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City Department wants to lease parking spots for Lucid Motors test cars – Pasadena Now

The Pasadena Department of Transportation is asking the city council for permission to execute a contract with Lucid Group USA, which manufactures the much-vaunted new electric vehicle Lucid Air, to lease nine reserved parking spaces in the school’s garage owned by the city to use as a location to park and charge the vehicles the company uses for test drives.

Published reports describe the Luicid Air as the automotive industry’s first serious challenger to Tesla’s dominance in the high-end luxury electric vehicle market.

Schoolhouse Garage was identified as the most feasible location due to its proximity to the planned Lucid Motors showroom on Colorado Blvd. in Old Pasadena and the amount of space available in the garage.

The contract will be for an initial term of five years at $24,784 per year, or $123,930 for five years. The annual amount will be recalculated at the start of each additional five-year period, the Department for Transportation said in a preliminary report.

The recommendation has been approved by the city council’s finance committee and will be taken up as an action item at Monday’s city council meeting.

In January, the city approved a Minor Use Conditional Use Permit (MCUP) allowing Lucid Motors to open a sales office in Old Pasadena. The new office would be located on the first floor of a three-story, 4,386 square foot commercial building previously occupied by a fast food restaurant at 32 West Colorado Blvd.

The MCUP is required for vehicle sales and rental service land uses in Old Pasadena and is intended to maintain and enhance the historic character of the area and support the long-term viability of the area as an attraction. regional retail and entertainment industry.

The city began negotiations with Lucid Motors in April to seek a suitable parking lot and electric vehicle charging garage.

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Parking spaces

‘The Marquis’ secures agreement to bring 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces to Easton | Lehigh Valley Regional News

EASTON, Pa. — The Easton Planning Commission gave approval on Wednesday to the development plan for “The Marquis,” a planned seven-story mixed-use building at 27 S. Third St.

The structure will replace the current Pine Street Garage and occupy the block between Pine and Ferry Streets.

According to Robert DiLorenzo, senior project manager for the developer, City Center Investment Corporation, the project is on track to begin work next spring, with the first units going on sale by the end of 2024.

DiLorenzo said planning and approvals for the project are on track, but Downtown wants to wait until the new Fourth Street garage is finished later this year before closing the Pine Street garage to begin construction. works.

DiLorenzo revealed a new rendering of the project that adds design elements recommended by the city’s Historic District Commission. The new design divides the facade into sections, intended to evoke a row of townhouses rather than a continuous structure.

The facade at the corner of Third and Pine Streets in particular was designed to pay homage to the Drake Building, a seven-story building with a cast-iron facade that stood on this site until its demolition in 1972 at the far end. back of Easton. phase of “urban renewal”.

“One of the things that got us excited about working with HDC was exploring Easton’s story,” DiLorenzo said. He said the designers were happy “to try to give a little homage, a little nod, to the Drake building”.






The ground floor of the Marquis will include commercial space, while the overall development will have approximately 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces.




The ground floor of the Marquis will have commercial space, which DiLorenzo says would be perfect for something like a small cafe, a fitness room, and a retail store.

The first two levels behind the storefronts will be dedicated to parking. The plan calls for 305 spaces, many of which DiLorenzo said would likely be empty on weekdays and available for public parking.

The third floor will have two courtyards, one with a swimming pool and picnic area for residents and the other with a dog park. The roof of the building will include a residents’ deck and a 20,000 square foot green roof, which will aid in the structure’s stormwater management plan.

The overall development will have between 270 and 280 apartments, depending on the eventual mix between one- and two-bedroom units, DiLorenzo said, and rents will likely start around $1,300 per month.

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Parking Spaces Market Size 2022 Demand, Global Trend, News, Business Growth – Instant Interview

A report on Parking Finder and Reservation has been released which provides an overview of the global Parking Finder and Reservation industry along with a detailed explanation that provides a lot of insights. The definition of the product/service as well as the different applications of this product/service in different end-user sectors of finding and booking parking spaces can be found in the overview. There is also a considerable amount of information that highlights the growth trajectory of the global Find and Book Parking Spots Market. The information provides a solid basis for Find and reserve parking spaces segmentation of the market into different segments. In fact, the information also displays the maximum market share during the forecast period by 2030.

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Parkopedia, Appyparking, Yourparkingspace, Stashbee, Parkingforme, Spothero, Parklet, Parkhound, Bestparking, Parkme, JustPark, RingGo

By typeProvide a reservationSearch onlyBy applicationTo usersTo parking owners

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About Us

Marketreports.info is a global provider of market research and advisory services specializing in offering a wide range of business solutions to its clients, including market research reports, primary and secondary research, demand forecasting services, focus group analytics and other services. We understand how important data is in today’s competitive environment and so we have partnered with industry leading research providers who are constantly working to meet the ever-increasing demand for research reports. market throughout the year.

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Parking spaces

Chick-Fil-A wants to add a 3rd lane and remove 15 parking spaces to solve traffic problems | Local News

The owners of the beleaguered Chick-fil-A restaurant on State Street want to eliminate 15 parking spaces, add a third lane of traffic, build a metal awning and cut down five trees at its popular downtown location.

This proposal was its response to ongoing traffic congestion issues that threatened the company’s ability to have drive-thru at the restaurant at 3707 State St.

Chick-fil-A, and its Santa Ana architecture firm CHROappeared before the Santa Barbara Architectural Review Board on Monday night — and faced strong opposition to his proposal.

“It seems like what’s happening here is we’re bringing a lot of cars to the site, more cars to the site, and making that allowed, but we’re not opening it up to let them out of the site,” said the board. member Leon Olson. “I think it creates a kind of congestion that, I don’t know, plays by all the rules.”

The ABR voted 5-0 on Tuesday to proceed with the project indefinitely, telling Chick-fil-A it didn’t like the canopy, or the removal of the landscaping to accommodate a third lane of cars. The hearing was a concept review, so the restaurant can revise the plan and come back to the board.

Traffic was not under the jurisdiction of ABR, which is responsible for an aesthetic review of the proposal. The project must also be submitted to the planning commission and the city council for review of the functionality and circulation of the proposal.

Chick-fil-A is popular with customers, but has clashed with some locals in the San Roque area.

The restaurant can get so busy that sometimes motorists back onto State Street, creating problems for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, and people trying to get out of nearby Rusty’s.

Chick-fil-A has until June 7 to remedy the issue, or the city’s legal team will prepare submissions for the city council to declare the restaurant a “public nuisance,” which could mean loss of service to the flying.

Chick-fil-A, known for its thick, meaty chicken breasts and waffle fries, is a popular destination for locals, sometimes attracting up to 2,500 people a day. The restaurant replaced Burger King, which was not as popular and did not experience the same congestion problems.

Decades ago, Santa Barbara banned all new drive-thru restaurants, so Chick-Fil-A runs the risk of losing drive-thru if he can’t work out a solution with the city.

However, the restaurant may have created a new problem while trying to solve its traffic congestion problem.

Under the proposed plan, Chick-fil-A would create a third lane, including two used by motorists to order food. The third lane would allow cars to enter the site and park, rather than backing into the street.

“It will help with backing to the street,” said Carlos De la Vega, architect at CRHO.

The restaurant would widen the entrance to the site, eliminating some landscaping at the front. The driveway entrance is 32 feet and should be extended to 42 feet. This would also involve moving the disabled parking spaces to the other side of the restaurant.

To add the third lane, Chick-fil-A would need to reduce the number of parking spaces from 45 to 30 and remove five trees. Part of the remaining parking lot would become parallel instead of sloped.

Board members told Chick-fil-A that he should find a way to add a “finger planter, and maybe more trees, to provide more vegetation to the site. Council members were also unhappy with the look, color and design of the metal canopy over the drive-thru lane.

“In terms of the aesthetics and the structure itself that you’ve come up with, I don’t know if I would be in favor of its design,” said board member Steve Nuhn. “Just this big metal canopy. It has nothing to do with the building. I think it needs to be reworked.”

Council chairman Kevin Moore said more landscaping was needed.

“I encourage you to look carefully at the layout and see where you might find planting areas,” Moore said.

– Noozhawk writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Login with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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Parking spaces

Eid shoppers irritated by lack of parking spaces

Rawalpindi: Lack of parking spaces has become a nuisance for visitors rushing to markets and bazaars to finish their shopping before Eidul Fitr.

Although visitors also shop during the day, the majority of them start arriving at the markets after Iftar time. They face extreme levels of distress when they cannot find a place to park their vehicles in the markets.

Abdul Sattar, a visitor to the Kashmir bazaar, said: “I parked my vehicle about a kilometer from this bazaar because I couldn’t find any parking space near this site. I do my shopping but also worry about the safety of my vehicle.

The majority of shoppers are now seen parking their vehicles on major roads in front of malls, leading to massive traffic jams, especially in the evening. Parking cars on the side of the road reduces space for vehicular traffic and creates traffic hassles and mental agony for Eid shoppers.

Asim Chaudhry, a visitor, said: ‘The plan for shopping malls and plazas that do not have proper parking facilities should not be adopted and those that already exist should be closed unless such facilities are provided. for people’s convenience.”

He said: “With no proper parking facilities, visitors park their vehicles on the roads. Then the traffic police lift those vehicles and the owners have to pay a fine to get their vehicles back.

A group of people set up an unauthorized parking spot in part of a public park in Commercial Market (Satellite Town).

Ashraf Ali, a visitor, said, “I found a parking spot at the public market park site. The person charged me Rs50 but they didn’t give me a receipt.

He said, “When I asked them if they had gotten permission from the local government for this work, they said permission would be given in the next few days.”

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Parking spaces

Dine in parking spots on B’way might be here to stay

The proposal to continue seasonal outdoor dining in public parking lots along Broadway received support from elected officials and nearby businesses after being heard at a city council workshop on April 20.

“Broadway is an area where everything is so tight and none of these restaurants that I know of have the ability to expand outside without it,” said former Newport Mayor Richard Sardella, who owns and operates Sardella’s, a restaurant on Memorial Boulevard. “The first two years of the pandemic were very successful for these restaurants. They were able to survive thanks to that.

“If it’s cleaned up and looks good, it’ll be better than looking at a bunch of cars,” said Greg Verdon, owner of High Hope on Broadway.

“I think, in part, you’ve shown that you can be successful,” Mayor Jeanne-Marie Napolitano told Broadway restaurateurs during the workshop. “That’s why we came to you and asked you to make a proposal.”

According to the city, there are 120 public parking spaces on Broadway. About 30 are currently used by outdoor dining areas.

Proposal

Seven restaurants on Broadway are permitted outside the food zones in public parking lots: Pour Judgement, Tavern on Broadway, Boru Noodle Bar, Scratch Kitchen & Catering, Humming Bird Newport, Corner Café and Malt.

In an April 18 letter to city council, restaurant owners proposed the continued use of outdoor dining parking spaces each year from May 1 to October 31. The existing jersey barriers provided by the city would be returned and replaced with the restaurants. , at their expense. The owners would instead establish a unified aesthetic to alleviate concerns about the current appearance of much of the outdoor seating and enhance the culture of the local neighborhood. The vision includes “tasteful” windbreaks, landscaping, and matching styling between each configuration.

“Originally we all did it on a small budget and we didn’t invest a lot of time or money in the process, but the new proposal will be something that we all work together and in which we we are all ready to invest. our businesses,” said Chelynn Sheehan, co-owner of Malt.

In their letter to city council, the restaurateurs said they were unaware of the longevity of the barriers the city put in place at the start of the pandemic, and were therefore “hesitant to invest significant sums in their appearance.”

Restaurants would also foot the bill to remove and store the new barriers to free up parking spaces from November through April.

What other companies are saying

“Is there a way to protect some of these places? asked Root on Broadway owner Paul Webber. “A protected spot with a 10 minute parking sign in front of my business so my Doordash guy can get in and out [would be beneficial].”

Webber said the city shouldn’t forget “the little guy” when deciding broader policies for the street. While he was generally in favor of continuing outdoor dining, Root has plenty of takeout customers, he said.

“A big part of our business is pick up and we have customers who say they would like to come more, but they can’t find a parking space,” he said.

Other nearby businesses have requested spaces at similar times in front of their businesses to accommodate traveling customers.

“The real controversy is how this fair is doing for all businesses,” said Verdon, who called himself neutral on the overall issue and in favor of the seasonal component. “It definitely affects us. There is already a shortage of parking spaces here. The thing is, if that happens, restaurants will get extra free meals and who knows how much extra revenue for next to nothing.

Councilor Charlie Holder asked if there was anyone present who objected to continuing to eat out and was met with silence. However, the workshop was only scheduled a week before, on April 13th. The problem has been widespread in Newport since indoor dining restrictions began to ease last year.

Jim Quinn, co-owner of Hungry Monkey on Broadway, urged the council to continue supporting patios and tables on public sidewalks across the city as it decides the fate of outdoor dining in public parking lots along Broadway .

The financial aspect

Broadway offers two-hour unmetered parking, and restaurants pay the city food and beverage taxes annually. The city will see additional tax revenue if the businesses are successful. Now, the council and city will work to determine a fee for seasonal use of public parking by restaurants on Broadway.

The Newport Ordinance Code establishes an approval process, regulations, and an annual fee of $300 to be paid to the city for “sidewalk cafes.” Twenty-seven licenses have been approved this year and there is no limit to the number of licenses granted by the city. Finally, a restaurant with two or three tables outside pays the same $300 annually as a restaurant with five or 10 tables on the sidewalk. Additionally, the cost of retail space in Newport ranges widely, from $14 to $25 per square foot, with property on Washington Square as high as $46 per square foot.

“If the city is going to allow them to continue, [the restaurants] should pay for that space,” said Verdon, who said the fee money could be put to good use in other Newport neighborhoods.

The city is considering a facility for Broadway similar to the annual fee paid for sidewalk cafes, City Manager Joseph Nicholson Jr. said. The licenses would be renewed annually and could be revoked. During the workshop, Napolitano and councilor Kate Leonard inquired about a fee structure if restaurants are allowed to continue using the spaces. Nicholson said that while he hasn’t had those discussions yet, he’s been toying with some numbers.

And after?

All board members expressed support for the idea, with some citing a need for balance and certain conditions to be met, such as a uniform design. Council Vice-Chair Lynn Ceglie asked the restaurateurs if they could come up with a more detailed design by the May 25 council meeting. The board would likely vote on the details of any plan at an upcoming meeting.

Councilwoman Angela McCalla supported the idea, but said any plan must incorporate pedestrians, cyclists and be ADA compliant.

Meanwhile, as the issue is resolved, the city likely won’t enforce local laws prohibiting restaurant use of public parking spaces this year, Nicholson said. Any ordinance drafted and approved by the board would go into effect in May 2023.

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Parking spaces

Beshear vetoes parking bill

We now have the first Beshear veto of the post-session period. And what is it? Parking spaces.

Governor Beshear vetoed HB 291, an “ACT relating to transactions between the Legislative Research Commission and the Executive Branch.” His veto message is short and not too sweet:

I, Andy Beshear, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, pursuant to authority granted under Section 88 of the Kentucky Constitution, hereby veto the following:

House Bill 291 of the 2022 regular session of the General Assembly in its entirety.

I veto Bill 291 because the role of the General Assembly is not to determine who gets which parking spaces on Capitol Hill by statute. Moreover, in House Bill 291, the General Assembly attempts to give itself more favorable terms of lease and service than those enjoyed by the executive branch.

Now, before you assume this is just a minor pissing contest between Republicans and the government, the bill is actually worse than Beshear’s ratings. At the very end of the bill, it says that the Legislative Research Commission (headed by the Republic leadership) will assume control of the entire Capitol Annex, and then there’s this:

The Cabinet allocates to the General Assembly and the Legislative Research Committee all parking spaces in the Capitol campus parking lot, all parking spaces in the east, south and west parking lots of the new Capitol Annex State and all parking spaces to the west. New State Capitol parking lot, except for spaces in the New State Capitol West parking lot allocated, effective January 1, 2022, to the Kentucky Supreme Court, Attorney General, and Secretary of State. Any additional allocation of parking spaces allocated under this paragraph shall be at the sole discretion of the Legislative Research Commission or its delegate.

Have you ever heard the term “land grabbing”? Now we have a “parking spot grab”. And of course what it really is is a power play.

It is a good thing that someone reads the bill to the end. And kudos to Governor Beshear for vetoing.

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Parking spaces

Towards car parks dedicated to cargo bikes in Brussels

The Brussels region should soon have parking lots specially dedicated to cargo bikes, which are more and more numerous in the Belgian capital. According to figures from the Belgian bicycle observatory, in 2020 they represented 6% of bicycles in circulation, compared to only 2% in 2018.

The Brussels authorities hope to encourage the use of cargo bikes, but to do so obviously requires a minimum of suitable infrastructure, starting with car parks capable of accommodating these bulky bikes.

It is indeed very difficult today to park these bicycles in the city, especially near public places such as schools, administrative sites or department stores. It should be noted that one of the rare underground car parks capable of accommodating cargo bikes in Brussels, right in the city centre, even has a lift sized accordingly. This shows how important constraints can be for this type of transport.

However, a secure and sheltered parking lot for cargo bikes could soon see the light of day. The idea could even be to increase the standard to one cargo bike space for every 10 bike spaces in multi-unit residential buildings. This is still in the planning stage, however, and will need to be voted on to be implemented.

Parking spaces alone will not necessarily be enough to convince people to buy a cargo bike, and other infrastructure will also have to be adapted. For its part, the Daily Cyclists Research and Action Group (GRACQ), which represents and defends the interests of cyclists in French-speaking Belgium, is campaigning for adapted cycle paths, in terms of width and turning radius, in Brussels. and its surroundings

.

David Benard

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Parking spaces

Motorists struggle to find parking spaces, MCC will soon provide payment and parking facilities

Payment and parking facilities will be available on Balmatta Road, Tanishq Jewelery at Khazana Jewellery, Balmatta-Ambedkar Circle, Hampankatta, Hamilton Circle-Rao and Rao Circle, Lalbagh, near KCCI at Bunder, Badria School Road, Nellikai Road, Mission Street, three stretches of Market Road, near Roopavani Theatre, first junction of Maidan Road, road opposite Linking Tower to Kalpana Sweets, Light House Hill and Alake Market.

Mangaluru: Soon, if you’re driving a quad or two-wheeler around Mangaluru town, you might have some extra cash in your wallet or purse, in case you need a parking spot, because Mangaluru City Corporation has decided to provide Pay-and-Park amenities, in order to alleviate the parking problems faced by motorists. But if you look around the city, there are enough parking spaces, however, all the main parking spaces have been invaded by illegal street vendors, mobile street canteens, vehicle repairers, among others – and the MCC turned a blind eye. And now they are trying to squeeze hard-earned money from tax-paying citizens to pay for parking, while allowing needed parking spaces to be overrun by non-tax-paying citizens, i.e. street vendors. Bah smoker!

Due to widening of many major roads in the city and increasing traffic density day by day, Mangaluru City Corporation (MCC) has decided to increase the number of paid and parking facilities in the city. It is learned that based on a preliminary survey conducted jointly by the MCC and the traffic police, 13 locations have been identified so far to provide parking facilities. The MCC has issued a tender to manage the city’s paid and parking facilities. At present, with a large number of local vehicles moving around the city, as well as those who visit the city by vehicles, are hampered by the lack of parking space.


As the works on the main roads under Mangaluru Smart City Limited (MSCL) and MCC are approaching competition, the municipality has decided to reserve parking spaces at identified locations. An MCC official speaking to the Mangalorean team said: “A tender has been issued to start payment and parking facilities at 13 locations in the city. While the total amount set for 13 pitches is Rs 23 lakh, bidders will be required to pay 10% of the bid. Successful bidders can provide parking facilities for two-wheelers and light motor vehicles, collecting prescribed fees for the following year,”

Payment and parking facilities will be available on Balmatta Road, Tanishq Jewelery at Khazana Jewellery, Balmatta-Ambedkar Circle, Hampankatta, Hamilton Circle-Rao and Rao Circle, Lalbagh, near KCCI at Bunder, Badria School Road, Nellikai Road, Mission Street, three stretches of Market Road, near Roopavani Theatre, first junction of Maidan Road, road opposite Linking Tower to Kalpana Sweets, Light House Hill and Alake Market.

In addition to these Pay & Park facilities planned by MCC, a multi-level parking complex is already under construction at Hampankatta, (the former bus stop area), which would solve the major parking problem in the city a once finished. This project is taken over in PPP mode, through a company based in Mangaluru, at an estimated cost of Rs 95 crore. It is being developed on 1.6 acres of the vacant site of the city’s former bus station, work undertaken by Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL).

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Parking spaces

You ask, we answer: Will the Fairfax Pool add more handicapped parking? | You ask, we answer

CLEAR WATER (WQOW) – It’s time to dive into another edition of You Ask, We Answer. Friday’s question comes from Marsha Robinson, who has spent more time in the Fairfax pool parking lot than in the water.

“I’ve been here several times and left in tears because the parking spaces are full,” Robinson said.

Robinson bought a season pass at Fairfax Pool in 2020, but she hasn’t used it much.

“I only went there twice because there were no parking spaces available,” she said.

Robinson uses disabled parking due to his ailing knee and heart, but in Fairfax only four of the 160 locations are marked as accessible.

Hoping that a space would become available, she would wait in the main parking lot in the summer.

“I would wait about 15 or 20 minutes,” Robinson said. “And then I would decide that there will be no one leaving. Most people come to the pool for a day session or a day swim.”

Assistant city engineer Leah Ness said the number of accessible booths is based on Wisconsin laws.

“Based on state law, 2% of booths must be accessible to people with disabilities based on the number of booths in the lot,” Ness said.

But for Robinson, the bare minimum is not enough.

She said it’s not just old people like her who need these places. Young disabled children like her granddaughters also use them.

“We end up taking two cars, and that’s two out of four seats we would need,” Robinson said.

“At this location, we weren’t aware of the need for additional accessible stalls,” Ness said. “We notice our parking lots on an annual to semi-annual basis, depending on the wear of the paint, so it is something that we can adjust.

So the answer is yes.’ The city plans to add additional ADA locations by scouting the land before the pool opens in June.

“Being able to go in the pool would be a pleasure,” Robinson said.

Ness said Robinson’s concern prompted officials to review the need for additional accessible stalls at other city-owned facilities.

If you have a question you would like answered, email us at [email protected], send us a message on Facebookor submit your question here.

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Moving tennis courts means more parking spaces | News for Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

The two tennis courts just south of W. Caroline Street and east of the Shiawassee River in downtown Fenton are scheduled to be moved to Bush Park.

OHM Advisors, the city’s engineers, are surveying the plot where the tennis courts are located for redevelopment.

The large parking lot behind the Fenton Community and Cultural Center at 150 S. LeRoy Street is also under investigation. Redevelopment of this parking lot could result in a parking deck for additional parking.

These topics were discussed at the DDA meeting in February and the DDA board approved $17,000 in survey fees.

Michael Hart, deputy city manager and executive director of the DDA, said for more parking behind the community center they could opt for an improved surface lot or for a lot more money they could opt for a patio parking lots, where future maintenance costs would increase. significantly. “We’ll see how things go over the next few months as everything unfolds,” he said.

Hart said the existing tennis courts, which are between 20 and 25 years old, are at the end of their life. He said the city would like to rebuild them and add pickleball courts, but move them all to Bush Park.

The relocation of the courts to Bush Park could strengthen the offer of the N. LeRoy Street park.

Moving the courts could also free up space for more parking spaces along the river. Hart said the existing tennis courts are located in a flood plain. The area would not be suitable for structures, however, it may be suitable for additional parking.

Hart said the cost of rebuilding the tennis courts and pickleball courts at Bush Park could be quite expensive, however, he did not have an exact amount at this time. He said the DDA could apply for grants, but that process could take years. An alternative would be for the DDA to cover the costs. “It makes sense for the DDA to cover the costs,” he said.

The demolition of the existing tennis courts would be carried out by the city’s public works department. Hart said they wouldn’t have a timeline for when it will be over.

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Parking spaces

Rutherford GO Station in Vaughan adds 1,200 new parking spaces

A new, modern parking structure at Rutherford GO Station in Vaughan opened on Friday.

With 1,200 new net spaces and 100 new secure bicycle parking spaces, the project is part of a $239 million initiative to reduce traffic and support future two-way, all-day service along the Barrie Line GO.

“This much-needed infrastructure has created more than 1,000 new parking spaces to serve this critical link in one of Vaughan’s busiest transit hubs,” Vaughan Mayor Maurizio Bevilacqua said Friday during the opening ceremony.

As one of Ontario’s fastest growing municipalities, Vaughan directly benefits from the positive benefits of having a subway in the downtown core, the Vaughan Metropolitan Center (CMV) as well as other transit, which continue to be catalysts for job creation, said the mayor.

The new parking structure in Rutherford is fully accessible and offers approximately 30 dedicated accessible parking spaces. It is also a gold level certification under LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design).

“I am strongly committed to providing better transit options, expanded parking and a better transportation experience for families in Vaughan,” said Stephen Lecce, MPP for King-Vaughan.

The Rutherford GO station is one of a total of seven GO stations identified by Vaughan, including the proposed Kirby GO and Concord GO stations.

Vaughan’s population is expected to increase 36% by 2031 and jobs are expected to increase 18% over the same period.

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Parking spaces

Tough time for film festival delegates as they jostle for parking spaces in Kochi

Lack of adequate parking space for delegates’ vehicles at the main venue proved to be a major hurdle on the first day of the Kerala International Regional Film Festival (IFFK) which kicked off here on Friday.

The five-day festival has the complex housing the Saritha, Savitha and Sangeetha theaters as its main venue housing the office of the organizing committee and the delegates’ cell for collecting passes and festival kits.

Although entry into the premises of the main venue remains limited to certain vehicles of office staff and guests, no other space has been provided for in the immediate vicinity either. Last year, when the city hosted IFFK, when it was held decentralized in several cities across the state due to pandemic curbs, the sprawling St. Albert High School campus in the vicinity immediate was made available for parking, which was not the case this time.

Delegates who made it to campus were turned away by security guards. “We have endeavored to make the campus available as a parking space. But the management couldn’t allow it, because it was a test assessment center. There was also no alternative parking space in the neighborhood,” said Shibu Chakravarthy, general manager of the regional IFFK organizing committee.

With the limited space around the venue already filled with parked vehicles, the majority of delegates had to keep circling around the busy Banerjee road to find a parking space which proved elusive. Delegates who attempted to park vehicles in front of stores were chased away by shopkeepers claiming the spaces were for their customers. Left with few options, they were forced to squeeze their vehicles even into narrow lanes.

Asked about the difficulties faced by the delegates, Mayor Mr. Anilkumar said that the company could not actively get involved in the preparations for the festival unlike last year due to the hectic year-end works.

Daniel, a delegate, fumed that he had to park his vehicle at a chargeable facility about 200 yards from the venue and that too after driving the busy road several times.

Interestingly, while a regional IFFK board was placed outside the facility, no provision was made for parking. “Many drive around assuming it’s a parking space for IFFK, and that leads to arguments when we say they have to pay,” a security guard said.

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Patients frustrated with contractors taking up parking spaces at Worcestershire Royal Hospital

THE parking situation at the Royal Worcestershire Hospital has come under fire after claims construction crews were taking up spaces.

A tweet claimed that “20 contractor vans” were parked in the parking lot after a visit.

The hospital is currently working on major county A&E department expansion projects.

When completed, the work will see the relocation of the Worcestershire Royal Hospital’s A&E department and the creation of a new ’emergency village’ on the site.

Patients and visitors have been provided with free parking at the city hospital since the peak of the covid pandemic.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid announced the benefit would end nationwide last Friday.

However, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said it would continue to offer free parking for Worcestershire Royal patients until June 1 and would continue to offer free parking for staff until the end of June.

We have contacted Worcestershire Acute Hospitals Trust for comment on the parking situation.

Read more: End of free parking for Worcestershire Royal Hospital patients

Drawings have already shown a 971 square meter single storey extension to the Aconbury East side of the hospital which will house its new emergency and urgent care facilities.

A dedicated A&E service for children will also be included.

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Parking spaces

Albany wants commuters out of residential parking spots

ALBANY – State employees, beware.

The city’s council is considering an ordinance to crack down on commuters who abuse a loophole in the city’s residential parking permit system, evicting residents.

The ordinance does not change much of the permit system itself, rather it is intended to reinforce the intent of the original legislation.

The changes will prohibit drivers who do not have a residential permit from parking in a residential area for more than two hours, even if they change parking spaces.

Tension over parking between out-of-town commuters and in-town residents is nothing new. City residents have complained about commuters flooding parking on residential streets, especially around large employers such as the state government and Albany Medical Center Hospital, for years.

The parking permit system, which was passed in 2010 and went into effect in 2013, was intended to address this problem by creating three zones around the State Capitol where residents could apply for a limited number of parking permits. Since then, the state has also built new parking lots for employees.

Council members said they have received complaints over the years from residents about out-of-town drivers abusing the system by parking in one spot for two hours and then moving their car to another location for a work break.

“The purpose of the legislation is to protect residents who live in very congested areas,” said Alfredo Balarin, city councilor for the tenth arrondissement, sponsor of the legislation.

The council’s law committee approved the order at a meeting Tuesday, 4-1.

Sixth Ward councilwoman Gabriella Romero was the only one not to vote. Romero explained that she opposes the legislation on two fronts. Her main concern was that the legislation created criminal liability for people who violated it – something she personally opposed, she said. She added that she was also concerned about students or others who might visit businesses in the Lark Street area and spend more than two hours studying or doing other work.

The parking permit system operates from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays. The system is divided into three zones around the State Capitol, with a total of 3,500 spaces available for residents. Zone A includes parts of the Center Square, Washington Park, Hudson/Park and Park South neighborhoods. The other two areas include parts of the Mansion, Pastures and Ten Broeck Triangle neighborhoods.

Matthew Peter, executive director of the Albany Parking Authority, said if the ordinance passes, authority employees will use license plate readers to track how long cars have been parked in an area. If the reader spots a license plate that is not in the permit system and then reads the same plate anywhere else in the same area more than two hours later, the employee can issue a ticket.

The ordinance will take effect 60 days after it is passed by the full council. Peter said the authority would give commuters a two-week grace period to adjust to the new rules, with employees leaving a note on violators’ windshields before starting to write tickets.

Part of the problem with pre-applying was due to technology, Peter said. Employees used to chalk the tires of cars that weren’t in the permit system and could issue tickets if they saw them past the two-hour mark.

“Now with license plate readers, we can apply the intent behind it,” he said. “I think that will solve at least some of the problems.”

He said commuters who are concerned about parking and don’t want to use employer-provided options have other choices, including CDTA’s incentive parking system.

*This story has been updated to clarify Councilwoman Gabriella Romero’s concerns about the legislation.

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Virginia adds truck parking spots along I-95

The Virginia Department of Transportation is increasing the number of parking spaces for trucks and other large utility vehicles in the Ladysmith Safety Zone of southbound Interstate 95 in Caroline County, located at Mile 108. (With l courtesy of Google Maps)

CAROLINE COUNTY, Virginia – The Virginia Department of Transportation is increase the number of parking spaces for trucks and other large utility vehicles in the Ladysmith Safety Zone of southbound Interstate 95 in Caroline County, located at Mile 108.

According to a press release, the project will increase the number of parking spaces available for trucks and large commercial vehicles from 20 spaces to 45 parking spaces.

Construction starts in May 2021 to build the new parking spaces, which are expected to open to traffic in June 2022.

All rest area washrooms, amenities and car parking will remain open to visitors during construction.

A brief closure of the parking area for trucks and oversized vehicles is planned from April 4 to 14 and again from April 19 to 29. This brief closure will allow the project contractor to install concrete in the future truck parking area.

In addition to 20 truck parking spaces, the property offers 55 car parking spaces and 4 handicapped accessible parking spaces.

Construction barrels are installed along the shoulder of the freeway entrance and exit ramps at the rest area, and at the rear of the truck and oversized vehicle parking area. Motorists will not be able to access the shoulder in these areas during construction.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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LETTERS: Unused parking spaces; the commission’s good faith effort | Opinion

Wasted parking spaces

It was disappointing to drive by America the Beautiful Park and see the new signs that say ‘no parking Nov 1-April 30’.

There have always been over 100 free parking spaces throughout the year.

To the average citizen, this might feel like the city is banning these parking spots to force motorists to pay for paid parking downtown.

Rick Sheridan

colorado springs

The Commission’s good faith effort

Once again, political scientists Tom Cronin and Bob Loevy complain that the Colorado Legislature has been manipulated to the detriment of Republicans (The Gazette, March 20). They imply that the legislative boundaries should have been drawn one way or another with political parties in mind, using their usual definition of competitiveness. This is disappointing because such misinterpretations erode voter confidence in our electoral framework.

The Independent Colorado Legislative Redistricting Commission, on which I served as an unaffiliated voter, followed the Colorado constitution and prioritized voters over politicians. The Colorado constitution prohibits the creation of legislative districts that protect any political party. Therefore, any plans to create convoluted ridings to achieve partisan parity would likely not have faced judicial scrutiny.

The commission was to understand the geopolitical makeup of the state and draw maps that reflect shared political interests such as urban, rural, industrial, agricultural, water, education, transportation, public health and many other demonstrable issues that matter to voters at local and regional levels. The state constitution also required that we preserve the integrity of counties and cities and ensure that cohesive minority groups are authentically represented.

The commission made a good faith effort to maximize the number of politically competitive ridings by using an evidence-based statistical model to measure partisan balance. Competitive constituencies, or more precisely reactive constituencies, were drawn only after satisfying higher priority redistricting criteria. To learn more about the logic behind their design, visit the commission’s website at https://redistricting.colorado.gov/

Carlos Perez

colorado springs

Looking for childcare

Early childhood is the most important period of life. Ninety percent of brain development occurs before age 5, and we know that early childhood experiences can have long-lasting impacts on academic and life outcomes.

Despite the importance of the early years, many children in El Paso County are deprived of valuable childcare and learning opportunities. For 22 years I ran a home daycare in Colorado Springs. Every day, on average, I receive 5 to 20 calls from parents looking for babysitting. Unfortunately, the waiting list for my center is one to two years long. I cannot serve all the children who need care.

Across El Paso County, families are looking for child care, but we don’t have enough child care spaces to meet the demand. In fact, over 50% of Coloradans live in childcare deserts. Fortunately, Colorado has made progress, with the creation of the new Department of Early Childhood. This ministry will consolidate several early childhood programs and services under one system to make it easier for children and families to access the care and services they need. Right now, state legislators can build on that foundation by voting “yes” on Bill 22-1295, which guarantees: A high-quality early childhood system for all programs and services. Join me in calling on Colorado state legislators to vote yes on Bill 22-1295 and create better beginnings for all Colorado children.

Kelly Fugate

colorado springs

Don’t shelter today’s youth

I would like to respond to Lorena Wilder’s concern about summer time and students having to get up an hour earlier.

Let me put it into perspective. I was born in Germany before World War II. When the war ended in 1945, we were refugees and internally displaced persons and found ourselves in a small village in the Land of Hesse. We were lucky because there was a middle school and a high school in another town. But we had to take two trains to get there and then walk more than a kilometer. The first train left the village at 5:45 a.m., yes, 5:45 a.m. and we had to get up at 5 a.m., summer and winter, in the cold and at night, six days a week. Yes, we had school also on Saturday.

When we got off the first train, we had to wait on the cold, dark platform for the next train, which often arrived late.

My siblings and classmates did this until I was 19. Yes, we spent 13 years in school and graduated at 19. We survived these hardships even during the years of famine that followed the war. We graduated, studied, and became successful, contributing adults, and now, in our 80s, most of us are still alive.

I don’t think young people today are less capable and need to be “protected” from getting up early because of summer time! Set your expectations of young people higher. Most will rise to the occasion and do well.

Erika’s Shadow

colorado springs

Cause of unnecessary accidents

Governor Jared Polis:

I implore you to veto HB:1028. Cyclists are members of the Highway Transportation System (HTS). As such, they are required to obey all traffic signs and laws. We have already laid them out with designated cycle paths. However, they are not required to possess a driver’s license, registration, or license plate/tag to have the privilege of operating this vehicle on the HTS.

Now HB 1028 will grant them another privilege that drivers of vehicles do not have. As a former Colorado State Driver’s License Examiner, I know this law will cause unnecessary accidents, possible injuries and fatalities.

Ernest Przybyla

colorado springs

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New plan to add 250 parking spaces at Bolton College of Medical Sciences

Plans to add a further 250 parking spaces at the future Bolton College of Medical Sciences (BCMS) and wider Royal Bolton Hospital site have been submitted.

This is an increase from the net gain of 159 spaces that would have been created under the initial BCMS application.

BCMS is a modern vocational skills and training center between the University of Bolton, Bolton College, Bolton NHS Foundation Trust and Bolton Council, located at the Royal Bolton Hospital in Farnworth.

Planning permission was granted for BCMS in June 2019, including dedicated multi-storey parking.

The new application proposes to replace the multi-storey car park of the original designs with a surface car park, which was not viable in 2019.

As part of the new proposals, additional parking for hospital staff will be provided from the outset and at each stage of the development, including to cater for spaces that will be moved when construction work begins on BCMS, which is being built on the site. of an existing surface car park on the Royal Bolton Hospital campus.

The construction will result in the displacement of 140 parking spaces for hospital staff. But, before construction begins, the first stage of a three-phase car park improvement program will see 281 new spaces, some temporary, provided elsewhere on the site, by converting currently underused land.

During the second and third stages, 250 places will be provided throughout the hospital. Of these additional spaces, 170 will be for BCMS users and the other 80 will be reserved for additional hospital staff and visitor parking.

BCMS Project Manager, Mark O’Reilly, said: “This amendment to the plans already approved for BCMS serves to improve the design and provision of on-site hospital parking. When we originally submitted plans for BCMS in 2019, multi-storey parking was the only viable option.

‘Since then, greater clarity has emerged on the hospital’s wider regeneration plans following its recent bid for £500m funding from the government’s Hospital Improvement Scheme. This now makes the necessary amount of surface parking viable and allows us to align more closely with their larger vision for the site.

He added: “Essentially no staff parking will be lost during the construction of BCMS – which as we know is a much needed facility bringing countless benefits to the Bolton community including high quality healthcare , job opportunities and a £150million boost to the local economy. »

The updated planning application for BCMS makes no other changes to the original pre-approved plans beyond the nature of the parking supply. It is due to be presented to Bolton Council’s planning committee in June.

Subject to planning permission, completion of the BCMS is expected by July 2024.

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Work begins on 1,000 new parking spaces in Southampton

WORK is now underway in Southampton to create 1,000 new parking spaces in areas of the city.

By spring 2023, the council is to work with its road partner, Balfour Beaty, to deliver the spaces.

It also plans to maximize the number of spaces by creating a mix of formal car parks, parking bays and converted roadsides.

READ MORE: Calls to tackle ‘unsafe’ sidewalk parking in Shirley

This follows a survey by ward councillors, cabinet members and housing services staff to identify project sites, taking into account locations where vehicles are currently parked on verges, causing ground damage.

Subject to further planning and consultation, new parking facilities will be added in:

  • bassette
  • Beovis
  • Bitterne (where projects are already underway at Lydgate Road and Farringford Road)
  • Coxford
  • Harefield
  • Millbrook
  • Redbridge
  • Shirley
  • Sholing
  • Swaythling
  • Woolston

Communities, Culture and Heritage boss Cllr Spiros Vassiliou said: “This high priority 1,000 parking space project will help us deliver on one of our key commitments to Southampton and its people.

“While we want to encourage people to use public transport as much as possible, there is still a need for adequate parking for the intended use in the city.

“I hope that by creating dedicated parking spaces, we can improve the safety of motorists and vehicles, as well as the appearance of neighborhoods and create environments in which people can be proud to live.”

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Parking spaces, new signs could soon appear in Scott’s Addition

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – More parking options may soon be coming to Scott’s Addition after some residents complained about a lack of spaces.

Members of the Greater Scott’s Addition Association recently accompanied Richmond Department of Public Works (DPW) crews to identify irrelevant loading areas, curbs that could be filled in and any outdated parking signs.

John Hancock, who works at Scott’s Addition, said it was getting harder to find parking spaces throughout the day.

“If I have to leave during the day and come back, it’s more of a challenge,” he said. “I can usually find something within a few blocks on foot.”

The department told 8News that crews visited certain areas of the neighborhood to get feedback from business owners on improving parking signs.

Improvements could mean replacing and removing panels or adding new ones.

Some drivers blame the business boom and new apartments for parking shortages, but Hancock said construction could be a good thing.

“One of the things that makes this neighborhood unique is the fact that we have industries, people and businesses in a small area. If we make it so industry can’t be here, it changes the whole character of the neighborhood,” he said.

The Department of Public Works said teams are planning a second visit to the neighborhood next week to review previous information compiled during the first visit and to assess any additional areas.

The department will review all notes and information from both visits and follow up with the neighborhood association.

In a written statement Tuesday, the department said, “Improvements to signage will be made after a full evaluation. The review will also help identify areas to increase parking opportunities.

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More accessible parking spaces are needed in Basingstoke – council must step in and help

Please can I ask how many residents of Church Street have parking permits? No names or addresses, just the number of permits currently held.

My request comes after I was fined for parking in a “shared” parking spot. Having spent two cold nights in Church Street, I saw no one parking there with a permit. The reason I parked where I did was to allow my wife to safely exit our rear entry wheelchair accessible vehicle, WAV.

There is no parking for this type of vehicle in Basingstoke, all places are either one behind the other (Church Street leaving no room for an access ramp) or accessible in the car parks which implies going out into the traffic stream, which I’m sure is being ignored by planners to allow more spaces for paying visitors.

I recently sent photos of our vehicle in the Red Lion car park where yellow markings are on the ground I am told for the benefit of the visitor queue at the payment point during the pandemic these will be in turn brought back online when the pandemic is considered complete, so security is once again for WAVs brought into contact.

I’m pretty sure that if I get an answer it’ll be something along the lines of “This, that and the other”, meaning nothing will be done. I have to say with all the hoo-ha at #10 to think that a Tory based council will do anything to help is beyond me, just another Tory rip-off for the disabled I guess but I live in the hope.

Name and address provided

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‘Southbourne needs more parking spaces, not less’

Finally, Bournemouth planners appear to have come to their senses, rejecting plans to build flats in the small car park. (Southbourne Crossroads car park)

It would appear that apartments would be out of the price range for most locals anyway, once again attracting second home buyers who only use the property part of the year.

There is no mention of parking spaces, and sooner all planners would mandate at least two parking spaces per apartment or house, then at least there would be less ‘on-road’ parking.

This should apply to all new developments.

I believe I read a while ago that underground parking was mentioned for these apartments? What madness. So close to the unstable cliffs and cracks already appearing on the opposite zigzag – then we have the road cracking and sinking.

At present we have parking on the road, and even at this time of year it is full. Where do all the other people go to park in the summer when the Bistro on the Beach was developed?

All the roads in the area are filled with cars or have the dreaded yellow lines.

If anything, Southbourne needs more parking spaces, not less.

New beach development could make Southbourne beach the new Sandbanks.

We will have all the facilities, golden sand, beautiful food facilities, restrooms, showers etc. – but with nowhere to park, people will give up and move on.

Please Bournemouth Council and planners don’t waste money on new beach development unless you provide the parking facilities to take advantage of it.

If anything, turn our small parking lot into multiple stories and cheer on vacationers and even locals at our end of the beach.

ROMARINE WARREN

Springfield Avenue, Southbourne

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Illegal conversion of parking spaces is rampant in Kozhikode

Despite constant warnings from local administrators, several small and large merchants in the city are believed to be involved in the illegal conversion of parking spaces for commercial activities. The directive against such acts is largely ignored by traders in the absence of strong legal action or remedial action by the authorities of the company.

Incidentally, illegal parking in the city is mainly due to encroachment on demarcated parking spaces. As a result, motorists are forced to avail paid parking services. Awnings and semi-permanent structures, common in front of many stores, mostly take up parking spaces and serve as product display areas or storage spaces.

“The biggest drawback is the remote paid parking spaces, on which customers are forced to depend in the absence of practical spaces in front of the shops. There are also instances where roadside spaces are misused due to inability of store owners to maintain parking spaces for customers,” said V. Saneesh, an accountant at a store in the city. . He pointed out that a simple inspection by the company could easily reveal such violations.

Incidentally, the majority of these stores are located within the premises of mofussil and KSRTC bus stops. There are also many shops on Mavoor and Kallayi roads, where customers are forced to use the roadside space to park. A few hotels have also used their parking spaces for outdoor dining.

In some textile stores, parking spaces have been transformed into exhibition spaces.

“One strange thing that came to my mind is the craze of shop owners to park their vehicles in the available spaces,” said Manoj Mathew, an electrician from Kottuli.

Meanwhile, company officials have argued that legal notices were served on violators during surprise inspections. They also claimed that many such spaces had been cleaned up after fining owners.

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Spring breakers close Ocean Drive, MIA advises no more parking spaces in garages

MIAMI BEACH, Florida. – Miami Beach police officers were forced to shut down Ocean Drive at some point Friday night as spring breakers swarmed South Beach. Thousands of people were ready to party and soak up the sights of South Beach.

But what hasn’t been seen, at least until now, is the chaos that spoiled the fun last year in Miami Beach.

In addition to prohibiting drinking on the beach, all floats, tents, large coolers, and loud music are prohibited from being taken onto the sand.

The crowds also have South Florida airports filled with passengers. Miami International Airport is reporting a record number of airport arrivals and announced its busiest day “ever” last Sunday. More than 150,000 people enter and leave this airport every day.

On Saturday morning, Miami International posted a travel advisory on its Twitter account saying its garages were completely full.

A d

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport reported to an advisor that its curbside valet was full, but self-parking options were available.

Copyright 2022 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.

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In 2021, Boston planners approved more parking spaces than homes – StreetsblogMASS

According to year-end statistics compiled by the Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA), Boston city planners have approved dozens of construction projects in 2021 that could give the city 7,887 new homes, 6 million square feet of new commercial space and enough parking to store 8,668 more cars.

Nearly three-quarters of this new parking lot — 6,441 spaces — would be built in transit-accessible neighborhoods within a quarter-mile of an MBTA station.

During 2021, the BPDA approved 71 new development projects which include a combined total of 17.1 million square feet of real estate within the city limits.

Most of these new projects include a housing component, either in purely residential apartment buildings or in mixed projects:

BPDA 2021 project approvals for mixed-use and residential developments

“TOD” indicates “transit-oriented development” – projects located within a quarter mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter rail station. Source: BPDA

Purely residential projects Total in TOD % TOD
Number of projects 29 12 41%
Housing units 2,352 1,226 52%
Parking spaces 1,114 481 43%
Mixed-use projects Total in TOD % TOD
Projects 29 20 69%
Housing units 5,535 4,550 82%
Residential Square Feet 5,305,476 4,390,132 83%
Commercial sq.ft. 2,503,372 1,364,697 55%
Parking spaces 3,620 2,615 72%

Of the 29 purely residential developments the BPDA has approved in 2021, developers plan to build 2,352 new apartments and 1,114 new parking spaces – roughly one parking space for every 2 apartments.

But among the subset of 12 subdivisions that would be within a quarter-mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter rail station, the parking ratio was slightly lower: a total of 481 new spaces. parking space for 1,226 apartments (approximately 0.4 spaces per dwelling unit).

Related:


StreetsblogUSA: Apartments with free parking reduce transit ridership

The BPDA also approved 29 mixed-use projects in 2021, and collectively those projects could give Boston about 5,535 new homes, 2.6 million square feet of office, retail and other non-residential space, and 3,620 parking spaces – approximately two parking spaces for every three apartments. However, it is likely that some of these parking spaces will be reserved for the commercial tenants of these buildings.

Compared to previous years, the parking ratio per dwelling for residential and mixed-use projects has decreased.

In 2019, the agency approved 4,762 new homes as well as sufficient parking for 4,773 cars in residential and mixed-use projects – approximately one parking space for each apartment.

In 2020, this ratio fell slightly, to around 0.9 parking spaces per dwelling.

Related:


Boston planners approved more than 11,000 new parking spaces in 2020

However, BPDA non-residential project approvals in 2021 had significantly more associated parking than in previous years.

The agency has approved 10 office and laboratory projects as well as three institutional projects that collectively propose to build 3,934 new parking spaces:

BPDA 2021 Project Approvals for Commercial and Institutional Developments

“TOD” indicates projects located in transit-oriented neighbourhoods. Source: BPDA

Purely commercial projects
Total in TOD % TOD
Projects ten 8 80%
Total square footage 2,178,420 1,934,233 89%
Parking spaces 2,454 2,368 96%
Purely institutional projects
Total in TOD % TOD
Projects 3 2 67%
Total square footage 2,282,252 1,816,150 80%
Parking spaces 1,480 977 66%

In 2019, the BPDA approved 9 commercial or institutional projects with 2.4 million square feet of space and only 237 new parking spaces. And in 2020, the BPDA approved 2.3 million square feet of non-residential projects that collectively had only 200 attached parking spaces.

The increase in non-residential parking garage approvals this year can be partly explained by the types of applicants seeking BPDA approvals in 2021. While many non-residential projects in 2019 and 2020 were associated with universities, which tend to have lower parking demands, the BPDA’s program in 2021 included two large hospital expansions that insisted on spending health care dollars on large on-site parking lots.

One of the largest institutional project approvals this year was the Massachusetts General Hospital Expansion near Charles Circle. This project proposes to build a massive six-level underground parking garage for 977 cars next to traffic-congested Charles Circle in Boston’s West End (the project would also help build a proposed new subway platform for an extension of the MBTA blue line).

A handful of projects the BPDA has approved in 2021 would avoid building any on-site parking. The Boston Housing Authority final phase of the development of the HLM Old Colony districtwhich the BPDA Board approved in April, would replace 208 existing apartments and add an additional 134 affordable apartments in three new buildings with no off-street parking at the east end of the neighborhood, adjacent to Moakley Park.

And in Jamaica Plain, a short walk from the Green Street Orange Line stop, the BPDA has approved a new 5-story building (see rendering at the top of this article) that would provide housing for 38 low-income senior households. , plus a new street-level dining space for the El Embajador restaurant.

However, the owners of the adjacent Turtle Swamp Brewery sued to block this accommodation, specifically citing its lack of parking in their complaint.

Partly in response to lawsuits like that, the BPDA and the City of Boston passed two significant parking reforms late last year that could further reduce the number of parking lots that future developments can build.

End DecemberMayor Wu signed a new zoning ordinance that will eliminate minimum parking mandates for residential projects where at least 60% of new homes would be limited income for low- and middle-income households.

And in October, the BPDA passed new planning guidelines that will impose maximum parking limits for large developments, with stricter limits applying in the most walkable and transit-accessible areas of the city.

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Parking spaces

Parking lots in the old town will be transformed into outdoor dining areas

The parking spaces will be transformed into outdoor rest/dining areas as part of the regeneration of the old town and Hull City Council’s commitment to supporting the city’s evening economy.

Hull City Council today published a Record of Decision confirming the award of a contract to Broxap Limited for the supply and installation of two ‘parklet’ systems, valued at £70,000, using the Eastern Shires Purchasing Organization (ESPO) framework for street furniture. .

Parklets provide high-quality street furniture for outdoor hospitality, replacing on-street parking spaces and leaving the path free of obstructions.

Both parklets will be installed in existing parking spaces on the south side of Silver Street. Each will include stationary tables and benches separated by high-level planters for screening. Disabled parking spaces will be moved.

Councilor Rosemary Pantelakis, the council’s portfolio holder for culture, said: ‘Alfresco dining and drinking is a key part of the vision we have for the revitalization of Whitefriargate, Silver Street and the Old Town, as well as our continued commitment to the evening economy. .

“Parklets are a great way to provide street furniture without creating an obstacle in the sidewalk, which can be a problem for pedestrians or visually impaired wheelchair users.

“It’s a really exciting time for Old Town as we continue to transform the neighborhood into a vibrant place where people can live, work and play.”

What the parklets will look like (Image: Broxap)

The parklets will be made of hardwood lumber in an alloy steel frame. They will be 12 m long and will not exceed the 2 m width of the existing bay. The modular construction of the parklets allows flexibility in size and location.

Sliding bollards have recently been installed across the Lowgate entrance to Silver Street to provide protection for the hotel trade.

ESPO is one of the largest public sector-owned professional procurement networks in the country, covering 120 executives and bespoke procurement services. The framework of street furniture products contains a large number of suppliers.

All relevant suppliers were approached to submit a bid, and Broxap Limited was the only supplier on the frame who could supply the parklet systems.

The work is partly funded by the Welcome Back Fund, which provides councils across England with a £56million share of the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) to support the safe return to high streets and help “build back better” from the pandemic.


Return funds

Hull City Council has received up to £560,812 in funding from the Welcome Back Fund, provided by England’s European Regional Development Fund under the European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Program 2014-2020. The Department of Housing, Communities and Local Government (and in London the intermediary body Greater London Authority) is the managing authority for the European Regional Development Fund. Created by the European Union, the European Regional Development Fund helps local territories boost their economic development by investing in projects that will support innovation, businesses, job creation and the regeneration of local communities. For more information visit https://www.gov.uk/european-growth-funding.

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Parking spaces

La Londonienne opens in Calais with 135 secure parking spaces

Calais has a new secure truck park following the opening of a new 135 space site called La Londonienne Secure Truck Park.

“Calais is a central hub for HGV traffic, and we want to provide the safest and most comfortable truck parking in the region,” said Jean Pierre Devigne, founder and CEO of RDV Transport who worked with Snap. for the launch of the new placer.

The Londoner opened on March 1 with 135 truck parking spaces, showers, toilets, laundry and kitchen facilities and new security infrastructure installed by Snap Access & Security.

“We look forward to welcoming truck drivers from across Europe, including Snap customers, and providing them with our top-notch facilities,” said Devigne.

The site has front and rear ANPR cameras to monitor vehicles entering and exiting the site. There are also internal and external CCTV cameras and three-metre fences, while the site is patrolled by five security guards with guard dogs.

RDV Transport started working with Snap in 2020, paying with Snap Account’s smart payment system at locations in the UK.

“Our drivers must use a Snap account when in the UK for security reasons, so we always advise them to find Snap locations,” Devigne explained.

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Parking spaces

Furious residents resort to ‘carts full of rocks to reserve parking spaces’

Drivers who are tired of looking for parking spaces near their homes have decided to leave supermarket trolleys full of stones and concrete slabs on the roads

Some of the trolleys left on the roads by drivers to save their parking space

Furious drivers, tired of struggling to find parking spaces near their homes, decided to leave concrete-weighted supermarket trolleys behind to reserve a spot for their cars.

Shocked residents on the streets of Sparkbrook, Birmingham saw the shopping carts abandoned outside houses.

Residents desperate for a parking space piled stones or concrete slabs inside the carts to make them difficult to move, with stones stuck behind their wheels.

Other space savers used by “selfish” drivers include traffic cones and bricks, according to birmingham live.

A resident, who took pictures of the carts, said of the situation: “I was driving through sparkbrook and saw a parking space with concrete blocks inside the carts.

“There was concrete behind the wheels to keep them from rolling. They reserved a decent space for a car or larger vehicle to enter.

“It’s crazy, it’s inadmissible if it’s the only space available. There are no road markings on the road.







Other road users resorted to chaining bins to the ground so they could park later
(

Picture:

Chad Miah/BPM Media)








Other people used throw pillows, sofas and debris to save their spaces
(

Picture:

Chad Miah/BPM Media)


“You can’t reserve a space for yourself. I’ve seen couches, cushions, cones, bins, bricks, etc. used to reserve spaces, but that takes it to another level.”

People have been using large objects to save parking spaces for several weeks because parking spaces are often difficult to find.

Last month, fellow resident Chad Miah said he was ‘astonished’ when he went to a friend’s wedding in the area and found a wheelie bin chained to the ground as he tried to find a space.

He said, “It’s pure selfishness. Parking is a big problem in Handsworth and this street in particular is a nightmare to drive on.

“We would all like to come home with a parking lot in front of our houses. But that is not the case.”

Some nearby residents vowed to move the objects from the roadway if they encountered them.

Others say they will call the local council or the police to report blockages.

A fed up resident said: ‘If I ever see any cones, wheelie bins or trolleys on the road I will remove them, or call the police and local councilors to have them removed.

“No one has the right to take possession of a stretch of road.”

A Birmingham City Council spokesperson said: ‘We ask people to park with consideration and respect all road users.

“Using a wheelie bin to reserve space on the freeway could be considered a freeway obstruction.”

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Parking spaces

Cut to temporary free parking spaces in Castle Street car park behind Inverness Townhouse

Denise Collins is campaigning for more public car access to the council car park on Castle Street.

Signs indicating temporary free spaces have been removed from a car park in Inverness town centre.

They were introduced to the premises of Inverness Town House over the festive period and were due to last until January 2.

This meant that motorists could take advantage of a maximum free stay of 30 minutes, Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., in the front part of the car park.

They were intended to be used for short term stays to help local businesses have a pick up/drop off space to help with delivery and collection of customers.

Contractors were spotted removing signage last month.

The fact that the free spaces have not been made permanent has been criticized by a local businesswoman.

Denise Collins, who runs the Castle Gallery, which is opposite the car park, has campaigned for the car park to be accessible to the public at all times.

It is currently for the exclusive daytime use of Highland councilors and council staff.

She said: ‘Although very little publicized, this facility was used by independent local small business customers in Castle Street and nearby areas.

“The termination of this facility shows an appalling lack of judgment on the part of council, particularly in light of the Scottish Government’s recent announcement of funds to promote the resumption of town center footfall.”

Last month, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced a financial package aimed specifically at promoting the resumption of city center footfall which the Inverness Business Improvement Group (BID) is working on.

A council spokesperson said: “Council was pleased to be able to temporarily allow extended public access to Castle Street car park, Inverness.

“This was done to support downtown businesses during the holiday season. The availability of the additional parking supply was much appreciated and the council will be looking at other possibilities to extend public access to the car park again in the future.

“In the meantime, the Castle Street car park remains accessible to the public, paid and posted, after 5 p.m. Monday to Friday and all day Saturday and Sunday.”


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Parking spaces

Covington begins mandating metered parking spaces on nights and weekends to protect small businesses

Seeking to preserve on-street parking for small businesses that need it to survive, the City of Covington will begin enforcing parking meters in the evenings and on Saturdays.

The long-awaited change brings Covington in line with surrounding towns and responds in part to complaints from business owners about spaces being monopolized by drivers who leave their cars parked throughout the weekend and into the evening.

(Photo by City of Covington)

“As downtown grows and gets busier, we want to make sure our businesses have parking available for their patrons and customers,” City Manager Ken Smith said. “These metered spotlights are designed for constant rolling. This is their goal. If a car is left in one place every late afternoon or from Friday afternoon to Monday morning, it harms surrounding businesses.

The change takes effect immediately, although there will be a grace period – i.e. “courtesy tickets” or warnings – while the public gets used to the new rules and meters are recalibrated and relabeled. The City will work with merchants near metered parking lots to find ways to educate their customers.

The new hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Previously, meters were not applied on Saturdays and after 5 p.m. on weekdays.

The new app was approved by the Board of Commissioners on Tuesday evening as part of a series of parking-related changes. These changes include:

• Increase in metered rates from $1.10 to $1.50 per hour, matching the rate in other urban areas this side of the Ohio River. Drivers will be able to continue to pay in cash at meters or via the free PassportParking® app available for download on the App Store and Google Play.

• $5 increase in monthly passes at many public parking lots and surface lots (bringing most to $55 or $60 per month).

• “Clean up” the language in the ordinances to continue to refine the authority of the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority and its legal status as “owner” and manager of parking lots. (The authority was established in 2018 to operate and maintain public on- and off-street parking in Covington. Its five members are approved by the Board of Commissioners. The City contracts with ABM Parking Services for day-to-day operation. )

• Hired a first-ever Executive Director to handle the administrative duties of the parking authority and help the City take a more strategic and analytical approach to its parking issues. Kyle Snyder will split his duties between this position and his duties as the City’s infrastructure development specialist.

Other changes are possible on the road, including the return of parking meters in commercial areas like the MainStrasse Village, and better signage.

The changes were recommended by consultants who undertook a comprehensive analysis of the City’s parking, by the parking authority itself, and by City staff working in areas such as economic development and public works.

(Photo by City of Covington)

The City is in the process of updating a web page at www.covingtonky.gov to reflect changes and show available public parking locations in Covington.

Invest in the future

Although modest, the fee increases will allow the city to begin making more robust investments in improving its parking lot, Smith said.

“We definitely need more parking space, and we need to improve amenities, such as kiosks,” he said. “But you can’t upgrade or add facilities and options without revenue, and we’ve fallen behind.”

The perceived lack of parking is an ongoing source of complaints in Covington. As in urban areas across the country, however, some of the complaints are based on unrealistic expectations that parking should be free and always available right outside a destination. For example, people who are comfortable walking from the confines of a mall parking lot are not willing to walk the same distance from a garage or lot to a restaurant or bar.

“Street parking is a commodity, plain and simple,” Smith said. “We have plenty of parking spaces downtown, if you know where to look, but there will never be enough spaces along a busy street to accommodate three to four cars per household, the more visitors, the more customers entering and leaving stores.

The city manager called the parking changes “growing pains” as Covington’s economy continues to grow.

“If you have an abundance of parking spaces downtown, that’s a sign of a ‘dead’ city,” he said.

From the town of Covington

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Parking spaces

Green spaces could be used as parking spaces in Ty-Sign

REDUCING the amount of green space is one of many options being considered to address the parking shortage at Ty-Sign.

This follows a long campaign by residents to end what they say is a dangerous and chaotic parking situation along two of Ty-Sign’s busiest roads – Elm Drive and Manor Way.

A petition started by resident Kyla King has gained considerable momentum in recent weeks – putting pressure on local councilors and Caerphilly County Borough Council to find a solution to the problem.

Caerphilly Council has since confirmed it will allocate £400,000 of Welsh Government funding to improve the parking situation at Ty-Sign – which could lead to less green space in the area.

Ty-Sign’s green space could be used to solve some of the parking problems in the area. (Google Maps)

“We are looking at different options – garages, pavement designs and the possibility of turning small green spaces into parking areas,” said Cllr Philippa Leonard, who represents the Risca East district. Argus.

“We will soon be having a site meeting with council officials to discuss the options – and we will try to do the best we can with the funding we have been given.”

The Ty-Sign housing estate was built in the 1960s to house working families from the Llanwern Steelworks in Newport and green space on the estate is scarce.

NO MORE NEWS:

One of the main complaints of many residents is that the estate’s sidewalks are too wide, making parking difficult.

Kyla King – who started the online petition after receiving two parking fines – said: “From what I can see there are a lot more cars on the streets than there are spaces available and there are ‘there is no alternative parking,’ Ms King said.

“There are spaces at the top of Elm Drive outside the shops, but you can’t park there for more than an hour or you’ll get a ticket.”

South Wales Argus: Many have complained that the pavements along Manor Way and Elm Drive are too wide making it difficult for them to use them for parking.  (Google Maps)Many have complained that the sidewalks along Manor Way and Elm Drive are too wide, preventing them from using them for parking. (Google Maps)

Ms. King feels the current parking situation is unfair to herself and other residents commuting to work.

“I work long hours and when I come home from work in the evening around 10 p.m., I find it difficult to find a parking space even on the sidewalk,” she added.

“Something needs to be done about this now as it is spiraling out of control, and I imagine everyone on the street feels the same way I do. I can’t afford to keep paying parking fines for parking in front of my home.

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Parking spaces

Green space among the parking options at Ty-Sign

USE of small amounts of green space is one of many options being considered to address the parking shortage at Ty-Sign.

This follows a long campaign by residents to end what they say is a dangerous and chaotic parking situation along two of Ty-Sign’s busiest roads – Elm Drive and Manor Way.

A petition started by resident Kyla King has gained considerable momentum in recent weeks – which has put pressure on Caerphilly County Borough Council to find a solution to the problem.

Caerphilly Council has since confirmed that it will allocate £400,000 of Welsh Government funding towards improving the parking situation at Ty-Sign.

“We are looking at different options – garages, pavement designs and the possibility of turning small green spaces into parking areas,” said Cllr Philippa Leonard, who represents the Risca East district. Argus.

“We will soon be having a site meeting with council officials to discuss the options – and we will try to do the best we can with the funding we have been given.”

The Ty-Sign housing estate was built in the 1960s to house families of workers from the Llanwern Steelworks in Newport and green space on the estate is scarce.

NO MORE NEWS:

One of the main complaints of many residents is that the estate’s sidewalks are too wide, making parking difficult.

Kyla King – who started the online petition after receiving two parking fines – said: “From what I can see there are a lot more cars on the streets than there are spaces available and there are ‘there is no alternative parking,’ Ms King said.

“There are spaces at the top of Elm Drive outside the shops, but you can’t park there for more than an hour or you’ll get a ticket.”

Many have complained that the sidewalks along Manor Way and Elm Drive are too wide, preventing them from using them for parking. (Google Maps)

Ms. King feels the current parking situation is unfair to herself and other residents commuting to work.

“I work long hours and when I come home from work at night around 10 p.m., I find it difficult to find a parking space even on the sidewalk,” she added.

“Something needs to be done about this now as it is spiraling out of control, and I imagine everyone on the street feels the same way I do. I can’t afford to keep paying parking fines for parking in front of my home.

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Parking spaces

Birmingham locals are renting out their driveways and parking spaces to make money

The Happy Brummies are ready after renting their driveways and parking spots all over town. Last year nearly £700,000 was generated from commercial deals in Birmingham and Sutton Coldfield.

Ten areas were revealed as the best performers for generating funds. Edgbaston owners made £279,176, while Perry Barr brought in £119,912 and Ladywood owners brought in £86,176 in 2021.

Lots of money has been made by members of YourParkingSpace.co.uk. The program allows people to advertise their parking spot for a fee and gives people the ability to reserve a spot to park at a specific location.

READ MORE: ‘Pure selfishness’ – Man finds trash can chained to ground to ‘reserve parking space’

Birmingham is the fifth most successful region in the country for the lucrative scheme in 2021. A whopping £26m has been made by landlords across the country – with £11.5m made in London alone.



£26million was made by owners renting their driveways across the country in 2021

Chrysa Gotsopoulou, 33, rented her closed parking space on the ground floor of her building for two years. This was before she bought a car and used the space herself at Cutlass Court in Granville Street, just off Broad Street.

“The whole time I rented it there was not a single day when the parking space was available,” she told BirminghamLive. “I used to do it long term on a monthly basis. But most people needed a lot more time than that.

“If it became available it was booked within an hour. In my case people needed it to work with many business people working in the Brindleyplace area.

“They mainly used it on weekdays to be close to work. Some of them also used it on weekends so they could park here or shop in Birmingham city centre. Still it’s a great place.

“It’s a great idea for a bit of extra cash. There’s also CCTV so it’s very secure.”

A 56-year-old man has been renting his garage in Kings Heath for four years. The small structure was bought in the 1960s, so it remained inactive because it could not accommodate his car.

“I have a flat with a garage in Kings Heath,” he said. “People don’t want to leave their vehicle knowing it’s not secure. It’s not a big garage, but suitable for a small car or motorbike.

“I couldn’t install my car, so it was dormant. It was successful for a few years.

“People with a small car going on vacation used it for two or three months. One guy had a motorcycle that kept getting stolen, so he used my garage to keep it safe. Others used it for storage.

“It’s not used all the time. Some have used it for a year, others for months. I was very happy with your parking spot and never had a problem.”

For more information about the program and to list your driveway or empty space, visit www.yourparkingplace.co.uk

Rental income from car parks in the area generated in 2021:

Edgbaston – £279,176

Perry Barr – £119,912

Ladywood – £86,176

Yardley – £55,826

Selly Oak – £32,017

Sutton Coldfield – £28,724

Green Hall – £21,840

Northfield – £17,831

Erdington – £16,926

Hodge Hill – £10,925

Total: £669,353

Source – YourParkingPlace.fr

To stay up to date with the latest news from your street or area in Birmingham or the West Midlands with our Birmingham News email updates.

READ MORE: Savvy Birmingham homeowners who rent driveways for parking earn £500,000 a year

LOOK: CCTV shows Birmingham’s Kitty Cafe in Grand Central destroyed in devastating raid

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Parking spaces

Cities are forcing businesses to overstock parking spaces. A lawsuit says it’s unconstitutional.

Zoning laws have recently received a lot of (well-deserved) bad press for driving up housing costs, driving out residents, and generally prohibiting people from putting their properties to their best use. Even in the precious few municipalities that don’t have a comprehensive zoning code, city officials still have plenty of tools to make life difficult for budding entrepreneurs.

This includes unzoned Pasadena, Texas. The city will not allow local business owner Azael Sepulveda to open a body shop on his own property unless he adds 23 more parking spaces. Sepulveda says a lot of parking spaces won’t fit on his property, and even if it did, the cost of creating it would be ruinous.

“I put everything on the line to develop my business and support my family,” he said. noted. “I have operated with a handful of parking spaces for years and had no problems. Now the city is preventing me from achieving my dream and is threatening to put me out of business.”

In December, Sepulveda sued Pasadena in Harris County District Court. His complaint argues that the city’s parking regulations violate the Texas Constitution’s guarantees of economic freedom and equal protection.

Earlier this week, a Harris County judge granted Sepulveda a temporary injunction against the city, allowing it to open at its new location while the trial unfolds. It’s a good sign for the trial and a welcome break for his business, says Tori Clark, an attorney at the Institute for Justice, the public interest law firm representing Sepulveda.

“It gives him a reprieve from paying both the mortgage on his property and the lease on the property he currently operates,” Clark said. Raison. “It is true that this is only a temporary injunction. There is a risk that our client will open his new shop and eventually have to close.”

Sepulveda opened its first body shop, Oz Mechanics, in 2013 in a rented storefront in Pasadena. In July 2021, he invested all his savings in buying his own garage.

The previous owner also had a body shop that had operated smoothly through the city for decades, leading Sepulveda to assume he would have no problem moving his own business there.

But when he applied for the permit he needed to open his business, the city told him that Pasadena’s recently updated parking ordinance required body shops to contain 5.5 spaces for every 1,000 feet. of ground surface. This meant that his company would have to have 28 spaces in total, which is 23 more than it currently has.

According to his complaint, Sepulveda customers rarely occupy more than two parking spaces per day, which the existing five spaces on his property could easily accommodate. Adding the extra 23 spaces would cost $40,000 that he doesn’t have, and they wouldn’t even fit on the property.

This economic burden that these parking requirements placed on Sepulveda’s business and the physical impossibility of complying with them should have been enough to earn it a gap with the city. Indeed, planning staff encouraged him to apply, which he dutifully did in October 2021.

That’s when things started to get weird.

City staff initially did not confirm that he had received his application. When Sepulveda attempted to file a $400 filing fee, the city refused to accept it. This initial silence precipitated a month of back and forth between Sepulveda’s lawyers and the city; the first continually asking what the status of the request was, and the second refusing to say why it was not being considered.

Left with no other option, Sepulveda sued Pasadena in December. The lawsuit comes at a time when parking requirements are under intense scrutiny.

libertarian leaning experts argue that these regulations force developers and business owners to create more parking spaces than a free market would provide. Regulatory compliance progressive don’t like them for supposedly encouraging people to drive more and use public transport less.

Either way, the result of parking minimums is overconsumption of land and higher development costs overall. Some projects, be it a new apartment complex or a new restaurant, are rendered completely unprofitable.

Due to these adverse effects, cities begin reduce or even completely repeal their minimum parking regulations. The results are lower rents and more commercially viable Properties.

Clark notes that neighboring Houston manages to do just fine while requiring half the number of parking spaces for auto repair shops. The fact that other cities survive with much lower parking minimums makes Pasadena’s regulations not only unnecessary but also unconstitutional, she says.

“The city cannot point to any evidence why auto repair shops in general, and Mr. Sepulveda’s shop in particular, need as many parking spaces as they need,” he said. she.

This lack of evidence, combined with the burden placed on Sepulveda’s activities, constitutes a violation of the Texas Constitution’s guarantees of economic freedom and private property rights, its lawsuit argues. The complaint also alleges that the city’s requirement that its business have more parking spaces than hotels or gymnasiums violates Texas’ guarantee of equal protection under the law.

Clark says a trial date is set for early June. The case presents an opportunity to protect his client and other Pasadena business owners from regulations that impose significant costs with no real benefit.

“The city has no good reason to make these demands” on Sepulveda, she said. “Complying with these demands is physically impossible, and it prevents him from opening his shop and ensuring that his family is taken care of.”

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Parking spaces

Love’s adds hundreds of truck parking spaces with new locations

The new Love’s in Newport, Tennessee is introduced. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY — Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Newport, Tennessee, and Ripley, New York, with two travel stops opening Thursday.

The Newport store, located on Interstate 40 (1129 Smokey Mountain Lane), adds 60 jobs and 70 truck parking spaces to Cocke County.

The Ripley’s store, located off Interstate 90 (6201 Shortman Road), adds 85 jobs and 94 truck parking spaces to Chautauqua County.

“We are excited to open our 19th and 4th locations in Tennessee and New York, respectively,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Love’s provides clean, safe places for customers to stop while on the road and team members will get them back on their way to their destination quickly and safely.”

The amenities by location are as follows:

Newport, TN

  • Over 13,000 square feet.
  • Chester’s Chicken, Godfather’s Pizza and Petro’s Chili. (Opening March 7)
  • 70 truck parking spaces.
  • 84 parking spaces.
  • Five RV parking spaces.
  • Eight diesel bays.
  • Seven showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Speedco. (Opening March 28)
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Ripley, New York

  • Over 13,000 square feet.
  • Hardee’s. (Opening March 7)
  • 94 truck parking spaces.
  • 49 parking spaces.
  • Eight diesel bays.
  • Eight showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Speedco. (Opening April 11)
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand openings, Love’s will donate $2,000 to the Ripley Central School District and the Grassy Forks Volunteer Fire Department in Newport.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

On-street parking spaces available for car sharing







March 3, 2022






Winnipeggers traveling by car-sharing may notice new vehicle locations, as car-sharing companies can now request access to on-street parking spaces.

Car sharing allows multiple customers to access a fleet of shared vehicles according to their needs, creating a convenient alternative to owning a personal vehicle.

“Carsharing offers a viable alternative to owning a personal vehicle and reduces the demand for on-street parking,” said Ron Maxwell, facilities and operations manager at the Winnipeg Parking Authority.





In addition to reducing the demand for parking spaces, car sharing can also help reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

“Winnipeg’s Climate Action Plan aims to shift Winnipeggers away from personal vehicle travel, which currently accounts for more than 80 per cent of weekday travel in the city,” said Lindsay Mierau, City Sustainability Manager.






We tested on-street parking access for car sharing as part of a two-year pilot project, which is now an ongoing program. The initial spaces are for Peg City Car Co-op customers and can be found at:


In the future, any car-sharing organization can apply for a permit to have a designated space on the street. To access a vehicle in a given space, customers must contact the car-sharing company indicated on the car park signage.



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Parking spaces

App Connects Car Renters to Parking Spots – Rental Software


The Sunny2go mobile app, which now includes parking data from Parkopedia, is provided to customers 14 days prior to vehicle rental via a unique link to act as a “personal concierge service” with various trip planning features.

Photo courtesy of Parkopedia.


Connected vehicle service provider Parkopedia has partnered with European car rental specialist Sunny Cars to provide parking information to its drivers via the “Sunny2go” web application, it said in a statement. Parkopedia helps drivers find parking and will now provide Sunny Cars customers with parking information for streets and parking lots in 89 countries, according to the release.

Parkopedia collects information about parking locations, including position, number of spaces, prices, opening hours, electric vehicle charging stations and height restrictions. Parkopedia’s Dynamic Data, which will be added to the app later this year, uses a combination of real-time data and predictive algorithms to determine parking space availability at any time. This gives drivers “local knowledge” of parking while on the move, providing information on occupancy, as well as the likelihood of finding parking at a destination.

Sunny Cars works with global fleets with around 8,000 locations in 120 countries.

“Our parking information will be an integral part of Sunny Cars’ extensive ‘complete carefree package’,” said Hans Puvogel, COO of Parkopedia. “Travellers using Sunny Cars services are typically the most demanding of local knowledge and assistance with services such as parking while on the move, so we are delighted to be able to help ensure a positive customer experience. As our parking services continue to expand, we are confident that our industry-leading, accurate and comprehensive parking data will support even more drivers around the world and we actively welcome further company integrations. mobility and related industries.

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Parking spaces

🌱 Two dead in bed fire + lawmakers oppose parking spaces

Hello, brooklyn! I’m your host, Patrick Murray here with three new stories to start your day.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Partly cloudy with highs of 49 and lows of 40.


Here are the top stories in Brooklyn today:

  1. A young mother and her toddler died of injuries sustained in an apartment fire early Tuesday morning. 9:49 a.m. March 1, FDNY firefighters responded to a fire at 6 Agate Court, and were greeted by heavy smoke and fire issuing from the brownstone. Three victims were pulled from the fire, including the 22-year-old mother and her 1-year-old son. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. (NAMI)
  2. Park Slope Council Member Shahana Hanif doubled down on her demand, along with other Brooklyn lawmakers, that developers stop building parking lots in new buildings. The letter sent to the planning agency, endorsed by Hanif and nine other local leaders, cited climate change and the need for more affordable housing as key concerns. These lawmakers argue that the city would be able to build more affordable housing, reduce carbon emissions and create additional commercial space if it reduced the minimum parking requirements. (Room)
  3. Sydney and Michael Hursa, owners of Synful Eats, announced the expansion of their delivery service to Brooklyn and Queens. Their sophisticated candy delivery service has been hugely popular in Manhattan and the Hamptons and will now be available to residents of Brooklyn. Synful Eats supports Every mother matters, an organization dedicated to the safety of mothers during pregnancy and childbirth. by donating 1% of its total profits. (NAMI)

From our sponsor:

Today’s Brooklyn Daily is brought to you in part from our friends at GoodRx – the best way to save money on your prescriptions. GoodRx helps you locate the lowest prices for drugs at local pharmacies, so you don’t pay too much. Also works for pet medications! To see how much you can save, go to GoodRx.com.


Today in Brooklyn:

  • First discoveries, Brooklyn Botanical Garden. (10:30 a.m.)
  • Elton John Happy Hour at fourth avenue pub. (5 p.m.)
  • Traditional Slow Jam at old stone house. (6:15 p.m.)
  • Live music at Brooklyn Steel. (8 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • BAM brooklyn announces a stellar spring lineup! (instagram)
  • Brooklyn Community Foundation Spark Prize Breakfast in just a week! (Facebook)
  • RSCP here for the Brooklyn Annual Meeting Harbor Ring Tower. (Facebook)
  • Brooklyn real estate overview. (Brooklyn patch)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

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Do you like the Brooklyn Daily? Here are all the ways you can get more involved:


That’s all for today! See you soon.

Patrick Murray

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Parking spaces

Saltash’s new parking spaces are only suitable for half a car

Parking is something many of us dread. It’s even worse if the spaces are quite tight or difficult to access – but a Saltash car park has spaces that are almost impossible to guarantee your car is in the lines.

The Belle Vue Short Stay car park, on Belle Vue Road, has become a popular talking point on the Saltash Community Facebook group, with one man joking that people need a ‘small car’ to park there .

Read more: Coronavirus tester slams ‘joke’ treatment of staff as Plymouth center closes

Many had commented that spaces “had always been boring,” but some wondered if spaces were meant to be used laterally.

We asked Cornwall Council but after no response we went to check the spaces ourselves and can confirm the width is too small to accommodate a side car.



The spaces are only this size against the wall, the rest of the parking spaces are larger

The rest of the parking lot has normal sized spaces, but the spaces along the wall are smaller than the others.

Some people have joked that parking attendants can “give you a ticket for not standing in lines.”

According to the British Parking Association, off-street spaces should be 2.4 meters wide by 4.8 meters long.



Parking spaces at the Belle Vue car park in Saltash

“These dimensions are neither minimums nor written on stone tablets, and may be revised to suit your particular needs, but remember that good access and wider bays allow efficient use of the parking area “, he adds.

“Some car parks are now designed with a thick colored outline around the bays, an area to allow better access.”

Have you noticed small gaps elsewhere? Let us know in the comments.

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New ‘controversial’ boulders blocking parking spaces in Cornwall attacked as ‘rubbish’

The boulders have been placed in 15 parking spaces in the central car park in Lizard, the UK’s southernmost village. However, local businesses have attacked the changes, warning lack of parking could cost drivers hundreds of thousands of pounds every year.

The changes are believed to have been made to improve road safety in the area, but many warn that the changes have cut off much access to the village.

The Lizard is unique in that parking fees are paid solely through donations and have no fixed fees.

Speaking to CornwallLive, Phil Bolt of Triggs Gift Shop called the update “rubbish”, warning “there was never any accident”.

He said: “The parking here is unique to Cornwall.

READ MORE: Major parking law change to be debated as drivers slam ‘senseless tax’

“Especially after Covid, taking over a business in Cornwall is a risk. So many people come and go and we need all the support we need.

“The parish council is playing with businesses and jobs and it is not smart business. How is all this a smart decision? »

Local resident Zena Brown also attacked the new scheme because businesses depended on parking

She said: “People park on the green at their own risk, but these spaces which have now been removed are vital to business.

“There’s huge disquiet in the village and it’s one of the most controversial things to ever happen in The Lizard.”

Express.co.uk has contacted Landewednack Parish Council for further comment.

Cornwall Live has also contacted the council on several occasions but has yet to receive a response.

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Parking spaces

More private residential parking spaces to get EV chargers

Electric vehicle charging stations will be installed in 140,000 parking spaces in 700 private residential buildings, Paul Chan announced.

The government launched a HK$2 billion home electric vehicle charging grant program in October 2020 to promote the installation of charging stations in parking lots of existing private residential buildings.

Given the overwhelming response, an additional HK$1.5 billion will be injected to extend the program for four years until the 2027-28 financial year.

The program will support the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure in around 140,000 parking spaces in 700 residential buildings, or almost half of the eligible parking spaces in Hong Kong.

A government source said Hong Kong has seen rapid growth in electric vehicles, with one in four electric vehicles of newly registered passenger cars last year.

The source said authorities found it necessary to allocate more funds as they had already received 560 applications as of the end of last month, which were for around 115,000 parking spaces, while the initial funding of $2 billion HK for the program could only cover about 60,000 parking spaces.

About 240 of the 560 applications have been approved. The additional HK$1.5 billion may provide more room for new applications, the source said.

The first installation work should begin within the week. The source said it is expected that installation works will be completed for around 100 private car parks by March next year.

Meanwhile, Chan said the government is preparing to gradually convert some gasoline or liquefied petroleum gas filling stations into fast charging stations, to support the provision of charging services for more diverse types of vehicles. .

“We will also explore the feasibility of developing larger service station sites under the ‘single site, multiple use’ model,” he added.

In innovation and technology, HK$10 billion will be injected to promote the development of life and health technologies. The funding will be used to support equipment, research talent, clinical trials and data application so that universities and institutions can improve their capabilities and capacities.

An InnoLife Healthtech Hub will be set up in the Hong Kong-Shenzhen Innovation and Technology Park, which will include 16 life science and health laboratories established under the flagship project of “InnoHK Research Clusters”.

Universities will see their grant amount under the Technology Startup Support Program for Universities doubled to HK$16 million. It’s about helping them create their own start-ups and commercialize their research and development results.

[email protected]

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Electric vehicle charging facilities to be added to 140,000 parking spaces: FS

Electric vehicle charging facilities will be added to 140,000 parking spaces in 700 existing private residential buildings, Financial Secretary Paul Chan Mo-po announced in his budget.

The government launched a HK$2 billion home electric vehicle charging grant program in October 2020 to promote the installation of charging stations in parking lots of existing private residential buildings.

Given the overwhelming response, an additional HK$1.5 billion will be injected to extend the program for four years to the financial year 2027-28. The program will support the installation of infrastructure for charging electric vehicles for a total of approximately 140,000 parking spaces, or nearly half of the eligible parking spaces in Hong Kong.

To advance innovation and technology, the FS will inject an additional HK$10 billion to promote the development of life and health technologies.

The funding will be used to support areas such as equipment, research talent, clinical trials and data application so that institutions like universities can improve their capabilities and capabilities in life and health technologies. health and strengthen the industrial chain.

An InnoLife Healthtech Hub will also be set up in the Hong Kong-Shenzhen Innovation and Technology Park, which will include 16 life sciences and health laboratories established under the flagship project of “InnoHK Research Clusters”. and eight relevant state key laboratories.

The Hospital Authority will also help more institutions explore how to better use their hospitals to conduct research and clinical trials, as well as the valuable clinical data they have accumulated for research and development.

“Our goal is to promote multi-faceted collaboration in scientific research and industry development, to make Hong Kong a major center for research and development in life and health disciplines, and to connect industrial clusters related,” Chan said.

Meanwhile, universities will see their grant amount under the Technology Startup Support Program for Universities doubled to HK$16 million to help universities create their own start-ups and commercialize their research results and development.

The increased grant will be awarded to start-ups from universities with private investment on a one-to-one matching basis, and each start-up can receive an annual grant of up to HK$1.5 million for up to three years.

On the other hand, a new “Digital Economy Development Committee” will be set up to facilitate Hong Kong’s progress in the digital economy.

The proposed committee will be made up of experts and academics, industry elites and relevant government officials, Chan said, after describing digitalization as an “inevitable trend” for Hong Kong.

To strengthen Hong Kong’s intellectual property regime, a total of approximately HK$85 million will be allocated to the Department of Intellectual Property over the next three fiscal years to enhance the city’s ability to conduct substantive examination. in the processing of original patent applications.

As the Copyright Ordinance Amendment consultation period ends today, Chan said the government will “carefully consider” the views gathered before the Copyright Ordinance Amendment Bill the amended Copyright Ordinance is submitted to LegCo in the first half of this year.

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New law reduces veterans’ access to disabled parking spaces

DALLAS – This year, a new law was implemented that disabled veterans in states who only have DV license plates can no longer park in disabled parking spaces. Veterans with disabilities must now apply for a license plate or disabled parking plate in order to be permitted to park at these locations.


What do you want to know

  • SB 792 was implemented so that disabled veterans who only have DV license plates could no longer park in handicapped parking spaces.
  • The bill’s author said organizations like the Paralyzed Veterans of America requested the change urgently due to a lack of availability of handicapped parking spaces.
  • Dallas veteran says he has to jump through hoops just to get the sign

Senate Bill 792 established that only vehicles displaying a license plate or license plate International Symbol of Access (ISA) can park in the disabled parking spaces. Current disabled veteran license plates do not feature the ISA, and not all disabilities that qualify a veteran for DV plates will qualify them for plates or placard with the ISA.

The author of the bill, Texas Senator Donna Campbell — a former chairman of the Veterans Affairs and Border Security Committee — said organizations like Paralyzed Veterans of America had requested the change urgently due to a lack of availability of disabled parking spaces, particularly at VA facilities.

“Before SB 792 was implemented, anyone with a disabled veteran license plate could use the disabled parking lot, whether or not they were disabled,” Campbell said.

While Campbell said he wrote the law to make it easier for disabled veterans to get to the front door of an apartment building, one Dallas veteran says he has to jump through hoops just to get the sign.

“Previously, you could park with your disabled veteran plates, just with that DV itself and that marker that you’re a disabled veteran. But now you actually have to have this license plate with a DV callsign on it and a sign that you have to hang in your rearview mirror,” said disabled veteran Louis Medina. “I totally disagree with this new law. I think it’s obtuse and cumbersome and there’s more paperwork than anything I’ve encountered regarding disabled veterans.

Medina served for several years in the Marines. During this time, he suffered injuries to his knees, ankles and lower back. Medina currently has DV plates on his vehicle, signifying that the United States Department of Veterans Affairs has certified his service-related disability rating as 50 percent or more. He has been trying since the start of 2022 to be approved for the new disabled parking plate, but his doctor initially refused his application. He said she said her condition did not warrant the placard. He has since been diagnosed with arthritis, which he says will help his case with the claim.

“I do not use [disabled parking spaces] all the time. Most of the time I park at regular spots, but it’s just that a day you really need it, and you can’t use it now because the VA decided, “Oh no, you’re not getting it because X, Y, Z, because you haven’t proven that you deserve it,'” Medina said. “She just said that my condition wasn’t enough to warrant the placard, that there are basically — in some words — veterans who are worse. Which, I mean they are and I absolutely agree. But there are other times I need help because it just hurts. I would rather a Vietnam vet or a Korean vet have use of the spot because I’m still a bit capable, but it’s good to have it just in case one day. It’s better to need it than not to have it.”

Medina says he’s seen more people who aren’t veterans abusing handicap parking spots outside Kroger or Walmart, which he says is irritating.

“They abuse the system. I’m not saying they aren’t disabled, but who knows? So it’s a draw,” Medina said. “We don’t know if the person is disabled. At least with us [veterans]you know you have to go through the process of fighting the VA and get them to say yes you are over 60% disabled [to get DV plates]. But these days you pretty much have to prove you’ve got [DV plates] besides being able to articulate to your doctor, ‘Hey, that’s why I need [the placard]’, then the doctor has to say yes, you deserve the sign.

The international symbol of access on a handicapped parking sign and plate in a car outside the Dallas VA Hospital. (Spectrum News 1/Stacy Rickard)

Medical conditions that meet the legal definition of a disability—which determine eligibility for a license plate or disabled person’s license plate—are visual impairments and mobility problems that significantly impair ability of the person to move around, such as wheelchair confinement and foot disorders. See the full list here. Medina says that unfairly excludes veterans who may struggle with mental disabilities or reduced mobility that worsen in cold weather.

“There are mental disabilities where they might have a bad day with PTSD and they just want to park out front and go get their groceries instead of having to drive around the parking lot and try to find a parking space down below . And maybe they had a bad episode of their PTSD and that might aggravate something else where they’re going after somebody and it might just be this simple thing where it triggered a combat veteran for , I don’t know, hurting someone — which wouldn’t be the best idea,” Medina said.

The next steps for Medina are to contact his doctor and schedule a follow-up appointment to plead his case and show him his surgical information which he says will be enough evidence to get a reversal of the decision.

“They need hard papers with the VA surgical information that says, ‘Hey, yeah, this guy deserves or needs the disabled veteran sign. I really hope. It’s a headache because if it doesn’t work then I have to go back to square one and try to figure out what I can do,” Medina said. “It’s just more bureaucracy for a veteran. We already deal with enough paperwork with the VA as it is, having them give us all types of grief like, “Well, you know, we don’t think you have that condition.”

Campbell encourages any veterans who have questions regarding the recent law change to contact his office at 512-463-0125.

“There is no more honorable profession and greater title of bravery than to be called a veteran. I have started every hearing of the Veterans Affairs and Border Security Committee with this statement as a reminder of how much we owe and appreciate our veterans. I was born on a naval base and grew up with great respect for the military. Every legislative session, I work hard to ensure that we meet our obligations to our veterans, not just in words but also in deeds,” Campbell said. “We are indebted to our veterans for protecting our national security and defending our freedom. It is an honor to serve those who have served our nation so selflessly. »

Download the forms needed to get new disabled parking plates or learn more about the requirements here.

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Parking spaces

Monmouth Mall plans to become smaller and reduce parking spaces

EATONTOWN, NJ – There are big changes on the horizon for Monmouth Mall:

First, Kushner Cos., the property developer and owner of the Monmouth Mall, wants to demolish the existing three-story car park on the site.

In its place, Kushner plans to build a flat parking lot, in the same location as the parking lot. However, the car park will accommodate far fewer cars: The overall number of parking spaces will be reduced by 638 spaces.

“This is a former parking lot that has deteriorated over time and has been deemed unsafe for pedestrians and vehicles,” said Michael Sommer, vice president of development and construction at Kushner Cos.

This month, Kushner Cos. asked the City of Eatontown to approve his request to demolish the garage; Eatontown will issue a decision in March.

Second, demolishing the parking lot is actually part of Kushner Cos’ larger plan. to reduce retail space in the Monmouth Mall by 25,000 square feet. The company has yet to describe how it will reduce the size of the mall and where the disposals will take place.

“As you know, there are a lot of vacancies at the mall,” Sommer told Patch on Thursday.

Kushner Cos. is owned by Jared Kushner, son-in-law of former President Donald Trump. The company was started by Charles Kushner and the Kushners are the developers of Pier Village in Long Branch. Charles Kushner and his wife still live in Long Branch to this day.

Third, last year the City of Eatontown declared the mall “an area in need of redevelopment.” This means that the borough will create a redevelopment plan, which will most likely alter what is built at the mall. Depending on what this redevelopment plan says, it may also change the zoning of the mall, perhaps adding residential zoning.

Eatontown has previously stated that it would be acceptable to have residential units in the mall: in 2018, the city approved Kushner Cos. to build 700 apartments in the mall; there was a significant pushback from residents who lived nearby. But this proposal is currently on the back burner.

“We haven’t backed down from (this idea),” Sommer warned Thursday. “However, in the current retail environment, we need to determine what are the highest and best uses for the mall. In terms of our overall vision (for Monmouth Mall), we are planning a significant redevelopment for the remaining retail and other businesses on-site, to be successful not just today, but long-term into the future.”

There was also a plan to build outdoor pedestrian corridors and outdoor plazas at the mall, but that idea was also scrapped by the developer.

Last spring, Kushner Cos. took full ownership of Monmouth Mall, buying out its partner Brookfield Properties, the Asbury Park Press.

According to this report in The Real Deal, Brookfield and Kushner both defaulted on a loan at the start of the pandemic, when all businesses in the state were forced to close, putting the entire mall at immediate risk of foreclosure . But Kushner then bought a $110 million loan for the property at auction, saving the mall and becoming the sole owner.

Although Kushner Cos. has made it clear that it wants to retain ownership of the shopping centre, what does the future hold for Monmouth Shopping Centre? That remains to be seen.

Construction is also underway on an RWJBarnabas Health outpost at the mall. It is planned to be a two-building medical complex next to the Boscovs. It will provide pediatric care, women’s health, emergency care and family welfare.

The first building is expected to open in the coming months, Sommer said.

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The city of Naples seeks to free up more parking spaces

NAPLES, Fla. — A new Naples City Council will be sworn in on Wednesday, and one of its biggest challenges will be managing the city’s growth.

This includes addressing its lack of parking.

More people coming to town means more cars on the road. And one of the first tasks of the new city council will be to try to ensure that parking is available for tourists and residents.

At Wednesday’s meeting, council members will consider changing parking orders to try to free up more spaces in the city. The changes would impose stricter rules to ensure businesses have the appropriate number of parking spaces required by law.

People in downtown Naples we spoke to say it’s time.

“Yesterday we tried the car park, and it was full. Today we managed to get into the garage just around the corner,” Gail Moscicki said as she got ready for lunch on Fifth Avenue South with her husband, Steven. “And it’s only the afternoon. Come in the evening, it’s a nightmare. Parking is crazy.

Currently, businesses and properties are required to have a certain number of spaces by law. However, they can reduce this number by requesting a “Parking Needs Analysis” study.

The city council is considering making these studies more rigorous and limiting the number of parking spaces a company can eliminate. The new rules also would not allow businesses to reduce parking due to valet parking.

“The proposed changes to the Code would limit the amount that new developments can reduce their parking needs through valet parking and/or parking needs analysis, which should result in the provision of more parking spaces,” the city’s planning advisory board said in a statement.

Residents of downtown Naples said on Tuesday the roads seem busier than ever this year and more parking is needed.

“There’s definitely been a lot more traffic this year,” said part-time resident Mary Beth Booth. “We came here at dinner time and it’s hard trying to get a seat.”

Her husband, Ned Booth, added: “You have to come early and choose your seats, of course. Other than that, (parking is hard to find)”

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City Council plans to lease parking spots from local car dealership – Pasadena Now

As part of Monday’s consent schedule, the city council will consider an amendment allowing Rusnak/Pasadena to lease 171 parking spaces from the city in the Del Mar train station garage to store excess inventory of sales vehicles at the detail.

The city would receive a payment of $122,094 for the initial one-year term.

The Del Mar Station garage is constantly operating at less than maximum capacity, and the revenue expected from renting these spaces helps balance the cost of running the garage. The projected revenue of $122,094.00 is calculated on 171 spaces rented at $70 per space with a 15% discount.

Since 1998, the City has provided the means for Rusnak/Pasadena Automotive Group to store excess retail vehicle inventory in an off-site location.

Rusnak’s property does not have sufficient storage space for these vehicles, according to the report.

In 1998, the city leased parking spaces from the Parson’s Corporation parking structure to sublet to Rusnak/Pasadena. In 2013, this agreement ended when Parson’s remodeled its campus, resulting in the loss of parking spaces.

To compensate for the loss of parking spaces at Parson’s, in 2013 the city entered into an agreement with Rusnak/Pasadena to lease 171 parking spaces in the Del Mar Station garage. The city designated two isolated sections of the garage for storage cars. The sections are fenced, secure and located in such a way that the regular circulation of vehicles is not affected.

  • Approval of the Federal Legislative Platform and Atate Legislative Platform for calendar year 2022. At the January 25 meeting of the Legislative Policy Committee, the Committee approved the staff recommendations and voted in favor of the federal and state legislation that benefits early childhood education programs. Each year, the City Council, through the Legislative Policy Committee, is asked to adopt legislative platforms for state and federal governments. The platforms convey to legislators, decision-makers and the public the City’s position on important policy issues and legislative discussions. Staff prepare platform revisions in coordination with city departments and its state and federal lobbyists.

  • A resolution allowing electronic service of government claims and tort notices. Government tort actions against public entities must be brought in accordance with the specific procedures set out in the Government Code. Effective January 1, 2021, SB 1473 amended the California government code section to permit public agencies to accept electronic service of government complaints and to send electronic notices in response to such complaints to the complainant, if the public entity expressly authorizes such service by resolution or order. .

  • To pass a Pasadena City Council resolution authorizing remote teleconference meetings of the City Council, all subordinate city bodies, and all boards of directors of the city’s nonprofit corporations and their subordinate bodies, for the period from February 7 to March 9. Since March of 2020 and due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Pasadena City Council, all of its subordinate bodies and all of its non-profit corporation boards and their subcommittees have met at distance pursuant to an executive order that suspended certain Brown Act teleconferencing requirements. Acknowledging that the pandemic continues, on September 16 the governor signed AB 361, which amends the Brown Act. On October 4, pursuant to Section 54953 of the Government Code, the City Council passed “A resolution of the City Council of the City of Pasadena authorizing meetings by remote teleconference of the City Council, all subordinate bodies of the City and all councils and boards of non-profit corporations in the city. their subordinate bodies, for the period from October 4 to November 3. If council wishes to continue to meet remotely, it must find that it has reviewed the circumstances of the state of emergency, and either: (i) the state of emergency continues to directly impact the ability of members to meet in person safely, or (ii) state or local authorities continue to impose or recommend measures to promote social distancing.

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Free parking spaces temporarily return to downtown Gainesville

Free parking returns to downtown Gainesville until June 1.

The Gainesville City Commission voted 5 to 1 on Thursday to suspend the paid parking structure in downtown Gainesville.

Mayor Lauren Poe was the only dissenting vote.

Since Jan. 3, residents and local businesses have been hit hard by parking fees of $1 per hour from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. for high-demand spaces on the street that were free for two hours.

Business owners and residents agreed in public comments that the new parking mandates were classist, ageist, inconvenient and hindered local businesses.

After four months, paid parking will return. This time, the City Commission will work with downtown business owners and workers to discuss a more appropriate implementation plan.

Noe Lopez, owner of Wyatt’s Coffee, and other downtown business owners who were able to attend the meeting were disappointed by the obvious lack of planning and failed policy in the city.

“We gradually experienced the downturn in business as parking enforcement and attendance increased,” Lopez said. “The continuation of these parking measures affects downtown businesses that have managed to survive through the heart of 2020 and 2021.”

Anthony Rue, owner of Volta Coffee, said he’s frustrated with the constant changes to downtown Gainesville’s parking structure without consultation with business owners who will be affected.

“I keep hearing from my customers about the frustration of never knowing what the parking situation will be like when they get downtown,” he said. “They just want consistency and they want access.”

Commissioner-elect Cynthia Chestnut also spoke during the public comments.

She suggested seeking input from downtown business owners as well as the Chamber of Commerce regarding the economic impact of parking fees. Additionally, she advised commissioners to consider the economic impact on disenfranchised citizens and residents who have technological challenges or do not own a smartphone.

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“Ultimately, we’re diverting people — we’re driving people — away from downtown and negatively impacting our downtown merchants,” she said. “And above all, we inconvenience our neighbors.”

Commissioner Harvey Ward admitted the city has not devised a plan to mitigate the financial loss to businesses and their customers who are bearing the brunt of the new parking fees. He said the city should plan in the next two to three months how to mitigate those inconveniences before reinstating the fee.

“I’ll take full responsibility, but I’ll also say I’m nimble enough to want to make the changes,” Commissioner Ward said. “We can do better. We should do better.

The commission will work soon to cover paid parking signs, but it did not specify a date. The two-hour parking time limit will still be enforced.

Contact Carissa at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter @carissaallenn.

The Independent Florida Alligator has been independent from the university since 1971, your donation today could help #SaveStudentNewsrooms. Please consider donating today.


Carissa Allen

Carissa Allen is a second-year journalism and political science double major. She is a general duty subway reporter for The Alligator. In her free time, you can find her scuba diving, working out, or listening to a podcast.

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Lee County is moving to add designated parking spots on two Sanibel Causeway islands

The Lee County Board of Commissioners discussed the $8.5 million Sanibel Causeway Islands Improvement Project at their workshop meeting on Tuesday, February 1.

The project will enhance Islands A and B using money from tourism development taxes and state funds.

The project aims to align the Sanibel Causeway with other traditional beaches in the area such as Lynn Hall, Bowditch Beach and Bonita Beach. This effort will include the construction of traditional beach amenities like pavilions, picnic areas, restrooms, native plant landscaping and designated parking.

“I think this is a great project that will give us a chance to continue using these islands long into the future,” said Lee County Commissioner Brian Hamman.

Phase 1 of the project started in 2016 as erosion remediation. As Lee enters Phase 2 of the project, officials discuss additional water retention areas and public safety concerns.

“We’ve seen a lot of erosion on these islands over the past few years,” Hamman said. “Having so many cars driving all over the island has unfortunately led to more erosion and accidents where people get stuck and have to be pulled out by tow trucks.”

The main public safety concern is that without designated parking, vehicles travel close to shore. This can increase the risk of getting stuck in the sand. Next, vehicle owners should call tow trucks. This concern was addressed by the proposal to add compacted shell designated parking areas to the causeway.

Designated parking is one of the stipulations required by the grant the county received to complete the project.

“We just wanted to try to make it more orderly so people could enjoy it,” Hamman said. “So when you get there you’ll know where to park, how to park and what to do, unlike now it’s pretty much free for everyone.”

While parking was a top concern for Lee Commissioners, some beachgoers don’t believe the current parking situation is a problem.

“We never had a problem no matter how busy it was,” said local resident Tommy Schoenfeld. “You say it was free-for-all, but with free-for-all everyone got along. You come here no matter how busy it gets and someone will come around for your car.

The project’s design improvements include both parallel and front parking. As part of preliminary plans, Island A is estimated to have 234 standard parking spaces with 4 RV spaces, and Island B is estimated to have 214 standard parking spaces.

Some community members like Diane Oliver, a local resident who often visits the causeway, don’t take issue with the project as long as the county respects what has been there for years.

“I know they’ve taken down several trees and that’s concerning,” Oliver said. “But as long as they respect nature and you’re able to not overcrowd the areas, I don’t see any problem with that.”

However, Schoenfeld, who visits the Causeways once a week, says it makes counting easier.

“The toilet would be a great amenity,” Schoenfeld said. “But everything else…they messed it up.”

Schoenfeld said the causeway works well now as a place to visit and relax.

“They are well on their way to interceding in our beautiful causeway for no good reason,” Schoenfeld said.

A question raised at the workshop was whether designated parking would be paid parking.

“We were asked what we would think of charging for parking like they do with other beach parks and all five commissioners said they weren’t interested in charging for parking.” Hamman said. “We thought right now, with inflation and rising costs all over the country, it wasn’t even time to start charging for parking here.”

To track the project, Lee County has launched an interactive web tool for the Sanibel Causeway Islands Project to provide easy access to information about the proposed project, including maps, plans, timelines and more in one interface. friendly. The tool also allows for public participation through a survey of additional amenities.

The interactive web tool can be accessed at https://leegis.leegov.com/CausewayIslands or by going to the Parks Projects page on the county’s website.

While not everyone using the causeway will be happy with the proposed changes, the project will continue to move forward and the state funding agreement requires the project to be completed by June 30, 2024.

“It’s hard to say goodbye to the old and bring in the new, but sometimes you have to do it as long as they respect the nature of Sanibel,” said Diane Oliver.

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New West apartment to convert parking lots into living spaces

Goodbye parking spaces and storage, hello houses.

The city received an application from the landlord of 520 Eighth St. to replace seven parking spaces and part of the building’s resident storage and locker areas with two new bachelor and three one-bedroom units. The owner of the building, which currently has 56 units, has applied to the city for a housing agreement and a development exemption permit.

On Jan. 31, council gave three readings to a bylaw that authorizes the city to enter into a housing agreement with the landlord requiring all residential units in the building to be secured as market rental units.

Council also gave notice that it would consider issuing a Development Variance Permit, which would reduce the number of off-street parking spaces required by 21% from the standard required for guaranteed market tenancies. in the zoning bylaw.

According to a staff report, the proposed five new units do not require additional parking spaces under the city’s zoning bylaw. With the removal of seven parking spaces to create new rental units, the building would have 49 parking spaces for residents and no spaces for visitors.

The staff report says a survey of parking space usage found that 15 of the existing 56 spaces are allocated to residents, 14 are in use by other neighborhood residents, and 27 spaces are vacant.

Council also approved six long-term bicycle parking spaces and six short-term bicycle parking spaces as part of the development variance permit.

“Given the proximity to public transport and the similarity in (parking) rates used in the downtown area, staff consider the parking gap to be reasonable when accompanied by a commitment to take actions that support active travel,” a report to the council said. “Specifically, transport staff recommended the provision of six short-term bicycle parking spaces. The applicant has agreed to provide a minimum of six short-term spaces, with the design of these spaces to be reviewed as part of the development permit process.

According to a staff report, notices will be sent to surrounding residents so they can provide written feedback, but an “opportunity to be heard” is no longer required at a council meeting.

This isn’t the first time the city has received a request to convert parking spaces into residential units in a New West apartment.

In June 2021, the council backed a development waiver permit (to modify off-street parking) and a housing agreement for a 55-unit rental apartment at 322 Seventh St., where the landlord sought to replace nine parking spaces. existing parking lot by five new residential studio units.

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Parking spaces

Free parking spaces temporarily return to downtown Gainesville

Free parking returns to downtown Gainesville until June 1.

The Gainesville City Commission voted 5 to 1 on Thursday to suspend the paid parking structure in downtown Gainesville.

Mayor Lauren Poe was the only dissenting vote.

Since Jan. 3, residents and local businesses have been hit hard by parking fees of $1 per hour from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. for high-demand spaces on the street that were free for two hours.

Business owners and residents agreed in public comments that the new parking mandates were classist, ageist, inconvenient and hindered local businesses.

After four months, paid parking will return. This time, the City Commission will work with downtown business owners and workers to discuss a more appropriate implementation plan.

Noe Lopez, owner of Wyatt’s Coffee, and other downtown business owners who were able to attend the meeting were disappointed by the obvious lack of planning and failed policy in the city.

“We gradually experienced the downturn in business as parking enforcement and attendance increased,” Lopez said. “The continuation of these parking measures affects downtown businesses that have managed to survive through the heart of 2020 and 2021.”

Anthony Rue, owner of Volta Coffee, said he’s frustrated with the constant changes to downtown Gainesville’s parking structure without consultation with business owners who will be affected.

“I keep hearing from my customers about the frustration of never knowing what the parking situation will be like when they get downtown,” he said. “They just want consistency and they want access.”

Commissioner-elect Cynthia Chestnut also spoke during the public comments.

She suggested seeking input from downtown business owners as well as the Chamber of Commerce regarding the economic impact of parking fees. Additionally, she advised commissioners to consider the economic impact on disenfranchised citizens and residents who are technologically challenged or do not own a smartphone.

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“Ultimately, we’re diverting people — we’re driving people — away from downtown and negatively impacting our downtown merchants,” she said. “And above all, we inconvenience our neighbors.”

Commissioner Harvey Ward admitted the city has not devised a plan to mitigate the financial loss to businesses and their customers who are bearing the brunt of the new parking fees. He said the city should plan in the next two to three months how to mitigate those inconveniences before reinstating the fee.

“I’ll take full responsibility, but I’ll also say I’m nimble enough to want to make the changes,” Commissioner Ward said. “We can do better. We should do better.

The commission will work soon to cover paid parking signs, but it did not specify a date. The two-hour parking time limit will still be enforced.

Contact Carissa at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter @carissaallenn.

The Independent Florida Alligator has been independent from the university since 1971, your donation today could help #SaveStudentNewsrooms. Please consider donating today.


Carissa Allen

Carissa Allen is a third-year journalism and political science double major. She is excited to continue her work at the Subway Office this semester as a reporter from East Gainesville. In her free time, you can find her scuba diving, working out, or listening to a podcast.

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Drivers without private parking spaces could face a £70 fine as new law is considered

Drivers risk being fined £70 for parking in the wrong place under a new law consulted that there are no double yellows.

A new scheme has been drawn up which would give fixed penalty notices to those who break the rules, with consultation underway in England and Wales.

If drivers choose to park on a curb to avoid blocking a narrow road or simply for convenience, they risk a charge of £70, MoE reports.

If passed by the government, drivers could receive a fixed £70 fine notice simply for parking in the street.

A quarter of motorists said they were unsure of the rules around parking on the sidewalks.

The curb parking law is just one of many new driving laws coming into effect this year, and drivers who don’t obey could face both a Penalty Notice (PCN) and points on their license.

While some drivers might think curbside parking is just a minor infraction, sidewalks are there to provide a safe path for pedestrians.

When the sidewalk is blocked, pedestrians may be forced to use the road to bypass vehicles – and that’s a safety risk.

Alex Kindred, auto insurance adjuster at confused.comcommented on the changes and how they will affect drivers in the coming months.

He said: “What may seem like a small inconvenience to some may be a huge hindrance to others.

“But it’s important to remember that sidewalks are there for the use and safety of pedestrians only, and should therefore be respected by all other road users.

“However, without a clearer understanding of the law on on-street parking, it will be difficult to issue fines to drivers who break the rules.

“Current on-street parking laws can be quite confusing, which is why it is sometimes difficult to prosecute drivers.

“With consultations underway for England and Wales, Scotland already pioneering the path to big change, drivers should be wary of changes that could come into effect sooner rather than later.

“Councils will be given greater responsibility and penalties could be issued.

“The curbside parking laws are just one of many new driving laws coming into effect this year, with the safety of road users at the forefront.”

More than 70% of drivers said they had to park on a curb in the past, and more than two in five said they felt unsafe doing so.

The problem can be particularly dangerous for children and people with disabilities.

A number of changes have recently been made to the Highway Code, which aim to protect all road users from unnecessary dangers.

One of the rules concerned sidewalks and the potential danger that cyclists and pedestrians face when using them.

Rule 239 of the Highway Code states: “When using an electric vehicle charging station, you must park near the charging station and avoid creating a tripping hazard for pedestrians by trailing cables.

“Post a warning sign if you can. After using the charging station, you must carefully replace the cables and charging connectors to minimize the danger for pedestrians and avoid creating an obstacle for other road users.

Some changes are still pending for England and Wales, although local councils are expected to have more authority over fines for drivers.

Parking on pavements is already illegal in London and other parts of the UK.

The Scottish rulings are due to come into effect in 2023.

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Centurion Union’s new 5-story building will feature 105 public parking spaces with residence above

The Union Township Planning Board has approved the fifth phase of Centurion Labor Centerpaving the way for the start of construction of a new residential building that will include much-needed public parking spaces, according to an announcement Monday from Markwhich has been appointed as the redeveloper of the Stuyvesant Avenue redevelopment project.

Rendering of the Centurion project. (Reference)

The final step in the revitalization of downtown Union, the new five-story building will include a two-story parking lot with 105 spaces on the ground floor for public use. Three residential floors above will house 85 luxury rental residences, with the second floor of the garage containing 107 parking spaces reserved for Centurion residents.

Located at 968 Bonnel Court, the building will join previous phases of residences, modern amenities and street-level retail space completed by Landmark.

“Throughout the planning and development of this project, we worked closely with the township to ensure Centurion was a catalyst in transforming Union Center into a vibrant downtown,” said Manny Fernandez, founder of Landmark. “We remained aware of the needs of the community as a whole and committed to providing all the elements to make the downtown area welcoming to current and new residents, local businesses and customers. These efforts have focused on the collective vision of Union Center, and the addition of over 100 new public parking spaces will help us fully realize this vision.

When completed, Centurion Union Center will include more than 320 new residences and approximately 27,000 square feet of retail space in five buildings along Stuyvesant Avenue in the township’s downtown district, which had never seen no new residential construction for over three decades.

The first phase of 80 luxury apartments was launched for rental in September 2020 and quickly rented. The second phase of the community of 75 residences and seven retailers is practically rented just two months after its opening. Centurion Union is also home to many local retailers, including Unity Bank, Emily’s Bakery, Illusions Hair, Norma’s Florist, Angie’s Nails, and the soon-to-open Qsina 8 Ramen Noodle/Asian themed restaurant.

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Sidewalks not cleared of snow, parking spaces making navigation more difficult

Sidewalks not cleared of snow, parking spaces making it more difficult to navigate the narrow streets after the northeast



WHERE YOU ARE. JOURNALIST: PROGRESS MEANS THIS PAVENTME IN MOST PLACETBU THERE IS ALSO THIS REALLY THESE ARE PARKING SPACES. IT’S A MINGAK CHALLENGE YOUR WAY AROUND. INCHGIN UP TO AN INTERSECTION. TIGHT CLAMP AROUND. NARROW STREETS LOTS OF SNOW ONE DOWN, ONE UP. THE APTITELY NAMED RUE DE LA TOUR IN SOMERVILLE IS AN EXAMPLE OF THIS DANCE IN THIS DENSELY POPULATED CITY. AND THIS IS WHERE RESIDENTS WORK HARD TO GET IT ALL OUT OF THE WAY >> THE MOST DIFFICULT PART IS THE BOTTOM THAT HAS BEEN CRUSHED. THIS IS WEO. G REPORTER: THIS IS THE HARDEST PART OF SHOVELING, BUT AN EVEN MORE DIFFICULT PART COULD BE WALKING AROUND. THE SIDEWALK IS THEREFORE CLEAR. AND IT’S A GOOD THING. BUT I’M ONLY 5’8, THANK YOU MOM, AND IT’S REALLY HARD TO GO AROUND AND SEE THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SNOW ACCUMULATED THAT HIGH. >> THERE ARE DEFINITELY A LOT OF PLACES THE SHOVELING HAS BEEN SPOY.TT REPORTER: IN BOSTON, PART OF THE CONCERN IS THAT BUSINESS OWNERS AND HOMEOWNERS ARE CLEANING UP THEIR PROPERTY AND PUTTING IT INTO THE PUBLIC ROAD OR DON’T CLEAN IT AT ALL. BOSTON’S NEW STREET MASTER SAYS YOU WANT A FINE. >> SMALL RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES WILL BE $50, COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES UP TO $200. THIS CAN’T BE A TICKET D. REPORTER: INCOME IS NOT THE GOAL HERE THOUGH HE SAYS IT’S A DETERRENT FOR I HOPE DOHE T RIGHT INTH LYRE

Sidewalks not cleared of snow, parking spaces making it more difficult to navigate the narrow streets after the northeast

In Boston, homeowners and business owners will be fined if they refuse to clear their property.

In Boston, homeowners and business owners will be fined if they refuse to clear their property.

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Parking spaces

Utah bill aims to preserve some wheelchair parking spots

As more people have become eligible for disabled parking permits in recent years, a Utah lawmaker hopes a new bill will preserve spaces for those who use wheelchairs. (B. Brown, Shutterstock)

Estimated reading time: 3-4 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — As more people have become eligible for disabled parking permits in recent years, a lawmaker hopes a new bill will save spaces for those who use wheelchairs.

Rep. Jeff Stenquist, R-Draper, says a constituent contacted him to let him know about a problem he’s having trying to park and get in and out of his car with his wheelchair when places for the disabled are exhausted.

The inspired constituent HB213, which would create an additional permit for people in wheelchairs or certain people with walking difficulties only. It would require companies to allocate at least one in six places for the disabled to people who hold this specific permit.

Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, more and more people have become eligible for disabled parking permits.

In Utah, the Motor Vehicle Division offers disabled permits to those with certain disabilities that make them unable to walk 200 feet without stopping to rest; those who need help walking; and those who are limited by lung disease, heart disease, or who need portable oxygen.

“So a lot of times those handicapped parking spaces are taken,” Stenquist said, adding that his constituent often can’t find an accessible place to park.

Amy Webb knows this experience well.

As the mother of a young girl who uses a wheelchair, she has faced stressful times trying to figure out how to keep her daughter safe.

“We’ve had times where, even going to the movies, and there just aren’t any accessible places, let alone a van-accessible place, before COVID,” Webb said.

Sometimes she had to park at a regular spot. When they get back to their car, they hope no one has parked next to them on the ramp side. If they do, that means her daughter has to wait on the road for her to get the space van out.

“I have to make sure she’s not behind a car where someone is going to pull out,” Webb explained.

She noted that not all children can maneuver their wheelchairs on their own, which increases safety concerns.

The family now lives in Ohio but used to live in Provo. She said she sees general concerns about disabled parking spaces and toilet stalls.

“I also think, for me, that one of the biggest issues, in general, is just trying to educate the general public about accessible spaces and the fact that they’re not for you. If you don’t don’t need them, don’t use them,” Webb said.

Often, she will notice that those who don’t have wheelchairs use the wheelchair accessible toilet stalls, and those who have a disability permit but don’t have vans will park in the van spaces.

Compared to regular spaces, all handicapped spaces are wider — not just those accessible to vans, Stenquist noted. Unlike Webb, his constituent can park in any handicapped spot, allowing him to get in and out of his car.

But often, all those spaces will be taken.

In these cases, it will sometimes park at a regular spot that has no other cars parked next to it. But when he gets back to his car, others will have taken the nearby parking spot, which means he doesn’t have enough room to get back into his vehicle.

“And then it’s a real problem because maybe he has to find someone to help him move his car,” Stenquist explained.

He said the intention of the bill is not to force companies to create additional spaces for people with disabilities, but to ensure that they at least hold a space for those who have the most. need. The rest of the places will still be available for those who have other qualifying conditions.

Small businesses with less than six disabled spaces will also need to designate a space for people with a wheelchair accessible permit.

Stenquist said he has received many positive comments from the disability community and has spoken with advocates, as well as experts in disability parking architecture and design, to find the right balance.

A lifelong Utahn, Ashley Imlay covers state politics and breaking news for KSL.com.

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Parking spaces

Work begins to increase parking spaces at Radcliffe Metrolink station

Commuters at Radcliffe Metrolink station are warned that the car park is closed because

A new temporary car park has been opened nearby.

It comes as the car park at Whitefield Metrolink station reopens after creating an additional 120 spaces.

Radcliffe will be closed to users other than blue badge holders following the last tram departure yesterday and work to install a new car park, increasing capacity from 369 to 480 spaces, is expected to be completed by summer 2022.

The drop zone will remain open at Radcliffe and blue badge spaces will still be available at this facility during construction.

Other motorists will be redirected to the temporary 250-space site, already set up above the road and accessible via Spring Lane.

Chris Barnes, Projects Group Manager at Transport for Greater Manchester, said: “We are delighted to have completed the work required to provide 123 additional parking spaces at the Whitefield Metrolink stop. This additional capacity will allow more people to access the Metrolink network and use public transport as part of their overall journey.

“We are also very pleased to continue the ongoing Park & ​​Ride expansion work at the Radcliffe stop. The preparatory operations that we have undertaken so far have gone well and we now look forward to taking the work forward in earnest, after the closure of the main facility.

“We ask anyone wishing to park near the Radcliffe stop to proceed to the alternative site opposite the entrance to the existing Radcliffe Park & ​​Ride facility for the duration of the construction work.” For more information regarding the car park expansion works, please visit the TfGM website at: www.tfgm.com/mcip

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Parking spaces

Delhi: New parking spaces at GK, Lajpat, Nizamuddin, Punjabi Bagh coming soon

Mayor Mukesh Suryan said on Monday that the civic body had identified spaces in Janakpuri and Club Road, Punjabi Bagh, to construct fully automated multi-level car parks.

According to a 2017 government report, the number of registered vehicles in the nation’s capital has crossed the crore mark. (Image: PTI)

South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC) Mayor Mukesh Suryan said on Monday that the civic body had identified spaces in Janakpuri and Club Road, Punjabi Bagh, to construct fully automated multi-level car parks.

Work on the parking lot that can accommodate 238 cars at GK-2 market, 81 cars at Amar Colony-Lajpat Nagar and 225 cars near the cremation center at Punjabi Bagh has also started.

Mayor Mukesh Suryan said, “A space to construct multi-level car parks has been identified at Punjabi Bagh Club Road and Janakpuri. Construction of a parking lot with a capacity of 399 cars at GK-1 market and another parking lot with a capacity of 86 cars at Nizamuddin is in full swing.”

He also said that the SDMC has tried to strengthen the parking system in all areas and more spaces will be identified to build modern parking lots in the future.

According to a 2017 government report, the number of registered vehicles in the nation’s capital has crossed the crore mark.

Delhi government transport department data puts the total number of registered vehicles at 1,05,67,712. There are 31,72,842 registered cars in the city. The numbers have increased several since then.

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Parking spaces

New parking spaces at GK, Lajpat, Nizamuddin, Punjabi Bagh coming soon

The South Delhi Municipal Corporation would construct several new parking facilities near Gk-1 Market, Nizamuddin, Gk-2 Market, Amar Settlement, Lajpat Nagar and Punjabi Bagh, Mayor Mukesh Suryan said on Tuesday.

He said space to construct multi-level car parks had been identified at Punjabi Bagh Club Road and Janakpuri.

Suryan also said that the construction of a parking lot with a capacity of 399 cars at GK-1 market and another parking lot with a capacity of 86 cars at Nizamuddin are in full swing.

Work on the parking lot that can accommodate 238 cars at GK-2 market, 81 cars at Amar Colony-Lajpat Nagar and 225 cars near the cremation center at Punjabi Bagh has also started.

According to a 2017 government report, the number of registered vehicles in the nation’s capital has crossed the crore mark.

Delhi government transport department data puts the total number of registered vehicles at 1,05,67,712. There are 31,72,842 registered cars in the city. The numbers have increased several since then.

Suryan said that currently, fully automated multi-level car parks are operational at Green Park with a capacity of 136 cars, Lajpat Nagar-3 with a capacity of 246 cars and Adhchini Village with a capacity of 246 cars. a capacity of 56 cars.

He also said that the SDMC has tried to strengthen the parking system in all areas and more spaces will be identified to build modern parking lots in the future.

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Parking spaces

Why Salisbury has too many parking spaces

The Journal reported on January 13 that 61.9% of online respondents to the Salisbury Neighborhood Development Plan consultation opposed plans for housing in the Brown Street car park.

The intention was always, when the five Park and Ride locations opened, to reduce downtown parking.

However, this plan was never implemented, instead the long-term car parks were replaced with short-term car parks, which led to more traffic movements in the city and a failure of the Park and Ride to achieve the traffic reduction for which it was intended.

We are now left with a city that has far too many parking spaces taking up valuable space, an underutilized park and ride, congested streets and poor air quality.

For the past 20 years the intention has remained for Brown Street and Salt Lane car parks to be redeveloped for housing and other commercial uses, but once again Salisbury residents have opposed any restrictions their right to drive and park where they want. and in this they are supported by some of our elected councillors, including the head of the Departmental Council.

I cannot agree with Cllr Clewer’s statement that removing parking on Brown Street would increase travel times and carbon emissions for those who live on the south side of town.

The Culver Street car park is in need of refurbishment, it is directly accessible from the Ring Road and would avoid congestion on Exeter Street which causes poor air quality for residents and schoolchildren along this busy road.

When will Salisbury follow the example of many other cities in this country and move towards streets for people not cars and encourage active travel and public transport for the benefit of all?

We seemed to be heading in the right direction with the central area setting and the friendly streets, both approved by our elected councils, but abandoned due to strident objectors.

Councilors react to the wishes of voters so let’s make our voice heard, the neighborhood plan is that opportunity, we all have a right to clean air and safe streets, if not with more and more housing generating more car journeys, Salisbury is heading for disaster.

Pam Rouquette

Salisbury

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Parking spaces

DU faces an acute parking space management problem





Dhaka’s century-old university has a lot of problems; shortage of dormitories for students, housing for teachers, poor water supply and waste management. Add parking problems to the list.

Cars, motorbikes and bicycles, parked on the road in front of and around the arts building, are a common scenario. Without officially designated spaces, many are forced to park their vehicles haphazardly, UNB reports.

“Usually the university administration doesn’t allow us to park here, but exceptions are made for special guests and visitors,” said driver Abu Hanif, who parked his car in front of the building. Arts.

Asked about car parking at Shadow, a corridor next to the arts building where a space is reserved for parking, Abu Hanif said the space was too small to accommodate the growing number of vehicles.

Another driver, Saiff Kader, said: “It’s a decent space for us to park here. But the university administration does not allow us to stay here long.

“Sometimes they also file complaints,” he added.

DU campus car parks

However, it should be mentioned that only 15 cars can be parked in the shade at a time and this is the only parking area in the Faculty of Arts. In addition, Shadow is reserved for teachers’ vehicles. And there is no parking area for student and tutor vehicles.

On the other hand, the parking lots of the Faculty of Business Studies and the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Institute of Business Administration and the Faculty of Science are a bit different.

The Faculty of Commerce has two parking lots, one for teachers and the other for students. Most of the time, in the faculties of commerce, the vehicles are systematically parked.

Meanwhile, the Faculty of Social Sciences has its parking lot in its basement but the facilities are not sufficient.

Also, University vehicles to transport students, teachers and staff can be seen parked on the road on Mall Chattor and on the north side of the Jagannath Hall Playground.

Due to the lack of proper parking facilities, parking anywhere on campus has become a problem not only in the academic parts of campus, but also in dormitories and in the central library.

Bicycles and motorbikes are seen parked in hallways and lobby passageways as there is no allocated space for parking.

In addition, the facade of the libraries is cluttered with student bicycles and motorbikes.

The suffering of students

Anis Hossen, a 2nd year student in the Department of Management Information Systems, said, “Sometimes it looks like the whole campus is a parking zone, because you can see cars, motorbikes and buses are parked. anywhere on campus.”

Imon Hasan, a 2nd year student in the Tourism and Hospitality Management department, regretted that the campus has become a highway where there is no one to monitor the parking of vehicles.

“I’ve never seen the front of the Teacher-Student Center (TSC) area empty. I don’t know when it turned into a rickshaw stand!” he added.

Students cannot navigate campus roads easily due to unauthorized parking and excessive traffic from outside vehicles, the students said.

What the relevant authorities say

“We do our best to maintain discipline but we also have to be human. We have to admit that we don’t have enough space to park but we have to park our cars, buses and other vehicles,” the vice said. -Chancellor (Admin) Pr Dr Abdus Samad.

“Also, foreign vehicles such as secretarial cars are parked on campus. We all know that public transport should not be allowed on campus, but we have to allow it because it is a problem. national.” he added.

He also said, “Before making a difficult decision, we should think twice about our ability.”

“This issue will take a long time to resolve. We have to deal with this parking issue until the ‘Master Plan’ is implemented,” Prof Samad added.

Professor DU Proctor AKM Golam Rabbani said: “Whenever we see cars in a no-parking zone, we chase them away”,

Shafiqur Rahman, one of the managers of the university’s transport management office, said: “Actually, we don’t have enough space to park, even though we have a total of 23 vehicles at our disposal. .”

When contacted, the University of Dhaka property manager, Fatema Binte Mustafa, refused to speak by mobile phone about the matter.

Master plan to improve parking

Apart from the new high-rise university buildings, the Tk 90 billion master plan, marking the university’s 100th anniversary, includes the development of transport services with parking facilities. It also contains new roads with bike lanes and overpasses.

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Parking spaces

The residential area of ​​the city of Laois will share parking lots with buyers

A residential square in a town in Laois will see some of its private parking spaces shared with the public, to boost local businesses.

Jessop Court in Portlaoise with 15 houses opens onto the Hynds Square shopping area.

Four of its parking spaces must now be allocated to the public, but only at certain times.

Shoppers will be able to use the spaces between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday, so that the people who live there can find their spaces in the evening and on weekends.

Portlaoise Cllr Catherine Fitzgerald welcomed the decision by Laois County Council, but she wants more public spaces to be provided.

“I see that as a good start. I sincerely believe there could be more. The fact that we’re going to bring the manager in now, could he do a monthly survey and take pictures and then judge him? is a core area in Portlaoise,” she said.

She spoke at the January meeting of the Municipal District of Portlaoise, where she tabled a motion asking for an update on Jessop Court and Hynds Square.

The board gave the following response.

“Revised car parking arrangements at Jessop Court have been drawn up whereby, Monday to Friday (9am to 4.30pm), four car parking spaces will be made available to the general public subject to parking charges and Time restrictions apply in Portlaoise town centre. Outside of these hours, parking is restricted to local residents only.

Portlaoise City Manager Simon Walton said the decision was based on investigations by traffic officers and four spaces were “very conservative”.

He said there could be more space available, but the goal is not to disrupt residents while supporting local businesses.

Meanwhile, Hynds Square is getting an outdoor canopy to sit in, with services director Simon Walton explaining in more detail.

“We have received a grant of €140,000 from Fáilte Ireland for outdoor furniture. Hynds Square has been identified for the supply of a stretched awning and additional lighting. It is being acquired. It will be similar to the canopy of the Abbeyleix library.

“We are at the mercy of the contractors, but it will definitely be completed in the first half of this year,” he said.

Cllr Fitzgerald asking him to extend the new Main Street paving to Hynds Square. Mr Walton said that “optimistically it would be the end of 2022”.

“Hynds Square is a really lovely place in Portlaoise, a central area. If people can sit down and have their coffee or their ice cream, that will be great for downtown,” she said.

Cllr Caroline Dwane Stanley has in the past reported residents’ concerns.

“They’re wedged between commercial and residential areas. If you live in that square, you could be paying €1,200 a month in rent and not be able to park,” she said.

Parking problems have persisted for 20 years since the construction of Jessop Court and Hynds Square. Residents had complained about shoppers parking in their private spaces or blocking them off, but shoppers had complained about receiving parking fines and wanting spaces for public use. Laois County Council took over Jessop Court in January 2020, pledging to review parking.

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Parking spaces should be located away from homes to discourage their use, says Oireachtas

Parking spaces should be located away from homes to encourage people to abandon their cars, an Oireachtas committee heard.

The Oireachtas housing committee met on Tuesday to discuss the issue of urban regeneration, with Dr Cathal FitzGerald, senior analyst at the National Economic and Social Council (NESC), saying regeneration was only possible with the availability of transport.

“Transport oriented development means locating higher density housing, typically more than 50 housing units per hectare, within 400m to 800m of a transport stop.

“This transport stop is usually a light rail or a dedicated bus lane serving Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). Thus, more homes are within walking or cycling distance of public transport. This transport should be of high quality, high frequency and be integrated into a network.

Transport-oriented development also means actively discouraging car use and ownership, by reducing the availability of parking spaces or locating parking away from dwellings, in garages on the outskirts of development.”

Fianna Fáil Dublin North-West TD Paul McAuliffe told the meeting that towns in his constituency – Finglas, Ballymun and Santry – were at risk of being left behind as they are “sandwiched” between two local authorities and much of the proposed development is too intense.

Dr Sarah Rock of TU Dublin told the meeting there was a need to make any development walkable.

She said that in regeneration, “there tends to be a rush for other modes of transportation,” but if areas, especially older areas, aren’t passable, they won’t succeed.

Sinn Féin’s Eoin Ó Broin asked witnesses for models that could avoid delays in the implementation of public transport projects. He said more needed to be done to ensure the transport project planning process was less divisive and received more input.

Dr Lorraine D’Arcy of TU Dublin told Mr Ó Broin that the Irish transport system was “fundamentally journey-based”, meaning there is a political bias in favor of this form of travel. She said more should be done to promote “all-day travel”.

Conn Donovan of the Cork Cycling Campaign told the committee that housing development should not be used to justify more road infrastructure. He said if communities are expected to do 70-80% of their trips without a private car, they shouldn’t be “high-speed” environments.

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‘Reduce the number of parking spaces to discourage car ownership,’ committee says

The number of parking spaces should be reduced to encourage more people to give up their cars, DTs and senators will be told today.

he National Economic and Social Council (NESC) will today tell the Oireachtas Housing Committee that car use and ownership should be discouraged.

The committee will discuss urban development and in particular housing developments that are transport oriented.

According to the NESC, this can be done by reducing parking spaces or by setting up parking lots farther from dwellings.

“Transport-oriented development also means actively discouraging car use and ownership, by reducing the availability of parking spaces or locating parking away from dwellings, in garages on the outskirts of development,” NESC’s Dr. Cathal FitzGerald will tell the committee.

Meanwhile Conn Donovan from the Cork Cycling Campaign will tell the committee there should be a move away from private cars and towards public transport, walking and cycling in the development of the city.

In his opening remarks, Mr Donovan will say that communities are suffering from “increased risk of death and disease” due to heavy car use.

“We know that when urban areas are dominated by cars, communities suffer. Less social interaction, increased risk of death and disease, sleep disturbances and developmental delays in children have all been associated with living near busy roads,” he will tell the committee. .

He will also claim that cycling to work reduces “the risk of developing heart disease and cancer by 40%” and that if there was access to a drug that did just that “governments around the world would rush to ensure that their citizens had access to it”.

The committee will today discuss urban regeneration and the role of transport-oriented development.

Mr Donovan will argue that the government should use a ‘carrot and stick approach’ to get more people to cycle, with the carrot approaches being ‘safe cycle paths, high quality cycle parking and compact neighborhoods.

The ‘stick’ includes higher parking fees, limiting car access in built-up areas and ‘repurposing road space’.

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Parking spaces

OPINION: Why are we discussing parking spaces so violently?

I witnessed a bit of rowdiness over the weekend.

Two women yell at each other in the parking lot of a pet food store – “That was my space!” one of them shouted from his vehicle, with a few expletives launched.

The other woman had not, at the time, properly secured the space, but when it became available, her passenger got out to hold onto it while she backed up, past the other driver who was waiting on the other side.

It looked like the howler was about to come out and challenge the intruder, but he thought better of it and made aggressive gestures instead.

Nothing like a parking space to get excited. Throughout the country, over the course of a week, there are dozens of incidents, many of which have such serious consequences that they end up in court.

Last week, a Manchester man was jailed for two years after he attacked a driver with a baseball bat following an argument in a parking space. We heard him say, “I’ve been waiting for this place,” before attacking the passenger in the other car. Also last week, a court in Liverpool heard how a man threatened his neighbor with a knife and a gun in a parking space, while last year in Somerset a man was charged in the death of a couple, who were allegedly murdered in a row in a parking lot.

Why do we get so worked up about parking? We may only need the space for a few minutes while we go to a store. Even on a weekly trip to the supermarket, we only stop for about an hour. There’s always plenty of room outside the parking lot, but people want the ones closest to the entrance – they walk around and if they spot an empty space and someone else sneaks in before their eyes, they see red.

It’s strange that we – and I include myself, as I’ve been known to sound hushed when someone cheekily fired into a space I’ve been waiting for for several minutes – can be so possessive over a tiny Tarmac strip that we only use for a short time.

We spot a space and it becomes ours. We own it and woe betide whoever catches it first.

Maybe it has something to do with us being territorial. We visually mark our territory and must secure it against all odds.

Of course, frustrating as it is, I would never go so far as to threaten anyone for a lost parking space. I carry a controller in the trunk of my car, but I haven’t felt pissed enough to wave it outside Morrisons yet.

However, those who are sane enough not to attempt a face-to-face confrontation do not always leave the matter aside. Parking issues are frustrating motorists in the UK so much that one in three of us have written an angry note and left it on someone else’s car, according to research from the car dealership used heycar.

More irritating than a stolen seat, I find, are those people who return to their car, spot others waiting for the slot, get inside, then spend several minutes fussing around, adjusting their mirrors, putting on make-up, sorting out their handbags, listening to the radio, who knows what. This happened to me recently at a busy station in York. After five minutes, the driver turned on her back-up lights, but did not shift gears for another five minutes.

People do it at gas stations too, as if enjoying gaining some power over those queuing behind.

There is so much anger about parking – it seems ridiculous that people would go so far as to use extreme violence on each other just to find a place to park their car.

Life’s too short, surely, for all that pointless aggression on something that, in the scheme of things, really doesn’t matter?

Maybe we could find space to park in our New Year’s resolutions: keep calm, relax, drive, go to another supermarket is necessary, let your neighbor park in front of your house if he arrived in first, so what if someone rushes past you at the station? Take a deep breath, ignore it, close your eyes. you will be a better person for it.

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Parking spaces

These are the three most expensive parking spots in Toronto right now

For most residents of downtown Toronto, a car is more of a luxury than a necessity. Sure, you might need to move a couch on the subway once in a while, but you can probably manage your day-to-day life without investing in a car.

But if you just can’t live without that luxury, then be prepared to cough up luxury prices accordingly to own a place to store that car, with those lines painted on the asphalt now costing some buyers way more of $100,000.

Turns out there are three such spaces that currently exceed the six-figure mark in Toronto, and a look at the three most expensive parking spaces listed on realtor.ca offers a window into the madness unfolding in condo parking lots across the city.

197 Yonge Street – $125,000

A regular on the lists of the most expensive car parks in the city, 197 Yongeknown as Massey Tower, tops the list through 2022, with a space listed for $125,000. And that’s not even taking into account the $211 monthly maintenance fee.

It was one of three buildings with a parking space that exceeded the $100,000 mark in 2020, and if that wasn’t enough, the building had space listed for a whopping $120,000 in 2021.

If you’re wondering why this slim condo tower charged such high parking prices, it’s more than the building’s central location just steps from the Queen subway station.

The tight Massey Tower site required a complex automated parking garage with car lifts, stacks and turntable systems, hidden behind the tower’s sculptural Yonge Street facade.

89 McGill Street – $100,000

This condo tower at the corner of Church and McGill has a space listed for the modest sum of $100,000and as 197 Yonge, Alter on Church at 89 McGill Street is a relatively new condominium building.

And while it’s not quite the fancy high-tech garage seen at Massey Tower, this place comes with an electric charging station and a much more reasonable monthly maintenance fee of just under $87.

49 Liberty Street East – $100,000

The Liberty Central condo complex in 49 Liberty Street East in the King West Village neighborhood seems like a rather unexpected place for a parking space with so many zeros at the end.

The area may be less central and the condo tower less glitzy than the other places on this list, but this space comes with an extra storage locker and a very cheap monthly fee of just over $30.

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Parking spaces

Clemson imposes new 15-minute parking spots downtown

By Greg Oliver

The newspaper

CLEMSON — Earlier this week, the city of Clemson reinstated all of its parking regulations that had been suspended for much of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Street parking, which had been extended from one hour to two hours, with all paid parking in garages free, is now limited to one hour, and those parking in city center car parks will be required to supply the meter .

A new parking sign in downtown Clemson tells visitors they can only stay 15 minutes.
EMILIE WILSON | THE NEWSPAPER

But the city also reminded residents to be on the lookout for new 15-minute street parking spots for anyone doing quick tasks, such as picking up orders. These spaces, all clearly marked with a sign in front of the space, were approved by Clemson City Council last year on the recommendation of the Economic Development Advisory Committee.

The resolution states that spaces will be permanently designated for 15-minute parking on a first-come, first-served basis 24 hours a day, with none to be used exclusively by a business or businesses or their suppliers, carriers, employees and / or customers. Rideshare drivers cannot perform pick-up and drop-off using the designated 15-minute parking spots or use the staging or waiting spaces.

The city’s community and economic development co-ordinator Lindsey Newton, who presented the resolution to council, said the spaces “give people access to downtown businesses, especially in a faster way.”

“Thanks to COVID, business models have fundamentally changed,” Newton said. “A year ago the curbside and curbside service – almost no one was offering it. I don’t think it was a problem a year and a half ago, but I don’t think it will change.

City Administrator Andy Blondeau said the city should probably consider hiring an additional parking attendant because of the change, as well as the new hotel being built downtown. Newton said the cost of an additional officer could come from revenue if metered parking spaces are placed downtown.

Newton said there are businesses along College Avenue and on Earle Street, North Clemson Avenue and Sloan Street “who want central space for their businesses.”

“They want it where their customers, their clients, their bosses, grab what they need and walk away,” she said.

Advice on new parking spaces

Councilor Catherine Watt said she felt the recommendation “is definitely reasonable”.

“I know older people who would love to have something downtown and don’t walk at the same pace as you or me, and they would definitely love to have those spaces,” Watt said.

Councilwoman Alesia Smith said adding 15-minute parking spaces “is a good idea.”

“It will help businesses and other members of our community who don’t have to drive around, look for parking and cause more traffic jams,” she said.

[email protected] | (864) 973-6687

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The City offers parking spaces, limitation of the number of scooters in the city center

The city of Corpus Christi may soon add designated parking spaces and limit the number of dockless scooters across the city.

People ride rented motorized scooters along North Shoreline Boulevard on Friday, December 28, 2018.

At a city council briefing on Tuesday evening, the city presented proposed changes to the existing pricing structure for dockless scooters and other changes, including limiting the maximum number of scooters in the city to 1,200 with a limit of 300 scooters parked on the dike of the American bank. Center at Waters Edge Park.

The changes could also limit the scooter speed to 10 miles per hour on the sea wall using geolocation. Scooters have a maximum speed of 20 miles per hour, and the speed of scooters would not be limited elsewhere in the city.

Designated parking corrals would be installed throughout downtown, the SEA neighborhood, the Cole Park seawall at the American Bank Center and other locations identified by the city or requested. The city said it was working with the Downtown Management District, private businesses, parks and recreation, the marina and public works to identify the best locations for scooter corrals.

A survey of 20 downtown business owners showed that 75% wanted dedicated parking corrals for scooters.

Scooters parked along the dike should be parked in a corral using a geo-fence. There could also be no-go zones, depending on how the city looks.

The first reading of the ordinance by the city council is scheduled for January 25.

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New disabled parking spaces in Oldham after ‘three year wait for spaces’

New disabled parking spaces have been approved in Oldham after some people were forced to wait almost three years for a space.

Liberal Democrat advisers previously raised the issue of borough residents waiting for disabled bays, saying the authority had not allocated any money for new bays since the 2018-19 fiscal year.

Councilor Howard Sykes, the leader of the Lib Dem group, had said there was a backlog of 80 people awaiting assessment to see if they were eligible for a parking space.

He added that some residents had to wait “almost three years” for a place.

Handicapped parking spaces require the area designated as a bay to be painted on the freeway and then a traffic control order (TRO) issued.

Now 25 successful applications have been processed from the backlog after the introduction of a limited number of bays in 2021.

Creating the new bays will cost the authority £20,000 from its motorways budget, with annual maintenance costs amounting to £2,400.

Officers are to review the remaining 82 applications in the new year to identify which other bays will be granted.

A council report says the motorways team receives around 70 requests a year for on-street disabled parking from residents who find it difficult to park near their homes.

“This can cause considerable stress and cause additional physical suffering,” officers say.

“It is considered that the only effective way to help residents with disabilities is to provide people with disabilities with on-street parking close to their property.

“This will allow these residents to more easily access their properties and improve their mobility and quality of life.

Department for Transport figures show 9,613 Blue Badges took place at Oldham in 2020.

People with learning disabilities, mental health issues and other hidden disabilities can now apply for a blue badge after the program was updated in August 2019.

The board’s website states that “due to limited financial resources, it is only possible that applications will be considered annually if funding is available.”

Councilor Barbara Brownridge, cabinet member for wards, previously said the council was receiving a “large number of requests” for disabled parking spaces.

And she said that in the first year of the pandemic, officers responsible for processing applications had been deployed in other functions.

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Parking spaces

Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson NJ to lose parking spots

PATERSON – More than half of the parking lot in the 314-space garage built as part of the renovation of the Hinchliffe stadium has been reserved for tenants of new housing planned in the district.

The developers have said that 85 of Hinchliffe’s parking spaces will be reserved for residents of a 127-unit apartment complex on Totowa Avenue that received approval from the Paterson Planning Council on Monday evening.

The developers at Hinchliffe said they had previously reserved 75 seats in the stadium garage for tenants who will live in the senior citizen building which is part of the $ 94 million stadium project.

Critics have claimed tenant parking leases will create problems by using space in a garage they say was not large enough to accommodate the 7,000-seat stadium from the start.

But supporters of the plan have claimed there will be enough space available in the parking lot for people attending the high school sports that will make up most of the stadium’s activities. They said events that draw larger crowds – like the mayor’s hopes for a Major League Baseball game in honor of Hinchliffe’s legacy in the Black Leagues – would use a network of other parking lots. to Paterson with shuttles.

Paterson’s Director of Economic Development Michael Powell said the parking leases for tenants at Totowa Avenue housing will ensure the viability of the Hinchliffe garage by providing income at times when there is no stadium events.

Hinchliffe Stadium is featured from Maple Street in Paterson.  Thursday 23 December 2021

Powell and Hinchliffe developer Baye Wilson said he didn’t expect the 75 parking spaces reserved for the senior citizen building to be used because older residents are less likely to have cars . Powell and Wilson also said they didn’t expect the stadium’s new garage to provide capacity for everyone attending major events in Hinchliffe.

“People are going to have to walk,” said Powell.

But members of Paterson City Council who represent Ward 1, where Hinchliffe is located, and Ward 2, which is a few blocks away, said they expected mayor issues due to the lack of parking.

“I hope you are joking?” First Ward Councilor Michael Jackson said when told about the arrangement to reserve 85 seats in the stadium garage for the new accommodation. “I’m speechless. The level of poor planning here is numbing.

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Shahin Khalique, city councilor for Ward 2, said allocating seats in what he described as an undersized stadium garage to tenants would make the situation worse.

“It doesn’t make sense to me,” Khalique said.

For more than 18 months, Khalique has been calling for a traffic study on the impact of the stadium on the surrounding streets, which almost all have only one lane in each direction.

Powell said the city recently got a grant of $ 250,000 that can be used to look at traffic issues. He said he doesn’t think Paterson needs big transportation projects to handle Hinchliffe’s customers. He said installing traffic lights at key locations, such as the intersection of Maple and Wayne Avenues, as well as the use of traffic police, might be sufficient.

The story continues after the gallery

The town planning council voted unanimously to approve the new 127-apartment project on Totowa Avenue, one block from Hinchliffe, proposed by Bergen County-based developer Billy Procida. The developer would convert a former industrial building into housing and 6,779 square feet of retail space.

100 Renard Totowa, LLC of Procida bought the property for $ 5.5 million last June from David Garsia, the owner of the Art Factory complex. In 2018, Procida’s investment firm provided Garsia with a $ 12.5 million line of credit to borrow money to renovate the Act Factory complex on Spruce Street. Garsia said the money from the sale of the Totowa Avenue land was used to pay off this previous debt.

Prior to the mixed-use project approved on Monday, developers planned to convert the site into a storage facility. But Mayor Andre Sayegh’s administration was not happy with the plan, as officials said it would not match the mayor’s plans to revitalize the Hinchliffe area.

This rendering shows a planned residential development on Totowa Avenue in Paterson

Wilson, the builder of Hinchliffe, praised the new Totowa Avenue mixed-use plan.

“I think this is a major project not just for Hinchliffe but for all of Paterson,” Wilson said of Procida’s plans.

Powell said the development of Totowa Avenue will help transform the neighborhood. But Jackson said the project represents what he described as the mayor’s latest effort to over-develop the city at the expense of the quality of life of the city’s residents.

“The mayor doesn’t care about the Patersonians,” Jackson said. “All he wants to do is sell the town to anyone who wants to give to his countryside.”

State campaign finance records show no donation from Procida or her company to Sayegh. But the mayor has received tens of thousands of dollars in developer contributions with other projects in Paterson.

Joe Malinconico is editor-in-chief of Paterson Press. E-mail: [email protected]

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Hero Edinburgh Royal Infirmary staff withdrawn from free parking spaces after Covid

Staff at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary have criticized the ‘unfair’ points-based parking system which NHS Lothian will reinstate from Monday, which offers a limited number of free parking spaces.

Staff at Petite France hospital have blasted the decision to return to the scheme which makes it difficult for staff to get a free parking space while working shifts at the capital’s biggest hospital and have now launched a petition which has more than 15,000 signatures.

The petition opposes the points-based system which decides which staff get free parking on site, those who don’t are forced to rely on public transport.

They argue that using buses and trains can put a few extra hours on their shift while commuting or that they have to rely on unsafe alternative parking options in surrounding areas if they are driving.

The collective petition from NHS staff at the hospital reads: “After two years of tireless work to fight COVID-19, here are the thanks we receive from the NHS Trust. Many healthcare professionals are working 12.5 hour shifts.

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“These changes will mean that many employees will add up to 2 hours of commuting time to an already long day.

“With the new variant spreading rapidly across the country, the NHS is severely understaffed more than normal. Staff are on their knees and it will only get worse.

“Staff are looking for alternative positions in different hospitals and bank/agency staff will not take their shifts as they are not eligible for on-site parking permits. Making hospitals unsafe with levels of staff.

“We need these solutions reassessed and adapted to protect staff well-being and avoid further staff shortages at the RIE site.”

Staff have been consulted on the change, but many remain unhappy with the return to the points-based system, which will cause further inconvenience to many.

Edinburgh Live spoke to hospital staff who are increasingly concerned about the program and the impact it will have on the well-being of staff who have worked tirelessly throughout the pandemic.

One member of staff said: “All staff who need to park on site at the RIE must have a permit. Permits awarded on a points system which you must score 30+ to get one. Points given for the home zip code, travel time, dependents, medical conditions, etc.

“It is considered acceptable for the journey time to the hospital to be 90 minutes each way. So for shift workers who work 12.5 hours, their day will now be 15.5 hours.

“Many shift workers will have to take more than one bus as there are not many direct buses to the RIE so they will have to get off one bus and walk in the dark to get another bus.”

She continued: “We have been encouraged to use the Sheriffhall Park & ​​Ride which has 561 spaces. All hospital staff start at 7am except maternity staff who start at 8 am – so the park and ride will be full by the time the maternity staff arrive to park their car.

“The hospital will provide a shuttle to and from the park and ride, but this will stop at 6.30pm, so shift workers will not be able to use this service after their shift which ends at 7.30pm or 8.30pm.

“This parking arrangement comes into effect on January 17 – many employees still do not know if a permit has already been granted

“Lothian buses operate on Saturdays in January so staff will struggle to get to work on time and have long waits outside the hospital

“There is the security aspect, it is dark when we arrive, dark when we leave. Staff have been attacked within the hospital grounds in the past. Staff who chose to park their cars in the vicinity from the hospital suffered violence, verbal abuse and damage to their cars for doing so.

“They offer ‘department permit passes’ which will potentially be shared for people who can carpool for certain shifts. 1 car will be able to use the permit and the driver will have pre-arranged to take 2 people on shift with them which day, however, staff are not allowed to share the car at the moment due to the pandemic!

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“At Christmas and in New York, the parking lots were empty – proving that the congestion is not due to shift workers, it is due to staff working during normal hours, i.e. 8-4 or 9 -5, so not to nursing or medical staff.

“Why are visitors allowed to park for free but staff caring for loved ones are denied safe parking on site?”

But Jim Crombie, deputy chief executive of NHS Lothian, hailed the scheme as a move to address parking issues at the hospital.

She said: “We are reintroducing the free staff parking permit system as one of several measures to manage the demand for staff, patient and visitor parking.”

“Parking has long been a problem on the Petite France campus, as it is in many Scottish hospitals. This can cause delays for people accessing the site and cause serious problems for our blue light services who need to be able to pass through the hospital site at all times.

“We have engaged with staff and union partners on measures to support staff in transport and to make the site more accessible. Our plans to reintroduce the permit system have also been widely communicated to staff.

“We will also be introducing a regular free shuttle service for staff from Sheriffhall Park, following a pilot project and have developed a car-sharing system to allow as many staff as possible to travel to campus by car when COVID-19 guidance permits. car sharing to pick up.

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Impact on the website! With the new parking action plan, the non-scientific parking spaces on the LHH road have been removed


Impact on the website! With the new Parking Action Plan, the unscientific parking spaces on Light House Hill Road (LHH) have been removed

Mangaluru: Talk about the magic that the issues highlighted on Mangalorean.com are fixed in no time. civic issues and within hours or days the authorities concerned, who cannot stand criticism of their negligence, swiftly step into action and rectify civic issues. In the past, Mangalorean.com has highlighted various civic issues on our website, and there has been a huge effect with most issues resolved in no time, from the rectification of dilapidated roads, open drainage, unfriendly trails, dog threat, neglect, garbage, illegal palisades, potholes, dying trees, etc.

Following the report (Ref: Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY! ), Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL) officials have now removed non-science parking spaces near the Ladies Club / across from Tagore Park on Light House Hill Road, Mangaluru, after developing a new action plan for the parking.

BEFORE WEBSITE IMPACT….

As the construction works on the section of Light House Hill Road to Dr Ambedkar Circle (Jyothi Circle) widened, although the project was progressing slowly, it was good news for the citizens of Mangaluru and tourists in Mangaluru. . Unfortunately, the bad news was that providing unscientific parking spaces for all four wheels on this widening road, which was just a silly idea. All of the educated people and people of common sense that the Mangalorean team interacted with all said that the parking spaces that had been provided were nothing but foolish and absolutely a stupid idea, of the from those responsible behind the plan.

These car parks are close to the Ladies Club and opposite Tagore Park, on the stretch of LHH Road, where four-wheelers parked in these spaces with their bumpers extending out onto the road, imagine what the situation would be like on the road. traffic on this road during rush hour. Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces. A few days after the publication of our report, Sincerely, from the Mangalorean team, received a call from the General Manager (Technical) of MSCL stating that the parking spaces will be removed and the new parking action plan will be given to us. notified soon.

AFTER IMPACT ON THE WEBSITE….

Once again, on January 7, 2022, Er Arun Prabha, the Managing Director of MSCL, said that with the new action plan for parking, instead of allowing four-wheeled vehicles to park on the side right of the road adjacent to the wall of the Ladies Club, a parking space will be provided for two-wheelers, with marked lines. And now, where the two-wheelers are parked next to the Tagore Park, this space will be provided for the parking of four-wheelers, with marked lines (only). This is the new action plan on the parking issue, and I hope it will serve the purpose without objections or complaints from motorists and citizens.

Either way, I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

Vehicles parked along the road can create a similar bottleneck and sometimes accentuate a pre-existing bottleneck due to the conflict and blockages they create for the flow of traffic. Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every now and then the meters can divide the congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.

As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to get people to get out their cars and vehicles more often, but to provide more convenience for those who choose to bring their vehicles and remove bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.

Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more informed for drivers to choose the right mode of transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! .

MSCL CLARIFIES ON THE DIGGING / CUTTING OF THE NEW LIGHT HOUSE HILL ROAD:

In response to the report published in Mangalorean.com (Ref: OH MY GOD! Total nonsense yet again dig / cut all new Light House Hill Road ), Er Arun Prabha – General Manager (Technical) of Mangaluru Smart City Ltd clarified by stating

“MSCL dismantled about 50m of this section at the end of the road for a lane width to build a retaining wall. This became necessary due to the (free) U-turn to the right. We also had to realign the UGD line here. This is old concrete, not new concrete.

ALSO, READ RELATED ARTICLES ON WEBSITE IMPACT:

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Parking spaces

An Australian township has installed “horse parking spaces” and it’s like an old western!

You wouldn’t believe me if I told you (but I still will …)

Riders can now trot up to the canton of Toora and park their HORSES – just like in the movies!

ABC Gippsland

Toora is a town in eastern Victoria and is known to be more of a coffee and art genre.

It is located along the Gippsland Railway which sees many riders galloping around town!

Until recently, riders literally had to hold the reins while waiting for their café au lait, but now horses can have a drink and stay for free while they roam the township.

ABC Gippsland

Ms. Hopkins, president of the Toora Community Action Team, was a driving force behind the project.

“If you can stop somewhere on your horse and have lunch, that puts a final end to a ride and it just makes it easier for everyone, gives everyone a chance to take a break.

South Gippsland’s head of infrastructure planning Tony Peterson said the residents of Toora were involved in the design process.

“The local pony clubs and riders have been essential in the planning so that we can meet their needs. It works very well, ”he said.

What a great initiative!

Credit (Original article): ABC Gippsland

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Toora Township horse parking spaces entice Gippsland riders to stay awhile

It’s straight out of an old western.

Anna Hopkins and her friends saddle up and ride to town, although in this scene there is no shooting or sheriffs.

Toora in eastern Victoria is more of a coffee and art place.

Until recently, if you rode around town, you had to hold the reins while waiting for your latte.

From now on, the municipality has parking lots for horses. Six enclosures along the shopping street of Toora.

The South Gippsland Shire Council has built public stables along the Great Southern Rail Trail, not far from the Toora pub.

Your horse can drink and lodge for free while you ride through the township.

Anna Hopkins regularly rides Toora on her black and white mare Indi.

“I ride around town all the time. Last weekend I passed by and the cafe had just opened, so I passed by and had a coffee,” she said.

Friends Kylie Beaumont, Sarah Reeves and Anna Hopkins with Sarah Dunsty’s son and horses Oaky, Catory, Minx and Indy.(Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

“Before horse parks, we usually couldn’t stop unless you were standing there holding your horse.”

Ms. Hopkins, chair of the Toora Community Action Team, was one of the driving forces behind the horse paddock project.

“We hope it will bring opportunities to our city, bring in different people who normally couldn’t stop.”

South Gippsland infrastructure planning officer Tony Peterson said that if the Toora Horse Parking Lots brought tourism to the town and were a success, the council would build more horse facilities along the track.

Riders enjoy a beer at the Toora pub with horses in the background.
The riders enjoy a beer at the Toora Pub, but don’t let go of the reins!(Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

“The local railroad is like a backbone that runs through our community. It’s no more than about 10 kilometers before another town,” he said.

“We plan to build more hitch bays along the way, determining which cities would have enough space.”

Mr Peterson said the people of Toora were involved in the design process.

“Local pony clubs and riders were key in the planning so that we could meet their needs. It works out really well,” he said.

Wood parks under the gum trees, horse paddocks.
New stables built to ‘park’ mounted horses in Toora, Victoria. (Provided: Kylie Beaumont)

Anne Roussac-Hoyne, who owns Rare Earth Studio Gallery in Toora, said she looked forward to more people visiting her town.

“I see so many bikes going up and down the street off the rail trail and the horse lessons mean people on horseback can do the same,” Ms Roussac-Hoyne said.

“It should definitely be good for Toora’s businesses.”

And the bigger question, what about all the horse poop?

“People can put it in their gardens,” said Toora local Ms Hopkins.

Horse parking spaces are located at Sagassa Park in Toora, South Gippsland, Eastern Victoria.

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Why are EV charging stations necessary in commercial parking spaces? – Hometown station | KHTS FM 98.1 & AM 1220 – Radio Santa Clarita

Businesses with electric vehicle (EV) charging stations often attract more visitors, occupants and customers. It helps to increase income.

If you currently operate a carport or parking lot, you may have realized that maintaining high housing standards is essential to being productive. With electric vehicles now common, drivers will continue to look for places to charge their vehicles.

When EV charging stations are brought into your parking lot or parking lot, you will attract these drivers. These are potential customers who keep coming back. Find out why you should install these charging stations in your garage.

4 reasons EV charging stations are important

An EV charging station has many advantages. Drivers can charge more safely faster and that gives your business a boost. Here are four reasons why EV stations are important.

Adds an attractive image to your building

One of the advantages of having EV charging stations in your parking lot is that they will give your structure an attractive image. It also attracts more people because they will see that you are doing environmental safety. They might be more willing to help your business or choose your building for office space, depending on the property you own.

Add to your income

Assuming you need something beyond a method of attracting customers to your business, you can use EV charging stations to increase your income.

You can set a price for what people will pay to power their electric vehicles. The most straightforward approach is to keep the price constant whether or not the people using the stations enter your business environment.

To retain your customers, you can offer free charging services, especially those who are real patrons. You can charge a fee to those who only use the charging stations.

More commercial notoriety

Yes, organizations continue to look for good ways to improve awareness of their businesses to reach and capture customers. This is vital and should be an ongoing activity.

Have some VE Recharge Stations installed in your business can be a great strategy to attract more customers. This increases the awareness of your business. People who search online for nearby areas with EV charging services are likely to find your business. Since this business is not yet generous in many places, your business will be a good catch.

Boosts environmental sustainability

This is the biggest advantage! Adding EV charging stations to your parking lot will help prevent toxic pollution to your environment while conserving its limited resources.

Many people now know about the ecological problems that society causes. They are now taking concrete steps to reduce the negative effects caused by their lifestyle.

With these charging stations, there will be opportunities for environmental sustainability as you will provide a separate place for electric vehicle owners to constantly park and charge their vehicles.

Conclusion

Providing EV charging stations is a great initiative if you are currently operating a parking lot or commercial garage. In addition to earning additional income, it also promotes brand awareness of your business.

Do you have a news tip? Call us at (661) 298-1220 or email [email protected] Don’t miss a thing. Get the latest KHTS Santa Clarita News alerts delivered straight to your inbox. Report a typo or error, email [email protected]

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Parking spaces

More downtown parking spaces among the list of upcoming urban projects | Government and politics

Officials in the town of Dothan hope to link the project to plans involving the Poplar Springs creek that passes near this area.

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In other cases, City Manager Kevin Cowper has awarded Lisa Reeder, Chief Financial Officer, on her retirement from the town of Dothan after many years of service.

In other actions, the municipal commission:

Approved restaurant retail liquor license application (on-site) for The Juicy Crab, 4753 Montgomery Highway, by Leo Chen.

Approved an application for a Beer and Table Wine (Offsite) Retail License for Beeline 643, 1378 Hodgesville Road, by Pankaj Patel.

Annex certain properties owned by Raefield and Jacquline E. Vester, located at 165 Vester Court, within the city limits of Dothan.

Declared certain properties as creating a nuisance, endangering the public health, safety and convenience of the citizens of the Town of Dothan, and authorizing the demolition and removal of said structures.

Agreed to purchase a parcel of land located at 825 Dusy Street for $ 8,500 in order to access existing drainage facilities.

Change order approved with Saliba Construction Co., Inc. for the erection, management and dismantling of the Wadlington Park ice rink to include additional hourly labor estimated at $ 37,347.52.

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Parking spaces

How Oslo is recycling its old parking spaces for cyclists

In recent years, Oslo has seen a proliferation of pedestrian streets, public transport now serves all corners of the city, and parking spaces, usually reserved for cars, have transformed over time into cycle paths. When they don’t end up like this, they are replaced by green spaces or bicycle parking lots.

The trend is now for the transformation of old car parks into cycle paths, easily recognizable by their red color. Bikes (including cargo bikes) are available through bike-share systems to help those without their own bike get around the city center, which is fully geared up for them.

However, there are still a few parking spaces, reserved primarily for disabled drivers, emergency vehicles or delivery drivers (even if the latter are generally only allowed to drive in the morning). Others are dedicated to charging electric vehicles. In addition, there are still many parking lots on the outskirts of the center.

It should also be noted that the few cars still circulating in the center of Oslo are mostly electric. The Norwegian capital is now one of the European cities with the highest rates of electric vehicles on the road, according to a recent report by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT).

All of these changes are being made to help improve air quality and combat climate change. But another advantage is the safety of road users. A pioneer in the pedestrianization of its city center, Oslo recorded no deaths of pedestrians or cyclists in 2019, a unique case in the world for a city of its size.

While Oslo began its transformation decades ago, other major European capitals, such as Paris, Madrid and Berlin, often face greater opposition from residents when imposing this type of policy. – AFP Relax news

Try the bike today. Buy bikes at affordable prices with Shopee promo code Shopee promotional code

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Parking spaces

IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out


IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out

Mangaluru: Talk about the magic that the issues highlighted on Mangalorean.com are fixed in no time. civic issues and within hours or days the authorities concerned, who cannot stand criticism of their negligence, swiftly step into action and rectify civic issues. In the past, Mangalorean.com has highlighted various civic issues on our website, and there has been a huge effect with most issues resolved in no time, from the rectification of dilapidated roads, open drainage, unfriendly trails, dog threat, neglect, garbage, illegal palisades, potholes, dying trees, etc.

Following the report (Ref: Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!) posted in Mangalorean.com, relevant officials at Mangaluru Smart City Ltd have decided to remove unscientific parking spaces and come up with better parking facilities, and details of this plan will be updated soon when we have it. . After the report was highlighted on our website, many of our avid readers forwarded the links of the report to officials at MSCL as well as to the Commissioner and Mayor of Mangaluru City Corporation, who received affirmative action.


One reader praising the efforts of the Mangalorean team to highlight civic issues commented, saying, “This is why I love the Mangalorean.com web for news that is unbiased. Your website is totally different from other web news in Mangalore history. So much social awareness that inspires others to follow in your footsteps. Thank you for the various civic issues reports and also for keeping Mangaluru clean through much of your news. Continue like this and we are with you ”. Thank you, dear reader, for your kind words of wisdom.

Providing such unscientific parking spaces for four-wheelers on this LHH road is nothing but a dumb idea. Every educated person the Mangalorean team interacted with all said the parking spaces made here were nothing but foolish and an absolutely stupid idea, on the part of the officials behind the plan. . Did the SMART CITY engineers and managers believe that four-wheeled vehicles parked in these spaces with their bumpers sprawling across the road would create problems for traffic on that road during rush hour? Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces? Aside from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have become extensive parking spaces for vehicles instead of taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

Yet another reader of our website, Praveen Chandra Shetty, a social worker and auto insurance claims adjuster, followed our report on this matter with Er Arun Prabha, the General (Technical) Director of MSCL, and he managed to get the good news. from Er Arun that unscientific parking spaces will soon be phased out and better parking facilities with a better plan will be implemented soon. I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every few meters can divide congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.
As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to encourage people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to make it easier for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove the bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.
Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more enlightened drivers to choose the appropriate mode. transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! So until the new parking system is implemented on the LHH road, drive or ride safely on the LHH road and don’t run into those unscientific parking barriers.

ALSO READ RELATED ARTICLES ON WEBSITE IMPACT:

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Parking spaces

More than 60 additional parking spaces arrive at the TPP in time for Christmas

Vance Lewis

Management at the Cyril B. Romney Tortola Pier Park (TPP) is creating an additional 60 parking spaces to accommodate more visitors to the multimillion-dollar facility as the holiday season and cruise ship arrivals gear up.

According to TPP CEO Vance Lewis there have been complaints over the years about the lack of adequate parking spaces at the pier park and he and his team have sought to address this issue with the new car park which is expected to be ready soon.

“You know, because Christmas is coming up, we’re kicking things into high gear. We’re in the process of making sure we have improved parking. Improved parking means we have additional parking options. One of the perennial complaints that we had in the pier park is that parking is limited so just at the entrance there is a space which is cleared, rolled and paved and it is going to be marked to provide some 60 additional parking spaces” , Lewis said.

“Then we will open the gate to allow people to enter the park directly from the pier. Thus, you will be literally a stone’s throw from the park of the pier. This is in addition to the parking we currently have at the facilities,” added the CEO.

Lewis noted that the holiday season, which includes TPP’s annual three-day Christmas event, means there will be a greater influx of patrons into the park. He said that means more and safer parking lots are needed to make park users feel comfortable while they shop and have fun.

The CEO added that the reopening of the cruise ship has also led to increased activity in the pier park, which also requires additional parking spaces for taxi operators; therefore the area is being prepared in time for Christmas.

Lewis hopes the parking lot will be ready for vehicles next week as the postponed three-day Christmas celebration kicks off on Tuesday.

The event, which was to take place from Thursday December 16 to Saturday December 18, has been postponed due to bad weather.

However, according to management, everything should go as planned on December 21.

Copyright 2022 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.

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Parking spaces

Love’s adds hundreds of truck parking spaces in five new locations

Love’s new location in Fillmore, Utah is shown. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Heflin, Alabama; Kimball, South Dakota; Fillmore, Utah, and Leavenworth, Indiana, thanks to four stores that opened Thursday morning.

A fifth store in Klamath Falls, Oregon, opened on Friday. Together, the stores will add more than 380 truck parking spaces and more than 280 jobs in their respective communities.

“For only the second time in Love’s history, we are opening five new locations in one day that will be ready to help customers get back on the road quickly and safely,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Our team members in Klamath Falls, Heflin, Kimball, Fillmore and Leavenworth will provide customers with the freeway hospitality they expect when they stop at Love’s.”

Pitches are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Equipment is broken down by location below:

Klamath Falls, Oregon

  • Over 13,000 square feet
  • Carl’s Jr. (Opening January 17)
  • 94 truck parking spaces
  • 80 parking spaces
  • Seven diesel bays
  • Five showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories

Heflin, Alabama

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Bojangles. (Opening January 10)
  • 72 truck parking spaces.
  • 57 parking spaces.
  • Four RV parking spaces.
  • Seven RV hookups.
  • Eight diesel bays.
  • Seven showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Speedco. (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Kimball, South Dakota

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Godfather’s Pizza and Subway. (Opening January 10)
  • 68 truck parking spaces.
  • 48 parking spaces.
  • Five RV slots.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Five showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Fillmore, UT

  • Over 11,000 square feet
  • Taco John’s (Opening January 10)
  • 73 truck parking spaces
  • 58 parking spaces
  • Two VR spaces
  • Eight diesel bays
  • Seven showers
  • Laundry room (Opening later)
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories
  • dog park

Leavenworth, Indiana

  • Over 12,000 square feet
  • Hardee’s (Opening February 14)
  • 75 truck parking spaces
  • 50 parking spaces
  • Three RV parking spaces
  • Nine RV hookups
  • Seven diesel bays
  • Five showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (Opening later)
  • Gourmet coffee beans
  • Branded snacks
  • Fresh cooking concept
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories
  • dog park
The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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200 parking spaces to be created in the industrial area of ​​Dorset

An office building in an industrial area in East Dorset will be partially demolished to create more than 200 parking spaces on the site.

The clearance will allow a 26 new light industrial unit project to proceed on the Ferndown industrial area adjacent to the Peartree Business Center site – subject to obtaining planning permission.

Dorset Council has approved the partial demolition of the Peartree Business Center south of Vulcan Way and east of Cobham Road, Ferndown.

The application is the first phase of the redevelopment of the area which is expected to see the construction of new industrial units offering more than 2,500 square meters of space. A preliminary application is currently under consideration and public comment was closed a month ago on November 15.

Consent for the demolition of the one-storey section of the north side office building will result in the loss of over 3,200 square meters of office space – but will leave 6,360 square meters of office space in place. The removal of the building will allow access to the brownfield area beyond and the creation of a larger parking lot.

The application also allows the creation of a new internal road on the site and will be developed in parallel with a separate application for 26 new industrial units north of the Peartree Business Center.

The site is close to the recently completed Porsche garage.

Ferndown and Uddens Business Improvement District supported the changes, as did Ferndown City Council in letters to Dorset Council in support of the planning request.

In total, the consent will create 214 parking spaces and 51 bicycle spaces.

The development will result in the loss of some trees although those on the northern and eastern limits of the site will be retained and will need to be protected during the construction phase.

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Parking spaces

City Council approves changes to new development car and bicycle parking bylaws – City of Toronto

Press release

December 15, 2021

City Council has passed zoning bylaw amendments that will remove most requirements for new developments to provide a minimum number of parking spaces. At the same time, limits on the number of parking spaces that can be built will be added. With the goal of building healthy and sustainable communities, this change helps to better manage automobile dependency and strikes a balance between too much and too little parking.

Adapted regulations – aligned with the City’s Climate Action Strategy, TransformTO and the Provincial Policy Statement and Growth Plan (2019) as amended – propel Toronto forward as it strives to achieve ambitious goals that address environmental sustainability, including reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving resident livability and creating healthier communities.

These zoning bylaw updates encourage residents to use alternatives to driving such as walking, cycling and public transit, reducing traffic congestion and creating space to improve conditions for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users.

Quote:

“Today the City Council took concrete action for a healthier and more sustainable city. The move means developers will no longer be required to build parking spaces that buyers don’t want, making it easier for residents who live without a car to buy a home.

– Mayor John Tory

“This more strategic and thoughtful management of the parking supply will contribute to the City’s priorities for addressing the climate emergency, improving housing affordability and encouraging alternative forms of mobility for a greater number of people.

– Deputy Mayor Ana Bailão (Davenport), Chair of the Planning and Housing Committee

Toronto is home to more than 2.9 million people whose diversity and experiences make this great city Canada’s main economic engine and one of the most diverse and livable cities in the world. As the fourth largest city in North America, Toronto is a world leader in technology, finance, film, music, culture and innovation, and ranks consistently at the top of international rankings thanks to investments supported by its government, residents and businesses. For more information visit the City website or follow us on Twitter, instagram Where Facebook.

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Parking spaces

Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!

Unscientific parking spaces on Light House Hill Road (LHH) are not a SMART IDEA by the SMART CITY managers of Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL)!

Mangaluru: The good news for the citizens of Mangaluru and tourists to Mangaluru is that the section of Light House Hill Road to Dr Ambedkar Circle (Jyothi Circle) is widening and about 80% of the work is complete, although the project is in progress. a slow pace. Unfortunately, the bad news is that providing unscientific parking spaces for all four wheels of this widening road, which is just a silly idea. Every educated person and common sense person the Mangalorean team interacted with, they all said the parking spots that are being made are nothing but foolish and absolutely a stupid idea, on the part of the officials who are behind the plan.

These parking spaces are prepared near the Ladies Club and in front of Tagore Park, on the section of LHH Road. As the four-wheelers park in these spaces with their bumpers extending out onto the road, imagine what the traffic situation would be like on that road at rush hour. Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces. Apart from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have been ample parking spaces for vehicles rather than taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Traffic delays have multiple reasons: high volume of vehicles, potholes slowing traffic, ineffective coordination of traffic lights, unhealthy driving practices, infrastructure failures, etc. previous section. The presence of a building as a religious institution, or a natural obstacle through trees, are common examples of bottlenecks. Vehicles parked along the road can create a similar bottleneck and sometimes accentuate a pre-existing bottleneck due to the conflict and blockages they create for the flow of traffic.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every now and then the meters can divide the congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.

As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to get people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to provide more convenience for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.

Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more informed for drivers to choose the right mode of transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! .

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Parking spaces

New Love locations offer 280 parking spaces nationwide

The new Love’s in Pacific Junction, Iowa is introduced. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY — Love’s Travel Stops announced the opening of four new stores Thursday.

Together, the locations will provide 280 large parking spaces and create 190 jobs.

The new stores are in Great Falls, Montana, Drayton, North Dakota, Pacific Junction, Iowa and Dalhart, Texas.

“Love’s continues to open new locations during the holidays to help get professional drivers and four-wheeled customers to their destination safely and quickly,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Whether it’s fuel, fresh food and drink, or a gift for a loved one – like a toy or today’s latest electronics – customers can get what they need. when they stop at one of our more than 570 locations across the country.”

In honor of the grand openings, Love’s will donate $2,000 to nonprofit organizations in each city. The donation will go to CASA-CAN in Great Falls, Montana; the Twilight Fund in Dalhart, Texas; a later chosen organization in Drayton, North Dakota, and it will be split between Glenwood Public Schools and the Glenwood Public Library in Pacific Junction, Iowa.

Here is a breakdown of each location’s amenities:

PACIFIC JUNCTION, IOWA

  • Over 10,000 square feet.
  • Metro.
  • 84 truck parking spaces.
  • 51 parking spaces.
  • Three RV spaces.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Five showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

DALHART, TEXAS

  • Over 8,000 square feet.
  • Chester’s chicken and the godfather’s pizza. (Opening December 13)
  • 77 truck parking spaces.
  • 48 parking spaces.
  • Five RV slots.
  • Five diesel bays.
  • Four showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

DRAYTON, NORTH DAKOTA

  • Over 7,000 square feet.
  • Taco John’s. (Opening December 13)
  • 63 truck parking spaces.
  • 45 parking spaces.
  • Six RV slots.
  • Six diesel bays.
  • Four showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA

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Township revises laws on parking spaces and accessory buildings

LOWER POTTSGROVE PA – Two recent land use concerns in Lower Pottsgrove – regarding the future size of parking spaces or “stalls” for routable vehicles, and increased interest by landowners in building construction “Accessories” to house small workshops or leisure equipment – were addressed on Monday (6 December 2021) in a change of law approved by the Council of cantonal commissioners.

Parking space sizes

For future land use planning proposals only, the minimum size of parking spaces created in the township will increase by 6 inches in width, from 9 1/2 feet wide by 18 feet deep to 10 feet wide by 18 feet wide. feet deep. The additional width, determined after research and comparison with the standards of other municipalities, was found to be sufficient to accommodate the larger size of newly manufactured pickup trucks and vans.

The parking spaces must be reasonably level, limited to a single vehicle and cannot include an area reserved for passages, aisles or other means of circulation or access, specifies the law. Its adoption was recommended by the chairman of the board of directors Bruce Foltz, himself the owner of a large pick-up.

Additions to the accessory building

Seeing the change in parking space as an opportunity to resolve another issue of subdivision law and land use planning, the commissioners agreed to also amend related parts of the township code dealing with accessory buildings.

A growing number of landowners have told the township, mainly by submitting new land use plans and building permit applications, that they are interested in adding free-standing structures. Many are intended for storing trailers, RVs, lawn equipment, or pool supplies. Some are used as workshops or tool sheds. Commercial and agricultural home uses are also permitted.

Their use and size are governed by the zoning code of the municipality, and generally require the approval of the Zoning Hearing Panel as a special exception.

The commissioners agreed to amend the code to expand the permitted area for accessory buildings eligible for exceptions from more than a minimum area of ​​600 square feet to a minimum of 600 to 1,000 square feet or less. Structures are also subject to setback requirements, determination by the zoning hearing panel of neighborhood suitability, a building’s “visual impact” and landscaping.

The intention, said township manager Ed Wagner, was to avoid a proliferation of pole barn-sized buildings that could have benefited from special exceptions under the previous section of the ordinance.

The commissioners unanimously agreed to the changes at the first board meeting of the month. He was preceded by a 6.45 p.m. public hearing, during which no one spoke to oppose the measure.

photo by Vitalik radko Going through Photo submission, used under license

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More parking spaces for Staveley in a ‘tremendous’ regeneration boost for the town

The scheme will see the number of parking spaces increased opposite the playgrounds on Chantry Road, providing better visibility of the site from the road, better lighting and easier access to the nearby cemetery and Trans Pennine footpath.

“There has been and is so much energy and commitment to the Town Deal from all sides and we would like to thank the Town Deal representatives, Chesterfield Borough Council and their planning department who have guided and helped us in these very difficult times through the pandemic,” said Terry.

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Staveley’s regeneration plans have been further bolstered with plans for more parking spaces.

“Seeing Staveley MWFC receive the first Town Deal funding and lead forward is rather unique and sets the stage for the remaining £25.2m projects with their sponsors knowing they can work towards the reality of seeing their own projects come to life with funding.

Currently there are only 30 parking spaces available at the site, but when completed this number will increase to 84, including several spaces for the disabled.

Preparatory work is expected to start next month and be completed in 2022, ready for the start of work on the improved parking facilities.

The application also includes plans to create a new pedestrian crossing that will make it safer to cross the road to access the playgrounds, cemetery and the Trans Pennine Trail.

Trees beside the road will be removed to increase visibility in the car park, which should limit anti-social behavior.

The works are funded by the Staveley Town Deal.

Ivan Fomin, Chairman of the Staveley Town Deal Board, said: “To go from discussing these projects at board meetings to delivering them so quickly is a testament to the hard work of everyone involved.

“Our plans aim to make Staveley a place to live, work and grow and we have selected a wide range of projects which will benefit the whole community.”

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Parking spaces

New Pittsburgh Legislation Says Designated Bike Lanes Are Not Potential Parking Spaces

Pittsburgh has more than 60 miles of designated bike pathsa number that officials hope increase considerably in the next few years, because helping more people find car-free ways to get where they need to go is a long-term the objective of elected municipal officials. However, it’s not uncommon to find a car or truck – or several – parked in lanes meant for people on bikes and other low-speed modes of travel like stand-up scooters.

Vehicles parked or idling in bike lanes are “a clear problem and a clear safety concern,” said Eric Boerer, advocacy director for Bike Pittsburgh.

But solving the problem turned out to be more obscure.

“I’m like, ‘OK, well, we’ll just contact law enforcement and it’ll be easy, and that’s okay,'” Councilor Bobby Wilson said. “Turns out it’s a bigger lift than we think.”

Pennsylvania law prohibits blocking a lane of traffic, which includes bike lanes, but the rule simply isn’t in Pittsburgh’s municipal code.

“Right now, if the police are going to cite [someone parked in a bike lane] they would like to see a no parking sign right next to the bike path,” Wilson said.

Instead of spending taxpayers’ money installing hundreds of new no-parking signs, Wilson decided to simply add “in a bike lane” to the list of places drivers can’t stop, stand or park under applicable municipal regulations.

Road safety depends on predictability; bike lanes are designed so that drivers and cyclists can reliably anticipate the movements of others, Boerer said. But when someone blocks a bike lane, “it forces cyclists out of the bike lane into traffic, and people don’t expect that,” he said. “It kind of screws up the whole system.”

This is especially true in recently installed bike lanes that travel against the current, such as on Forbes Avenue in Oakland, Boerer said. If cyclists have to exit a bike lane to avoid a vehicle, they face oncoming traffic.

Boerer added that when people park vehicles in bike lanes, it leads to negative feelings and confrontations, “and we just want to get away from that.” He hopes that, if passed, the legislation will clear up confusion about where people can and cannot park. The organization has conducted bike lane assessments and found that some lanes are blocked 25-50% of the time.

“It doesn’t make sense to go and spend taxpayers’ money investing in bike lanes if we don’t make sure the people who use them have access to them,” Wilson said.

The legislation, which the council passed unanimously on Tuesday, would not apply to paratransit vehicles that pick up or drop off passengers. If there is a section of the street where parking in a bike lane is sometimes critical, people can ask the Ministry of Mobility and Infrastructure for an exception and signage.

Wilson said the city generally relies heavily on police to enforce traffic rules, but parking violations really should be the Pittsburgh Parking Authority’s responsibility. Wilson said he’s had conversations with agency management that agree that if agents issue tickets for expired meters, then “we want you to follow up and do everything,” and cite others violations, such as parking in crosswalks or in cycle lanes. .

“Parking in a bike lane is dangerous, don’t do it, cut it off,” Wilson said. “Do better. And everything will be fine.”

Updated: December 7, 2021 at 3:05 p.m. EST

This story has been updated to reflect the passing of the proposal at City Council on Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

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Parking spaces

Sunflower parking spaces ‘make life easier’ for people with hidden disabilities – Clarke

Deputy Sorca Clarke wants the council to introduce Sunflower parking spaces in Blackhall and other public car parks in the county.

Longford Westmeath Sinn Féin TD Sorca Clarke has asked Westmeath County Council to introduce Sunflower parking spaces in all major towns and villages.

The purpose of Sunflower Spaces, Deputy Clarke explained, is to “make life a little easier for people living with hidden disabilities and have them available in parking lots for people who don’t have a license. blue badge, making local facilities and amenities more accessible.”

“Hidden disabilities can include learning disabilities, mental health issues as well as mobility, speech, sight or hearing impairments. They can also include conditions such as asthma, COPD and other debilitating lung conditions as well as chronic conditions such as kidney failure, diabetes and sleep disturbances, all of which can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life.

“Living with these types of conditions can make everyday life more demanding for many people. They affect each person in different ways and can be painful, exhausting and isolating. Without visible evidence of a hidden disability, it is often difficult for others to recognize the challenges people face, which means that sympathy and understanding can often be in short supply.

“Similar pilot projects are underway in other local authorities across the country and there is no reason why, at very little cost, it cannot be implemented in Westmeath,” the report concluded. Deputy Clarke.

Sinn Féin local representative for the town of Mullingar, Hazel Behan, echoed Deputy Clarke’s calls for the council to introduce sunflower spaces across the county.

“I think it is imperative that Westmeath recognize people living in our community with hidden disabilities and follow the progressive example of other local authorities who have successfully implemented this system in public car parks.

“Having Sunflower Spaces raises awareness and greatly helps people with hidden disabilities who may face significant challenges in their daily lives. Making sure everyone knows what the sunflower means shows that someone who has chosen to park in this type of designated space may need extra support and lead to understanding and tolerance additional.

“I look forward to Westmeath County Council taking the necessary steps to make our communities more inclusive and the lives of hidden disabled people more tolerable by implementing this relatively cheap and sensible measure,” Ms Behan said.

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Parking spaces

According to recent accounts, many parking spaces are not in use

Submitted photo

Many of those who drive to campus every day may not be aware of some parking options that aren’t as crowded as those closer to the heart of campus.

During the first days of November, Transit and Parking counted empty parking spaces in specific areas of the campus that included student lots, commuter parking, and faculty and staff lots. The tally revealed that of the more than 14,000 parking spaces on campus, more than 2,000 spaces are open during the busiest times.

Students may find plenty of space available in Lot 56, while faculty and staff will find open parking in areas such as Lots 54, 78 and 78A.

Lot 99, with 1,100 parking spaces, also has many spaces open every day. It is located south of the main part of the campus and is open to any current holder of a parking permit.

Razorback Transit serves lots 56 and 99, as well as several other parking areas on campus. You can see the campus parking plan for details.

The recent tally reminds us that the numbers don’t exactly support the claim that there isn’t enough parking at the university.

In order to determine a minimum number of available parking spaces, the count was made on Monday and Tuesday mornings (when the largest number of classes meet and the campus is most crowded).

Obviously, more parking is available at other times when fewer people are on campus.

Specifically, the count of vacant parking spaces showed that 1,638 parking spaces were not used in the student parking lot and in the commuter parking lots.

During the same period, 438 parking spaces for professors and staff were available (in the yellow lots on campus).

This means that during the busiest times, 35% of parking lots for students and commuters and 24% of parking lots for teachers and staff are vacant.

They finished the count on the mornings of November 1, 2, 8 and 9. It included the count of vacant spaces in lots 1, 15, 15A, 36, 36B, 37, 38, 41, 42, 44, 45A, 45B, 45C. , 46E, 47N, 47W, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 56D, 57, 57A, 58, 62, 62A, 69, 74, 75, 78, 78A, 78B, 80, 83 and 99. Vacant Spaces for teachers and staff have also been counted in the Meadow Street parking garage. You can see them on the campus parking plan.

Naturally, most of the open parking spaces are in the parking lots farthest from the center of the campus.

This does not mean that some parking lots are not full, as some are. This also does not mean that the covered car park and the reserved car park are never close to their capacity because they are (the count does not include the main garages and the reserved car park).

Those who park further away often take the Razorback Transit buses that go to the parking lot. For more information, you can consult the bus lines schedule or use the Go GO! application.

Transit and Parking understands the unique logistical issues that affect the parking and morning commutes of thousands of people, and is always open to feedback from motorists on campus. Slight changes are made every year. The university regularly reviews parking availability, along with ideas and suggestions, and if a change is warranted and feasible, it can be implemented.

For more information on campus parking issues, you can check out Transit and Parking’s Frequently Asked Questions.

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Parking spaces

Bombay: Eight shopping malls open their car parks to the public at night

In a bid to address the lack of parking space in Mumbai, locals, visitors and commercial vehicle owners will be allowed to park their vehicles between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. at eight malls in the city from of December 1.

According to a plan drawn up by Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and the new Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA), 6,500 new parking spaces will be available. The MPA, responsible for regulating parking in the city, had met with shopping center owners in 2019 to discuss the idea of ​​using vacant parking spaces on their premises during non-working shopping center hours.

While five malls charge for parking on a monthly basis, others have opted for weekly or overnight charges. The largest number of parking spaces, over 1,100, is available at the Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel at Rs 3,500 per month. The parking rates have been decided by the mall authorities. “This will be particularly beneficial for crowded residential settlements where parking spills out into the streets and adequate parking is not available on their premises. Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility,” MPA said.

Earlier, MPA opened the BEST bus depots for private bus parking. BMC had also declared 100 meters around 29 public car parks as no-parking zones. Sections along five thoroughfares in different parts of the city have also been turned into no-parking zones. However, the plan was later withdrawn,

The MPA, formed in January this year, won the approval of the BMC Standing Committee in May and is headed by Additional Municipal Commissioner P Velrasu. Based on the suggestion of Municipal Commissioner IS Chahal, MPA is in the process of creating a Municipal Parking Pool – which will be an online aggregation platform that will contain details of all available parking spaces in the city.

Chahal had appealed: “All other government agencies, which have parking areas under them, should be encouraged to participate in the City Parking Pool (CPP) to ensure that citizens can reserve any parking in the city using a single platform”.

Under the CPP, owners (commercial spaces, shopping malls) will be free to open their premises as they wish and will have the flexibility to keep schedules, prices and rules to their liking.

The authority also made recommendations on the planning and control of all on-road and roadside parking in the city.

Experts appointed by the authority will carry out nine tasks, including studying legal issues relating to the implementation of the workforce, preparing a comprehensive plan for parking management in the 24 districts, drafting of a parking policy, uniform signage and consideration of appropriate parking rates, officials said.

To meet the growing demands for affordable parking spaces in every neighborhood, the MPA team also actively identifies open and vacant lots that can be converted into surface or underground parking.

The eight malls that have opened their car park are – Growels 101 in Kandivali, Infinity malls in Andheri and Malad, R City mall Ghatkopar, R mall in Mulund, Inorbit Mall in Malad, Phoenix Market City in Kurla and Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel.

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Gazebo at West Frisco Park will be removed to add parking spaces | Local News

Eureka officials plan to remove the gazebo from West Frisco Park to increase parking in the Old Town business district.

City Administrator Craig Sabo said the parking lot has 39 spaces and the removal of the gazebo at 14 West Frisco Ave. will make room for 17 more, for a total of 56.

“(The gazebo) was not used much and was a frequent target of vandalism,” he said.

Sabo said the city will reconfigure the parking lot near the corner of West Frisco Avenue and South Virginia Avenue to make it easier for vehicles to enter and exit.

“Circulation (will) be improved by eliminating diagonally opposite parking, as well as closing the lane entrance/exit to clearly define traffic flow,” he said.

Sabo said officials haven’t discussed whether the park will be renamed, but the area likely won’t be called a park.

“If it’s named at all, it would seem logical to rename it West Frisco Parking Lot,” he said.

Sabo said the gazebo was built in 2011.

Eureka Parks and Recreation Coordinator Lizzie Roberds said the gazebo is the least-praised park facility in town, but has been used for parties and weddings.

Sabo said a rack that can hold up to nine bikes will be added to the lot.

Sabo said the total project cost is around $90,000.

“I anticipate that funds from the capital improvement program will be used for the project,” he said.

Sabo said a portion of the proceeds from Eureka’s sale of its water and sewer system to Missouri American Water can be used to cover capital projects such as parking lot improvements.

“I anticipate that a proposed order authorizing the contract to be entered into will be considered at the December 21 Board of Aldermen meeting,” he said.

Sabo said the gazebo is expected to be removed by the end of this year and improvements to the parking lot will likely begin after early 2022.

“Although the successful bidder will receive a notice to proceed on January 3, the completion date will depend on their workload as well as the weather, as if it is too cold they will not be able to obtain and lay the asphalt. “, did he declare. “Scratching the pitch also requires the air and ground temperature to be at least 40 to 50 degrees.

“Of course, there is also less demand for parking during the winter months, and it will be finished well before spring, when demand starts to increase.”

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Parking spaces

Several shopping malls open their parking spaces to the public at night in Mumbai

About eight malls in the city will offer their parking lots to car owners overnight, for a weekly or overnight fee.

Bringing relief to Mumbaikars, vehicle owners in the city will soon be able to park their cars overnight at no less than 8 multiplexes, spread across the city.

According to the Times of India (TOI) report, the Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA) has recently unveiled its plan to provide parking lots for companies and buildings near several shopping malls. About eight malls such as Growels 101 Mall in Kandivli (E), Infiniti Mall in Andheri (W) and Malad (W), Inorbit Mall (Malad), Phoenix Market City Mall (Kurla), R-City Mall (Ghatkopar), RMall (Mulund) and Phoenix Mall (Lower Parel) will have parking lots for residents.

The report says malls will charge between Rs 2,500 and Rs 3,500 per month for installation. For the uninitiated, around 6,500 vehicles can be parked in the eight malls each night. It will be available between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. and some malls will only offer weekly passes.

The official said, “Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility.”

“This will be especially beneficial for crowded residential settlements where adequate parking is not available and people park their vehicles on the street or at the side of the road,” he added.

City planner Prachi Merchant, a member of the proposed MPA, told TOI, “The plan is ready and the facility should be launched soon. It will take off organically as people learn about it.”

“This effort is part of the proposed MPA’s efforts to create a City Parking Pool (CPP), where all city parking lots will be accessible through a common IT platform in the future. Until then, the BMC is working to get private and commercial entities, residential corporations and government organizations to share their parking spaces for public parking,” she added.

READ| Business trip turns tragic as Ukrainian woman falls to death from 12th floor in Mumbai

Click here for IndiaToday.in’s full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Parking spaces

PHOTOS: City adds 210 paved parking spaces and electric vehicle charging stations to Steamboat rodeo grounds

The City of Steamboat Springs wrapped up an improvement project in November, bringing newly paved parking spaces, electric vehicle charging stations and more to Brent Romick Rodeo Arena in Howelsen Hill Ski Area.
Town of Steamboat Springs/Courtesy Photo

A total of 210 parking spaces are now paved at the Brent Romick Rodeo Arena in Howelsen Hill Ski Area, following the completion of the Steamboat Springs Town Improvement Project.

The project included paving the east side of the rodeo’s existing gravel lot, as well as adding drainage infrastructure, stormwater quality fixtures, sidewalks, lighting and landscaping. The site also now includes nine charging stations for electric vehicles accessible to the public.

The project was partially funded by the Colorado Department of Transportation through a Congestion Mitigation Air Quality Grant, which is intended to support efforts that help improve the quality of air and congestion.



Brent Romick Rodeo Arena at Howelsen Hill Ski Area in Steamboat Springs seen before the 2021 improvement project, which was completed in November.
Town of Steamboat Springs/Courtesy Photo

Steamboat and Routt County readers make the work of Steamboat Pilot & Today possible. Your financial contribution supports our efforts to provide quality and locally relevant journalism.

Now more than ever, your support is essential to help us keep our community informed about the evolution of the coronavirus pandemic and the impact it is having locally. Every contribution, big or small, will make a difference.

Each donation will be used exclusively for development and creating increased media coverage.


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Love’s opens 3 new stores and adds hundreds of parking spaces for large platforms

The new Love’s Travel Stop in Garden City, Georgia is shown.

OKLAHOMA CITY – At a time when it is very difficult to find a safe place to park a large platform, Love’s Travel Stops has created 300 new truck spaces across the country with the opening of three new locations.

The new Love’s stores are located in Bellefontaine, Ohio, Milton, Florida and Garden City, Georgia.

“Opening three locations in one day is no small feat, but our team members are ready to show customers Love’s Highway Hospitality in Bellefontaine, Milton and Garden City,” said Greg Love, Co-CEO of Love’s. “Whether it’s fresh food, snacks or coffee, today’s latest technology or just a place to stretch your legs, Love’s offers the amenities that professional drivers and customers alike. four wheels need when they are on the road.

Together, the new stores created 200 jobs.

Here are the amenities of each store:

Bellefontaine, Ohio

  • Over 13,000 square feet.
  • Hardee. (Opening December 6)
  • 126 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 55 parking spaces.
  • Seven motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Eight showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Milton, Florida

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • that of Arby. (Opening November 22)
  • 88 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 85 parking spaces.
  • Four motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Eight showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Speedco.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

Garden City, Georgia

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Hardee. (Opening November 22)
  • 97 parking spaces for trucks.
  • 63 parking spaces.
  • Three motorhome spaces.
  • Eight diesel compartments.
  • Six showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • CAT scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, helmets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.
Trucker News Staff

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. Trucker News staff are based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Hesperia Park & ​​Ride adds 200 parking spaces – VVNG.com

HESPERIA, CA (VVNG.com) — The Park & ​​Ride located at the southwest corner of US Highway 395 and Joshua Street in Hesperia will soon have additional parking spaces.

Rachel Molina, deputy city manager of Hesperia, told VVNG that the city is expanding by adding 200 more spaces.

Molina said they expect the project to be completed by the end of January 2022.

According to the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, Park & ​​Ride lots provide parking spaces for commuters to park and meet their rideshare or vanpool, or for commuters making transit connections. San Bernardino County Park & ​​Ride lots are free and do not require a permit.

Park & ​​Ride car parks are restricted to daytime use only, overnight parking is not permitted unless carpools are parked in designated carpool overnight parking spaces.

Click on HERE to view the full list of Park & ​​Riee locations.

(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)
hesperia park and ride on joshua street in hesperia
(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)

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Ghaziabad Development Authority selects land for parking spaces at RRTS stations

The Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA) has identified and finalized the proposed land to be made available for vehicle parking at five of the seven stations of the Regional Rapid Transit System (RRTS) project, officials said on Thursday.

GDA officials said that a plot of at least 2,000 square meters (m²) has been identified for the project parking lot, and it is also included in the proposed master plan 2031 which will soon be finalized.

The National Capital Region Transport Corporation (NCRTC), implementing the 82 kilometer long RRTS project attached to 30,274 crore – which is proposed to link Delhi, Ghaziabad and Meerut with high-speed rail connectivity, and is expected to go live in 2025.

Part of it – about 40 km of the route – falls under the jurisdiction of Ghaziabad, where the NCRTC is developing RRTS stations at Sahibabad (land not found), Ghaziabad (already has parking arrangements), Guldhar, Duhai, Muradnagar, Modinagar (South and North).

“Following the traffic and usefulness of the project for commuters, we have identified land in five stations, where at least 2,000 m² of land have been identified. At Modinagar (south) station, the land area is almost 3,000 m². Provision for parking at Ghaziabad railway station is already included in the project. Also, we couldn’t find any land to park near Sahibabad Railway Station,” said Asheesh Shivpuri, Chief Architect and Urban Planner, GDA.

“The land will be handed over to the NCRTC for development and maintenance. It is expected that a 2,000 m² site will accommodate nearly 84 cars or 400 to 500 two-wheelers. The proposal has also been included in the upcoming master plan 2031 and sent to the state government for approval,” Shivpuri added.

According to estimates by GDA officials, a car for parking and taking turns, among other things, requires at least 24m² of space. More two-wheelers will be seen at stations like Modinagar, Muradnagar and Duhai among others, and city stations will have comparatively more cars, they said.

According to the detailed project report, the estimated ridership of the RRTS project is around eight lakh passengers per day. The NCRTC occupies a 17 km stretch between Sahibabad and Duhai in Ghaziabad – as a priority stretch – which will be the first stretch opened for suburban operations in India. It is expected to be open to passengers by March 2023.

Meanwhile, NCRTC officials said they are working closely with local administration and government authorities to provide parking spaces and park-and-ride arrangements based on particular station requirements and vehicle availability. lands.

“At RRTS station locations, feeder roads are provided to separate station-bound traffic from regular road traffic to facilitate traffic operations and avoid traffic jams. Further, for effective multi-modal integration, various space arrangements are made for suitable pick-up and drop-off facilities for various modes linked to RRTS station locations for efficient traffic dispersal,” said Puneet Vats, Relationship Manager (PRO) of the NCRTC.

The RRTS project is expected to provide a better experience for commuters and will also allow commuters to switch from private to public transport, officials said.


  • ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Peeyush Khandelwal writes about a range of issues in Western Uttar Pradesh – from crime to development authorities and infrastructure to transport. Based in Ghaziabad, he has been a journalist for nearly a decade.
    …See the details

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Morley Stanwood students to create parking spots for veterans

MORLEY – A group of Morley Stanwood students are working on a project to provide parking for veterans on school grounds, board members learned at this week’s meeting.

A student-led effort in a leadership class, led by Jay Gross, the new parking spaces will be reserved for veterans visiting the school.

Superintendent Roger Cole said the new parking spaces will be designated with new signage.

“The kids in the leadership class are the ones running the whole show with this project,” Cole said. “They wanted to choose a project in the community and started looking for ways to serve the city. Another school district had done something similar with veterans-only parking signs, and the kids said they wanted to incorporate that into our school.

“Some of the students involved in the idea of ​​the project showed up to the board and presented their plans,” he added. “The board of directors was thrilled with the idea and we gave the green light to complete the project. “


The next step in the project plan is to get the new signage designating the veterans’ parking spaces and have them mounted on a movable cement block for each space.

Cole said the goal of the project for the students is to provide parking for veterans in the area and start doing little things that make a difference in the community.

“The idea is to say that if you are a veteran, you have a designated space to visit our school,” Cole said. “We want to let the veterans know that we appreciate them and want to say thank you. We weren’t going to dedicate the spaces to specific veterans, but instead create spaces for any veterans who might be visiting for a sports game or other event and maintain those spaces for them.

During the meeting, the council also discussed improvements to be made to the outdoor educational space on the north side of the current primary school. The education space was built with the help of a multi-year-old grant that funded the construction of the school when the primary building was used as a college, but it has fallen into disrepair over the years in due to less frequent maintenance.

The council discussed ongoing plans to revitalize the space to make it usable for educational purposes.

“There is a lot of interest in reviving the space into something we can use for teachers and students,” Cole said. “We want to take the time to make it a space where children can come and learn. It will be a closed steel structure that will withstand the elements better, and we look forward to how the space will be used by our teachers as there will be a lot of learning opportunities. “

If the plan is approved, the proposal is to completely demolish the space and rebuild and upgrade the space to include more area and year-round use. Cole said the newly constructed structure is expected to be a unique new addition to the school grounds.

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Luton Council boss receives ‘extremely hostile’ reception for car park cuts ‘which will kill business’

The chief executive of Luton Council received a hostile reception from business owners angry at parking cuts, during a trip to High Town.

Robin Porter had visited the conservation area along High Town Road last week after business bosses said plans to drastically reduce their parking spaces for a new housing estate would drive away shoppers.

Estate agent Mohammed Shahid said Mr Porter faced angry shopkeepers.

Barriers around the Ville Haute car park

“It was extremely hostile,” he said. “Business people feel very disappointed.”

He has now started a petition in the area calling on the council to rethink its plans to remove 28 public parking spaces, which businesses fear will drive away customers who cannot park. Merchants will be left with only 12 places for themselves and the customers they say.

“We were not consulted on the plan,” he said. “We were all taken by surprise.

“All businesses have been closed during the shutdowns and some are barely surviving. The loss of parking closes a lifeline, they will close.”

The warning of advice to traders

Mr Shadid said since parking spaces were removed to accommodate a new development of flats, there has been chaos on the road, with people parking in yellow lines or on the pavement.

“The parking lot has been around for 45 years,” he said. “We all have to find somewhere else to park. The general manager has witnessed chaos in the area with people parking on double yellow lines.”

Dorota Bodniewicz lives and works in High Town and said: “It’s ridiculous what’s happened here. They’re literally killing businesses as customers struggle to park. They’re just killing the area.

“The council is keeping its fingers crossed that we get used to it.”

Twenty-eight places were lost

The petition states: “Luton City Council has failed to properly consider the impact of the loss of these car parks and has made no proposals regarding alternative parking arrangements.

“The construction process has already started and is progressing rapidly. This will significantly reduce the level of on-street parking in the area, but will also remove the vast majority of long-term parking in the High Town Road commercial area.

“This long-term parking lot is used by both local residents and people who work in businesses and shops in the upper town. This change will also impact people with reduced mobility and parents with strollers who again rely on the ability to park closer to the store or business they are visiting.”

And he calls on the council to rethink the situation. “We are asking the Upper Town Councilors and the Chief Executive of Luton Council to reconsider LBC’s decision and retain this vital parking resource on High Town Rd / Brunswick Street. Alternatively, to allocate an appropriate number of spaces to accommodate relocation within the local (High Town Road, Brunswick Street and Back Street) at a distance equal to that of the existing Brunswick Street car park.

A council spokesperson said: “The council is committed to investing in redundant sites across Luton to meet the needs of residents. In High Town in particular, we have recently invested £275,000 in improving street lighting and additional funds to facilitate public realm improvements at the junction of High Town Road and Burr Street.

“The new High Town development supplied by Foxhall Homes on the former Taylor Street car park, will improve the area and provide large family homes, which are rare in Luton. There will be 23 homes for sale between individuals and nine homes for rent affordable..

“As part of our aim to make Luton a carbon neutral city by 2040, we are committed to encouraging the use of local facilities that are easily accessible on foot or by bike and believe this development will benefit retailers across the area as it will bring new buyers to the locality.

“Once the work in progress is complete, there will be 12 spaces for public use, accessible from Brunswick Street and the 27 spaces, accessible via Back Street, for private parking.

“There are other pay and display car parks on Wenlock Street and Hitchin Road within a few minutes walk. There is a full bus service and a mainline rail station less than 0.2 mile away.

“We continue to work and engage with local businesses, not just in the Upper Town but across Luton, to achieve our Luton 2040 goal of having a city where everyone thrives and no one lives in poverty.”

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Drivers who occupy two parking spaces, you piss me off

There are certain things in life that annoy me. For some reason, the majority of annoying things in my life involve chewing vehicles and people. One of the most irritating things is people taking up two spots in a parking lot, especially when it’s full.

With the holiday shopping season in full swing, the worst lots will be at the mall, Consumer Square and major retail stores everywhere. The scenario that really triggered me today was the parking lot at one of the local restaurants I frequent. Who would have thought that the Tuesday morning crowds would lead to a mad dash for easy parking. But, of course, there was a perfectly good spot that was hampered by a jerk in a white Mercedes.

Now I can understand some circumstances where you as a driver are forced into a position where you end up looking like the jerk based on how others around you have parked, but in most cases, there is a gross lack of care for other motorists and diners/buyers. I understand that you don’t want your car to be “bumped” or “damaged”, but no one wants to damage your vehicle either. No one wants to be left without a parking space either. In fact, they’re more likely to want to “ring” your car if you’re a jerk.

Other factors that can contribute to inadvertent double parking or parking in two places are snow in the winter. Now obviously it’s harder to see the lines of the terrain, but you have to use common sense and logic when it comes to figuring out the best way to give other cars enough space. When you go out shopping this year, keep these thoughts in mind so you don’t look like the jerk in the white Mercedes.

Check out these bizarre moments captured on CNY Ring doorbells

More and more people are replacing their old doorbells with RING or other video doorbell systems. It’s really amazing what this new technology can do. The video and audio quality of these devices is so good that in some cases the captured images have helped police solve crimes. These images are from bizarre moments captured by RING users.

What You Need to Know About New York’s Marijuana Legalization Law

On March 31, 2021, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill legalizing adult cannabis use, called the New York State Cannabis/Marijuana Regulation & Tax Act. Here are the 13 things you need to know about New York State law

Route 5 8 12 Construction in Utica, New York

Route 5 8 12 Construction in Utica, New York

The hamlets of Oneida County, New York

Have you ever heard of a hamlet? No, not Shakespeare’s character. It is a small settlement, usually smaller than a village, and there are several in Oneida County. Some are more common than you might think. Others, which you’ve probably never heard of unless you live there.

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Parking spaces

Property of London: the posh city where parking spaces sell for £ 5million

Central London has become so expensive that parking spaces are selling in the millions.

Estate agents in the upscale neighborhoods of Kensington and Chelsea are full of lists of parking spots costing six figures.

A variety of private parking spaces are listed with the real estate agent John D Wood & Co in some of the most luxurious streets of the capital.

A parking space has been put up for sale at Kingston House South in Knightsbridge for £ 350,000.

READ MORE: Harrods parking space is on sale for £ 250,000 and people are ‘very frustrated’

But in its last sale in March 2016, it grossed an unimaginable amount of £ 5,050,000.

A four bedroom house in the borough is listed for around £ 5million on Zoopla.



Parking spaces across Kensington and Chelsea cost a staggering amount

The three-meter-wide parking space has its own metal gate and is half a mile from South Kensington Station.

A parking space opposite Harrods costs £ 250,000 and has its own private entrance and 24 hour security.

Luxury buyers can even take a 360-degree virtual reality tour of the location to make sure it’s perfect for their supercar.

The high demand for private parking in central London has also led to much more usual parking spaces costing a tempting sum.

A double parking space next to Gloucester Road tube station is available for £ 150,000.

Potential buyers can get a mortgage to help pay for the place, but it will cost £ 572 per month for the next 25 years.

Meanwhile, at Holland Park, a 10-foot-wide parking spot will set you back £ 119,000.

The dramatic prices of parking spaces are reflected in the prices of housing throughout the borough.

A mansion in Chelsea is listed on Rightmove for £ 35million and the average property in Knightsbridge costs £ 2.83million, according to the Foxtons estate agency.

Kensington and Chelsea council said it was in desperate need of housing due to the borough’s huge prices.



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City Councilor Johnny Thalassites, responsible for environment, planning and venue, said: ‘We are in desperate need of housing and as a borough with some of the most expensive land and property in the UK – it’s very frustrating to see a six-digit number. price tag on a parking space and discouraging for those looking to climb the property ladder.

“This is a major challenge for us as a city council as we seek to build new homes. Despite the challenge, we are making progress, with the first of our 600 new homes – 300 on social rent – currently under construction on Hewer Street and Kensal Road.

John D Wood & Co Director Matthew Harrop said: “These parking spaces have traditionally attracted shoppers with classic cars and motorcycles and expensive or rare cars which, if left on the street, are in danger of falling. ” be stolen or damaged.

“The spaces have excellent security recognized by the Safer Parking Scheme award; with a 24 hour concierge desk, entry barrier, security video cameras throughout, electric gates and an automated key.

“Closed garages that were built in the 1950s-1970s are now often too narrow for modern cars and as such are popular with homeowners who want storage right on their doorstep – which is. more practical than renting a storage room which could be a 30-. minutes by car.

“We have also seen an increase in the popularity of garage spaces as more of these garages have electric charging points that allow owners to safely charge their cars on the main street at night. “

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Parking spaces

Where are the affordable parking spaces near Camperdown Plaza in Greenville?

Juniper, the rooftop space of the AC Hotel Greenville Downtown at Camperdown Plaza.

Question: Where is Greenville affordable public parking for Camperdown Plaza? The Falls Park lots are identified as hotel and Juniper only. Valet parking costs $ 30! The Broad Street pop-up bundle costs $ 10. Didn’t the city help fund this project? Where is their public parking lot?

Reply: Camperdown’s large mixed-use development on Main and Broad streets has public improvement costs of nearly $ 20 million funded by taxpayers, according to a Greenville News article from September 2020.

Following: Camperdown project in downtown Greenville costs taxpayers $ 20 million

Beth Brotherton, a spokesperson for the City of Greenville, said there were several city-owned parking lots within walking distance of Camperdown Plaza.

They are as follows:

Poinsett Garage: 0.1 mile (less than 3 minutes on foot)

Riverplace Garage: 0.2 mile (less than 5 minutes on foot)

River Street Garage: 2 miles

Broad Street Garage: 0.2 miles

Spring Street Garage: 0.3 mile (5 minute walk)

This map shows the public parking lots near Camperdown on South Main Street

This map shows the public parking lots near Camperdown on South Main Street

(Walking distance and map information were extracted using Google Maps, according to Brotherton.)

There is no charge for the first hour in the garages. The cost for the second hour is $ 2. Each additional hour costs $ 1 with a daily maximum of $ 7, according to Brotherton.

Do you have a question you want answered? Email it to me at [email protected] or mail it to Angelia Davis, 32 E. Broad St., Greenville, SC 29601.

This article originally appeared on Greenville News: Ask Angelia: Where To Find Affordable Parking Near Camperdown

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Parking spaces

Lack of security in paid parking places angers SHC – Pakistan

KARACHI: The Sindh High Court on Tuesday expressed its anger at the Karachi Metropolitan Corporation (KMC) for charging money for parking cars and motorcycles in different areas without providing any security and other facilities.

A bench of two judges led by Judge Zafar Ahmed Rajput objected to the failure of the parking lot instructed by the director of the District Municipal Corporation-South to file comments despite the court’s earlier directives.

He ordered her to be present on December 1 and to file paralegal comments on the next hearing without fail.

The bench noted that despite the collection of parking fees, there was no facility or protection for vehicles, which were stolen from these parking spaces.

Bench points out that people’s vehicles are stolen despite paying parking fees

A petition has been filed against provincial, road and local authorities asking for directions to remove illegal and illegal parking spaces and keep traffic flowing on the roads of the provincial metropolis.

The petitioner also sought an injunction against the respondents to charge high and excess charges for the parking of vehicles.

He argued that “double parking” was illegally permitted on various arteries in the city, causing massive traffic jams.

Citing the Chief Secretary of Sindh, Commissioner of Karachi, DIG Traffic Police, KMC, Paid Parking, DMC-Sud and others as defendants, the petitioner added that there were many illegal parking lots being managed. by private parties in collusion with the defendants. without any auction or legal route.

Just last month, another CHS bench, at the hearing of another petition filed against paid parking, ordered DIG Traffic and all DMCs to file comments on November 29 and also help the court whether there was any structure available to regulate paid parking in Karachi.

The bench also asked the authorities under which law parking fees were charged to citizens and who had authorized the parking of vehicles on the roads because in several areas both sides of the lanes were used for parking disrupting traffic.

A citizen filed a petition stating that the Supreme Court clearly prohibited relevant authorities from charging fees under the guise of parking, but respondents still charged such fees in different parts of the city using public spaces in violation of the Supreme Court . order.

Posted in Dawn, le 10 November 2021

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