will only ruin the quality of the island. Trying to think of other islands/keys in the area that have public parking lots…no, I can’t think of any. There may be a reason for this.
Katie Pierola
JUNE 19, 2022 • Here we go again, Commissioner Van Ostenbridge threatens the town of Holmes Beach for state appropriations for the storm water problem. He still wants the parking lot. His job as District 3 Commissioner is to help them. The 3 cities should levy 1% more on the tourist tax for infrastructure. Tourism development gets 3% and doesn’t need it. Their marketing tool is AMI beach. If they only got 2%, it might slow down traffic + parking. Please, the mayors of the island are fighting for that extra penny! Fl lawmakers must take Fl’s coastline as gospel.
Russell Owens
JUNE 19, 2022 • The island has about as much population and construction as it can support. What are the environmental issues of placing such a large, heavy building on what is mostly a sandbar? The best solution to this problem is a shuttle for day users with a garage on the mainland.
Arthur Tooth
JUNE 19, 2022 • Anyone who objects to kids visiting the beach on a sunny Florida afternoon is just plain unethical. The rest of the discussion is just noise meant to distract you from the real issue. Families should be able to use public beaches. That’s all. There is nothing more.
David Daniel
JUNE 19, 2022 • Hooray for Mayor Titsworth! You go girl…and continue down a path to a Manatee County District 3 race to topple a pompous, arrogant, uncivil, and indifferent commissioner. When a person writes to VanOstenbridge – his response is always a few cut-and-paste words that mean he doesn’t care what his constituents say. It’s not like he gets so many letters he doesn’t have time. Leave me alone. He must go !!
Deby
JUNE 19, 2022 • REAP what you sow in manatee county….the chair is a LOSER…he has a takeover mind and the chair title went to his head…then we have an ethics complaints individual whose lips continue to lie… then we have a drunken individual whose dui investigation takes 2 months to determine when his wife aided and aided her drunken husband and was ALLOWED to bring him back home while other normal citizens would be in jail with bail and a lawyer…then we have a preacher boy who should have stayed a preacher or saved prostitutes and wrote bounced checks…HOPES will continue to ‘to be hopeless…Maybe there will be investigations by OUTSIDE AGENCIES…something positive has to happen in our county.
MM
JUNE 19, 2022 • Citizens should be informed that this demagoguery by the KVO started because the mayor would not endorse any candidate for county commissioner in 2020. He entered his new role as commissioner with a chip on his shoulder from the beginning not for the reasons of helping to govern the citizens. Just look at any motion he has made in 2020. Unfortunately for him, he has no mind of his own and is just ruled by those he owes for campaign finance. It’s quite sad because if he had really taken a step back and thought about it, he could have made a difference instead of silencing those who want to debate.
David Levin
JUNE 19, 2022 • Obviously benefits the developer who requested it the most. Wants to pour concrete everywhere in paradise.
Rick Lewis
JUNE 19, 2022 • Short man syndrome refers to a condition in which a man feels inadequate due to his short stature and may try to compensate for it with overly aggressive behavior. The syndrome is often called Napoleon complex in reference to the famous military leader
Ray
JUNE 19, 2022 • It is evident that a parking garage on county-owned Holmes Beach property would benefit the citizens of Manatee County on the mainland. I have lived at Holmes Beach three times over many years and yes the island has changed and so has Manatee County. We have to accept that change is not necessarily good or bad, it is right and you have to adapt and adapt to the times you live in. Limiting beach access by preventing a parking option on county owned land seems pretty selfish and mean to me. . On a different note, how about the County Commission address the Coquina Beach parking debacle. About 1/3 of the public parking spaces are not usable due, I am told, to the bankruptcy of the contractor who worked on the site. It’s been going on for about a year and no one is saying anything about it.

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Proposed Multi-Family Housing Units for Future Kalispell Parking Garage

In the months following the town council’s approval of a five-storey hotel and around 250-space public car park in downtown Kalispell, developers of the separate properties proposed the addition of four floors for multi-family housing to the parking structure, which city officials discussed during a council business session on June 13.

The developers proposed to add 70 units to the future parking garage, which would be located on the city’s Eagles lot at the southeast corner of First Street West and First Avenue West. It would include studio, one and two bedroom units, according to preliminary designs, which would also include commercial space on the lower level of the garage.

Ownership of the city-owned parking garage would use Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and is expected to cost approximately $7 million before the multifamily housing component is proposed. Developers and city officials are considering transferring the parking structure to private ownership.

Of the approximately 250 parking spaces, approximately 90 would be leased by the developer for the hotel’s parking demand. The $47 million hotel development, located at Third Avenue and Main Street, is currently in the process of transferring land from the city to buyer developer, Montana Hotel Dev Partners, LLC.

Developers and city officials are proposing the addition of 38 parking spaces to the garage, causing councilors to fear that the additional spaces are still not enough to accommodate 70 households.

“Where would all these residents park? Councilwoman Jessica Dahlman asked city officials during the meeting.

TIF funds generated by the downtown district would be used to reimburse developers for the costs of constructing some of the parking spaces, and city officials are considering the possibility of using these funds to create housing for the labor, which is an allowable expense under state TIF laws. ; however, it is currently proposed that the units be priced at the market rate.

“(The developers) are happy with the market rate so we can push it through unless the council wants to push the road (TIF) through,” City Manager Doug Russell said.

In addition to the parking garage, the five-story hotel development was approved earlier this year at the Main Street location as part of the same project. It will feature 79 guest rooms, a full-service restaurant, rooftop bar and valet parking. Office space is also proposed for the project to accommodate hotel operations staff, likely in an existing building close to the hotel site.

A trio of developers from Compass Construction, BOND Partners and Alchemy Development collaborated on the project and formed Montana Hotel Dev Partners, LLC. The hotel and project developers were the only respondents to city officials’ request for development proposal submissions last year. The housing unit proposal should be approved by the planning board before being submitted to the city council for approval.

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The developer offers an 8-storey parking garage with housing


Kalispell City Council is interested in a concept to add accommodation to a downtown parking structure, pushing the proposed building approximately eight stories high.

The developers behind the Charles Hotel and the associated parking lot at the intersection of First Avenue and First Street West approached the city to modify the plan of the parking structure to include approximately 70 housing units.

The city council held a working session on Monday on the subject. Any changes to the hotel and parking agreement must be voted on by the board. The project must also go through the planning council and obtain final council approval.

In addition to 250 parking spaces, the four-story garage was designed to include 7,000 square feet of ground floor retail space. However, the developer is interested in adding four more floors to the building for multi-family housing.

Jarod Nygren, director of city development services, told council that while working on the project, the developer returned to seek changes to the plan. In addition to housing, the developer is seeking to retain ownership of the garage, rather than handing it over to the city.

“One thing we heard from the public is that the hotel is great, but why not the accommodation,” he said. “So I think that was factored into the developer’s mind.”

“We could also see the public benefits of including parking without having to own a building and pay for long-term maintenance,” Nygren said while noting that city staff wanted advice from council beforehand. to work out the details of the amendments to the agreement.

The city council was generally supportive of the housing addition and private ownership of the structure. Although some councilors had questions regarding the logistics, especially in terms of providing the necessary parking for the accommodations.

Councilor Sid Daoud said the town would benefit from housing

“I think we are all in favor of the arrival of these units,” he said. “But now we have to figure out what we want to do about parking these units.”

“I would hate to get to the point where the size of the garage isn’t big enough for the parking we need,” Councilor Sam Nunnally said. “We see this as a long-term plan for downtown to revitalize it and bring people downtown.”

REGARDING THE potential housing units, city staff also suggested working with the developer to ensure that at least some of the units are reserved as affordable units for labor. While this suggestion received some support from some advisers, it also prompted several questions about how it might be structured.

City manager Doug Russell said council could consider designating tax increase funding funds – which are already earmarked to be used for parking – to reduce the cost of some of the housing units that will be probably developed at the market rate.

“Any type of housing we add is good, but we have the ability to make sure it’s affordable housing for the workforce,” he said. “What they will build is housing at market price if we allow them to include housing in this project. But there is an opportunity here if the council wants to participate to add housing for the workforce.

Councilor Ryan Hunter said he would support housing, but wants to ensure that if the city contributes funding, housing is guaranteed to be affordable.

“It only makes sense to me if it’s a restricted act like permanently affordable,” he said. “Otherwise it could change a year later. We need to know that this will provide housing for this workforce in the future.

Daoud said that if the city subsidized housing with TIF funds, he would want to know more about the income levels allowed for people living in the housing and how it would be handled in the future.

Mayor Mark Johnson pointed out that the deal is already in place for the garage, but with the suggestion to add housing, this could be an opportunity for the city.

“We can use the tax increase funding to buy out that rent on a number of units because we’ve heard from the public over and over and from this Council that we need to do more to address the housing crisis,” did he declare. “It may not be the perfect option, but it is an option we can consider. We can look at the numbers and how we can structure that.

THE DEVELOPER plans to build a $47 million hotel on the corner of Third Street West and Main Street, which would also come with parking. The garage is expected to accommodate the hotel’s parking needs, replace displaced parking spaces in the two city-owned lots, and build additional spaces for future development.

The city is providing financial assistance to the parking garage project under the Kalispell Town Center TIF Assistance Program, which was developed to support redevelopment activities and advance the objectives of the center’s urban renewal plan -City of Kalispell. Hotel Charles should generate the TIF funds for parking.

The 89,000 square foot hotel is expected to feature 79 rooms, a restaurant, bar and lounge, retail spaces, conference space and a rooftop patio.

Montana Hotel Dev Partners is the developer behind the hotel and parking lot.

The estimated parking cost is $9.2 million.

Managing Editor Heidi Desch can be reached at 758-4421 or [email protected]

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Crews begin cleaning up after a fire in the Charleston International Airport parking lot

NORTH CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – Charleston International Airport officials are beginning to clean up the aftermath of two vehicles that caught fire in their parking lot.

The North Charleston Fire Department said on Twitter that it was on the scene at Charleston International Airport just after 11:30 a.m. Thursday.

Deputy Chief Stephanie Julazedah said two vehicles were involved in the blaze and one firefighter was slightly injured and was taken away by Charleston County Emergency Medical Services. No other injuries were reported.

The blaze was escalated to a structural fire when a North Charleston Deputy Fire Chief first arrived on the scene and then other units were on their way. The Charleston County Volunteer Rescue Team and the Charleston County Emergency Department also responded to assist during the incident.

Airport spokesman Spencer Pryor said a driver entering the car park reported a “burning smell” coming from his vehicle shortly after 11 a.m.

“The driver was able to exit the vehicle and contact emergency services,” Pryor said.

North Charleston firefighters say the fire started when this driver’s engine caught fire on the second floor of the Daily Parking Deck.

Following the first vehicle, a second vehicle also caught fire, according to Pryor. It was also extinguished, but not before several other vehicles in the area were damaged by the fire.

The daily garage is now open for passengers to park, except for two areas on levels two and three. The airport also says it will start trying to contact the owners of the vehicles.

Airport officials assessed the area for any possible damage to the garage.

This photo submitted by a viewer shows thick black smoke coming from the Charleston International Airport parking lot on Thursday morning. The North Charleston Fire Department says to avoid the area.(Barbara Hill)

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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New Stamford station car park rises ‘like building a puzzle’

STAMFORD – One week there was not much to see of the waiting car park near the Stamford transport hub.

The next, the shell of a building jutted into the horizon.

It’s on purpose, state transportation officials say.

Contractors are on track to complete the second stage of the nearly 1,000-space parking lot by September to serve one of the busiest stations in the state, the Department of Transportation spokesperson said. State, Josh Morgan, at the Stamford Advocate.

Every day, items are “brought in and dropped on site, much like building a puzzle,” Morgan said.


City and state leaders opened the $81.7 million, 928-seat building in October 2021 to much fanfare. The car depot is intended to replace a crumbling garage on Station Place, directly opposite the train station.

Both DOT and Stamford characterize the new garage as part of a plan to revamp an area near the station plagued by wider transportation issues.

The DOT this year began a master planning process for the Stamford Transportation Hub, floating options that included a dedicated carpool zone and pedestrian improvements in the process.

Morgan explained that the first year of the project involved a lot of work out of the public eye, such as drainage improvements and foundation work. But, at the same time, “hundreds and hundreds” of the necessary precast concrete slabs were created offsite, he said.

Upon completion of preliminary work on South State Street, the concrete slabs could be moved into place and construction could begin. And quick. Construction industry professionals claim that precast units speed up construction time by reducing common obstacles such as weather-related delays.

“So if you walk past it today and again this time…next week it’s probably going to be a little bit different,” he said. After a year without much, everything happened suddenly.

Prefabrication isn’t the only reason the structure will be built by September. Morgan said the agreement with the contractors states that construction “should be completed in approximately five months” and that part of the work began in May.

And once the construction is complete, there is still work to be done. From late 2022 until summer 2023 – when the department plans to unveil the garage – contractors will work on interior finishes.

Next, the DOT will connect the garage to the Stamford Transportation Center via an enclosed pedestrian bridge. Morgan said the bridge should be in place “by the end of the year”.

[email protected]

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State College Pugh Street parking lot temporarily closed

State College’s oldest — and second largest — downtown parking lot will be temporarily closed for about a week to make necessary repairs, according to the borough.

The 50-year-old Pugh Street parking garage will remain closed from 10 p.m. Sunday until 6 a.m. June 27. Per Borough spokesperson Kayla Lafferty, repairs at Pugh and upcoming repairs at other garages include fixing concrete chips and cracks, weather stripping, stair tread repairs rolling, repointing of brick areas, installation of new roof drains, traffic coatings and painting.

During the closure, Pugh permit holders and other drivers are asked to use the Fraser Street and Beaver Street parking garages instead, as the second and third levels of the McAllister Street parking deck will be reserved for McAllister license holders only. (McAllister’s ground floor will remain open to the public, however.)

According to Lafferty, maintenance costs this year for the four garages are expected to be around $1.46 million. The Fraser Street parking garage will be closed July 23-26 for traffic congestion, and the McAllister Street parking bridge will be subject to partial closures for short periods as needed, but will not require full closure .

Repairs were expected. A consultant advised the borough last year that the parking lots will require approximately $7.3 million in maintenance from 2021 to 2029, and officials then said the Pugh Street parking lot would last no more than “7 to 10 years”.

A new garage could possibly see the light of day. The Borough’s 2023-2027 Capital Improvement Plan, which essentially acts as a roadmap for future costs and projects, currently provides $35 million for “new parking structures,” including $26 million in 2026.

For now, however, local residents and visitors will have to undergo necessary repairs in Pugh, which has 491 parking spaces. Those with further questions are asked to contact the State College Parking Department at 814-278-4769.

Pughclosed.JPG
The Pugh Street parking garage will be closed June 20-27 for repairs. Abby Drey [email protected]

Josh Moyer earned his BA in Journalism from Penn State and his MS from Columbia. He has been involved in news and sports writing for nearly 20 years. He boasts the best athlete he’s ever seen as Tecmo Super Bowl’s Bo Jackson.

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Manatee County parking lot ‘deteriorating from inside’ needs replacement

MANATEE COUNTY (WFLA) – Monday through Friday, each week, more than 500 county employees use the parking garage attached to the Manatee County County Administration Building.

A 2021 inspection by a third-party engineering company revealed that the life of the structure had been cut short. The parking lot was built in the late 1980s, but county officials say it has fallen into disrepair due to “delayed maintenance.”

“The point is that it is a concrete and steel car park. We live in a very humid environment and there may have been a period of deferred maintenance which resulted in water intrusion in concrete, causing the steel to deteriorate,” County Administrator Dr. Scott Hopes said. “That assessment has been made and we have a few years before we need to take aggressive action.”

The structure remains in use as of now. County officials say it’s “safe to park.”

“The maintenance plan wasn’t put in place in the late 80s and it wasn’t put in place in the 90s and it wasn’t put in place in the 2000s, so the ball was kind of dropped by a very large number of people over a very long period of time and now this council has just been given the problem and has to come up with a very expensive solution in the short term,” said the curator Kevin Van Ostenbridge.

The engineering report dated December 2021 says inspectors found “multiple and extensive locations of hollow sounds, cracks and spalling” on the top and bottom of the garage. The third-party firm also suggested “major and invasive repairs involving the removal and replacement of concrete” and recommends that the work be completed within the “next 18 to 24 months”.

Dr. Hopes told a meeting on Tuesday that it was in the interest of the county and the taxpayers to tear down the existing garage and build a new one. The cost is estimated at $34 million.

“The report made recommendations for the corrective measures needed for the car park, but that would only save us five to seven years of useful life where a new car park we can expect to get 50 or more years out of it,” said Dr. Hopes.

County officials say there is no official timeline for demolition or construction as plans are still underway. Dr Hopes said work could start late next year.

“Within a few years, it would become a security issue. We’re not there yet, so we’ll be spending the next 12 months designing a new parking lot and determining alternate sources for parking,” the county administrator said.

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Bricktown Parking Garage in Oklahoma City sold to Ohio investor

Cincinnati, Ohio-based Mobile Infrastructure this week bought Bricktown Parking Garage, 222 E Sheridan Ave.

The seller was Bricktown Garage Parking LLC, led by Fred Mazaheri, a local Mazaheri Properties developer, who bought the property in 2013 for $9,375,000.

The Bricktown Parking Garage comprises 206,598 square feet of space spread over an eight-story office and parking structure just north of the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark.

The garage has 537 parking spaces with leases in place with Hampton Inn & Suites, Hilton Inn, Homewood Suites and Springhill Suites. It also has monthly parking for office tenants and overnight parking for night traffic.

Price Edwards & Co. reports these commercial real estate transactions to OKC

• Gary Owens Construction paid The Hertz Corp. $3,200,000 for 32 acres on Parkway Center Avenue. Craig Tucker handled the transaction.

• Milestone Investment LLC paid Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations LLC $2,900,000 for a 67,500 square foot industrial property at 6209 and 6417 S Sooner Road. Mark Patton and Cody Beat handled the transaction.

• Resurrection Cemetery Corp. paid Native Doodles Inc. $2,000,000 for 40 acres at SW 119 and Meridian Avenue. Jacob Simon, Danny Rivera and Andrew Holder handled the transaction.

• Harris & Sons LLC paid JECN Investments LLP $1,300,000 for a 7,211 square foot, 1.49 acre office building at 9212 N Kelley Ave. Derek James handled the transaction.

• East Edmond Baptist Church Inc. paid $750,000 to Midland Capital LLC for 80 acres on Westminster Road in Arcadia. Phillip Mazaheri managed the transaction.

• Cordea Consulting paid $440,000 to Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4938 for a 1,230 square foot, 0.16 acre office building at 16 E Campbell, Edmond. Aaron Diehl handled the transaction.

• Blue Bee Farm LLC has leased 17,384 square feet of industrial space at 1255 E Reno Ave. Cody Beat and Mark Patton handled the transaction.

• Mack Energy Co. leased 11,450 square feet of office space in the BancFirst tower at 100 N Broadway Ave. Tre Dupuy and Ian Self handled the transaction.

• Dollar General renewed a lease for 9,735 square feet of retail space at Guthrie Plaza at 1603 S Division St., Guthrie. Rosha Wood handled the transaction.

• Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Foundation renewed a lease for 9,530 square feet of industrial space at Will Rogers III at 1111 Cornell Parkway. Chris Roberts handled the transaction.

• Nathan Prenk has leased 6,053 square feet of industrial space at 416 Glade Drive. Andrew Holder and Danny Rivera handled the transaction.

• LWPB leased 3,887 square feet of office space at the IBC Center at 3817 Northwest Expressway. Tom Fields handled the transaction.

• Rimrock Energy Partners LLC has leased 3,130 square feet of space in Possum Creek at 6301 N Western Ave. Craig Tucker and Allison Barta Bailey handled the transaction.

• Accenture LLP leased 3,052 square feet of office space at The Boulevard at 525 NW 11. Derek James and Allison Barta Bailey managed the transaction.

• Investors Trust Co. Inc. leased 2,863 square feet of office space in the BancFirst tower at 100 N Broadway Ave. Tre Dupuy and Ian Self handled the transaction.

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Engineering report reveals issues with county parking lot

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The six-story Manatee County parking lot in downtown Bradenton will need replacing after a technical inspection revealed signs of deterioration, Manatee County officials said. Replacing the structure is expected to cost $33 million.

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The Manatee County government plans to pay tens of millions of dollars to replace its parking lot in downtown Bradenton after an engineering report found “signs of deterioration”.

The garage is still a safe place to park, officials say, but replacing it as soon as possible has become a priority. The county’s recently released capital improvement plan includes $33 million to replace the garage, which is attached to the administration building at 1112 Manatee Ave. W.

“It’s not in imminent danger. If it was an immediate danger, I wouldn’t leave parking there,” County Administrator Scott Hopes said Friday. “We take all necessary measures to ensure that our employees work and park in a safe environment.”

Construction of the six-story garage was completed in the late 1980s. According to the project description, a professional inspection report found that age and “continuous water intrusion” caused significant damage to structure.

In a Friday afternoon interview with the Bradenton Herald, Hopes said he had sought a second opinion on the parking lot, but details of that inspection have not been finalized.

While the initial report determined that the “massive areas” would require $8 million in repairs over the next two years, the county’s property management department recommended replacing the garage entirely because the repairs would only add five to ten years of life in the garage.

“We continue to uncover examples of mismanagement and poor governance from years past. Neglecting this structure could have resulted in a catastrophic event had it not been caught by our new administration,” Commissioner Kevin Van Ostenbridge wrote in a text message to the Bradenton Herald.

“Fortunately, this was avoided. Unfortunately, it looks like it will needlessly cost taxpayers tens of millions of dollars,” he continued, expressing frustration at the unexpected expense. “The money we now have to divert to new parking could have been invested in new roads or new parks.”

County officials plan to demolish the existing garage to build a “larger and more efficient” parking lot for county employees and the general public, according to the project description.

If approved as part of the budget later this summer, county officials will immediately begin the process of designing a new parking lot. According to the capital improvement plan, construction could begin next fall and be completed by the end of 2025.

More than 500 county employees work daily in the Manatee County Administration Building. The building serves as the seat of government and houses a number of customer service areas for county residents.

A separate inspection report found no significant issues with the administration building itself, which is due to receive a roof replacement later this year.

During construction, it is unknown where these employees or visitors will be able to park downtown. There are other parking structures downtown, but these are smaller garages with other primary uses.

Speaking to the Bradenton Herald on Friday afternoon, Mayor Gene Brown said he expects the upcoming demolition and construction will cause headaches for downtown, but the city plans to work with the county to minimize problems.

“Obviously there will be challenges during construction,” Brown said. “Anything we as a city can do to help the process, we will. (County officials) are working on logistics, but hopefully we can make the transition as easy as possible. »

Hopes said the county would also consider running a shuttle between the administration building and county-owned parking lots, such as the site of Old City Hall at the southwest corner of West 15th Street and the West Manatee Ave.

The County Board of Commissioners will hold a series of budget meetings next week. The capital improvement plan, which includes money to build a new parking garage, will be discussed at Tuesday’s meeting, which begins at 9 a.m. at the administration building.

BRD_tt_parking_1
The six-story Manatee County parking lot in downtown Bradenton will need replacing after a technical inspection revealed signs of deterioration, Manatee County officials said. Replacing the structure is expected to cost $33 million. Tiffany Tompkins [email protected]

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The six-story Manatee County parking lot in downtown Bradenton will need replacing after a technical inspection revealed signs of deterioration, Manatee County officials said. Replacing the structure is expected to cost $33 million. Tiffany Tompkins [email protected]

This story was originally published June 10, 2022 3:07 p.m.

Related stories from the Bradenton Herald

Ryan Callihan is the county reporter for the Bradenton Herald, covering local government and politics. On weekends, it also covers the latest news. Ryan graduated from USF St. Petersburg.
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Buchanan Street Parking Garage Project Phase One Complete

The first phase of the Buchanan Street Parking Garage project in downtown Lafayette is complete.

According to LCG, the first phase included the removal of all concrete panels from the parking lot structure.

The next phase will include repairing elevators, stairwells and relighting the garage. This work, according to LCG, will begin soon.

A Facebook post says garage staff are currently using a golf cart to transport those who cannot descend garage levels.

Work on the garage began in April 2021. The parking lot was closed to the public in October 2018 in the interest of public safety.

In an earlier report on the garage, LCG said corrosion had damaged more than 50% of the steel beams and columns that support the garage floors and that in 2020 around 200 panels, held together by several corroded hangers and weighing over of two million pounds, were removed to reduce the load on the garage.

Repairs of $1.6 million were approved by the Lafayette board in February 2021.

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Parking garage facade of 25ft tall row of books in Kansas City, Missouri Central Library downtown is amazing | CJ Combes

Parking lot facade by the Central Library in downtown Kansas City, MO.Dean Hochman from Overland Park, KS, USA, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

If you’ve never visited the Central Library Branch of Kansas City, Missouri’s public library, the parking lot facade alone might tempt you to go. It’s so hard to walk past without stopping to look at the giant books in the library. The beauty of the architecture inside the library is an added bonus.

Known as the Community Library, the book spines are approximately 25 feet high by 9 feet wide. Edges are mylar for signage. Seriously, that’s an amazing idea. In 2006, due to the need for additional parking downtown, a garage was built and the community was asked to come up with ideas to improve the appearance of the structure. The idea for the library was creatively remarkable.

The shelf features 22 spines that list 42 titles, reflecting a wide variety of reading interests, as suggested by Kansas City readers and then selected by the Kansas City Public Library Board. Their final selection was made on March 16, 2004. The library was completed between March and fall 2004. (Source.)

Some of the book titles included are Catch-22 by Joseph Heller good night moon by Margaret Wise Brown, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. To see the full list, click here.

The row of books is along the south wall of the library parking lot on 10th Street between Wyandotte St. and Baltimore Ave.

central library

If you’re researching an ancient topic, the Special Collections stored in the Central Library’s Missouri Valley Room are worth a visit. Here you will find a great collection of local Kansas City history. I was looking for old newspaper articles from the 1940s and they were well preserved there on microfilm. The library also has originals of published articles, photos and postcards. This branch might also become your go-to spot due to its historical past and architectural beauty.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=05ouzT_0g0YNVWK00

Parking garage for the Kansas City Public Library, Downtown Central Branch.Photo by Nightryder84, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

Interestingly, in 1937, a book titled, Historical sketch of the Kansas City Public Library, 1911-1936, with extracts from the Librarian’s Annual Reports, 1911-1920 by Purd B. Wright was published. This publication provides a detailed history of the library’s beginnings and growth. The digitized version can be viewed online at the University of Michigan or the University of California.

The 88-page book is also available in print at a handful of Missouri libraries, including the Central Library. If you are a history buff, you will enjoy reading this article to feel the passion of the people involved in creating the library. The goal was to have the best library in the country. A brief overview of the library’s history can be found on the library’s website.

Thanks for the reading. Visit your local library soon.

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Bullard will control the commercial part of the Sundial car park • St Pete Catalyst

Local real estate contractors Fred Bullard Sr. and his son are exercising their right to purchase part of the Sundial parking lot.

The Bullards have leased the downtown St. Petersburg space at 117 2nd St. N. from the city for the past 22 years and will now seek to purchase the retail component in the parking structure.

Retail tenants include Starbucks, One Night Stand Bar, Tranquility Day Spa, Mio Grill and Cafe, The Optic Shop, Diagnostic Imaging, Pure Natural Nail Lounger and a BayCare Primary Care Center, according to the latest property maps. . Tenants should not be affected by the purchase as it will be under the same controlling entity.

On Thursday, the St. Petersburg City Council, meeting as the community redevelopment agency, passed a resolution that would ultimately lead to the dissolution of the city’s stake in the parking lot.

Council supported the partial termination and asked the mayor to authorize the termination of the Final Disposition Agreement (FDA) on behalf of the CRA. The resolution passed by a majority, with council member Richie Floyd casting the only negative vote. Floyd explained that he was opposed to the purchase because he is against giving up city-owned assets.

“We want to make sure that’s not a barrier to filing the property and quite honestly from a city perspective it’s a huge plus for us to get out of this deal as much as possible. All development arrangements in this repository have been processed, supported and are in place,” said city staff.

The resolution point is tied to the agreement that has been in place since the late 1990s. related to the development of Sundial, located at 153 2nd Ave. N., a movie theater complex and the city’s MidCore parking garage.

“When we entered into the Final Disposition Agreement (FDA) and the head lease, part of that agreement gave them the right to purchase this property, so the authority was already granted to them under the lease. and the FDA,” the staff said.

“The ARC is an actual signatory to the current FDA, which is no longer something done. It’s a technical step,” said Brad Tennant, the assistant city attorney, noting the necessary CRA approval.

Sundial. Google Earth

The expected purchase price for the ground floor retail business was not disclosed; however, the city told the St. Pete Catalyst the purchase price is estimated at around $2 million. The purchase price is based on the assessed value of the property and the leasehold improvements.

The option for Bullard Realty to purchase the retail portion comes as the entire Sundial complex experiences a renaissance.

Florida-based Paradise Ventures bought the Sundial shopping complex from longtime owner Bill Edwards earlier this year in a $21.13 million deal.

Paradise Ventures plans to fill vacant retail and restaurant spaces.

Today, the mall’s tenants include Sea Salt, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Chico’s, White House Black Market, Tommy Bahama, Diamonds Direct and the Man Cave barber shop, according to the Sundial website.

There are several large vacant spaces, including spaces formerly occupied by FarmTable Kitchen and Locale Market.

“Right now we’re looking at ideas for the backyard,” Paradise CEO Mike Connor said. Catalyst.

Connor said they are also in the process of executing leases with two or three new initial tenants, which will be announced once the contracts are signed.

Paradise Ventures is “in no rush” to secure contracts and make abrupt changes to the retail complex, as the group wants to take its time lining up the right tenants.

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Lakewood Parking Garage Collapse Court Hearing

LAKEWOOD, Ohio (WJW) — A construction company was arrested Thursday on charges related to a parking lot collapse in Lakewood last year.

A grand jury indicted Atlas Masonry Restoration and Maintenance, owner Elmer Mekker and foreman Charles Hawley last month. They are accused of having caused panic.

The December 23 collapse caused extensive damage to the Marine Towers West underground car park. Dozens of cars were crushed. No one was hurt. Damages are estimated at more than $1 million, prosecutors said. The defendants risk up to 36 months in prison.

The company was contracted to perform concrete repairs to the structure. The prosecutor’s office said Hawley and another employee removed concrete around some of the support pillars on the lower level of the garage, leaving only rebar. The structure began to shake less than 24 hours later, leading to the collapse.

“It is a miracle that the recklessness displayed, not only by Atlas Masonry but also by the owner and foreman in charge, did not result in serious injury or death,” prosecutor Michael O’Malley said in a statement. communicated. “Their poor decisions put hundreds of lives at risk, and they must be held accountable.”

The construction company was also found guilty last month of failing to obtain a permit before working on the Lakewood municipal yard garage.

A plea of ​​not guilty has been entered on their behalf. They are due in court on June 21.

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Parking garage under Chestnut Street condo tower reopens after $4 million in repairs

The 468-car garage, which has a separate owners’ association from the condo owners’ association for the upper floors, closed on July 9. It was about two weeks after the horrific collapse of a 12-story condominium building in Surfside, Florida. the condos feared a similar incident when they learned that the garage’s board had yet to complete concrete repairs that an engineering firm in 2018 deemed urgent.

Mike Boucher, one of five members of the garage’s owners’ council, said the repairs cost around $4 million.

Get 4 weeks of Crain’s for $1

“It’s like a whole new garage,” Boucher said. The repairs, he said, “should have been done years ago.”

The delays, Boucher said, were because “nobody wants to spend the money.” But the risk of collapse “has never been a real risk,” Boucher said.

In 2018, an engineering consultant advised garage owners that repairs to concrete support columns “must be done as soon as possible, as the conditions present imminent danger to users of the facility and to the structure itself. same”.

The consultancy firm, Walker Consultants, wrote to mechanics in early July 2021, saying that to their knowledge the repairs “have not been carried out to date” and that it is “highly probable that the conditions of concern have aggravated”.

With the alarming images of Surfside in mind, residents of 111 E. Chestnut told Crain’s in July that “my stomach is in knots” and “I can’t sleep at night.” A resident said she had banned her family and other visitors from parking in the garage for the past few years since she learned that repairs had not been made.

On July 9, the Department of Buildings ordered the garage closed until repairs were completed.

Boucher said during the 10-month shutdown he paid about $7,200 to rent two spaces in a building on Chicago Avenue, but his real concern was “the guy who has the public spaces and couldn’t make them work. all this time. How much did this guy lose?

The operation of the public car park holds the vast majority of the 468 spaces in the garage.

Garage manager Debra Bolden posed questions to Don Barnes, regional manager for parking operator SP Plus Corporation. Barnes did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Last year, the first estimate for repairs was $12 million, Boucher said, but the garage board eventually found an engineering company, WJE, to do the work for $4 million. Despite a two-thirds cost reduction, Boucher said the work was done to the same standards. “There’s no easy way out when you’re working with the City of Chicago,” Boucher said. “They had an inspector here every week.”

On May 26, the city’s building department lifted the closure order, spokesman Michael Puccinelli confirmed for Crain’s. An inspection “confirmed that the necessary structural repair work has been completed,” according to the ministry statement.

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Parking garage under Chestnut Street condo tower reopens after repairs

The 468-car garage, which has a separate owners’ association from the condo owners’ association for the upper floors, closed on July 9, 2021. That was about two weeks after a horrifying condominium collapse 12-story building in Surfside, Florida. Condo residents feared a similar incident when they learned the garage’s board had yet to complete concrete repairs that an engineering firm in 2018 deemed urgent.

Mike Boucher, one of five members of the garage’s owners’ council, said the repairs cost around $4 million.

Get 4 weeks of Crain’s for $1

“It’s like a whole new garage,” Boucher said. The repairs, he said, “should have been done years ago.”

The delays, Boucher said, were because “nobody wants to spend the money.” But the risk of collapse “has never been a real risk,” Boucher said.

In 2018, an engineering consultant advised garage owners that repairs to concrete support columns “must be done as soon as possible, as the conditions present imminent danger to users of the facility and to the structure itself. same”.

The consultancy firm, Walker Consultants, wrote to mechanics in early July 2021, saying that to their knowledge the repairs “have not been carried out to date” and that it is “highly probable that the conditions of concern have aggravated”.

With the alarming images of Surfside in mind, residents of 111 E. Chestnut told Crain’s in July that “my stomach is in knots” and “I can’t sleep at night.” A resident said she had banned her family and other visitors from parking in the garage for the past few years since she learned that repairs had not been made.

On July 9, the Ministry of Buildings ordered the garage closed until repairs were completed.

Boucher said during the 10-month shutdown he paid about $7,200 to rent two spaces in a building on Chicago Avenue, but his real concern was “the guy who has the public spaces and couldn’t make them work. all this time. How much did this guy lose?

The operation of the public car park holds the vast majority of the 468 spaces in the garage.

Garage manager Debra Bolden posed questions to Don Barnes, regional manager of parking operator SP Plus. Barnes did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Last year, the first estimate for repairs was $12 million, Boucher said, but the garage board eventually found an engineering company – Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates or WJE – that would do the job for 4 millions of dollars. Despite a two-thirds cost reduction, Boucher said the work was done to the same standards. “There’s no easy way out when you’re working with the City of Chicago,” Boucher said. “They had an inspector here every week.”

On May 26, the city’s building department lifted the closure order, spokesman Michael Puccinelli confirmed for Crain’s. An inspection “confirmed that the necessary structural repair work has been completed,” according to the ministry statement.

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CTEK will build 1,000 charging stations in Stockholm parking lot

Swedish charging specialist CTEK is cooperating with Stockholm Parking to install more than 1,000 electric vehicle charging stations in the new 18,000 square meter “Norra Stationsparken” car park in Hagastaden, on the outskirts of Stockholm.

Each of the parking spots in the parking lot will be equipped with a Chargestorm Connected 2 EV charger from CTEK and paired with a charge management system, according to CTEK. This charger is available in many versions. According to the published press images, the version with two Type 2 connections is used in the parking lot; alternatively, there are also versions with a single socket or fixed cables. The charging power is not mentioned in the release, it can be between 3.7 and 22 kW for the CTEK Chargestorm Connected 2 – with the Nanogrid solution the load is distributed according to the load anyway.

Norra Stationsparken is already the seventh car park in Stockholm where all parking spaces will be equipped with charging options for electric cars. When it opens, it will be one of the largest installations for electric vehicles in a car park in all of Europe. By 2026, Stockholm Parking aims to offer electric vehicle charging in all its car parks and aims to have more than 100,000 new charging stations by 2030.

“An investment of this size really shows that Stockholm is leading European capitals in supporting the shift to fossil-free transport,” says Cecilia Routledge, Global Director of Energy and Facilities at CTEK. “For CTEK, it is also proof that our multi-year collaboration with Stockholm Parking continues to grow. Business and government need to work closely together on mobility issues if we are to be able to meet our climate goals.

decision.com

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Missoula Parking Commission to Explore Citywide Expansion, New Parking Lot

Parking in downtown Missoula can be difficult depending on the time of day. The Missoula Parking Commission may seek to implement parking requirements beyond current working hours to include other peak times of the week. (Current Martin Kidston/Missoula file)

This is the first in a three-part series about the Missoula Parking Commission and its recommendations to the city for a new garage and expanded parking district.

Part 2: The logic behind a city-wide parking district

Part 3: Where to build a new parking garage?

Expanding its jurisdiction beyond the downtown district and funding a new parking structure are among the goals the Missoula Parking Commission is exploring as it seeks to manage parking in the future.

The parking commission hasn’t grown in 30 years, and members have likened its current approach to parking to a tail wagging a dog. The commission is now looking to take a more proactive approach to dealing with housing growth and costs, and finding the funding needed to align its goals with those of the city.

On Tuesday, the commission instructed staff to take the first steps to hire a consultant to review parking management, strategy and implementation for a citywide parking district, which could initially include the Hip Strip and the Riverfront Triangle, as well as some surrounding neighborhoods.

Wherever expansion occurs, city officials challenged the commission to think outside the box and prepare for the challenges that come with a growing city and its need for more housing.

“Management is going to mean a lot of different things in a lot of different areas,” said Dale Bickell, the city’s chief executive. “As we grow and become denser and denser, parking is going to become an interesting issue, and how we deal with that.”

Bickell asked the commission to consider an operation that is not funded entirely by parking revenue and enforcement fees. The expansion of the parking area also does not mean that a parking meter will appear in every neighborhood.

Still, Bickell said, expanding the parking district is something the city would like to see happen sooner rather than later.

“There is new interest through code reform for the parking commission to expand the boundaries to the entire city,” he said. “As our policy of growth forces us to look inward for housing – and our code reform bill sees parking as a tool to increase housing – we will need better tools to enforce parking in the neighborhoods.

This year, the city is set to begin reforming its building and zoning codes to streamline a number of goals and create a smoother, simpler building process. This should include changes to city codes regarding parking and the amount required for certain projects.

Last week, the city council got its first look at potential incentives designed to entice developers to include more affordable housing in their projects. Incentives could include a 50% reduction in parking in exchange for a set number of units held at an affordable price for a set number of years.

“The city already has a fairly progressive parking standard related to residential development. But we’re talking more about parking than housing,” Bickell said. “It would be nice to have more of this conversation about housing. Having a good, efficient system to manage this (parking) would help us achieve our housing goals.

Based on the findings of the consultant’s study, the commission would be the first to recommend the expansion of the parking area. This would be considered alongside other transportation plans. The final decision would rest with the city council.

While the whole city is at stake, commission members said the Riverfront Triangle, the Hip Strip and the Old Sawmill District would likely be considered first.

Parking garages have also been suggested for the Riverfront Triangle, the Hip Strip, the Old Mill District, and even Caras Park and City Hall. Funding for any of them has not been identified.

“The commission should take a holistic approach to looking at all of these things,” Bickell said. “If managed parking happens on the Hip Strip, it could push parking into neighborhoods. Being able to take a holistic approach to this would be smart.

The current parking district is relatively isolated from downtown Missoula, and although an expanded district has been mentioned in the past, it has only now been set in motion. In a vote on Tuesday, the committee agreed that its aim was “to prepare for future opportunities that reflect and align with the city’s mission and goals,” including housing, climate, equity, and other issues.

While public on-street parking will be in play if the neighborhood is expanded, exploring partnerships with private parking could also be part of the equation.

“Looking at our mission, it has a very reactionary tone. I wish it was more proactive and more interconnected with the city and what’s going on there,” said Ian Ortlieb, director of the Missoula Parking Commission. “It’s being able to spot things that are happening and being more active, or proactive, in dealing with things that may arise.”

In 2021, Ortlieb said the Missoula Parking Commission brought in $2.4 million in overall revenue. In the first three quarters of this fiscal year, it has already grossed over $2.1 million.

Expanding the neighborhood could generate more revenue and relieve some of the challenges that will come with increased density and congestion. Commission members said they were up to the challenge.

“I’m glad the mayor’s office is open to management. It seems their priorities overlap with ours,” commission chair Joe Easton said. “There is an opportunity for us to advance some calculated risks – to advance on initiatives from the mayor’s office and city council.”

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Troy works with the owner of Uncle Sam’s parking garage on demolishing the structure

TROY – The city and Bryce Companies are working on details for the demolition of Uncle Sam’s gated garage. Officials anticipate it will take four months to raze and clean up the site on the north side of Fulton Street between Third and Fourth downtown streets.

Originally built by the city in 1974, the now privately owned garage is nearly 50 years old and has been closed since last year as unsafe.

Bryce Companies had planned to eventually redevelop the 1,715-acre site when it proposed in 2021 to redevelop the south end of Troy’s atrium along Broadway, but that proposal fell through.

The company has not yet obtained a demolition permit to demolish the aging structure, said John Salka, spokesman for Mayor Patrick Madden. Salka added that the city and Bryce are developing plans to deal with the impact on local streets and surrounding areas when the garage is demolished.

The current proposal for the spot calls for the construction of 170 temporary surface parking spaces after the demolition of the existing parking garage, according to plans submitted by the company for review and approved by the Planning Commission. This would represent a loss of 630 out of the 800 spaces in the condemned garage.

David Bryce, owner of the Bryce Companies, which controls several prominent downtown buildings, including the Atrium and the historic Frear Building, could not be reached for comment Friday.

Bryce bought the garage from the city in 2010 for $2.4 million. He expanded the three-storey garage by two stories to add more parking. The structure provided parking for its downtown tenants and was used by the public as a parking lot to attend downtown events. The garage has been estimated to provide up to 18% of available off-street parking downtown.

The city has become more aggressive in enforcing on-street parking downtown to keep spaces rotating for visitors and shoppers. The city has garages on Fifth Avenue and State Street downtown, as well as parking lots on Front Street in Riverfront Park and First Street. There are also smaller city-owned lots.

The city ordered Uncle Sam’s garage closed in July 2021 after determining it was unsafe to use. An earlier technical study determined that the garage was structurally damaged and should be replaced within 10 years.

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Legislative parking garage OKd, accompanying a watered down housing bill

(Dave Cummings/New Hampshire Bulletin)

“If we don’t move on this, I don’t know where you’re going to park,” Rep. Steven Smith, R-Charlestown, said, urging NH House members to pass a bill that included some of the remnants. tattered. of a major labor housing bill. The House responded by passing House Bill 1661 on a vote of 244-99.

The bill was one of the last bills challenged on the last day of the legislative session, a day when the Senate and House approved or rejected agreements reached by conference committee negotiators last week.

There was virtually no debate about the corporate tax cuts contained in HB 1221. Some Senate Democrats have complained about the reduction in the corporate income tax rate from 7.6 to 7.5 %, but ended up voting for it because it also provided $28 million to municipalities that they hope will be passed on to be used for property tax relief. There was no debate on the measure in the House.

There was also no objection to Senate Bill 401, which provides $70 million to support municipal road and bridge projects as well as $4 million to build a road to support the redevelopment of the Balsams station in Dixville.

The two chambers also approved the agreement on HB 355, extending keno from bars and restaurants to convenience stores, without screens, as well as HB 1503, which provides a regulatory framework for cryptocurrency, without obliging state contractors. to use domestic steel, language that had previously been added to the bill.

And no one opposed SB 271, which means electric taxpayers will subsidize the Burgess BioPower plant in Berlin for another year.

‘Monster of a Bill’

The big kahuna was HB 1661, the 36-page, 80-section omnibus bill that includes legislation covering regional vocational technical schools, lead paint testing, special education grants for schools, the funding for opioid treatment, licensing criteria for recreation camps, rules for releasing defendants pending trial, and most importantly for lawmakers, a new garage for lawmakers’ cars, and laws that will encourage affordable housing.

Rep. Mark Warden, R-Manchester, came out calling the measure a “monster bill” because it merged so many other bills, including what was left of SB 400, the Bill on the Workforce Housing “Community Toolkit”, which developers saw as crucial to encouraging the construction of affordable housing in New Hampshire.

But in order for the House to pass the bill, the Senate removed a number of key tools from the bill. The House managed to get rid of “60 percent” of the SB 400, estimated Rep. Rick Ladd, R-Haverhill, who negotiated the bill on the conference committee and was one of the few to defend HB 1661 on the floor of the House.

What’s gone include provisions for a “Housing Champions” program that would reward cities that encourage affordable housing, as well as a provision to automatically extend local tax breaks typically provided for commercial development to housing and also extend the term of these tax breaks. Requirements to put labor housing on an equal footing with housing for the elderly have also been watered down.

A few transparency measures remain: Land-use boards will actually have to give a written reason for rejecting a developer’s plans and disclose municipal fees, as well as certain timelines, to speed up the approval process.

Warden particularly took issue with a provision that expanded the term “public use” to allow cities to acquire land, not only for a public service or to remove dilapidated structures, but also for the housing of the workforce ( but in this case not via eminent domain).

“Getting into building apartments is a very bad idea,” Warden said. “Why the hell do they think government is the answer to the housing problem? The government is causing problems in many cases with onerous zoning regulations, unreasonable restrictions on wetlands, requiring expensive fire sprinklers, and a lengthy approval and permitting process.

Warden didn’t mention any provisions in the bill that actually address the local approvals process, but he thought the best solution was the free market.

“’Workforce housing’ is a misnomer. It’s just housing. If high-end, luxury housing is built, high-income tenants will leave noisy, noisy old buildings for chic, stylish new buildings, providing more available and affordable housing in vacated units.

Rep. Michael Sylvia, R-Belmont, challenged the lead paint provision — not in Bill SB 400 — that would have removed the requirement for two children’s lead tests to trigger an investigation into whether the accommodation in which the family resides must be remedied.

“Now the assumption is that the apartment has to be reduced. We are going to increase rental prices. Some buildings are going to be taken off the market.

Others attacked the sheer size of the bill, calling it a “smorgasbord,” while others criticized the $9.35 million outlay to demolish the Justice Department building in Concord to make way for a garage estimated at over $35 million, “to save two blocks of walking.

Ladd defended the bill. He argued that the original bill as presented – which he said would double the number of students leaving vocational technical secondary schools – was one of the most important pieces of legislation on education adopted this year.

But overall, it was the garage that was the biggest selling point.

“If we don’t move today, we’ll be without a garage when the one on Storrs Street falls, which will probably happen in the next 10 minutes,” joked Rep. Karen Umberger, R-Kearsarge, who then added, ” the next years. »

“I know I hate it when concrete falls on the hood of my car,” added Smith, the Charlestown rep.

The bill, like the others, now goes to Governor Chris Sununu for his signature.

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Lexington KY Library parking garage closed; lots available

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The Lexington Public Library in downtown Lexington.

The Lexington Central Library downtown parking lot will be closed for maintenance for approximately three weeks beginning June 1.

According to Anne Donworth, director of development, marketing and communications at the Lexington Public Library, routine repairs will include membrane maintenance and other “minor maintenance issues”. The job is expected to take around three weeks, although Donworth said the timeline is largely dependent on the weather.

“Hopefully we can get things done quickly, but we’ll see how the Kentucky weather cooperates,” she said.

In the meantime, library patrons are encouraged to park on the street or at nearby structures like the Helix On Main Garage on E Main Street. The library is unable to validate parking for those other locations, she said.

Library parking lot
A screenshot from Google Maps shows the Central Library, Helix on Main and the Lextran Transit Center in downtown Lexington, Ky.

Some tenants in Park Plaza apartments and other surrounding buildings also park in the garage, and Donworth said the library is working with LexPark to move their parking to the Helix Garage or the Lextran Transit Center on E Vine Street.

Donworth said the parking lot predates the library building, which was built in the mid-1980s. According to the library’s website, the structure contains 428 parking spaces with 10 spaces accessible to people with disabilities or vans.

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Parking Wars: City Commission Votes to Approve Donation of Parking Garage | New

ASHLAND After an equally divided public comment session and over the objections of a commissioner, the Ashland Board of Commissioners voted 4 to 1 to approve the Community Trust Bank’s donation of a parking lot to the city.

With an initial cost of around $455,000, the donation was fiercely opposed by Commissioner Cheryl Spriggs, who decided to drop the ballot in order to do a parking study.

Spriggs argued that if opening the garage to the public was a good idea, why isn’t the bank doing it themselves?

During public comments, Chief Commissioner and Solicitor Roger Hall said he was not there to represent anyone or any organization, but as a private citizen.

“It’s nice to be in front of a public forum with an agenda,” he said.

Hall questioned the commission about the discrepancy between the property’s PVA appraisal ($884,000) and appraised value ($1.575 million) saying it would result in a nice tax deduction for the bank. He also questioned the terms of the lease (50 years) as well as the number of parking spaces that will still be kept by the bank.

“There is no liability for the bathroom, for insurance and structural assessment,” Hall said. “They will keep all the signage there. All the city gets is partial use of the parking spaces.

After Mayor Matt Perkins informed Hall he had reached his five minutes to comment, Hall asked two questions: What will the city get from the 50-year deal and which party approached whom?

“I just think we’re in a rush here,” Hall said.

After a brief intermission where Hillcrest Bruce apartment manager Mike Maynard reported on the number of people who have found employment or education through the mission, Ashland City Commission nominee David Williams, stepped onto the podium.

Right off the bat, Williams asked the commission why they commented on Maynard’s report, but did not respond to Hall’s questions.

“We can choose to comment here or we can choose to wait until the end to address questions and concerns,” Perkins replied.

Williams first posed questions and criticism regarding the entertainment district proposal (allowing open containers at special events with special regulations in downtown), to which City Attorney Jim Moore pointed out answered.

“We’re not reinventing the wheel here,” Moore said. “It’s been done in 11 or 12 other cities in Kentucky and I haven’t heard of any problems.”

Williams’ comments then made their way to the parking lot, where he asked the city not to rush into this deal. Moore, along with Commissioner Amanda Clark and City Manager Mike Graese, said the deal lasted three years.

Moore also addressed concerns about the gap between the PVA’s valuation and the appraisal – he said the PVA was generally low in its real estate appraisals.

“Well, what if the public doesn’t want to take it on?” Aren’t we supposed to have parking at the convention center if you build it? said Williams.

“When we build it,” Clark said.

“Well, we don’t know if that’s going to happen – a lot can happen between now and then,” Williams said.

By this point, Williams’ time had expired – Perkins stepped in to let him know.

“While Mr. Hall here has said he likes being somewhere where they have an agenda, I like being somewhere where I can adequately voice my concerns,” he said. “As long as people don’t babble.”

Whit’s Frozen Custard owner Richard Ritchie took to the podium, saying that as a business owner, the potential for a parking garage could help alleviate parking problems downtown.

“The main problem is that my employees, myself included, have to park on Winchester,” he said. “There are a lot of older customers who may need to park elsewhere and won’t come in unless there’s an open parking space in front of my store.”

Ritchie said the parking lot could be used by downtown business owners as a place to park their employees, freeing up space for customers.

“It’s here, it’s built and it’s available,” Ritchie said. “I don’t know how we would do this, but we need to figure out how business owners can come together to make this our employees.”

Clark said she would help facilitate this through her connections with Summer Motion.

David Willey, restaurateur at Billy Bare, said customer perception is key – while there may be plenty of space available, they are not available directly across from Sal’s Italian Eatery.

“We employ 50 workers, we have 25 workers per shift,” he said. “That’s 25 occupied spaces during our busiest hours.”

Willey said customers knew there was a parking problem.

Perkins thanked the two businessmen for their support of Ashland.

When it came time to vote, Spriggs raised concerns about upfront costs, saying she felt there was no benefit to taxpayers.

“I don’t know if we have to shoulder this burden when 25% of our citizens live in poverty,” Spriggs said. “We install lighting. I feel pressured to vote for this and I can’t.

Commissioner Josh Blanton said Spriggs made a lot of good points, but he said his informal study of downtown parking – from when he lived downtown – showed he didn’t. There was no problem with the number of spaces, and the problem is the placement of the spaces.

He said the upfront costs were worth it in order to support the downtown’s future growth.

Clark said acquiring the parking garage does two things – it provides public restrooms for people downtown and it will be open later for downtown events. Currently, the garage closes at 7 p.m., Clark said.

She said that while another garage is under construction in tandem with the convention center, this garage will strictly serve the hotel and the conference center.

Spriggs said the misfortunes of downtown business owners are of their own making.

“They park in front of the business and then complain that their customers don’t have parking,” Spriggs said.

Spriggs also said the city’s losses after taking over the cemetery show that taking over a parking lot probably won’t work either.

“We’re not doing a good job there, so why would we accept that?” said Spriggs. “Like I said before, if it’s such a good idea, why doesn’t the bank do it?”

Before voting, Perkins said the heated discussion showed how much the City Commission cares about the use of its tax dollars.

“Whether it’s $1 or $2 of taxpayers’ money, we’ll always treat it seriously,” Perkins said.

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Watch SC Police Dogpile on 9ft Alligator in Parking Garage

A 9-foot alligator snuck into the parking lot of an apartment complex in South Carolina on Friday, May 20, but it’s what happened next that has people talking on social media.

A video shared May 23 by the Charleston Police Department shows Animal Control Supervisor Courtney Bayles subduing the reptile by literally jumping on its back like a professional wrestler.

Two guys then jumped on Bayles to stop the alligator from knocking her down.

It was then that two other people grabbed the alligator by the snout and began to tape its mouth shut.

All this happens in just 30 seconds.

The video got more than 20,000 views on Facebook in less than a day, and many commenters are praising Bayles for allowing herself to be crushed in the name of animal control.


RELATED:


“I feel like that woman in the front pulled a straw,” Matchew Allean wrote on Facebook.

“Kudos to the female officer at the bottom of the pile for supporting the weight (over 400 pds.) of male officers on her while trying to restrain the suspect!” said Matt Dailey.

“Charleston PD gator wrestling team, where I sign up,” Joshua Perryman said.

A resident of the apartment complex is credited with finding the alligator. The tenant was walking a dog around 3 p.m. Friday, got out of an elevator in the garage, and sat there, police said. The resident alerted the apartment staff and they called the police dispatchers.

After being captured, the alligator was carried “a short distance” from the apartments and released unharmed into a pond, police officials said.

Spring is mating season for alligators in the southeast, which means males stray from familiar territory in search of females. This is the second time this month that an alligator has turned up in the wrong place on Daniel Island, including one stuck at the Daniel Island school.

A 9-foot alligator counts as an adult, but it grows much larger in the state, reaching up to 13 feet, according to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

How the alligator entered a parking lot has not been revealed, but some commentators have admitted the possibilities are frightening.

“Imagine parking your car next to this guy,” Ben Marks wrote on Facebook.

_____

©2022 The Charlotte Observer.

Visit charlotteobserver.com.

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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San Diego will build a parking garage, at $188,000 per space – NBC 7 San Diego

Help is on the way for people looking for parking and green space in San Diego’s East Village, but if the city’s plan to build a new garage and park comes to fruition, it will not be cheap for taxpayers.

Photos: East Village Park approved with an $80 million price tag, 16 years after the original design

Sixteen years after the East Village Green park project was considered as part of the updated Downtown Community Plan in April 2006, the San Diego City Council recently approved an addition to its budget, which has swelled to nearly 80 million dollars for its construction.

Much of the overall cost of the project will be for a two-level, 185-space underground structure that will be built at an estimated cost of just under $35 million, or a cost of $188,374.49 per parking space.

The park, originally described as a 4.1-acre multi-block park, would span the area between F and G streets, bordered by 13th Street on the west and 15th Street on the east. is. The park would be divided by 14th Street, which could be closed on weekends and during special events in the park.

City of San Diego/Civic of San Diego

Phase 1 construction will begin in the areas delineated by red squares.

The original design, which was part of the 2006 downtown community plan, included large grassy recreation areas with an informal amphitheater as well as the possibility of a café, playground, area for farmers’ markets and a neighborhood center.

After years of delays, the project was approved by the San Diego City Council in December 2019, then estimated at just over $52 million and expected to include a 14,000 square foot two-story recreation and community center. , a playground with a paddling pool, off-leash dog parks and a passive play/reading area.

However, city council members this month approved an additional $27.3 million for the budget, due to rising construction costs, etc., bringing the project’s total to almost $80 million. . This amount also takes into account what the city will pay to move two homes currently on F Street, designated by the city as historic structures.

Several of the amenities originally planned for the park – the West Park Cafe building and the East Park Bark Bar, as well as a decorative shade structure above the performance pavilion – were, however, highlighted in the final proposal, and the decorative fence that was proposed has now, unfortunately, been downgraded to chain link. Downgrades save city more than $2.5 million

Approval of additional funds effectively serves as the city’s green light for the project; The city’s independent nonprofit planning agency, Civic San Diego, has invited bids to build Phase 1 of the project in the summer of 2021.

The project is expected to take shape in several phases, with construction of phase 1 expected to start in August 2022, provided the project is awarded by the end of the month.

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Urban search and rescue team simulate parking lot collapse during test

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – Dozens of Lowcountry firefighters who make up South Carolina’s Task Force 3 put their skills to the test and proved their operational readiness by simulating a parking lot collapse in Charleston.

The annual Urban Search and Rescue Task Force Operational Readiness Exercise was held at the Charleston Fire Training Center on Saturday morning.

Task Force 3 is one of five urban search and rescue task forces in South Carolina. It is made up of members from the Charleston, North Charleston, Summerville, Saint Andrews, James Island, Johns Island and Mount Pleasant Fire Departments.

For hours, the members dug the heap, used the Jaws of Life, and pulled the victims out of the pile of rubble.

The task force was previously called in to help after flooding swept through Georgetown in the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian and put on hold after tornadoes ripped through the Midlands two months ago.

The commander says the majority of his members have been with the task force for over 10 years.

“Any storm, hurricane, structural collapse, any technical hazard that is beyond the realm of normal firefighter operations, this team is capable of handling and performing at a higher level to get the job done and help our citizens,” the commander said. of Task Force 3 Kyle. said the bishop.

Task force members said training like this not only helps them hone their skills, but prepares them in case their help is needed.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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2 teenagers cited for vandalizing city parking lot | Local News

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Two teenagers cited for vandalizing city parking lot | Local News

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Yorktown parking garage access restricted after beam cracks form – Daily Press

YORKTOWN — Parts of the parking deck at Riverwalk Landing in Yorktown are temporarily closed after a crack was recently discovered in one of the structure’s support beams.

The crack, which was first spotted on Wednesday, happened “very suddenly,” York County spokeswoman Gail Whittaker said.

“We have people coming in and out of this garage all the time and there was nothing wrong, and then a citizen noticed it,” Whittaker said.

When the crack was discovered, authorities closed off the terrace to allow a structural engineer to inspect it, while firefighters were called in to shore up the beam. Officials still don’t know what caused the crack to appear.

Currently, the upper level of the garage is closed, while parts of the lower level are restricted. According to a recent update on York County’s Facebook page, officials anticipate that use of the parking deck will be restricted for at least 90 days.

With the parking deck partially out of service, Yorktown lost about 100 to 120 parking spaces, though Whittaker doesn’t expect that to make too much of a difference to visitors.

“We actually have 1,000 hard surfaces [parking] spaces,” she said. “That’s one of the reasons we have our wonderful streetcar system here in Yorktown that stops at parking lots around town to transport people to the waterfront or to the various historic attractions. … Some people may park in another space that they are not as familiar with and then get the cart down.

The Yorktown Trolley, which is air-conditioned, operates seven days a week. From May 27, hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Sian Wilkerson, [email protected], 757-342-6616

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Lakewood Parking Garage Collapse Fee

LAKEWOOD, Ohio (WJW) — A grand jury has returned an indictment charging a construction company and its owner and foreman in the collapse of a parking lot in Lakewood late last year, the court said. Cuyahoga County District Attorney’s Office.

Atlas Masonry Restoration and Maintenance, owner Elmer Mekker and foreman Charles Hawley are accused of causing panic.

According to the indictment, jurors found that the defendants “caused the evacuation of a public place, or otherwise caused serious inconvenience or public alarm by committing an offence, without regard to the likelihood that its commission would cause serious public inconvenience or alarm and resulted in economic damage of $150,000 or more.

The collapse took place on December 23, resulting in major damage to the two-level underground parking structure at Marine Towers West, as well as the crushing of dozens of cars. However, no one was reported injured in the incident.

The district attorney’s office confirmed to FOX 8 that damages are estimated at more than $1 million and those charged face up to 36 months in prison.

FOX 8 Picture

The company had been hired to perform concrete repairs to the structure. The prosecutor’s office said Hawley and another employee removed concrete around some of the support pillars on the lower level of the garage, leaving only rebar. About 18 hours later, the structure began to shake, which led to the collapse.

Lakewood Police discovered in an investigation that plans to fully secure the pillars were non-existent.

The building, which was built in 1963 and has 171 units, was evacuated at the time of the incident, with residents allowed to return the next day.

Marine Towers West has been owned and operated by Burton Carol Management for over 25 years.

Joy Anzalone, chief operating officer, says they are still appalled at what happened because they have worked with the contractor several times over the years.

“The owner has always done a great job,” she said, “However, you’re only as good as your last job and it was horrible for everyone.”

When asked what they thought of the indictments, she replied: “Relieved, we were confident that the Town of Lakewood and the entire investigation team were incredibly thorough and would uncover the truth. and background of what had happened.”

The contractor’s actions also led Burton Carol to pay a $250 fine and plead no contest to a misdemeanor for failing to obtain a work permit.

“It is a miracle that the recklessness displayed, not only by Atlas Masonry but also by the owner and foreman in charge, did not result in serious injury or death,” prosecutor Michael O’Malley said in a statement. communicated. “Their poor decisions put hundreds of lives at risk, and they must be held accountable.”

The construction company was also found guilty last month of failing to obtain a permit before working on the Lakewood municipal yard garage.

No arraignment date has yet been set in this new indictment.

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Charges filed for Lakewood Marine Towers West parking lot collapse

CLEVELAND — The Cuyahoga County District Attorney’s Office announced charges for last year’s parking lot collapse at Marine Towers West in Lakewood.

In November 2021, a month before the collapse, Marine Towers contracted with Atlas Masonry Restoration and Maintenance to perform concrete repairs on the property.

On December 22, 2021, the project foreman and another worker removed two support pillars on the lower level of the parking garage. Only the reinforcing bars remained to support the structure.

That evening, a tenant took photos of the exposed rebar after spotting it while taking out the trash. The tenant said he was in the garage hauling trash into the dumpster when he noticed the concrete collars forming the exterior of two support columns appeared to have been cut. The support columns were on the lower level of the garage and located on the left side, precisely in the area that collapsed, he said.

Courtesy of Stephen Myers

The previous month, the tenant said he noticed that the concrete at the bottom of the pillars had started to deteriorate and large cracks had started to form. The construction crew, which the city said was working without a permit, worked at the parking lot, which was built in 1963, in the two weeks before the collapse.

Tenant: Missing concrete, exposed rebar structure found night before parking deck collapse

On December 23, the garage collapsed. Residents of Marine Towers West, which is the adjacent building next to the collapsed garage, have been asked to vacate their residences while authorities investigate the collapse.

Emergency crews at the scene of the parking garage collapse on Edgewater Drive in Lakewood

“It is a miracle that the recklessness displayed, not only by Atlas Masonry but also by the owner and foreman in charge, did not result in serious injury or death,” said prosecutor Michael C. O’Malley. . “Their poor decisions put hundreds of lives at risk, and they must be held accountable.”

Lakewood parking garage collapse 1.jpg

News 5

According to the prosecutor’s office, “An investigation by the LPD (Lakewood Police Department) revealed that there were no plans to brace or shore up the pillars during the repair work. In addition, no planning permission was given. ‘was obtained through the town of Lakewood by Atlas Masonry for the job.’

Charges have been laid against the company, its owner and the foreman involved. All three were each charged with one count of inciting panic, all third-degree felonies. Last month, the company was found guilty of a county for failing to obtain a permit for work carried out in the garage, authorities said.

Lakewood parking garage collapse 3.jpg

News 5

“On the day of the collapse, I pledged that the town of Lakewood will not rest until we find out what happened,” said Lakewood Mayor Meghan F. George. . “Our thorough investigation revealed that the collapse was no accident. In fact, it was caused by the outrageous conduct of Atlas Construction and its executives, who had no regard for the safety of Marine residents. Towers West. Once the facts involved became clear, I requested that the county attorney re-examine the case to determine if felony charges could be pursued. On behalf of the Town of Lakewood, I would like to thank the Attorney O’Malley and his team for their work, and we look forward to its resolution in the justice system.

Both the business owner and the foreman will be arraigned at a later date.

RELATED: Tenant: Missing concrete, exposed rebar structure found night before parking deck collapse

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City Approves Equipment Purchases for Aggieville Parking Lot | News

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Investigation continues into Parma underground car park collapse: Photos

PARMA, Ohio — Two weeks after the partial collapse of an underground parking garage at 5800 Laurent Drive, Fire Chief Michael Lasky said the investigation is continuing.

“Two cars, for lack of a better term, were trapped and simply restrained by their bumpers,” Lasky said. “We were able to get all the cars off the bridge, so there’s nothing else on it now and there’s nothing under it.

“The structural engineer is currently assessing the incident. We hope to have a report by next week.

At 11:45 p.m. on May 3, a tenant parked his car in the above ground parking garage. Moments later, the vehicle was hanging precariously.

“The guy was smoking when all the cement under his car fell apart,” Lasky said. “It was a shock. He couldn’t believe what he was seeing. Then the same thing happened to the car next to it in the same 20ft by 20ft area.

“When we got there we were afraid there would be more, so we evacuated all the cars on the top of the bridge and got as many cars out of that area as we could.”

Parma firefighters and police removed all vehicles from the immediate parking area to reduce the load on the structure. No injuries were reported in the incident.

The fire chief estimated the Laurent Drive facility could hold more than 150 cars underground.

The Parma incident comes more than five months after the Marine Towers West parking lot collapsed in Lakewood.

“It’s a bit ironic because in January the building manager emailed his inspectors saying in light of what happened in Lakewood to make sure they look at all the underground parking lots “, said Lasky.

“It’s the only one we have that’s underground in Parma, so they were already looking at that and paying attention to things that needed to be done by (the management company) Regency to deal with it.”

According to the fire chief, there had been previous reports of water leaks inside the underground portion of the garage.

“It’s always wet out there,” Lasky said. “The biggest thing we try to tell anyone else, if you see anything – even if it’s minor – report it, because maybe we could have stopped it.”

Read more news from the Parma Sun Post.

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Redding’s new car park closed, for now

A new private parking lot in downtown Redding that held its grand opening earlier this month was temporarily closed on Saturday so its owners could stop people from hanging out there and leaving trash behind.

There are two exceptions to the temporary closure: The California Street Parking Garage at 1451 California St. will be open for free parking during the annual Asphalt Cowboys Pancake Breakfast, which runs from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Friday and usually attracts around 10,000 diners. .

The community breakfast will be held outside the new Market Center building, 1551 Market St., near the garage, which is located at California and Tehama streets.

The garage will also be open for free parking during the Rodeo Parade on Saturday. The parking garage’s hours on both days will be from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., said Rocky Slaughter, operations manager for garage owner K2 Development Companies.

The buzz: 3 steam whistles in downtown Redding as a tribute to the town’s past, a hip future

On weekdays starting May 23, the garage will also be open to the public, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., free of charge, Slaughter said.

Starting June 1, the garage should start charging a $1 hourly fee.

In a press release on Tuesday, K2 said it would use garage downtime “to adjust hours of operation, enforcement of parking regulations and additional security measures to ensure safety. of all users of the new car park”.

In an interview, Slaughter said K2 didn’t expect to find dawdling and littering the six-story structure that has 400 spaces and replaced a public car park.

“We thought people would park in the parking structure,” Slaughter said, not “hang around and eat and drink and leave things behind.”

Parking rates: How much are downtown Redding parking rates going up?

Looting and litter seem to be a problem primarily on the top floor of the six-story garage, which Slaughter says has “pretty incredible” views of downtown.

“Obviously we totally encourage people to climb to the top, take a look, take it and then go out to a restaurant or something,” he said. “At the end of the day, we’re just trying to provide the most positive experience for people going downtown. The whole point of all this recent development is to help these businesses thrive.”

ACE Parking Co. of San Diego, which operates parking garages in the United States and Europe, will be responsible for hiring security, waste management, the proper operation of the garage’s mechanical entrance doors and distributing parking tickets.

ACE Parking employees will arrive June 1, the same day the $1-per-hour parking fee begins, Slaughter said.

The parking garage has no trash cans, with cleaning of the garage and elevator taking place once a week, as recommended by parking consultants K2 Dixon Resources Unlimited, Slaughter said.

Michele Chandler covers municipal government and housing issues for the Redding Record Searchlight/USA Today Network. Follow her on Twitter at @MChandler_RS, call her at 530-225-8344 or email her at [email protected] Please Support our entire newsroom’s commitment to public service journalism by subscribing today.

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3 arrested, 1 wanted in Greenville parking lot assault, police say

GREENVILLE, SC (WSPA) – Four people have been charged with assaulting three other people in a Greenville parking lot early Sunday morning, the Greenville Police Department said.

7News previously reported that witnesses told police that two women attacked one of the victims on the second floor before following her to the fourth floor of the Richardson Street parking lot, according to the incident report.

Witnesses also told police that three men, who were in the same group as the women, attacked another person. Once police arrived on the scene, they located the third victim who said he was punched in the face, according to the incident report.

Greenville police said Jennifer D. Pace, 26, Hannah B. Poole, 21, and Johnny A. Holcombe Jr., 24, were arrested. They face the following charges:

  • Jennifer D. Pace – two counts of assault and one count of malicious damage
  • Hannah B. Poole – three counts of assault and one count of malicious damage
  • Johnny A. Holcombe Jr. – an assault and battery chief

The Greenville County Detention Center told 7News Pace and Poole they were released on bail on Tuesday for $1,087.50. Holcombe was released on Tuesday “on his own recognizance”.

Officers said Trenston Leavell Simpson, 33, remains wanted for aggravated assault.

According to warrants, police obtained surveillance and cellphone footage of the assaults. The warrants said the four suspects had admitted to the assaults in interviews with police

A victim’s phone was smashed and their vehicle was damaged in the assault, according to warrants.

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3 assaulted in Greenville parking lot, police say

GREENVILLE, SC (WSPA) – Police say three people were assaulted early Sunday morning in a parking lot in Greenville.

The Greenville Police Department said the incident happened in the parking lot on Richardson Street.

According to the incident report, witnesses told police that two women attacked one of the victims on the second floor before following her to the fourth floor of the garage.

Witnesses told police that three men, who were in the same group as the women, attacked another person.

Once police arrived on the scene, they located the third victim who said he was punched in the face, according to the incident report.

Recent attacks are leaving people who use the garage a lot on edge.

“It’s actually quite concerning because this is a very commonly used parking lot where, you know, people are taking advantage of this free parking,” Jamal Session said.

“It’s very scary and as someone who uses it often, this is the first I’ve heard of something like this. So I think I’ll definitely be on my guard,” said Bailey Verault.

Verrault said she constantly uses the Richardson Street garage.

” Several times a week. Nights, weekends, mornings,” she said.

She said she would continue to use it, but she would be on high alert.

“Yeah, I’m still going to keep going, but I think I just have that on my mind from now on,” Verrault said.

Savanna Neeley said she uses the garage several times a month, but she makes it a point never to go there alone.

“I make sure that if I go, if I’m alone, I’m right at the entrance, but if not, I always make sure I have someone. I don’t like going alone,” Neeley said.

She said that whenever she was in a parking lot, she always looked around.

“Oh, you think of everything. You’re like checking your back, looking at your purse. You just make sure you can get into your car and lock it as soon as you get there,” she said.

Even with the attacks, people 7NEWS spoke to said it was still a convenient place to park.

“I mean, it’s free on the weekends and stuff and I still feel like I can get a spot here. And it’s really close and central to everything, but I would really like to be with someone,” Neeley said.

“I think we’ll continue to use it, but just with a little more awareness of our surroundings and just trying to be vigilant about when we stay outside,” Session said.

Police have not released information about the suspects. They said they were still taking statements from victims and witnesses.

7NEWS will update this story when more information becomes available.

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Liberty-James Parking Garage Reaches Critical Point

ROME — It’s at the crucial point where something needs to be done — much like the status of the city’s Liberty-James car park, engineers told city officials.

Architect Steven Kushner of Bergmann Architects, Engineers, Planners of Rochester outlined four options for the city regarding the future of the downtown garage, built during the city’s urban renewal efforts in the 1990s. 1970 and now showing significant wear from its more than 50 years of existence.

But whatever plan they choose, Kushner told city officials and Common Council members on Wednesday that they needed to act quickly, given the unsafe and deteriorating conditions at the garage.

Among Kushner’s development options: rehabilitation, replacement, removal or partial construction.

“We’ve been working on it for a number of years – it’s been a process to see where you’re at over the repairs,” Kushner said. “If you decide not to repair, dismantle or do anything else, we cannot take responsibility knowing what we know about the garage. Over time, it does not improve or repair itself. You have to do something with where we are today.

Wednesday’s presentation began with a guided tour of the Liberty James Garage. My council members, Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development Matthew Andrews, City Planners, Chief Codes Enforcement Officer Mark Domenico and City Engineer II Joseph Guiliano.

Professional engineer Christopher N. Latreille led the walking tour, pointing out the rusting rebar running across the garage deck and the deterioration of the supporting concrete from water and salt corrosion. He said that in some areas the concrete is at the point of breaking and falling.

As for the parking surface, a “membrane” was applied around 2006, but it had “not been maintained lately,” Guiliano said, saying that in recent years only “band-aids” had been applied. applied to problem areas.

Latreille warned city officials that Rome would have to invest in an “aggressive” repair program if council members decided to retain and repair the current garage, but strongly recommended demolition.

“There’s no immediate threat of collapse, but this garage is so badly in need of work that you’re at the point where you need a new garage,” Latreille said. “It’s either” expensive aggressive repair program or teardown, that’s where we are right now.

During the presentation in the boardroom after the tour, Kushner said that some structural issues with the garage “may not be obvious, but we’re at the point where the next step could be the concrete drop, which that we want to avoid. The electrical engineers said all the electrical components needed to be replaced, period,” adding that Bergmann began his evaluation of the garage following the submission of the Downtown Revitalization Initiative of the city ​​in 2018.

Kushner said some of the garage exits had exposed wires coming out of cable boxes in stairway areas that needed to be closed off. He said the plumbing was going through (the walls) and the conduit was rusty to the point that you could see the wires inside.

“DRI’s original expectation, we thought it would take little structural and lighting repairs, but we can’t even meet that,” Kushner said. “Previous repairs have been ineffective, which is a major concern.”

The architect said if the city is leaning towards rehabilitating the garage, officials should consider whether the cost is worth the expected life of the structure. If fixed, Kushner said it would only extend the life of the garage by 10 to 15 years.

“We could remove the garage and put the same thing in its place, but does it need it?” he asked. “There hasn’t been a time when the garage has seen cars across the board. The size doesn’t seem necessary. The quickest (and cheapest) option would be to demolish the garage and replace it by surface land to meet parking demands, then you could develop the site in the future” if the demand warranted it.

Instead of simply replacing the garage with surface land, Kushner said the city could also choose to build a smaller, one-level garage on a smaller footprint.

And while the repairs would only extend the life of the current garage by 10 to 15 years, Kushner described this as the “high-risk solution”.

“Once we start opening things up, are there more issues in the concrete that we’re not aware of?” Kushner asked. “It would be something that would have to be addressed at that time if things happened beyond what we anticipate.”

Kushner also warned that since the presentation of initial work estimates in 2019, construction, materials and construction management have increased significantly and continue to intensify since the COVID-19 pandemic.

“From 2019 to 2022 you had three years of escalating 2 1/2 to 3% inflation every year, but now everything is even higher in the construction industry, and it’s hard to get materials,” he said.

Repair and rehabilitation

Kushner presented a breakdown of expected costs for each option:

• Option 1 — Garage repair and rehabilitation for continuous service in one construction phase: $7.4 million;

• Option 2 — Repair and Rehabilitation as a five-year multi-phase construction project: $8.1 million;

• Option 3 — Partial demolition and repair: $8.4 million and more.

Replacement in kind

Includes a 50-year long-term solution; would reconsider office space for state offices in a less vulnerable location; code updates and facade improvements. However, Bergmann representatives said the option would require ongoing maintenance and there is no demand for a garage of this size at present, with much of the garage sitting unused.

• Estimated cost: $23,600,000

Replace with surface land

Long-term solution that meets the anticipated parking demand (135 spaces and green space); forces state offices to move; can consider covered parking areas with photovoltaic panels above the parking area for buses and motorhomes; requires less maintenance; least risky solution — no more unknowns to cause future damage and no vertical structures to maintain; preferred concept development.

• Estimated cost: $3 million

Replace with a smaller garage

Long-term solution that adapts to future growth; the raised terrace probably has a useful life of 50 years (with 200 seats); allows for a more open site; forces state offices to move; requires ongoing maintenance; moderate risk solution — high initial cost with uncertain parking demand; and high cost/parking spot option.

Total estimated cost: $11 million

To advance

Councilors asked if the results of a parking study were available in order to know the demand for spaces needed downtown before a final decision is made. Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development Andrews said his office is awaiting the latest round of updates on the study, but does not expect the projected numbers to change dramatically. With around 550 spaces scratched in the garage currently, Andrews said that in 2019, garage utilization was around 28% and “garage utilization is down (compared to that) this year.”

Andrews added that the city currently has about $1.28 million in DRI funding for the garage, which “puts us in the demolition cost range.” City officials said Mayor Jacqueline M. Izzo was also interested in an American Rescue Plan Act funding commitment to the garage project.

Andrews said once a decision is made on which option to take and the project is approved, the city has until the end of 2024 to spend the allocated DRI funding, and ARPA funding must be committed. by 2024 and in use by 2026.

Council chair Stephanie Viscelli said she would prefer the council see the traffic study before deciding “yes” or “no” on either option. She said that once the traffic study is available, the council could act quickly. City officials said they would work to get the numbers to councilors as soon as possible so parking legislation could be on the May 25 city council agenda.

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News in Clarksville: School bus zone changes, $14 million arena parking garage and other top stories this week

CLARKSVILLE, TN – Here’s a look at some of the best local reporting from Clarksville Now this week.

Narrower bus zones next year will force children to walk on busy roads: CMCSS simply does not have enough drivers and needs to reduce bus zones. But Clarksville Now tried to hike one of those expected hiking routes on Sango Road. Here’s what we faced. READ MORE

Troops of the 101st Airborne Division going to Europe: Troops from the 101st are back in Europe to support NATO’s response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. READ MORE

$14 million from the state to build a new parking lot: The new public garage will be directly across from the F&M Bank Arena under construction. READ MORE

F&M Bank Arena will include the new Ford Ice Center: The arena will house a new Ford Ice Center, like those in Bellevue and Antioch. Check out this video tour of the center’s progress, along with photos. READ MORE

3 men killed in single-vehicle crash on Needmore Road: The three were killed when the vehicle hit a utility pole. READ MORE

Rezoning of Killebrew on Rossview Road approved by County Commission: With final county approval, the 1,300 units on 300 acres can begin next to the Kirkwood School under construction. READ MORE

House destroyed by fire at Stones Manor: A family of seven has been displaced by the Collins View Way fire. READ MORE

The council selects the next principal of schools, Jean Luna-Vedder: The school board voted to nominate the head of TDOE as the next CMCSS Principal of Schools. READ MORE

Woman charged with second degree murder in fentanyl overdose death: Tennessee state law makes the sale of fentanyl resulting in a person’s death second-degree murder. READ MORE

Inmate dies in county jail, cause under investigation: He had been booked the day before for drunk driving. When deputies conducted a security check the following morning, they found him unconscious in his cell. READ MORE

Prom evening 2022: Discover the photos of Clarksville Raised and Kenwood high.

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Second BNA Parking Garage Receives Coveted Parksmart Certification

The new Terminal Garage 1 at Nashville® International Airport (BNA) has achieved Parksmart Silver certification for its sustainable design, construction and operation. This is BNA’s second garage to achieve Parksmart certification, and BNA is home to two of the 42 certified parking structures worldwide.

BNA’s Terminal Garage 1 is a $174 million state-of-the-art facility opening in 2021 with six levels of public parking, 2,800 parking spaces, a variety of traveler amenities and a new and improved valet center with dedicated entrance. The structure was designed by Moody Nolan and built by Messer Construction using Parksmart protocols, the world’s only rating system designed to advance sustainable mobility through smarter design and operation of parking structures. In October 2019, BNA’s Terminal Garage 2 obtained Bronze certification.

“We have a long-standing commitment to sustainability here at Nashville International Airport. As we continue to expand our airport with BNA Vision, we are also focusing on ‘green’ design, construction and operation,” said BNA’s Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. “We are proud that another garage has achieved Parksmart certification. This is a huge achievement, and it speaks to the intentional effort of our entire team to prioritize sustainability.

Terminal 1 Garage Facts:

  • 224 million pounds of concrete used
  • 1,500+ workers
  • 807,000+ working hours
  • 93% of the workforce was local
  • $41 million in contracts for minority and women-owned small businesses (SMWBE)

Parksmart is the world’s only rating system designed to advance sustainable mobility through smarter design and operation of parking structures. Administered by Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), the Parksmart Framework provides a roadmap for employing innovative, solution-focused strategies. With guidance from the Parksmart Protocols, BNA has implemented an integrated design process that helps maximize the value of the structure throughout its life by reducing operating costs, reducing environmental impact and increasing energy efficiency.

Sustainability was a guiding principle in the development of Terminal Garage. Examples of “green” practices and components considered in the Parksmart certification of the installation:

  • Energy-efficient LED lighting, which is programmed to dim when no movement is detected, cutting energy consumption in half
  • A parking space guidance system to help travelers quickly find parking spaces, reducing unnecessary driving time, fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Walk-in pay stations, reducing vehicle downtime and greenhouse gas emissions
  • Charging stations for electric vehicles, promoting the use of an alternative energy source
  • Tire inflation station, helping travelers keep their tires properly inflated, enabling better gas mileage and reducing fossil fuel consumption
  • Recycling receptacles at all levels to encourage travelers to keep recyclable materials out of landfills
  • Environmentally friendly practices, such as using ionized water instead of chemical cleaners to clean the garage
  • Designed for durability, which increases the life of the garage through quality construction parameters, providing long-lasting structural and finishing elements
  • Emphasize regional labor and locally sourced materials, support the local economy, and reduce travel time, fossil fuel use, and greenhouse gas emissions

BNA Terminal Garages are major components of BNA® Vision, Nashville International Airport’s aggressive growth and expansion plan. In addition to terminal garages #1 and #2, BNA® Vision will include additional parking, a renovated central terminal, an expanded security checkpoint, a state-of-the-art international arrivals facility, an upscale hotel and continued. Take a 360 degree virtual tour, view renderings and watch the BNA® Vision video on BNAVision.com.

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New parking garage seeks to unlock growth potential in Salt Lake neighborhood

Ellen Winkler, co-founder of Industry, picks up gravel to mark the start of a new parking lot in Salt Lake City’s Granary District Thursday afternoon. The car park is expected to add 1,000 spaces in a growing part of town. (Carter Williams, KSL.com)

Estimated reading time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — As mayor of Salt Lake City, Erin Mendenhall is invited to attend many groundbreaking events.

These are ceremonies to celebrate the start of some kind of major structure that will one day play a vital role in the community, such as a new office building or facility. But as she stood in front of a crowd gathered outside Industry on Thursday afternoon, she admitted she was generally not enthusiastic about parking lots. Whoever will fill the floor she stood on might be the exception.

Moments after speaking, Industry co-founder Ellen Winkler jumped into an excavator and took the first scoop from the ground to signal the start of a parking garage project that will bring nearly 1,000 spaces parking lot at the Granary District, located directly to the southwest. from downtown Salt Lake City.

“What’s happening in the Granary (district) is really, really unique,” the mayor said. “For those of us who are long-time Salt Lakers, we might not understand how cool that is. There aren’t many capital cities…that have such a giant neighborhood that’s so ready for redevelopment, which have overlay qualified opportunity areas and is right next to the town center.”

The seven-story parking lot itself is located across from Industry, 650 S. 500 West. The company essentially laid the groundwork for the neighborhood’s future a few years ago, turning a former silver smelter into a co-working space for around 500 jobs from different companies that rent space in the building.

However, the neighborhood’s growth in recent years has led to an abundance of on-street parking and crowded parking lots that simply cannot accommodate everyone trying to get around. Jason Winkler, co-founder of Industry, said the project had been in the works for about four years, but had been delayed by a few hurdles, including COVID-19.

A rendering of the seven-story parking structure to be built in the Granary District of Salt Lake City.  The structure will add 998 parking spaces and more than 12,000 square feet of new retail space when completed in 2023.
A rendering of the seven-story parking structure to be built in the Granary District of Salt Lake City. The structure will add 998 parking spaces and more than 12,000 square feet of new retail space when completed in 2023. (Picture: Q Factor)

However, the project has not changed much since. The structure is expected to be 350,000 square feet, including 12,280 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. Construction is expected to take 16 months before being completed in the third quarter of 2023. Construction company Makers Line, one of a dozen companies assigned to the project, lists it as a project costing more than $25 million. .

“We all care so deeply about this neighborhood and its future,” added Tami Door, CEO of Denver-based Q Factor, the developer of the structure. “This next step with this parking lot is actually going to be an incredible benefit to the community, supporting the people who live and work here, and will be another great way to connect the different neighborhoods of our downtown and downtown neighborhoods. city.”

Although the neighborhood hasn’t been much to see in the past, Mendenhall said the success of the industry has inspired tech startups to reuse old buildings as well, which she says helps maintain the affordable neighborhood and keep its character intact. It is also more environmentally friendly to reuse old buildings than to tear them down and build something new in their place. She hopes this will help keep businesses that have been in the area for decades.

The parking garage will reduce the need for smaller car parks spread throughout the district so that the land can be used for other purposes.

Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall joined business executives, employees and others on Thursday to paint a mural in a space that will house a new parking lot in the Granary District.
Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall joined business executives, employees and others on Thursday to paint a mural in a space that will house a new parking lot in the Granary District. (Photo: Carter Williams, KSL.com)

It also plays into the future of the Granary district, which is at the center of the city’s major redevelopment plans. For example, it is located a few blocks from the large Fleet Block project that city leaders are currently trying to piece together.

With the growth of the state and city and the increase in new buildings downtown, the mayor says it’s really only a matter of time before the district of Granary becomes an extension of the city centre. Well, the city center with a different character.

“The technical definition of what downtown Salt Lake City is is outdated. I think we’re all aware of that,” she said. “Downtown is growing and what will be the Granary district will, over time, be a natural continuing extension of downtown, but a more creative, artistic, creative space that’s teeming with people living here, working here, tech companies from start-up to full-scale operation.

“It’s something we can incorporate into our downtown,” she added, “and it’s something that already defines who we are as a city.”

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Carter Williams is an award-winning journalist who covers general news, the outdoors, history and sports for KSL.com. He previously worked for the Deseret News. He is a transplant from Utah via Rochester, New York.

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$14 million from the state to build a new parking lot next to the F&M Bank Arena

CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) – A new downtown parking lot will be built adjacent to the F&M Bank Arena with $14 million in state funding.

Among the funding approved in this year’s Tennessee state budget was the $14 million grant for Montgomery County to build the public garage, which will be directly across from the under-construction F&M Bank Arena. , according to Vice President Curtis Johnson, R-Clarksville.

The Hand family donated the land for the garage at the corner of College and First streets, Johnson told Clarksville Now.

The garage will help alleviate parking problems downtown, especially with the 6,000-seat arena being built next door. “We need it in the worst possible way,” Johnson said.

The garage will be located on the same block as the Hand family’s Riverview Inn and adjacent to their planned Riverview plaza. The parking garage is shown in the plans for this project, which show it as a 724-space garage. These plans also call for the inn to become a Hilton DoubleTree.

Rendering of the proposed mixed-use development at the corner of Main and Second Streets between Riverview Inn and the F&M Bank Arena.

Sen. Bill Powers, R-Clarksville, lobbied for funding for the garage. He told Clarksville Now that having this garage on one side of downtown with the city’s planned new garage on the other will go a long way to improving parking in Clarksville.

“The geography of these two parking lots is optimal, with one being next to the Roxy and the other next to the arena,” Powers said. “This makes it a perfect fit for emerging downtown Clarksville.”

County Mayor Jim Durrett thanked lawmakers — Johnson, Powers and Rep. Jason Hodges — for bringing the funding home.

“This is another important step in revitalizing our community,” Durrett said.

Details for the public parking lot are still being worked out, but Montgomery County spokeswoman Michelle Newell said there are no plans to provide additional funding there or for the county to manage the parking lot. garage.

Oliver Hospitality, which handles communications for Riverview Square, said it was not yet ready to release details.

Other Clarksville Funding

Other Clarksville and Montgomery County specific projects that received funding were:

  • $43.5 million in additional education funding to the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System as a result of TISA.
  • $35 million to support the expansion of Nashville State Community College facilities in Clarksville.
  • $20 million for the Wings of Liberty museum.
  • $12.2 million in capital funding for Austin Peay State University.
  • $800,000 for Centerstone Military Services Inc.
  • $750,000 for the second year of a three-year cybersecurity program at Austin Peay State University.

“Montgomery County had a good year,” Johnson said.

Both Powers and Johnson supported Tennessee’s new Investing in Student Success Act (TISA). This new funding formula takes effect in 2023 and includes an additional investment of $1 billion in K-12 funding, focused on individual student needs, rather than relying on ratio components. and district averages, as the state’s Basic Education Program (BEP) did, according to a press release from their legislative offices.

“This new funding formula will transform students’ academic trajectories and enhance Tennessee’s recent progress in improving overall educational outcomes,” Johnson said in the release. “By focusing on the needs of each student, we will ensure that all children have the resources they need for a prosperous future.”

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City Council Approves Plaza Building Parking Lot Consolidation | News

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News | Gaithersburg, MD

The Department of Public Works announces that routine maintenance work will be carried out at the Olde Towne parking garage at 112 Olde Towne Avenue. The work will consist of sealing the concrete deck and covering the lines of the parking spaces. Work is expected to begin in June and continue through September, weather permitting.

A limited number of parking spaces will be available for the duration of this project. Some aisles will be temporarily staggered and up to one entrance will be closed. Parking reserved for tenants will be moved to a designated area inside the garage. Due to the large area that will be covered and the nature of this ‘rolling site’, progress will be variable and subject to weather conditions. The City is unable to confirm the exact dates of the work carried out at each level of the garage.

No Parking signs will be posted at least 48 hours prior to construction activity. These signs will be marked with the dates and times of the parking restrictions. If you plan to be away from your home for any length of time during this time, please arrange to have your vehicles parked elsewhere.

A list of additional car parks in Olde Towne can be found here.

Work will take place on weekdays between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

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Redding Town Center Parking Officially Open | News

REDDING, Calif.- The Redding Town Center Parking Lot is now officially open after the Redding Chamber of Commerce hosted it with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The new five-story structure has 400 parking spaces, double what the McConnell Foundation thought it could build.

It also has electric vehicle charging stations on several levels, access by stairs and elevator and solar panels on the top floor.








Action News Now has spoken to several companies who are delighted the structure is complete after 19 months of construction.

Jay Abraham owns Abe’s Mercerie downtown and hopes the new parking lot will make it easier for his customers to enjoy downtown.

“Overall, I think it’s a benefit for all small businesses,” Abraham said. “The city has invested a lot of money in the development of this downtown area, so we are delighted. He can’t do anything but help us.

In recognition of the community’s patience, parking is free until June 1st.

After the free parking period ends, people will have to pay $1 an hour, a rate the Redding Chamber of Commerce says is comparable to towns like Chico.

Redding Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Jake Mangas told Action News Now that paid parking will help open up more spaces in the downtown core.

“One of the things we heard from downtown businesses, especially first-floor businesses, is that they were concerned about the lack of turnover because people could park for free anywhere in a downtown surface street and stay there all day,” Mangas said. . “So creating paid parking alternatives helps create that revenue and gets people around so they can get in and out of that business or restaurant.”

Construction around the parking lot is not yet complete, so people cannot walk from the parking lot to downtown at this time.

People will have to walk on a blocked off portion of California Street before reaching businesses at the Placer Street intersection.

The McConnel Foundation hopes to have a gateway open in the near future.

Some companies have told Action News Now they are not concerned about the current march.

Many business owners, like Amber Treat, owner of Shop Around the Corner Books, have said that parking is one of the biggest problems downtown and that this garage should be a big help.

“Construction is still ongoing, so access from the parking lot to Butte St. where I am is not direct,” Treat said. “I just can’t wait to get all the construction done so people can walk straight from the garage to my store.”

“Walking a few blocks to get where you need to go isn’t insurmountable,” Mangas said. “We know there are options for people to park closer to the businesses they want to go to, and paid parking helps facilitate that. We recognize that not everyone has the physical ability to walk a few blocks.

Action News Now asked Abraham if this new structure would make a difference to his business.

“We all hope so. I think so, absolutely. The more people we can bring into town and have an easier parking situation, which will definitely increase traffic,” Abraham said.

You can now enter the California Street parking lot near Yuba Street.

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Parma apartment tenants face gas cut after parking lot collapses

PARMA, Ohio (WOIO) – Tenants of Regency apartments in Parma are frustrated that their building’s gas was shut off after a gas line was likely damaged when the parking lot collapsed.

“I believe they are working on it today, but there are no more cold showers and no kitchen,” tenant Nicholas Schultz said.

Schultz faced many problems related to the collapse of this parking lot. His car is now snagged by the bumpers where the structure fell.

“It’s kind of frustrating in that management didn’t do anything but, ‘hey, so you know we have an emergency stop,'” Schultz said.

In an email to tenants on Wednesday, management said the gas would be turned off for an emergency repair for the next 72 hours in the building next to the parking lot.

“We apologize for any inconvenience as we go through this difficult time and will update you once the gas is restored,” Regency Apartments management said.

Late Thursday evening, 19 News learned that the tenants had received an email stating that the emergency repair was almost complete and that gas would be restored.

Raina Hill, a tenant in a nearby building, was awakened by the sound of fire alarms when this happened. She said she was not surprised, but hopes management will take action to prevent something like this from happening again.

“I knew something was going to happen,” Hill said. “They don’t really care about anything that happens here.”

Copyright 2022 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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California mom sentenced for pushing baby out of parking lot

LA HABRA, Calif. (KTLA) — A mother was sentenced to 25 years to life on Wednesday for pushing her 7-month-old son out of an Orange County hospital parking lot, killing him more ten years old.

Sonia Hermosillo, 42, told the judge she was sorry for killing Noe Medina Jr. in 2011 and tearfully asked to be reunited with her family, the Orange County Register reported.

“I’m asking for an opportunity to be with my daughters,” she said through a Spanish translator. “Please, your honor, I know what I did was wrong, but I regret doing it from the bottom of my heart.”

Hermosillo was found guilty by a jury last August of one count of first-degree murder and one count of assault on a child causing death. She had pleaded not guilty and not guilty by reason of insanity, triggering a separate trial to determine whether she was legally insane at the time of the incident.

A month later, the same jury that found Hermosillo guilty of first-degree murder also found her sane at the time of the murder.

OC Superior Court Judge Kimberly Menninger said Wednesday her only sentencing options were either probation or 25 years to life behind bars, adding that a probation sentence for killing a baby was not a good option, reported the OC Register.

“There is no winner here,” Menninger told Hermosillo’s family. “It just became a tragedy and I’m so sorry for what you went through.”

On August 22, 2011, Hermosillo drove her 7-month-old son, Noe, to Orange County Children’s Hospital in the city of Orange and parked her car in the fourth floor of her parking lot.

Baby Noe was born with congenital muscular torticollis and wore a medical helmet to correct his plagiocephaly. His condition required him to receive regular treatment at the hospital, but the infant did not have an appointment scheduled that day.

Hermosillo removed Noe’s helmet and pushed him out of the parking lot, the prosecutor’s office said. Prosecutors say she intended to murder him.

The mother then walked inside the hospital, validated her parking lot and left.

A witness who saw the baby fall through the air called 911 and police responded to the scene.

Noe was taken to the trauma center at UC Irvine Medical Center in critical condition and died two days later.

Shortly after Noe was kicked out of the parking lot, Hermosillo’s husband, Noe Medina, called law enforcement to report that his wife and son were missing.

Medina told police at the time that his wife had recently been hospitalized with depression and was not allowed to be alone with the baby. He said she took Noe while he watched the couple’s other two children at their home in La Habra. He hadn’t been immediately aware of what had happened, but when he realized they were gone he called the police to report them missing.

That night, an Orange police officer saw Hermosillo drive past Main Street Hospital and arrested her, officials said.

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What caused the collapse of a parking lot in Parma?

PARMA, Ohio (WJW) — What caused a section of a parking lot to collapse in an underground garage at a Parma apartment complex late Tuesday night?

A team of investigators from the city of Parma is now trying to answer this troubling question. It happened at 11:45 p.m. at the Regency Apartments in the 5800 block of Laurent Drive.

Nicholas Schultz lives in the complex and says he heard a crumbling noise in the parking lot and decided to get out and investigate. He saw that a car had just stopped and parked next to his car, but he couldn’t believe what he saw next.

“Within about a minute I saw the garage collapse and both vehicles were then hung from the parking lot,” he said.

Shultz told FOX 8 that the only thing preventing his car and the other vehicle from falling into the underground garage below was the fact that the front and rear bumpers rested on the garage’s steel ceiling beams.

Luckily no one was in danger when the parking lot collapsed and no one was hurt.

“That was my first thought was to make sure no one was down, I was listening for the screams or something, I was making sure people who had just gotten out of their vehicles were okay too,” Schultz said.

The Parma Fire Department is currently investigating the cause of the failure of the supports holding the parking lot together, which looks suspiciously like the parking lot collapse at the Marine Towers West apartment complex in Lakewood in December 2021.

Picture WJW

“Each part of the parking structure has a cement deck between it and then it’s held up by metal beams, there was a failure in there. It could be a force of the weight of the vehicles themselves, the weight of the bridge itself, and then the age that always plays a role in everything,” Parma Fire Department spokesman TJ Martin said.

Firefighters say the parking lot foundation and building foundation are separate and they maintain the apartment complex itself is structurally sound. What is interesting about the parking terrace above the underground car park is that at some point the operators of the complex decided to permanently close a large part of the terrace.

“The engineering models at the time these buildings were constructed were not as polished as they are now, and I believe at some point they determined that it would not support the weight what it was designed for, and on an abundance of attention, the management company said ‘we’re not going to park there anymore,’” Martin said.

Residents say there have been a number of issues with parking over the years and they have made formal complaints to the management company that owns the resort.

A tenant, who asked not to be identified, told FOX 8, “There’s been water running through that ceiling for a while now, and there’s also cracks all over the floor, on the walls, and a part of the ground is raised.”

The resident says the parking lot collapse was an imminent accident.

“I mean you can’t walk into the garage without knowing something is wrong, you see puddles on the floor caused by water running off, like I said, you see this building, on the ceiling, people’s cars are covered in limestone deposits because of this, there’s no way they don’t know about it,” he said.

Investigators are checking the building’s inspection history, operated by the owner’s Bedford Heights-based management company. The company did not respond to our request for an interview or statement.

“It’s something you never thought would happen, so they don’t get inspected on a regular basis, the management companies themselves do it. And with the failure of a component, it’s not necessarily something which is going to be noticed at some point,” said TJ Martin.

Authorities are now making arrangements to remove the two cars which are hanging by their bumpers over the large hole in the parking lot, so they can do a more thorough assessment of the damage and identify the exact cause of the collapse .

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City OKs 7 story downtown apartment complex, parking garage

For seven years, the City of Lakeland has been looking for a builder to purchase the city-owned 1.5-acre parking lot on Oak Street downtown and replace it with a multi-use development. And now he has a deal with a company that wants to build a seven-story apartment complex with a 424-space parking lot.

The Lakeland City Commission on Monday approved a 21-page development agreement with Tampa-based ONICX Group to build at least 200 apartments, 2,000 square feet of street-level retail and multi-story parking. The vote was 6 to 1, with Commissioner Bill Read voting against.

But after months of negotiations, time is running out. The whole deal could fall apart if, or when, the US Federal Reserve raises interest rates and puts funding for the $53.6 million project out of Onicx’s reach.

As part of the pact, Onicx will buy the property for $1.836 million and the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency (ARC) will contribute up to $1.1 million towards the construction of the multi-storey parking lot.

The agreement includes several stipulations that allow the developer and the city to withdraw at different times from the project.

Onicx has a 90-day “inspection period” to determine the “suitability of the property for its project”.

If the company determines that the project is not feasible as planned, it may “terminate the agreement for any reason before the expiration of the inspection period and receive a refund of its $25,000 deposit. “, states the agreement. Onicx may request two 30-day extensions to the inspection period.

Under the pact, Onicx must complete the purchase of the property within one year of signing the agreement. He can request 30-day extensions, but they will cost the company $10,000 each.

Site plan for floors 5 to 7; see the plans of the other floors here or in the document at the end of this article.

Other stipulations include a $736,000 cap on the amount the city will waive fees related to site plan reviews, building permits, inspections, impact fees and offsite utility improvements.

“If these costs are expected to exceed this amount, Onicx will notify the City of the additional costs and the City will notify Onicx whether or not it agrees to pay, waive, or otherwise satisfy the additional costs,” the agreement reads. “If the city chooses not to bear the additional costs, Onicx may choose to pay the additional costs and move forward with the project or terminate the agreement.”

There is also a 36 month time frame to complete the project once it has started.

The terms are tied to lengthy negotiations with Onicx since winning the bid in September with a proposed $40 million, 153-unit apartment complex that has been drastically altered since October at the behest of the commission. , adding expense and complication.

“We and everyone involved in the process need to get it started,” Onicx Group Vice Chairman Arjun Choudhary told the commissioners. “Interest rates are rising” and the company is scrambling to secure financing before that happens.

The project has “already done the rounds”, he said. Onicx expects to have “answers” regarding funding within 30-45 days.

Choudhary said the Oak Street project is a pivotal project for Onicx, “the first of three that I’m trying to do” which will be introduced in the next six months and which will “catalyze” the downtown real estate market “for the success in the future; these will be the first projects of their kind” in Lakeland.

But first, the Oak Street project must get underway, agreed Choudhary, commissioners and planners.

On April 8, the Lakeland CRA Advisory Board unanimously approved Onicx Group’s proposed 40-page development plan for Oak Street for the block-sized lot on the north side of Oak Street. , between North Kentucky and North Tennessee avenues.

City Attorney Parker Davis told the commission that the plan calls for Onicx to build the seven-story apartment building and integrated parking lot, that the ARC will help build $1.1 million. dollars.

Onyx originally submitted a proposal for a six-story, 153-unit apartment building on the site. The original pact called for 10% of housing units to be set aside for affordable housing for households earning 80% or less of Polk County’s average median income (AMI) of $47,000.

With 153 apartments, that affordable housing “unit count” was 15. Under the proposed new agreement, the number of affordable housing units will remain at 15, with Onicx committing to build “at least” 200 units.

“We understand that affordable housing is a huge need for the community,” said Alis Drumgo, Lakeland CRA’s deputy director and deputy director of community development, noting that ideally the city is aiming for 20% affordable housing in new developments. , but, in this case, the commission’s request to add more units and build a parking lot changed the scenario for Onicx.

Because of this, he said, project costs have gone from an initial estimate of $36 million to now over $50 million.

“What we didn’t want to do was penalize the developer for responding to the commission’s request,” Drumgo said, so the affordable housing requirement would remain at 15 units.

Even then, “roughly calculating, (Onicx) ‘leaves about $2 million on the table’ over the 15 years, all 15 units should qualify as affordable housing.”

The proposed deal includes 10 years of tax increment financing (TIF) that reduces 80% of property taxes in the first five years, a 60% abatement of property taxes for years six through 10 and waives up to to $736,000 in impact fee permit credits.

The ARC has been planning to develop the Oak Street plot since 2015. In 2018, a private developer expressed interest in developing the site as a “dense urban multi-family residential project with the potential to incorporate some mixed-use elements” .

ARC began soliciting submissions in March 2019 for the project. A selection committee chose the plan from Tampa-based Catalyst Asset Management Inc. over the one submitted by Lakeland’s Broadway Real Estate Services.

Catalyst’s 2019 proposal called for a six-story structure with 173 apartments, 38 of which would be reserved for affordable housing. Their proposal also included 10,000 square feet for retail and a four-story parking garage. But after a year of negotiations, Catalyst pulled out of the project in September 2020, citing COVID impacts and “investor apprehension.”

ARC solicited a new round of bids in July 2021. The selection committee unanimously chose the plan submitted by Onicx Group. At its October 18 meeting, the city commission agreed and agreed to begin negotiations with a deadline to seal the deal within six months — no later than April.

An October development document submitted by Onicx lists potential monthly rents for apartments at market price at $1,196 for a studio, $1,350 for a T1, $1,932 for a T2 and $2,100 for a T2. .

Comparing rates to downtown competitors Mirrorton, eBay and The Gardens, the document notes: “Given the superior location and design type of 200 Oak Street compared to current market offerings, we have chose to set rents slightly higher than those of the competition.

Onicx Group has completed over $500 million in real estate projects over the past five years, with over 900 multi-family units in mixed-use projects currently under development. Projects in the area include the Marriott Residence Inn Downtown Winter Haven.

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Old Town Automated Parking Returns to City Review | ALXnow

Parking garage for 116 South Henry Street, image via City of Alexandria

Two years after plans for converting 116 South Henry Street into an automated parking garage were first submitted for city review, the garage is resubmitted to the Board of Architectural Review on Thursday, May 5 with some changes in mind.

The plan remains to build a 50ft garage just off King Street, but the entrance is undergoing some sort of overhaul after earlier designs were deemed too ‘monolithic’ in previous hearings.

“The lower levels of the garage will be clad in black brick and the upper levels will be clad in EIFS/Dryvit synthetic stucco,” the staff report states. “Entrances on the first level will consist of two rolling garage doors, an aluminum and glass storefront door system and two pedestrian doors. Large backlit letters spelling “PARKING” will be on the west end of the north elevation, above the entrances. »

The report contains some potential changes to the visuals of the building facade as well as options for different lighting, although to the untrained eye they all look roughly the same.

Construction was approved in April for all three buildings on the site. The parking structure will adjoin a four-story residential building and a four-story mixed-use building.

Staff recommend approval of the parking garage design, with a preference expressed for the fourth option.

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Pascagoula wants a new purpose for the little-used parking lot | Mississippi News

PASCAGOULA, Mississippi (AP) — A downtown parking lot on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast has barely been used since a city spent federal money to build it after Hurricane Katrina, and local officials say it has become a graffiti-covered eyesore.

Pascagoula executives are looking for ways to give the City Dock Parking Garage a new purpose, possibly adding office or retail space on the upper floors, the Mississippi Press reported. The original light fixtures and security cameras were destroyed a long time ago.

“Isn’t that terrible? said Mayor Jay Willis. “It’s just ridiculous. Because there hasn’t been much traffic there over the years since it was built, it’s become a favorite spot for people looking to do bad things and not be seen.

As billions of federal dollars poured into Mississippi after Katrina in 2005, Pascagoula used some of his money to build the parking lot in anticipation of future downtown development. The garage is near the Pascagoula River.

“You know the old phrase ‘Build it and they will come?’ Well, they didn’t come,” Willis said. “It has stood totally empty and unused since it was built.”

political cartoons

Willis and the Pascagoula City Council hope to turn the structure into something useful. The city contracted with a planning and design firm to determine the options.

“I really believe this is going to turn into something that will be very nice for the town of Pascagoula,” Willis said.

The city replaced the garage light fixtures and installed a new surveillance camera system linked to the Pascagoula Police Department. The garage sits directly behind nine new high-end townhouses being built along the river, with 11 additional townhouses under construction.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Pascagoula wants a new destination for a little-used parking lot

PASCAGOULA, Mississippi (AP) — A downtown parking lot on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast has barely been used since a city spent federal money to build it after Hurricane Katrina, and local officials say it has become a graffiti-covered eyesore.

Pascagoula executives are looking for ways to give the City Dock Parking Garage a new purpose, possibly adding office or retail space on the upper floors, according to the Mississippi Press. reported. The original light fixtures and security cameras were destroyed a long time ago.

“Isn’t that terrible? said Mayor Jay Willis. “It’s just ridiculous. Because there hasn’t been much traffic there over the years since it was built, it’s become a favorite spot for people looking to do bad things and not be seen.

As billions of federal dollars poured into Mississippi after Katrina in 2005, Pascagoula used some of his money to build the parking lot in anticipation of future downtown development. The garage is near the Pascagoula River.

“You know the old phrase ‘Build it and they will come?’ Well, they didn’t come,” Willis said. “It has stood totally empty and unused since it was built.”

Willis and the Pascagoula City Council hope to turn the structure into something useful. The city contracted with a planning and design firm to determine the options.

“I really believe this is going to turn into something that will be very nice for the town of Pascagoula,” Willis said.

The city replaced the garage light fixtures and installed a new surveillance camera system linked to the Pascagoula Police Department. The garage sits directly behind nine new high-end townhouses being built along the river, with 11 additional townhouses under construction.

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Parking garage

Buchanan Parking Garage reopens in time for International Festival, first phase complete | festivals

The Buchanan parking lot in downtown Lafayette will reopen in time for the Festival International de Louisiane crowds, according to a statement from the Lafayette Consolidated Government.

“The first phase of construction to repair the deteriorated steel columns and beams has been completed. The second phase to repair the elevators and stairwells is expected to begin in approximately three months,” the statement said. “Elevators will not operate until phase two is complete. Staff will use a golf cart to transport those unable to descend garage levels.”

Festival parking is $5. After the festival ends, the parking fee is $1 per hour, the statement said.

The six-story structure built in 1981 was abruptly closed in October 2018 after it was deemed unsafe, exacerbating parking issues for patrons of the nearby Lafayette Parish courthouse as many street parking spaces near the courthouse were then reserved for courthouse employees who used The Garage.

Corrosion damaged more than half of the steel beams and columns that support the floors of the 344-vehicle parking garage.

Mayor-President Josh Guillory signed an emergency declaration in March 2020 after an engineer’s report found advanced to severe corrosion in the latches that connect some of the 200 panels to the garage itself. The panels were removed to lighten the load on the structure.

Phase 1 of the garage repairs, involving structural repairs to the car park, as well as sandblasting and painting the exterior of the structure and installing an impact-resistant cable system, was due to be completed in January for a cost of $1.6 million.

Phase 2 is expected to include the repair or replacement of elevators, as well as repairs to stairwells and the electrical system, at an estimated cost of $1.6 million. The second phase may also include interior painting for an estimated cost of $500,000 to $800,000.

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Prominent lawyer charged with soliciting prostitute after parking lot arrest

The police report says Singal was initially charged with attempted human trafficking for commercial sex acts, but court records show the charge was changed on Thursday to a misdemeanor count of soliciting a prostitute.

Singal was arraigned Thursday in the Roxbury Division of Boston City Court, where he was released on a recognizance, according to a spokesperson for the Suffolk District Attorney’s Office. He is due back in court on May 19.

Singal, who handled public corruption and major fraud cases as an assistant U.S. attorney and later defended the owner of a now-defunct Framingham pharmacy responsible for a deadly meningitis outbreak in 2012, said also contributed to the opinion section of the Boston Globe, writing in 2018 about Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Singal was arrested as part of a Boston and state police initiative to reduce the demand for commercial sex in the area around Massachusetts Avenue, according to the police report.

Police first saw a sex worker, whose age was not included in the report, walking through this area and trying to interact with passing drivers. A gray 2019 Infiniti Q70L then slowed to a stop next to her on Peirson Street near Allerton Street, one block from Massachusetts Avenue south of Melnea Cass Boulevard, around 6:30 p.m., according to the report.

The sex worker got into the front passenger seat and the Infiniti headed down Massachusetts Avenue and took a right, continuing to the mall, then taking a left onto Allstate Road, where the sedan entered a busy parking lot and parked between the second and third levels, according to the report.

An investigator walked to the Infiniti, where he could clearly see through its windows that the sex worker was bending over to the driver’s knee area and performing a sex act, according to the report.

The officer knocked on the car window, gave her name and told the driver to get out, and soon other investigators arrived and told the sex worker to get out of the vehicle, according to the report.

Investigators asked the man to step away for a private conversation, and he handed over his ID, which showed it was Singal, police said.

Police told Singal they were working to reduce the demand for commercial sex, and he “said he understood and repeatedly asked for leniency and consideration”, explaining that he was a lawyer and that he knew the importance of the initiative, according to the report. .

Meanwhile, the sex worker told interviewing investigators that Singal picked her up and agreed to pay $40 for a sex act, and that he gave her the money before she committed. the deed, according to the report.

As officers arrested Singal, he asked to speak to a supervisor, and when allowed to do so, Singal “again asked that we consider not being arrested”, police said. The supervisor reminded him of the seriousness of the problem, according to the report.

Police referred the sex worker to a social services agency that helps survivors of sex trafficking and domestic violence, and she was driven away from the area, according to the report.


Jeremy C. Fox can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @jeremycfox.

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Part of the parking lot at Trumbull Shopping Center is still closed

Photo by Amanda Cuda


One of the raised parking lots at the Westfield Trumbull Mall, closed to traffic after a hole was discovered over the weekend, in Trumbull, Connecticut on February 14, 2022.

File photo by Ned Gerard/Hearst Connecticut Media

TRUMBULL – Two and a half months after a piece of concrete fell on the lower level of a Westfield Trumbull shopping center car park, part of the structure is still closed and being assessed.

The incident, which happened on February 13, tore a hole in the upper deck of the garage and caused the closure of part of the structure, which is near the Target store in the mall. It remained closed, and a mall spokesperson said in a written statement that it was unclear when the issue would be resolved and the full structure reopened.

“The Westfield team is working with its engineers to develop the scope of work for the repairs, but this process will take some time to tender the work and complete the repairs,” the statement said.

In the meantime, Trumbull building manager Robert Dunn said the city is working with mall management to make sure it’s safe to park on the lower deck.


“We have received preliminary reports from two structural engineers indicating where cars can be safely parked,” Dunn said in an email. “They put reinforcements under the section of the bridge that had a piece that fell off.”

However, that area of ​​the bridge is still closed, he said. Dunn said core samples were taken from various locations on the bridge for analysis by forensic engineers. He said an analysis of the results should be available soon.

When the parking lot was first damaged, mall security quickly began asking people parked in the affected area to move their cars. Mall officials said no vehicles were damaged in the incident and no one was injured.

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Mixed-use parking garage gets approval in Ferndale

Ferndale City Council approved special land use and site plan applications for a mixed-use parking structure at 180 Vester Street at its April 11 meeting. Shown here is a rendering by Serra-Marko & Associates of what the building might look like.

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FERNDALE — A mixed-use parking structure in downtown Ferndale has received City Council approval.

At its April 11 meeting, Ferndale City Council voted 4-0 to approve special land use and site plan applications for a 5-story parking structure at 180 Vester St. The property is owned at the Ferndale Collision auto shop.

The mixed-use building is proposed to contain 169 spaces over an area of ​​18,572 square feet. The first floor would not have parking, but would house shops. The project is connected to a mixed-use development at 141 Vester St. which was approved by council earlier this year.

A condition of this approval was that the developer agree to delay construction for 14 months from the date of approval to create an opportunity for the 180 Vester car park to be built first. The 141 Vester project will include 72 units with a focus on affordable housing.

“The rendering is basically the facade, a facade that’s broken in such a way that…it’s not immediately apparent as a parking structure,” said Peter D’Aleo, architect at Serra-Marko & Associates, during Of the reunion. “It attempts to be more compatible with adjacent buildings and contextually with the streetscape.”

Council approval, City Manager Joe Gacioch said, allows the developers, Zoma Investments, to move forward to explore their financing options.

Mayor Melanie Piana added that the banks need a good design project in order to estimate what the financing needs of the project would be to see if it can actually be built.

“Our business community and the residents of our meeting at 141 Vester wanted a guarantee that it was going to be built, and we said there was no guarantee of development,” she said, ” But this is just one step in the process of moving this project forward at a faster pace to see if it can meet parking demands, as well as the needs and demands that the business community and residents have set themselves a priority.

Councilman Greg Pawlica thought the project was excellent and made good use of the property. He also said the structure would allow Ferndale more flexibility with potential parking in land behind the Como restaurant, as well as any other development that might want to explore the east side of town.

“This addresses the need for additional parking on the east side, which (we will) lose a significant amount of parking to Project 141 (Vester),” he said.

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California Street Parking Garage opens to the public – anewscafe.com

After a nineteen month period of demolition and construction, the long-awaited opening of the California Street Parking Garage has arrived. The six-story garage, part of the Block 7 project in downtown Redding, features 400 parking spaces, electric vehicle chargers, an elevator, solar shade structures and spectacular skyline views of Redding. The garage is owned by a partnership between the McConnell Foundation and K2 Development Companies.

To commemorate the opening of this important community asset, all partners involved in financing, designing and building the project will celebrate with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the top floor of the garage on Friday, May 6 at 12:00 p.m. Members of the public are welcome to attend the event and park in the structure for the first time.

Shannon Phillips, chief operating officer of the McConnell Foundation, said We are thrilled the wait is over and anticipate the opening of the beautiful new garage will be well received by those who live, work and play downtown.

The garage was built by Modern Building, Inc. with a significant portion of the work done by Conco Commercial Concrete Contractors. The garage was designed by Arkansas-based Modus Studios and Bay Area-based DMARC Studio. The garage’s metal cladding consists of artistically placed Corten steel panels that are designed to oxidize over time to develop a unique patina that matches the warm reddish hue of Redding’s natural floors.

Prior to the May 6 opening date, the parking garage will be soft openingto the public on Thursday, April 28. There will be no parking fees until June 1 in recognition of the communitys patience when constructing the parking structure. Further announcements on parking rates, monthly passes and other parking amenities will be released around June 1.

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Grand Rapids Downtown Library’s parking garage and mixed-use concept spark questions at city commission meeting

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — A concept to build a 500-space maximum parking lot with mixed-use space, potentially housing apartments, businesses or community spaces, was rejected by Grand Rapids city commissioners on Tuesday.

Mobile GR, the city’s parking services department, has been considering for years the idea of ​​building a parking lot, with commercial or residential space, on what is now a 110-space surface parking lot, 111 Library St. NE .

After hearing the outcome of the community feedback the city gathered on the concept, several commission members wondered if an additional parking garage was needed. Instead, they suggested that residential housing, with enough parking to service the library and surrounding venues, should be the main focus of the site.

“In Grand Rapids, we need housing like hogs need slop,” City Commissioner Joe Jones said Tuesday, April 26. “Any opportunity to get housing is a good thing.”

Josh Naramore, director of Mobile GR, said building a parking garage on the site would allow the city to provide parking for city employees who currently park in more demand lots downtown.

The idea is to “free up more parking spaces in the heart of downtown, especially in the Heartside neighborhood where we have a lot of businesses that want to expand,” he said.

Naramore cited the Weston-Commerce ramp as an example of a parking garage that is “extremely oversubscribed.”

Commissioner Jon O’Connor expressed his opposition to the proposed parking garage.

He asked why the city would consider building the facility when a large parking lot used by the city, located at 36 McConnell St. SW, has a 60% utilization rate.

“If it’s something that’s 60%, why don’t we put cars out there at $0 cost,” he asked.

During his presentation to the commission, Naramore highlighted feedback the city has gathered from residents and community members on the parking garage concept.

Feedback was collected from neighborhood residents, as well as nearby institutions such as the Library, Grand Rapids Community College, Civic Theater, Grand Rapids Children’s Museum and others. Developer feedback was also collected.

As well as a parking garage, ideas for what to include in the development ranged from affordable housing, retail space for a cafe and outdoor recreation space, among others. , Naramore said.

The parking garage could consist of one development space on the first floor, followed by multiple parking floors, with additional development space above the garage.

He said the library’s biggest concern was making sure there was enough parking space for the library and its patrons.

“They’re very strong on what we’ve heard all along, which is that the new structure shouldn’t overshadow the existing historic structure,” Naramore said, referring to the library, which opened in 1904.

He said feedback from the development community highlighted that financial incentives will likely be needed to make the project a reality given rising construction costs.

Commissioner Senita Lenear said she would like the concept to focus primarily on housing.

“Housing is an important need,” she said. “For years, we have had people ask us to make housing available, as much as possible. When I think of the options here, it would have been great to see an option that is mostly accommodation with parking, perhaps, to support that.

A 2020 study, conducted for the city of Grand Rapids by Housing Next, estimates the city needs 5,340 additional apartments and 3,548 owner-occupied condos, townhouses or single-family homes by 2025.

For the next stages of the concept, Naramore said briefings on the concept will be provided to the Grand Rapids Public Library Board, as well as the Mobile GR Commission. Feedback from these councils and the city commission will be used to create a firmer concept for the site.

“With the approval of the city commission, we might like to move forward with the potential design of what the facility would look like based on your feedback,” Naramore told the commission.

Adding more parking to the area would also benefit nearby organizations such as the Grand Rapids Children’s Museum and St. Cecilia Music Center. Both organizations said one of the barriers to their growth is that they don’t have parking, Naramore said.

He said the size of the proposed parking garage could be reduced and that 500 spaces is not a definitive figure.

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Gables closed garage | News, Sports, Jobs


The city has condemned the Gables Building parking lot for security reasons, heightening the threat of a downtown parking shortage.

The shutdown came earlier this month after a complaint led to a codes department inspection that revealed a host of issues, according to department director Rebecca Brown.

A planned parking study is “even more important” now, said Sherri McGregor, president of the Altoona Parking Authority.

Numerous cracks in the concrete beams that support the Gables Garage’s deck panels have caused further deterioration of the beams, and there is significant spalling of the concrete from the panels and numerous exposed steel rebars, Brown said. , citing the inspector’s report.

The sentencing earlier this month led to the transfer of 48 vehicles that had been using the Gables garage to the garage at the nearby city transportation center – with a temporary reservation of 12 additional spaces, according to Vickie Chilcote, office manager of the Parking Authority.

Those 12 remaining spaces — which would become open to the general public for monthly rentals if former Gables occupants are not interested — represent the final 12 available for monthly rent in the Transportation Center garage, according to Chilcote.

There are also 14 spaces available in the surface lot behind Altoona Cardiology Associates and a few on the 10th Avenue Freeway near 11th Street, according to Chilcote.

Additionally, there are three-hour visitor spaces available behind the new Curry building and two-hour spaces on the avenues, McGregor said.

The city ordered Gables owner DSD Investors LLC of Upper Darby to hire a structural engineer to analyze the Gables garage and provide a report to the city with a chart of needed repairs, Brown said.

“The goal here is just to get that report and go from there,” said Brown.

The company, however, had difficulty finding a structural engineer to perform the task and requested an extension of time, according to the company’s manager, Brown said.

Brown doesn’t know if the company intends to repair the garage or how much it might cost, she said.

The city’s recent inspection showed that workers had already patched holes in the Gables garage, fastened heavy netting to the first-floor ceiling, installed wooden cribwork under the second-floor deck, and applied shotcrete in spots, Brown said.

As far as she knows, the condemnation of the garage will not affect the use of the rest of the Gables building, Brown said.

The garage has five floors, including a roof.

The lowest floor is accessible from a driveway connecting 11th and 12th Avenues, while the upper floor is accessible from the 1100 block of 13th Street and the remaining floors are accessible from the 1300 block of 12th Avenue.

The city has affixed yellow warning tape to all entrances.

“As we see how it unfolds, we will know more,” said McGregor.

Ongoing downtown revitalization has created pressure for more parking, though the upcoming summer break for Penn State Altooona should relieve some of that pressure.

The RFP for the Parking Study calls for a review of the 7th to 18th Street and 10th to 14th Avenue area.

The budget for the study is $40,000.

The study consultant must complete within six months.

This study “comes at a good time” said McGregor.

The transport center garage has 230 spaces.

The Gables Garage has about 100 spaces, officials said.

The DSD director spoke briefly to a reporter on Monday, suggested the matter could be discussed later, but did not call back after that.

The Mirror’s staff writer, William Kibler, is at 814-949-7038.



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Parking plans underway in Fondren; Senate approves $20 million

Developers in the Fondren Entertainment District are drawing up plans for the parking lot that will be built behind The Pearl tiki bar, Highball Lanes bowling alley and the Capri Theatre.

Jason Watkins and David Pharr, the Northeast Jackson residents who started the Fondren Entertainment District business, said they were handling plans for the garage because there is land available related to their development and that they have an established business relationship with a contractor, which should make construction as efficient and affordable as possible.

Senate Bill 3150 authorized up to $20 million in bonds to be issued by the Hinds County Development Project Loan Fund “to assist in the development and construction of infrastructure improvements, including structured parking , and other enhancements associated with an entertainment development project”.

“The leadership of the state — the governor and the speaker of the House of Representatives — led it that way,” Watkins said. “They saw the need for this garage. It was their choice to help him in this way.

In February, the Hinds County Board of Supervisors approved the garage’s general concept and voted to move forward with the legislation.

Supervisors will be responsible for loan repayment, Watkin said. Revenue from drivers paying to use the garage and fees paid by residents of a planned apartment complex will go to Hinds County to pay for the loan, he said.

“We have a few loose ends with the county regarding the structure of the loan agreement,” he said. “After that, the design phase will begin, and then construction, which will take six to nine months.”

Hinds County will take ownership of the garage upon completion, Watkins said.

“It will be the county’s long-term asset,” he said. “We have no interest in owning the garage.”

Plans call for a professional management company to lease and operate the garage, Watkins said. As is the case in many cities, drivers will pay a fee to park in the garage.

The exact location of the garage, which is estimated to be worth $13 million, has not been identified except behind the entertainment district, Pharr said.

Pharr and Watkins are working with a consultant who specializes in parking garages, who advised that a garage that can hold 500 vehicles would be the right size to accommodate area businesses and allow for future growth in the area.

Watkins hopes the garage will be ready for use by the end of 2022.

In a state where drivers value the convenience of front door parking, Pharr believes drivers will use the garage because it will provide an alternative to driving around the block and looking for an open parking space.

“We think people will appreciate the predictability and security of parking,” he said. An armed security guard patrols in front of the Quartier des spectacles in Fondren and another in the back of the Quartier des spectacles.

Nathan Glenn, owner of Rooster’s and Basil’s restaurants in the Fondren Corner Building, welcomes the extra parking.

“Parking is the only thing everyone complains about in Fondren,” he said. “Any additional parking would be fine. I think it will be good for the whole region.

Parking would also be beneficial when there are events in Fondren and parking is scarce, he said.

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Carrboro’s East Main Street parking garage offers teens a social gathering place

COMMUNITY

By Lola Oliverio, Proconian

Growing up in Carrboro, I can’t remember the first time I hung out with friends at the 300 East Main Street parking lot next to the ArtsCenter. This was my favorite place throughout my high school experience and I created countless memories there.

For the most part, the structure is a place to park your car while you catch a concert at Cat’s Cradle or enjoy a meal at Hickory Tavern. For many young people in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area, however, it is the meeting place. Often teens hang out on the top floor, sit in their car, or people watch while chatting with friends.

Erected in September 2013, the parking lot has served East Main Square businesses for nearly nine years. The structure was built as part of the “Phase One” construction process that brought Carrboro to a Hilton Inn and began in March 2012.

“When you say ‘the parking lot,’ everyone knows what you’re talking about,” said Chapel Hill Secondary School senior Victoria Romanova.

The place has become a staple of teenage life in the Triangle. With five floors (including one on the roof), an elevator and a beautiful view of Main Street, it’s the perfect place to meet up with friends.

“People have fun there; they relax,” said CHHS sophomore Emerys Bowers.

Many teenagers skateboard, have photo shoots, or just chat with each other on the roof of the structure.

“It’s a great place to hang out with people in a nice and safe environment,” said CHHS senior Julian Brown. “I feel pretty comfortable there.”

Many love the place because of its informal and intimate atmosphere.

“It’s a nice meeting place because it’s relatively secluded but also laid back and public,” added CHHS manager Mia Kalish. “Plus, you can see much of the beautiful UNC-Chapel Hill campus from up there.”

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, the structure became even more popular, as it was the only place many could see their friends.

“When my friends and I were unable to spend time indoors, we spent a lot of time in the parking lot,” said CHHS manager Tatum Chewning. “It’s a long way from Franklin Street so we would meet on the bridge and walk around downtown.”

The students say the Carrboro Police Department does not actively enforce loitering restrictions against teens who engage in innocent entertainment.

“The police have questioned my friends a few times, but usually they just ask what we’re doing and make sure we’re not drinking,” Brown said.

Fans of the band Glass Animals watch a performance in August 2021 from the East Main Street parking lot as the band plays in the new outdoor performance space at Cat’s Cradle. Photo by Lola Oliverio.

In 2021, Carrboro Cat’s Cradle Concert Hall built an outdoor performance space behind the arts center. During some shows, individuals can often be seen watching from the parking lot.

“It was really cool to experience a concert from up there,” said CHHS senior Linden Clemens. “I think it’s a good option for sold-out shows. It’s obviously not like being in the pit, but it’s still fun.

The parking lot may come across as an unconventional hangout, but it serves young people in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area quite well. It’s rarely empty, and there are often several groups of friends at the top of the structure. It’s a pleasant phenomenon and a lesser-known aspect of youth culture in the region.

This article first appeared in the Chapel Hill High School Student Newspaper Proconian.

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Carrboro’s East Main Street parking garage offers teens a social gathering spot

COMMUNITY

By Lola Oliverio, Proconian

Growing up in Carrboro, I can’t remember the first time I hung out with friends at the 300 East Main Street parking lot next to the ArtsCenter. This was my favorite place throughout my high school experience and I created countless memories there.

For the most part, the structure is a place to park your car while you catch a concert at Cat’s Cradle or enjoy a meal at Hickory Tavern. For many young people in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area, however, it is the meeting place. Often teens hang out on the top floor, sit in their car, or people watch while chatting with friends.

Erected in September 2013, the parking lot has served East Main Square businesses for nearly nine years. The structure was built as part of the “Phase One” construction process that brought Carrboro to a Hilton Inn and began in March 2012.

“When you say ‘the parking lot,’ everyone knows what you’re talking about,” said Chapel Hill Secondary School senior Victoria Romanova.

The place has become a staple of teenage life in the Triangle. With five floors (including one on the roof), an elevator and a beautiful view of Main Street, it’s the perfect place to meet up with friends.

“People have fun there; they relax,” said CHHS sophomore Emerys Bowers.

Many teenagers skateboard, have photo shoots, or just chat with each other on the roof of the structure.

“It’s a great place to hang out with people in a nice and safe environment,” said CHHS senior Julian Brown. “I feel pretty comfortable there.”

Many love the place because of its informal and intimate atmosphere.

“It’s a nice meeting place because it’s relatively secluded but also laid back and public,” added CHHS manager Mia Kalish. “Plus, you can see much of the beautiful UNC-Chapel Hill campus from up there.”

During the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, the structure became even more popular, as it was the only place many could see their friends.

“When my friends and I were unable to spend time indoors, we spent a lot of time in the parking lot,” said CHHS manager Tatum Chewning. “It’s a long way from Franklin Street so we would meet on the bridge and walk around downtown.”

The students say the Carrboro Police Department does not actively enforce loitering restrictions against teens who engage in innocent entertainment.

“The police have questioned my friends a few times, but usually they just ask what we’re doing and make sure we’re not drinking,” Brown said.

Fans of the band Glass Animals watch a performance in August 2021 from the East Main Street parking lot as the band plays in the new outdoor performance space at Cat’s Cradle. Photo by Lola Oliverio.

In 2021, Carrboro Cat’s Cradle Concert Hall built an outdoor performance space behind the arts center. During some shows, individuals can often be seen watching from the parking lot.

“It was really cool to experience a concert from up there,” said CHHS senior Linden Clemens. “I think it’s a good option for sold-out shows. It’s obviously not like being in the pit, but it’s still fun.

The parking lot may come across as an unconventional hangout, but it serves young people in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area quite well. It’s rarely empty, and there are often several groups of friends at the top of the structure. It’s a pleasant phenomenon and a lesser known aspect of youth culture in the region.

This article first appeared in the Chapel Hill High School Student Newspaper Proconian.

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Parking garage

Parking lot partially collapses as trucker searches for overnight parking

Searching for a trucker to park overnight accidentally led to a partial collapse of a parking lot in Virginia on Wednesday night.

The incident happened on April 20 in Lynchburg, Va., just after 10 p.m., in a parking lot near Three Roads Brewery.

According to WSLS News, the driver entered the parking garage while looking for a place to park overnight while waiting to deliver to Three Roads Brewery in the morning. As the driver crossed the upper deck of the garage, his truck fell through the concrete, causing the garage to partially collapse.

Fortunately, the vehicles parked in the basement of the collapse were able to drive away without incident and only one car was damaged. No one was injured in the incident.

“This one isn’t too bad. There’s no complete collapse, no threat of anyone getting trapped in the debris below,” a member of the fire department told WFXR News. biggest concern when something like this happens – a bridge collapse with occupants and cars below that would require search and rescue. Fortunately, this is not the case. »

The parking lot will be closed for “a period of time” as the city of Lynchburg works to inspect the structure. Officials say the incident was an accident and no citations have been issued.

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McMaster University’s Cootes Drive Parking Garage Suspended After Conditional Approval Expires

Conditional approval for a six-story parking garage at McMaster University off Cootes Drive expired April 14 before conditions were lifted, with no request for an extension to the approval.

City of Hamilton spokeswoman Michelle Shantz said planning staff were told by McMaster’s agent on April 13 that the university was not pursuing the application that had originally received conditional approval from the sitemap a year ago.

McMaster University spokeswoman Michelle Donovan confirmed that demand for the 567-space parking structure north of Thorndale Crescent is not continuing now, but left the door open for it to progress to the ‘coming.

“The project continues to be put on hold,” Donovan said on April 14. “Until this status changes, no further work on the project is undertaken.”

The proposed six-story, 20.4-meter-tall structure was the first of a dozen possible parking garages in the university’s campus master plan to reach the request stage.

According to the conditional site plan approval letter from the City of Hamilton’s Director of Development Planning, Anita Fabac, to McMaster Planning Consultant Katelyn Gillis of T. Johns Consulting Group dated April 14, 2021, it there were 17 conditions to be removed – including erosion and siltation control, grading and drainage control, tree preservation and enhancement plan, landscaping plan, stormwater management and site lighting plan — before any building permits are issued.

Shantz and Donovan did not say whether any conditions were waived or whether McMaster submitted anything for review.

In addition, there were eight special conditions on the issuance of building permits, including a transportation impact study, City approval of parking garage paving materials and color, and two minor variances. to the zoning by-law.

McMaster’s proposal would require approval of two minor variances by the Committee of Adjustment to allow for the proposed building height of six stories and 20.4 meters where a maximum of 2.5 stories and 11 meters is permitted.

McMaster also needed a waiver to allow parking space dimensions of 2.8 meters by 5.8 meters and 2.6 meters by 5.8 meters where a minimum space of 2.7 meters by 6 .0 meters is required.

The city had not yet received the required minor variance applications.

The application came as a surprise to nearby residents, as well as others who wondered about the structure’s impacts on the surrounding environment.

Questions have been raised as to whether the proposed change to height limits is actually minor in nature or should require a rezoning application to the city’s planning committee.

The six-story parking garage on the existing K parking lot was the first of several parking garages envisioned in McMaster’s campus master plan. The plan includes up to three parking structures on Westaway Road and one at the corner of Main Street West and Cootes Drive as part of a planned transit hub.

The plan also proposes a second vehicle entrance from Cootes Drive at College Crescent, where the majority of vehicles, including all buses, would access campus.

The city has apparently not yet received planning applications for McMaster’s other parking and transit development concepts.

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The parking garage is closed after three beams cracked on the upper deck

Wheeling, W. Va. (WTRF) – The Center Wheeling parking garage is now closed to vehicles and pedestrians.

The garage which was originally built to hold 853 vehicles was only used by 35 to 40 nowadays, and only on the lower floors.

Then last week it had to be closed.

Wheeling City Manager Robert Herron said the former Valley Professional Center next to the garage is being converted into a new police headquarters. In the midst of construction, a problem arose on the upper deck of the parking garage.

The contractor used the parking structure to access the various floors of the police headquarters project, including the roof. Even if they had permission to do so, we believe the weight of one of these vehicles caused three of the beams on the upper level of the parking structure to crack to a point where we thought it would safer to close the parking structure. entirely.

Robert Herron, Wheeling City Manager

Herron said the garage is closed for the foreseeable future.

It will be reviewed by engineers. Based on their findings, Herron explained that the city would decide to do one of three things: rehabilitate the structure, partially demolish it, or completely demolish it.

He hopes the lower levels can be reopened in the coming weeks.

Stay with 7News for updates.

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Shots in Perkins Rowe stem from kidnapping and sexual assault in parking lot

BATON ROUGE — A man shot a kidnapper who was holding his girlfriend captive at Perkins Rowe on Sunday night, causing a lengthy lockdown in the mall parking lot.

Within hours of Sunday’s incident, the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office initially reported the shots and the resulting law enforcement presence was tied to a domestic situation. On Monday, however, the department shared details of the attack and said a suspect was arrested the following day.

The victim told deputies her attacker, later identified as 69-year-old Leon Curry III, approached her around 7.30pm as she was getting into her car in the parking lot. The woman said Curry pointed a gun at her and forced her into his own vehicle.

According to arrest documents, Curry then led the victim to another level of the parking lot and sexually assaulted her.

When Curry returned to the original level, the victim’s boyfriend attempted to enter the car, and Curry fled with the victim in the car.

The victim told deputies she jumped out of the vehicle before it turned onto Perkins Road while her boyfriend fired at the vehicle.

Curry was arrested by deputies on Monday after a traffic stop. According to documents, Curry told deputies he was in the area at the time of the incident and “enjoys watching the women there.”

When deputies caught up with Curry on Monday, they searched his vehicle and found several hats, masks and a semi-automatic handgun-inspired BB gun. It is unknown if the BB gun was the same weapon used by Curry during the abduction.

Curry was convicted of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, aggravated kidnapping and sexual assault.

Deputies have also questioned the man who fired the gun, but he is not facing charges at this time.

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Suspect in custody after Perkins Rowe car park closed on Sunday

BATON ROUGE — A man shot a kidnapper who was holding his girlfriend captive at Perkins Rowe on Sunday night, causing a lengthy lockdown in the mall parking lot.

Within hours of Sunday’s incident, the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office initially reported the shots and the resulting law enforcement presence was tied to a domestic situation. On Monday, however, the department shared details of the attack and said a suspect was arrested the following day.

The victim told deputies her attacker, later identified as 69-year-old Leon Curry III, approached her around 7.30pm as she was getting into her car in the parking lot. The woman said Curry pointed a gun at her and forced her into his own vehicle.

According to arrest documents, Curry then led the victim to another level of the parking lot and sexually assaulted her.

When Curry returned to the original level, the victim’s boyfriend attempted to enter the car, and Curry fled with the victim in the car.

The victim told deputies she jumped out of the vehicle before it turned onto Perkins Road while her boyfriend fired at the vehicle.

Curry was arrested by deputies on Monday after a traffic stop. According to documents, Curry told deputies he was in the area at the time of the incident and “enjoys watching the women there.”

When deputies caught up with Curry on Monday, they searched his vehicle and found several hats, masks and a semi-automatic handgun-inspired BB gun. It is unknown if the BB gun was the same weapon used by Curry during the abduction.

Curry was convicted of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, aggravated kidnapping and sexual assault.

Deputies have also questioned the man who fired the gun, but he is not facing charges at this time.

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Construction begins on $34 million car park near Dublin BART

DUBLIN — Alameda County officials are moving forward with a long-delayed $34.5 million parking lot near the Dublin/Pleasanton BART station, slated to begin construction this summer.

Local and state politicians staged a groundbreaking ceremony for the garage about 3½ years ago, and a June 2020 county planning document indicated the garage would be completed by February 2022.

However, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors did not approve a construction contract for the project until late March, with construction beginning in August. The garage is expected to be completed by December 2023.

“This is not a typical timeline for a project,” District 1 Supervisor David Haubert said in an interview about the delays.

Haubert’s predecessor, Scott Haggerty, helped champion the project several years ago, and Haubert was at the inauguration in 2018, when he was mayor of Dublin.

Despite the delays, Haubert said he thinks the garage will be very useful to commuters in the future.

“I’m looking forward to a ribbon cutting and maybe a rededication,” he said.

The new county-owned five-storey garage will include over 500 parking spaces and will be built next to the current BART garage, on half of a 4-acre site on the corner of Iron Horse Parkway and Martinelli Way in Dublin. The other half of the land could be used for affordable housing in the future, Dublin officials say.

There were almost no public updates on the progress of the garage project between groundbreaking and the council’s approval of a $28.8 million contract with the Santa Claus contractor. Clara McCarthy Building Companies at its March 22 meeting.

Haubert said that as he worked with the General Service Agency to move the project forward, he acknowledged the board could have ensured there were more public updates on the project.

“In retrospect, when we were following all the letters of the law, so to speak, we could have had a more detailed discussion on this point. At least a staff report at a public meeting would have been good to do,” he said.

The contract includes a 5% contingency, instead of the normal 10%, to help keep the project within budget, Haubert said.

Up to $1 million of the contingency can be spent on change orders that can be authorized as needed by Kimberly Gasaway, acting director of the County General Service Agency, which oversees public works projects.

The garage project will cost approximately $34.5 million, which includes construction, initial design work, provident fund and soft costs such as construction management, utility connection fees, stormwater management and testing and inspections, Gasaway said.

The project has been delayed for a variety of reasons, Gasaway said, including turnover of senior county agency staff and project managers, and because the project involves a partnership between the county and the Livermore Amador Valley Transportation Authority.

Although a $20 million grant from the state Department of Transportation was one of the main sources of funding for the project, working out an agreement between Caltrans and the transit authority added to the delays, Gasaway said.

The garage project is also receiving $7 million in Metropolitan Transportation Commission Regional Measure 2 funds, an additional $7 million through Measure BB Transportation Sales Tax funds and $500,000 from Improvement Funds. of county assets, according to county documents.

“And then COVID came along and we had to identify which projects were critical,” she said, noting that some projects, like the Santa Rita prison, could have lifesaving implications and needed higher priority.

The General Services Agency was harshly criticized in a 2020 report by the Alameda County Civil Grand Jury, which wrote that many projects run by the agency “suffered from project management failures that contributed greatly to the delays and cost overruns”.

Haubert said the county “will have to manage change orders very closely and we will have to monitor this project very closely” so that it does not go over budget, particularly due to its lower contingency fund.

Despite the drop in ridership during the pandemic, Haubert and Gasaway said they believe the garage will be a boon once transit ridership rebounds.

According to BART, there are approximately 3,100 spaces already available near the station, between the existing BART garage and the BART surface lots. Before the pandemic, these spots filled up around 7:30 a.m. on a typical weekday, BART officials said.

Currently, BART is only seeing about 30% of its normal ridership compared to pre-pandemic, but in March the agency saw a 33% increase in ridership compared to February, likely in part due the reopening of more offices and the spike in gas prices linked to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Haubert said he’s optimistic ridership will continue to grow and the new garage will be well received by commuters, noting that traffic congestion on nearby freeways has already essentially returned to pre-pandemic levels.

“It’s going to fill up,” he said of the public transit.

“Everything indicates that we are already heading there. Garage parking was a must before, and I think it will be in the future.

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City of Miami Police Department parking lot closed for building security reasons

MIAMI – The Miami City Police Department Headquarters parking lot was suddenly closed for security reasons.

A police recruit was jogging on the ramps and garage floors last month when a piece of concrete gave way.

“You can see through one of the parking lot levels,” Miami Police Chief Manny Morales said.

Inspectors came, including an engineer, on the 40-year-old recertification of the garage, and in a letter described the deterioration of the concrete and the lack of reinforcements.

“Concerns about sections of slabs between beams that have deteriorated due to spalling,” Miami Buildings Manager Ace Marrero said. “But the current main building is in good condition.”

Last month’s letter about the garage’s closure refers to the 2016 recertification, which cited “concrete damage that required attention…which had not been cleaned or repaired to date.”

This 2016 report is filled with photos of concrete cracks and exposed rebar.

A d

The engineer wrote that there was no risk to life safety, but that the deterioration of the concrete and the cracking “must be dealt with quickly”.

If the catastrophic building collapse at Surfside comes to mind, Marraro said that situation was not like that.

“The structure system was a concern at Surfside, it’s very different,” he said.

Meanwhile, there will be no on-site parking for the next few months for hundreds of police personnel.

“The only concern is with the employees who actually work in the building,” Morales said. “The vast majority of officers assigned to this station patrol the streets of Miami and that’s where I expect them to be.”

Copyright 2022 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.

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New office building and parking lot planned in Packing District – GrowthSpotter

Just weeks after appointing the executive chef in charge of curating the Packing District food hall, the developer is pushing ahead with plans for the district’s first new office building and commercial parking lot which will open at the same time.

Dr. Phillips Charities has filed a master plan with the City of Orlando for the first phase of development in the southeast quadrant of the 212-acre mixed-use neighborhood. The plan calls for a four-story, 43,000 square foot office building and parking for 305 vehicles. CEO Ken Robinson said GrowthSpotter the company is already in talks with potential tenants.

“Each floor will be approximately 10,000 square feet, and one thing we can announce is that we will dedicate an entire floor to nonprofits,” Robinson said, noting that rents for those tenants will be below market rate. . “We want it to be an incubation space.”

Hunton Brady Architects designed the building, which will be immediately north of the food hall complex and will be visible from Orange Blossom Trail. The building mixes traditional red brick and metal on three sides, a nod to the district’s industrial past, with a glass wall that will face the courtyard and the future hotel to the north. The wall will feature electrochromic glass, which can lighten or darken depending on the seasonal position of the sun, time of day or weather conditions.

“You almost create an art element in the glass itself,” Robinson said. “It will have different impacts depending on whether it’s day or night, or whether it can be backlit.”

A monumental tower at the building’s northwest corner will be a perfect canvas to display the anchor tenant’s naming rights, Robinson added.

Dr. Phillips Charities announced on April 1 that New York chef Akhtar Nawab and his Hospitality HQ group would operate the 17,300 square foot venue to 11 vendors. The project is an adaptive reuse of the 1930s Great Southern Box Company building at 2105 N. Orange Blossom Trail. Work is expected to begin in August.

The car park, designed by finfrockwill be located in the northeast corner of the property next to the train tracks, where it can serve as an aural and visual buffer for the planned office building and future hotel at the intersection of Orange Blossom Trail and Princeton Street .

“We feel like aesthetically it works really well there,” Robinson said.

Dr. Phillips will not be involved in the construction or operation of the hotel. The developer is in talks with hotel companies and will likely sell that plot or do a ground lease, Robinson said. The southeast quadrant will also have a 4,000 square foot restaurant and bar and a 3,600 square foot micro-brewery.

Initially, the developer applied for a temporary permit from the city to build gravel parking lots for the food hall. But the pandemic delayed that project by nearly two years, putting it on roughly the same construction schedule as the office building. “The timing of the office building coming online at the same time as the food hall dictated that we go ahead and build the parking structure,” Robinson said, noting that all three would open. probably in September or October 2023.

Vertical construction of a new 27,512 square foot Publix will begin this summer on the site of Dr. Phillips’ original packing plant at the northeast corner of Princeton and Orange Blossom Trail. And in the southwest quadrant, several buildings were razed to make way for the first of three new apartment communities in the neighborhood.

Based in Texas Embrey Partners will add 350 units as part of the second phase of its Cannery multi-family community. Just south of this third-wave development will build the 293-unit “Northside Yards” community. Both projects will consist of five-storey mid-rise urban apartments with structured parking. The owners of the Princeton Commerce Center have also filed plans for new mixed-use residential buildings on their 10-acre site with rights for up to 600 homes and 20,000 square feet of office and retail space.

Do you have any advice on developing Central Florida? contact me at [email protected] or (407) 420-6261, or tweet me at @byLauraKinsler. Follow GrowthSpotter on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

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