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NYC parking spots now go for $600,000

Major US cities can tip the price of automated parking garages in New York currently being sold with its multimillion-dollar condos and co-ops: price tags of $300,000 to $600,000.

Futuristic parking lots, equipped with robotic lifts, can cost $1 million to install and install more cars than a standard garage, because they have no horizontal ramps or traffic lanes, CNBC Reports.

Scarce, high-tech amenities can cost every space expensive, as parking, already very expensive in New York City, is likely only to get worse as the city installs more bike lanes and imposes additional tolls.

One of these garages is at 121 East 22n/a Street, a condominium near Gramercy Park. Lori Alf bought one of the spaces in the garage for $300,000, to go along with the $9.15million five-bedroom apartment she gave her kids, who are now spending more time in Manhattan .

All Alf and his kids have to do to park the family’s Porsche Cayenne is go to the kiosk in the garage and wave a small radio frequency identification card. Then they press a button on the kiosk and the elevator in the kiosk takes the car below ground level to the garage, where no humans are allowed.

Before parking the car, cameras scan it to make sure its doors and trunk are closed and there are no stray objects or humans in the kiosk.

Picking up the car is the same process in reverse. Parking and summoning the car only takes 2 minutes and 15 seconds.

One perk that Alf particularly likes is that when she’s ready to leave, the kiosk turns her car to face the street.

“Who doesn’t live for a robot that points you in the right direction in New York?” Alf said.

CNBC found another automated garage at 520 West 28e Street, where parking spaces start at $450,000. Another, at 220 Central Park South, had parking spaces listed for $750,000. Corcoran Realty says its luxury garage apartment listings cost at least $595,000 per space.

Affluent buyers not only appreciate the convenience of robotic parking garages, but also the fact that they are completely private, safe and sanitary, the latter of which has been a concern for buyers since the eruption of the coronavirus pandemic.

The astronomical asking prices for parking spaces in New York City made the $300,000 cost seem practical to Alf.

As his broker at Douglas Elliman, Senada Adzem, said, “As crazy as it sounds, $300,000 for a residential parking space is considered a fair price in New York.”

What about charging electric vehicles? It will only cost you $50,000 more.

© 2022 Newsmax Finance. All rights reserved.

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Parking spaces

NYC parking spots now go for $600,000

Major US cities can tip the price of New York’s automated parking spaces that are currently being sold alongside its multimillion-dollar condos and co-ops: price tags of $300,000 to $600,000.

Futuristic parking lots, equipped with robotic lifts, can cost $1 million to install and install more cars than a standard garage, because they have no horizontal ramps or traffic lanes, CNBC Reports.

Scarce high-tech amenities can cost a lot per space, as parking, already very expensive in New York City, is likely to only get worse as the city installs more bike lanes and imposes additional tolls.

One of these garages is at 121 East 22n/a Street, a condominium near Gramercy Park. Lori Alf bought one of the spaces in the garage for $300,000, to go along with the $9.15million five-bedroom apartment she gave her kids, who are now spending more time in Manhattan .

All Alf and his kids have to do to park the family’s Porsche Cayenne is go to the kiosk in the garage and wave a small radio frequency identification card. Then they press a button on the kiosk and the elevator in the kiosk takes the car below ground level to the garage, where no humans are allowed.

Before parking the car, cameras scan it to make sure its doors and trunk are closed and there are no stray objects or humans in the kiosk.

Picking up the car is the same process in reverse. Parking and summoning the car only takes 2 minutes and 15 seconds.

One perk that Alf particularly likes is that when she’s ready to leave, the kiosk turns her car to face the street.

“Who doesn’t live for a robot that points you in the right direction in New York?” Alf said.

CNBC found another automated garage at 520 West 28e Street, where parking spaces start at $450,000. Another, at 220 Central Park South, had parking spaces listed for $750,000. Corcoran Realty says its luxury apartment listings with garages cost at least $595,000 per space.

Affluent buyers not only appreciate the convenience of robotic parking garages, but also the fact that they are completely private, safe and sanitary, the latter of which has been a concern for buyers since the eruption of the coronavirus pandemic.

The astronomical asking prices for parking spaces in New York City made the $300,000 cost seem practical to Alf.

As his broker at Douglas Elliman, Senada Adzem, said, “As crazy as it sounds, $300,000 for a residential parking space is considered a fair price in New York.”

What about charging electric vehicles? It will only cost you $50,000 more.

© 2022 Newsmax Finance. All rights reserved.

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Parking spaces

Drivers are urged to rent unused parking spaces to potentially earn £2,500

With the rising cost of living, motorists are looking for ways to earn extra money and research with the car insurance company Comparethemarket revealed that renting an unused parking space can be a great way to do this. Experts added that it was possible to earn over £2,500 a year.

The study also shared the top cities where drivers can get the most out of renting their parking spots. Almost one in two Britons (47%) are considering taking up additional employment and looking for additional sources of income.

And, some Britons are turning to renting out their parking spaces, experts say. A parking space can add an average of £14,275 to a property’s value, according to the study.

More importantly, however, by analyzing the average cost of renting a private parking space in 30 of the most populous UK cities, Comparethemarket found that Britons could earn just over £2,500 a year.

Drivers could earn an average of £209 a month just by renting out their private parking space to other drivers. Unsurprisingly, London is where motorists could earn the most from renting private parking spaces, with an annual earning potential of just over £7,000.

READ MORE: Drivers warned to ‘never’ buy fuel at some gas stations

Although significantly less profitable than London, Glasgow and Cardiff rank second and third among the best cities for earning extra income. At the opposite end of the scale, those in Stoke-on-Trent could earn an average of £91 a month renting out their space – the lowest of any city surveyed.

Leicester and Derby followed in second and third cheapest places, with an average monthly parking price of £99 and £100 per month. However, drivers considering renting their lanes have been advised to follow certain steps to stay safe and ensure the money is in their bank account. These are:

Create a contract

Make it clear that you are not responsible for damage to someone else’s vehicle on your property.

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The news comes after experts warned cashless parking scams are on the rise and are targeting the younger generation. These days, drivers can struggle to find a parking machine that accepts cash.

Most of them take cards or require road users to scan QR codes to pay online. As a result, scammers have resorted to replacing QR codes with fake ones in order to steal personal information and money.

By placing their own QR codes on parking kiosks, fraudsters are often able to trick drivers into giving them their card details or making a fake payment. According to reports, several websites across the UK have already been flagged.

Katherine Hart of Trading Standards said the scam was “very much on the rise”. Ms Hart added: ‘It’s another way to harvest data or phish personal information and steal our money. This type of scam often targets the younger generation who are more likely to use their smartphones to make payments. »

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Parking spaces

San Antonio airport to add 1,000 parking spaces as holiday approaches

SAN ANTONIO – Vacationers departing from San Antonio International will have additional parking spaces and gates available.

Two new surface lots will add 1,000 seats – an increase of around 10% – and the airport is on track to open three new gates in December and January.

Additionally, people will be able to pre-pay for valet parking. Airport manager Jesus Saenz said this will help officials get a good idea of ​​how many people they can expect during the holidays.

“We have to change and adapt to the number of users we have in parking lots today,” Saenz said.

READ MORE: 10 cheap flights this month from San Antonio International Airport

By the end of September, the airport’s two car parks had closed at least 50 times this year because they had reached capacity. And Saenz said the short-term garage has continued to face closures every week since then. The airport could privatize its car park down the road, but for now adding more space will have to suffice.

The closing of garages outside peak periods indicates growth, Saenz said.

“When you look at the overall geographic radius of airport users, it expands,” he said.

Airport visitors may also notice a change when going through security. Saenz said the Terminal B security checkpoint added a line last week. Saenz said it takes an average of less than 10 minutes to get through Transportation Security Administration checkpoints.

REALIZED : San Antonio airport difficulties explained: short runways, lack of travelers, etc.

The additional 1,000 surface spaces would bring the airport to nearly 11,000, Saenz said. The new ones will only be used if the rest fills up. People parking on the surface lots will take shuttle buses to get to the terminals.

Construction of a new gate at Terminal B for United Airlines is underway at San Antonio International Airport on Wednesday, October 12, 2022.

San Antonio Express-News/Staff photographer Kin Man Hui

The overflow spaces span two vacant surface lots that Saenz said the airport already owns but has not used for customer parking. One of them housed a hangar demolished two years ago.

Surface parking at the airport costs customers $8 per day. The short-term garage is $27 per day and the long-term lot is $16 per day. Valet parking has a daily price of $33.

READ MORE: As other Texans continue to pay less, San Antonio airfares return to pre-pandemic standards

The airport is also on track to increase its total of 24 gates to 27 in the coming months. Terminal B will add two and Terminal A will add one.

Gate B9 will open on December 9, A16 will arrive on December 22, and B1a will arrive on January 11.

American Airlines will use Gate B9 and will no longer be shared between Terminals A and B. B1a will serve United Airlines. Gate A16 will be a common use gate.

The three new gates, Saenz said, are expected to increase the airport’s overall boardings by 1.3 million passengers.

Saenz said additional gates are coming just in time to Return of Spirit Airlines to the airport on November 17. The airline will use Terminal A.

RELATED: Here are the most popular flight destinations from San Antonio International Airport

And more gates are on the way in the coming years as the airport continues its efforts to open Terminal C by 2028. This could bring the total number of gates to 37.

In December, the airport will ask the city council to consider a $32 million contract with Freese and Nichols to manage the project and construction. The contract is just one of many that will be part of the $1.2 billion terminal project. In Junethe board approved a $3.8 million contract for Terminal C planning services with Dallas-based Corgan Associates.

The construction of Terminal C is one of the first stages of the development of the airport 20-year $2.5 billion master plan to redo the airport.


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Parking spaces

A new way to buy parking spaces in residential buildings in Hungary

Significant changes have been introduced in Hungary from May 2, 2022 regarding parking spaces in parking garages.1 Unlike the old regime where a property registered as a “parking garage” included several parking spaces and was co-owned by several co-owners, it is now possible to separately register each parking space in a car park as a separate parking property. The co-owners’ legal right of first refusal will no longer apply to separate parking lots. In the context of sale and purchase transactions where the parking space is located in a co-ownership car park, the notification to the co-owners as beneficiaries of the legal right of pre-emption is also now possible by a simple announcement instead of send separate letters to each individual co-owner. This has already been used sometimes in practice but always with great uncertainty. These changes should facilitate and speed up the process of selling parking spaces.

Problems with previous legislation

To better understand the legal context, three aspects must be considered. From a planning point of view, in case of new residential developments, at least one parking space had to be provided for each apartment (and local municipalities can still prescribe the provision of one space, at most). Since building parking spaces has never been a profitable business, the developers never really intended to build more parking spaces than needed. While the availability of parking spaces in a residential building is limited, people prefer to buy an apartment with a parking space. From the point of view of the cadastre, a separate parking space could not be registered in the cadastre as real estate itself, but only the floor of the parking garage in which it was located; thus all parking spaces on the same level of a garage constituted a single property. This level of parking was the common property of those who owned a parking space in the parking lot. Last but not least, from the owner’s point of view, this made it difficult to sell the parking spaces because each co-owner on the parking level had a legal right of first refusal (ROFR) if one of the other co-owners decided to sell their participation in the parking lot.

One of the common problems in recent years has been the sale of parking spaces in condominium parking lots located in condominiums. As the sale of a parking space generally takes place with the seller’s apartment in the co-ownership, the ROFR legal notification has considerably slowed down the operation of the joint sale of the parking space and the apartment.

To expedite the process, for many joint owners, it has become a market practice to notify each beneficiary of the ROFR by means of a written notice posted on the bulletin board of the joint ownership, without direct notification to each joint owner by mail. recommended. This led to divergent practices in the land registers, as in some cases an attestation from the common representative of the co-ownership of posting such a notice was accepted, while in other cases it was not. .

Possibility of warning by an announcement

Previously, if a co-owner decided to sell his participation (parking space) at the level of the parking lot of the co-ownership, the request for registration of the purchaser’s title on the participation had to be accompanied by the co-owner’s declaration of renunciation. owners as beneficiaries of the ROFR. Or failing that, by the acknowledgment of receipt/delivery receipt proving that the beneficiaries of the ROFR have been informed and have not exercised their ROFR within the time limit. In exceptional cases, it was possible for the seller to substitute the proof when delivering the ROFR notice with a joint declaration of the contracting parties indicating that the place of residence or other circumstances of the beneficiary would make the notification extremely difficult or would cause undue delay. However, this provision has not been consistently interpreted in case law. Sometimes it has been upheld by the courts, but there have been cases where it has been decided that if no separate postal notification had been given to the recipient of the ROFR (referring to “extreme hardship” above), and the ROFR recipient became aware of the sale from any source within three years, they could challenge the sale and exercise the ROFR. This decision has created some uncertainty as to the application of contracts entered into within the dispute period and the application of the parties’ declaration in lieu of ROFR notice.

The new rules specify the practice from May 2, 2022, for covered parking lots in condominiums. If the property to which the ROFR applies is registered in a condominium as separate immovable property and its use is shown on the cadastral sheet as “parking garage”, it is acceptable to submit, instead of a acknowledgment of receipt or a delivery receipt (as indicated above), a statement from the common representative or the chairman of the co-ownership management committee. The declaration must mention that the offer to purchase has been posted on the bulletin board of the co-ownership. The new rules make life easier in several ways. First, the new possibility shortens the process of notifying ROFR beneficiaries, because sellers don’t have to spend months digging up co-owners’ addresses and trying to send notices by registered mail. Second, there is no need to send a separate letter to each individual co-owner, so the seller can reduce their own administrative and financial burden related to the notification requirement.

Introduction of a “parking space” as a separate property

Since May 2, 2022, the law defines “the parking space” as a separate property, that is to say as “an area intended for the reception of a vehicle within the confines of a building intended for the storage of vehicles, one side of which is connected to an access road leading to the parking spaces, and the other three sides of which are delimited by a permanent physical marking on the ground of the premises or by a wall. In addition, the area must also meet the dimensional requirements set by law to be classified as a parking space.

The new legislation helps owners of condominiums developing or developing in the future. It will be possible to register the parking spaces as separate properties in the cadastre during the constitution of the co-ownership, without creating any co-ownership in the parking garage.

In the case of existing and condominium parking lots, it is possible for owners to create real estate (parking spaces) separate from each parking space located in the condominium parking lot if the parking spaces meet the legal requirements. However, to do this, all owners must accept and sign an amendment to the founding deed of the co-ownership. Getting all owners to sign such an amendment can be a difficult task.

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What’s up with y’all going back to parking lots?

Shutterstock images.

First of all-

“You guys? I think we all need a home meeting”

Second, I put the above tweet out into the universe this morning after waiting in a parking lot behind two different people to return to their parking spots. Personally, I have no problem with people doing this, I was just curious about the thinking that goes into habit development.

Has it always seemed like a lot of work up front to save some time in the background? Basically a net zero. A wash. Right?

Turns out I was very wrong.

Some of the answers informed me of shit I had no idea.

For instance-

Is it true? Makes sense I guess.

I had no idea.

The newspaper – Backing into a parking spot gives you better control and makes it easier to maneuver out of the space. If you think parking in reverse is difficult, trying to get your car out of a tight spot when you’ve parked in front is much harder.

These days, with most new cars equipped with rear view cameras and parking assistance systems, it’s easier than ever to reverse park.

By the way, I’m talking about inversion in spaces perpendicular to the wall or perimeter. I am clearly not talking about parallel parking which should only be attempted in reverse.

So here are the reasons why reverse parking is the only option:

  1. It’s safer. When you back into a space, you enter a designated space with no vehicular or pedestrian traffic. By parking in reverse, you avoid blindly backing into oncoming traffic or the path of pedestrians. You can see your surroundings more clearly.
  2. In an emergency, it’s much faster to get in your vehicle and get out straight away. It could also be considered a security measure.
  3. Backing up close to a wall can deter thieves from breaking into your trunk because there won’t be enough space for them to work.
  4. Driving into a parking space is a false economy in terms of overall maneuvering time and safety. You’ll spend just as much time (if not more) trying to safely get out of space in traffic, so it only makes sense that you’d do it safely in empty space.
  5. If something were to happen to your engine – say, you leave your headlights on and the battery dies – you’ll have easy access to the hood if you’re in reverse.
  6. It’s more fuel efficient. According to a study by the Institute of Advanced Motorists, reported by Aviva UK, reversing out of a parking space with a cold engine consumes 20 to 25 times more fuel in the first few seconds than a warm engine. Doing this several times a week adds up in terms of fuel costs, not to mention engine wear.

Holy shit. Thanks Bob Max.

Have I been doing this all wrong this whole time or are people like that just badass?

True story.

Also you can never forget the repo man.

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Parking spaces

Oldest Brewery in Rochester Adds 20 Parking Spaces – Post Bulletin

ROCHESTER – Kinney Creek has always had a challenge with customer parking in its nearly 10 years in business.

Now parking options for people wanting to sample Med City Seltzer on tap are much easier as the brewery has purchased the land that once housed Zorba’s Greek restaurant, adding 20 more parking spaces for people.

“We have a big parking lot out back, but it’s behind our building and not everyone always sees it or knows about it,” said Lindsay Hendrickson, marketing specialist for Kinney Creek. “We have tried to add a lot of additional signage, so people know where to park and we are also seeing an increase in the number of customers in general. So it was time to finally have more parking spaces and something a little more accessible for all our customers.

Increased business over the past few years has led Kinney Creek to several additions to the brewery, such as the addition of patio seating in front of the main entrance to accommodate COVID-19 distancing during closures.

While parking for Kinney Creek business has always been available behind the building, many beer lovers have had to park on the streets of the residential area off Seventh Avenue. Now, with new parking spaces available, that won’t be a problem for Kinney Creek customers.

To help people get to know the new parking lot better, Hendrickson will repurpose the old Zobra sign into the Kinney Creek logo.

“I’m going to continue with the same kind of stuff that we already have, like some of the signs that we have outside are kind of this maroon red, trying to get the two logos there. I will also try to make sure our seltzers are showcased there as well,” she said. “Because a lot of our signage was done when we were just selling beer and this will be the first big permanent sign that we’re going to have our Med City Seltzers there.

People wishing to stop at Kinney Creek for a beer or seltzer can park in the parking lot of the old Zobra at any time.

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Parking spaces

Distribute parking spaces, LDA tells builders

The Chief Town Planner of the Lahore Development Authority (LDA) informed the Lahore High Court on Friday that all new buildings and plazas being constructed in the provincial capital have been given strict orders to specify the areas of parking as part of the new master plan.

The Chief Town Planner revealed that “59 buildings have been parked on the roads, of which 19 buildings have obtained stay orders from local courts for their illegal acts”. He made the revelation before Judge Shahid Karim of the LHC hearing petitions asking for direction from government authorities to take action to overcome the smog problem in the province.

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“LDA took a long time to push the city [Lahore] at this stage of destruction and now it would take time for it to get better, “said Judge Karim, inviting the authorities concerned to provide details on the buildings whose parking facilities have been made on the roads. Judge Karim also remarked that “the situation can only be improved with the improvement of public transport”. The CTP, however, told the court that in the master plan policy documents, builders were instructed to provide enough space for parking.

He said student data from 59 schools that caused traffic problems in the city was also sought. “It is an injustice to the city of Lahore that the plazas have not provided parking areas for people visiting them,” the CTP said, regretting the worsening traffic jam situation and traffic problems. parking. Advocate Syed Muazzam Ali Shah, the petitioner’s lawyer, argued that laws regarding parking lots with public and private buildings already exist, but unfortunately public and private buildings and squares do not provide specific areas for parking. parking.

The lawyer said parking on the roads not only causes traffic problems in the city, but also pollutes the air. He also argued that using the licensed building for “other purposes” also caused environmental problems. During the proceedings, Judge Karim also expressed serious concerns about the failure of the authorities concerned to implement the orders given to prevent farmers from setting fire to crop residues.

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The judge summoned deputy commissioners from four districts in Punjab, including Gujranwala, Kasur, Okara and Hafizabad, where he was told that leftover crops were being burned in the fields. The judge observed that the school education department should step in and conduct an awareness campaign among the children. He also observed that students should be trained through internship programs to deal with environmental issues.

The court also noted that the heat wave was another threat to the security of their cities and expressed serious concerns about the combustion residues in four districts of Punjab, including Gujranwala, Kasur, Okara and Hafizabad. The court also requested an implementation report from the relevant authorities and postponed the rehearing to September 18.

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Parking spaces

Residents welcome new parking spaces

A further £750,000 will be invested over the next two years to improve car parking in borough housing estates.

Plans are currently set to create over 260 additional parking spaces by the end of the project in locations such as Malinslee, Dawley Bank, Brookside and Dawley & Aqueduct, among others.

The team has already delivered over 170 places, with 85 more to come by the end of this year and additional sites are also being assessed by engineers.

The majority of the new spaces were assigned on the recommendation of ward members at the request of residents, in an effort to ease parking restrictions.

Councilor Lee Carter, Cabinet Member for Neighborhood Services, Regeneration and Main Street, said: ‘A number of estates were designed at a time when most households only had one car. This is no longer the case today and feedback from residents indicates that it is a welcome measure to alleviate parking issues.

“While we can never fix the problem on every area, we are doing what we can to invest and balance the need to make things better for residents while preserving green spaces.”

The investment comes as more than £16million is being invested across the borough in projects that will make the borough cleaner, greener, safer and more enjoyable. This is on top of the £50million already allocated to neighborhood and law enforcement services.

The Pride in Our Community program will provide infrastructure improvements including roads, trails, parking, sustainable transportation, street furniture, drains and structures.

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New twist on parking spaces during pandemic reaps benefits

After Toronto allowed some on-street parking spaces on major roads to be used as patios during the pandemic, analysis suggested it generated far more revenue than when they were originally used.Carlos Osorio/The Globe and Mail

When the creators of SimCity designed their virtual world, they realized they couldn’t represent metropolises accurately: there would have to be so many parking lots that the game wouldn’t be fun.

In real cities, the pandemic has shed new light on those acres of urban land, prompting many places to start using space in more valuable ways. Meanwhile, a growing push for sustainability had already sparked new thinking about the vast swathes of land dedicated to car storage.

In a Montreal arena, children are now playing in a space that was once used as a parking lot. Several parking lots in Winnipeg have been transformed into popular beer gardens. A mid-rise wood building is planned to replace a parking lot in downtown Toronto, where space for 37 vehicles is slated to become 100 rental apartments.

But this trend has sometimes progressed haltingly, where big goals have fallen victim to local backlash.

Opinion: How cities have built way too many parking spaces – and made housing even more expensive

Vancouver’s plan to charge more to park the dirtiest vehicles, as part of the city’s response to climate change, failed in a close vote in council last October. Regina recently approved another downtown parking lot. Calgary has announced plans to bar residents of most tall buildings from obtaining on-street parking permits, but recently backtracked in the face of local opposition and will instead charge a fee of up to $150 a year . And Toronto seems ready to keep most on-street parking when Kensington Market is revampeda downtown district that attracts a large number of pedestrians.

However, the larger pattern is a gradual dismantling of the decades-old assumption that more parking is inherently better.

In 2020, Edmonton became the first Canadian city to remove minimum parking requirements on developments. These rules, which require developers to include fixed amounts of parking, are based on pseudo-science rather than rigorous standards, said academic Donald Shoup, author of the founding book The high cost of free parking.

More than a dozen Canadian cities have followed suit, removing parking minimums in at least part of their area, according to a study by advocacy group Strong Towns.

Perhaps the biggest recent shift in attitudes towards parking has been the recognition of the value that can be foregone by using desirable urban real estate as car storage.

After Toronto allowed some on-street parking spaces on major roads to be used as patios during the pandemic, analysis suggested it generated far more revenue than when they were originally used.

COVID-19 has changed public spaces, but many cities have moved backwards

Researchers for an Association of Local Business Improvement Areas estimates customers spent $181 million in the redesigned parking spaces in the summer of 2021. The same spaces would have generated $3.7 million in parking revenue, depending on local parking authorityand even that modest figure assumed pre-pandemic demand levels.

“Sidewalks have long been one of the most important spaces in cities, and at the same time, in many cities they’ve been kind of forgotten as an afterthought, and there’s been a kind of failure to use them to parking,” said Alex Engel, spokesperson for NACTO, an association of urban transportation officials that counts several Canadian cities as members.

Parking in residential areas tends to pay even less.

In Vancouver, only in the city’s west end is the price of a parking permit allowed to increase at the market rate – with current permit holders being spared the increase. In other areas, an annual residential parking pass costs as little as 14 cents per day. And in much of the city, no permits are required.

“New York City may be the poster child for this, with vast areas of very high density and mixed use, but free street parking,” said Paul Barter, consultant and founder of the blog and podcast. Reinvent parking.

“People are screaming blue murder: ‘You’re stealing our precious parking spaces.’ The irony is that these ‘precious spaces’ are free. If they are so valuable, why are they free?”

Making public space available for much less than the equivalent real estate cost in expensive cities creates perverse incentives: for most residents, it is much cheaper to fill their garage with stuff and leave the car on the street than to rent a storage unit.

And the unrealized value of a parking space can also be measured in a less financial way.

An April council vote in Toronto approving mid-rise wooden apartment buildings in this downtown parking lot – more than half of which will be affordable – was part of a larger campaign to transform the parking lot in places of entertainment, parks and cultural sites.

“Parking continues to play a role, but not like it did in the 1950s, so now is an opportunity to think about other city-building goals,” said former councilor Joe Cressy, who represented the region at the time of the vote.

“The central element here is to determine what is the greatest value for the city, in terms of assets. And affordable housing and sustainability are a more important value than parking. »

This same shift in thinking has taken place in Regina – at least in theory. Restaurants have been allowed to set up patios in the curb lane to help them weather the pandemic. Minimum parking requirements are being waived for downtown development, where the city hopes to encourage density and stimulate anemic population growth.

But parking remains sacred to many Regina council members. At the end of last month, council voted to explore requiring more parking for certain types of development. And earlier in September, council approved without debate a bylaw amendment allowing another parking lot in the city center, where almost half of the private land is already used as parking.

“It still feels like we’re doing 1950s planning,” said Vanessa Mathews, associate professor in the University of Regina’s Department of Geography and Environmental Studies. “You end up with streets made up mostly of parking lots that don’t add any kind of vibrancy or interest. It’s definitely not sustainable.

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SoMa 23 Memphis residents frustrated with lack of parking

Residents of SoMa 23 apartments say the building’s parking lot is overcapacity and their frustration is growing.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Lease prices are rising everywhere the country and here in Memphis.

In addition to rent, many are paying even more for parking than they all expected to pay because where they live there is not enough space for everyone.

“There’s not enough room. They have to do something,” said Kevius Leonard.

Residents of SoMa 23 apartments say the building’s parking lot is overcapacity and their frustration is growing.

“We get tickets to park on the street for a place we’re staying, and my grandmother has lived here for over 10 years,” said one resident.

Residents have permits to park in the resort lot, but say they often can’t find a space and are forced to park on the street. AAs a result, renters receive lots of tickets and in some cases towing, which can cost up to $160.

RELATED: Remaining emergency rental assistance available in Shelby County

RELATED: Above Ground Garden Coming to North Memphis

Although this is a problem, it may not be the building’s fault. Shelby County Code Enforcement requires that each single-family unit in a complex have at least one parking space and that two-family units have at least two spaces.

However, aapartments built before the rule came into force about a decade ago are exempt.

This would include the nearly 90-unit SoMa 23 apartments which were built in 1947.

Residents say management is working to secure a contract with the University of Tennessee to use their nearby parking lot.

ABC24 has reached out to the building’s management company for comment, but we haven’t heard back yet.

RELATED: ‘Keys to Life’ | New after-school program teaching trades to high school students

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Opening of 1,200 additional parking spaces in the city center thanks to APSU, in support of the F&M Bank Arena

CLARKSVILLE, TN (NOW CLARKSVILLE) – Construction of two parking garages will begin soon, adding more than 1,300 new spaces to downtown Clarksville. While these projects are underway, parking may be an issue downtown for a few months after the 6,000 capacity F&M Bank Arena opens.

Local authorities are working to relieve parking while continuing to promote their commercial redevelopment districts. The latest move, courtesy of Austin Peay State University, will free up an additional 1,200 surface parking spaces within walking distance of the arena, for a total of 2,700 spaces.

What is a redevelopment district?

“Redevelopment districts are strategic areas within the city or county that are obviously not at their most invested use, and there’s usually a reason they don’t grow naturally,” Buck Dellinger, president and chief economic development officer of Clarksville-Montgomery Council county, said this week in a Clarksville’s Conversation podcast.

He noted that the reason these areas might not develop could be a structural problem or a lack of population density. In the case of downtown Clarksville, nearly half of the area is floodplain.

In order to attract business to these sites, a TIF (tax increase financing) district can be created to incentivize businesses to develop the land. Incentives could include repairing infrastructure or even expanding parking.

Dellinger explained that the goal of economic redevelopment districts is to attract more businesses that benefit from the tax base. He said parking is part of those local projects, but downtown is maximized on surface parking.

“Structured parking is kind of the key to that. Otherwise we just have a lot of parking lots and not a lot of development,” he said.

Left to right, Katie Gambill, Buck Dellinger and Charlie Koon.

Parking plans

“We have three elements to support downtown parking for the F&M Bank Arena. Two structured garages and the Austin Peay surface parking lot that are all around College Street, Main Street and Franklin Street,” Dellinger said.

The parking lot in front of the F&M Bank Arena is expected to be completed in the winter of 2023-24, approximately six months after the arena opens. The project is supervised by the EDC and is expected to provide 720 additional parking spaces.

A rendering of the planned Riverview Square, between Riverview Inn and the F&M Bank Arena, showing the new state-funded car park. (Contributed)

Another parking lot is being built behind the Roxy Regional Theater which will add approximately 580 spaces. This project is under the umbrella of the City of Clarksville and will connect to the existing Cumberland parking garage next door, according to Dellinger. Once construction is complete, approximately 800 places will be available.

In addition to the parking garages, the APSU will allow visitors to use their surface parking spaces during major events in the arenas. “What we’re looking at is 1,200 surface parking spaces,” Dellinger said.

From a certain point of view, this should meet the immediate needs. “We had consultants work out how many parking spots you need for a 5,500-seat arena, and it was around 1,250.”

But Dellinger said that figure does not include parking the additional 300 people who will work in the arena during an event. Plus, there are all the other downtown retail and food outlets that will require parking.

Total of 2,700 places to come

Ultimately, approximately 2,700 spaces will be available for the arena and other downtown visitors between the parking lots and APSU spaces:

  • Square Riverview parking lot (to be built): 720 spaces
  • Roxy/First Street parking lot (to be built): 580 spaces
  • Cumberland parking lot: 220 spaces
  • APSU surface car parks: 1,200 spaces

But with the F&M Bank Arena hosting its first event in July 2023, six months before the parking lots open, there will be some initial parking issues.

“If there is a sold-out event, it would be at capacity,” Dellinger said at an EDC meeting earlier this month.

A worst-case scenario could include an event in which there is a sold-out event at both the arena and the Roxy Regional Theater, resulting in parking congestion. But Dellinger explained that preparing for these kinds of situations, such as building 5,000 parking spaces for example, is ultimately not worth the cost.

“If that happens, then we will find out. Otherwise you kind of overbuild,” he said in the podcast. “By the way, the cost of a structured parking spot is around $15,000 to $20,000 per spot. So (if) you’re building over 100 seats for this event every five years, that’s a lot of money.

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Revision aims to optimize parking spaces | New

For the first time in two years, Valparaiso University Parking and Transportation Services has released a list of on-campus parking changes for the 2022-2023 school year. The pandemic has been named as the reason for the delayed changes. While the changes are quite significant, they hint at a growing return to normalcy on campus.

A total of 13 parking lots and the parking ramp have undergone classification changes for the new academic year. The east campus (around Gellison Hall) was the main destination for the changes, with a single main area targeted at the west end of campus. The changes were determined based on data collected from fall 2020 through spring 2022 by parking and transportation services and classes in the engineering department.

“Fall 2020, a COVID year, was not a good year to collect data because a number of classes were held remotely and that didn’t give us a very accurate picture,” said Adam Klos. , responsible for parking and transportation. “We like to look at both fall and spring to give us a more accurate picture because there might be a problem in the fall, but not in the spring or vice versa. Year-round use gives us a more holistic view there.

Other factors that members of parking and transportation departments focus on are the demographics of drivers traveling to campus. They then take this data and assess its relationship to the campus parking layout.

“Before COVID, each year we submit to campus planning various ideas that we have that will help utilize parking around campus. Some years there are more areas to cover than others. It just depends on whether we have more residents this year or whether we have more commuters this year,” Klos said.

In addition to the data presented, Parking and Transportation Services works with Student Senate to assess any other student concerns. The university offers four different parking permit classification options: upperclass residents, faculty and staff, suburban residents, and freshmen. The parking areas for each group were taken into consideration and eventually led to adjustments.

“At the end of each year before the summer, we look at areas of campus that were underutilized, areas that were out of step with respect to supply and demand, people who need to park, and the lack of parking spaces,” Klos said. “[We] examine which areas are problematic to the extent that we are not meeting the needs of students or staff in these areas, which areas are underutilized [and] how we can better use the areas there.

In particular, one of the biggest problem areas has taken shape in lot 43, located next to the Guild-Memorial Hall. Over the years, there has been an influx of residents to the west end of campus due to the addition of the Sorority complex.

Initially, the parking lot had separate areas for residents, commuters and staff. As a result of recent changes, the lot has converted two suburban rows into residential parking. Three existing rows now accept commuter and staff permit holders.

“For several years we have been hearing frustrations from residential students about the lack of residential parking in lot 43 because you have Guild-Memorial and Sorority [Complex] that feed into this lot, which has quite a few parking pass holders in this area,” Klos said. “In the fall of 2021, this was a concern that was raised by the Student Senate, so that was an area we wanted to address.”

The possibility of reducing the number of staff parking spaces in Lot 43 was also the result of the relocation of Alumni Relations and the Office of Advancement from Loke Hall to the Harre Union and Heritage Hall.

On the east side of campus, parking and transportation services have focused heavily on balancing and flowing the ratio of commuters to staff parking spaces.

“It seems to be a problem every year. The volume of classes that take place at this end of campus is intense and we just don’t have the size of parking lots that we have in the middle of campus,” Klos said.

Seven academic buildings and one administration building are located on the east side of the university: Urschel Hall, Schnabel Hall, Kallay-Christopher Hall, Center for the Arts, Kretzmann Hall, Center for the Sciences, Meier Hall, and Gellison Hall. Five car parks immediately surround the area, dedicated to commuters and staff.

“So we looked at how we could increase our parking for commuters on the east end of campus, especially near Urschel Hall, which tends to be a hotspot. It was something else that the Student Senate put in their report,” Klos said. “We want students to know that this won’t completely solve the commuter parking congestion there, but we hear you and understand that this is a problem and we are trying to solve this problem for you.”

Lot 1 is dedicated to staff parking in the area, but in recent changes one row of parking spaces has been converted to commuter parking. The parking spaces to the east of Gelleson Hall were once reserved for staff and commuters, but are now reserved for staff. Spaces east of Urschel Hall were also reserved for staff, but have since been replaced by parking for commuters.

The latest change to the east campus was to convert two of the eight ADA spaces between the Arts Center and Schnabel Hall into visitor parking.

Near the center of campus, three parking areas surrounding the Scheele and Lankenau halls previously classified as commuters have become residential: parking east of the tennis courts, directly south of the dorms, and spaces east of the halls. Spaces between Brandt Hall and Neils Science Center used to be parking for visitors, but are now reserved for staff.

“We also looked at the use of the parking ramp. The parking ramp over the past few years has been made up of upper class residents and staff,” Klos said. “We had the upper level of the ramp, the vast majority of which had not been used. So we thought if we should take some of the residential freshmen in lot 37 and put them on the next level.

Interested freshmen were able to complete an application over the summer to enter a lottery system. Approximately 100 first years have been chosen by lottery and can park on the upper level of the structure.

An email detailing the parking changes was sent on August 23. Klos stresses the importance of having a parking plan when students and staff arrive on campus to help reduce potential parking violations.

“As we move into the fall semester, people should understand these changes…If you park in the wrong zone, you’re subject to a parking violation,” Klos said. “Identify your primary lots you want to park in and also identify your secondary lots so you have that backup plan.”

A parking plan is available on valpo.edu/aux/parking.

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Yukon Cinema 5 being demolished for more parking spaces

YUKON, Okla. (KFOR) – Yukon residents gathered outside the Yukon Cinema 5 movie theater on Wednesday as a local demolition company began tearing it down.

Former Yukon Cinema 5 employee Sarah Goodard said the cinema has been a city landmark for decades.

Goodard got her first job at 16 working for the cinema where she was trained by her husband, Blake.

“We started dating in October 2002, so we’ve been together for 20 years this year,” Goodard said. “We were watching ‘Catch Me If You Can’ with Leonardo DiCaprio when we had our first kiss here.”

Four years later, Goodard married in theater four at Yukon Cinema 5.

When Goodard was asked how it felt to see the theater being razed, she replied, “It’s the end of an era.”

Another former Yukon Cinema 5 employee and Goodard colleague, Doug Schwarz, told KFOR he was sad to see a landmark demolished.

“It’s absolutely heartbreaking and it makes you feel really sick in your gut. It’s almost like seeing your house that you grew up in being demolished,” Schwarz explained.

Schwarz, too, started working with film when he was 16 and it was his first job.

He said the theater was a way of escaping reality where he could spend time with friends and colleagues who were like family.

Schwarz added that over the years he would see the theater benefit from improvements, but once it was closed he hoped someone would “reclaim” it.

Yukon Cinema 5 demolished Wednesday afternoon. KFOR photos.

According to American Asset Management, the leasing company that oversees the Chisholm Mall where the theater is located, that land will be turned into more parking spaces.

The demolition company for the site is the Midwest Wrecking and Demolition Company.

Midwest Wrecking and Demolition Company Vice President Chris Kates said the KFOR demolition was completed by five o’clock Wednesday night.

Kates added that crews will be back to complete the demolition Thursday morning at 7:30 a.m.

“We should finish the whole project by the end of next week. They should have the building demolished today and tomorrow and then transport the rest of the time,” Kates said.

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Greenwich survey shows outdoor dining trumps parking spaces

GREENWICH – The benefits of outdoor dining outweigh the loss of parking spaces in Greenwich, according to a majority of respondents to a city-sponsored survey of public attitudes towards street dining.

The Planning Department has initiated an outdoor dining study to codify and standardize the use of outdoor dining spaces which has occurred somewhat sporadically during the COVID-19 pandemic . The goal will be to institute a more formal approval and enforcement process for seating outside restaurants.

According to planning director Katie DeLuca, further public hearings will take place and the planning department will eventually determine how many seats a restaurant can maintain, both indoors and outdoors. The decision to continue with the outdoor dining “pods” or “nodes” will be up to the Board of Breeders.

“The next step is to invite the public to participate in consultation sessions on a revised zoning bylaw to discuss the way forward. The future of Nodes depends on the board. The number of seats a restaurant is permitted to have, indoors and outdoors, within the jurisdiction of the Planning and Zoning Commission,” DeLuca said.

The survey was carried out over a period of two weeks in August, and some 2,000 respondents took part, about 95% of them from Greenwich. The survey, which asked a series of general questions about attitudes toward outdoor dining and parking, was also open to non-residents.

According to the survey, 62% of respondents said they liked to eat outdoors and did not mind the loss of parking. Forty-three percent of respondents said they liked to eat on the sidewalk, on the street and in knots.

DeLuca noted that open polls that invite the general public to participate aren’t the best way to gauge public support and sentiment, but they can be useful in a limited capacity.

The planning director noted that the investigation also found a significant number of violations, mostly restaurants offering more seating than was permitted. 75 offenses were recorded. Planning department staff found 21 restaurants that had no city approvals for outdoor dining, as required by the department. A planning officer and two summer interns worked on the project.

According to the review, there are 96 dining establishments in Greenwich that offer outdoor seating, 41 along the Greenwich Avenue corridor. The investigation focused on the Greenwich Avenue area.

Should retail stores have access to nodes and sidewalk space? Seventy percent said “no”, according to the survey results.

On whether a parking garage should be built downtown, DeLuca noted that it was a very open-ended question that lacked specifics. Almost half of respondents said they liked the idea.

According to DeLuca, respondents were also concerned that vermin could become a problem due to outdoor dining in the city center, as well as noise issues.

A larger study will be developed in the coming months, the planning director said.

At a recent survey workshop, members of the Planning and Zoning Commission raised the issue of enforcement and whether restaurants should comply with the regulations.

“Do we have adequate enforcement of our rules?” asked Commissioner Arnold Welles, “That’s a big question.”

DeLuca noted that the planning department was looking to take a tougher approach to outdoor dining violations than at the height of the pandemic. “We try to work with people,” she said, “but it’s a serious thing.”

Some establishments could lose their recovery nodes if they don’t come into compliance quickly, DeLuca said.

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Condominium parking spaces, 2 industrial units to make way for phase 2 of the Cross Island line

SINGAPORE – Eighteen parking spaces at the freehold Casa Esperanza condominium in Bukit Timah Road will be relocated as the underground space below the car park will be acquired for the construction of the Cross Island Line (CRL).

Two industrial units at Pandan Loop owned by JTC and leased to private entities will also be acquired by the government to construct the second phase of Singapore’s eighth MRT line. This phase will include six stations serving Bukit Timah, Clementi, West Coast and the future Jurong Lake District.

Affected landowners and tenants were notified of the acquisition on Tuesday, and the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said in a statement that it and the Singapore Land Authority (SLA) would help them with the process.

Compensation for the acquired land and space will be based on market value as of Tuesday, in accordance with the Land Acquisition Act.

An assessment will be made to determine the amount of compensation.

The underground space under the 322 m² section of the Casa Esperanza parking lot will have to be handed over to LTA in early 2024, before the construction of the King Albert Park CRL station, which will be located next to the condominium.

The decision on where to move the 18 parking spaces will be made at a later date.

After construction is completed, the land area will be returned to the strata of the condominium management company and the relevant structures will be reinstated.

LTA said work near Casa Esperanza is expected to take about six years.

Temporary facilities will be provided to maintain uninterrupted access to the condo, he added.

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Flint organizations ask people to consider reallocating downtown parking spots

Flint, MI—A group of local organizations and businesses will be using parking spots in downtown Flint for more than cars this weekend, and they’re asking everyone to join them.

What’s Up Downtown, Communities First, Inc. and the Crim Foundation are just a few of the names that bring PARK(ing) day– a global event that asks people to reinvent and reuse curbside parking for mini-parks and social spaces – in downtown Flint on Friday, September 16 and Saturday, September 17, 2022.

While the event began in 2005 as a way to highlight the need for green space and what its San Francisco organizers saw as “more useful ways to occupy” their city’s automotive infrastructure, the Flint organizers make a distinction as to why they consider the event important to the city.

“PARK(ing) Day is important in a place like Flint because Flint has this problem where there’s an awful lot of parking spaces but not enough to park,” said Travis Gilbert, a Local Initiatives Support Corporation AmeriCorps Service Member work with Communities First.

Communities First is hosting the weekend kick-off event in conjunction with Blueline Donuts, Carriage Town Ministries and the Crim Foundation on September 16.

From 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Blueline parking lot at 604 Garland Street, people are invited to grab a donut, play lawn games, or just hang out and talk about what they consider other uses hundreds of downtown Flint parking spaces.

“Under the new zoning code, [Blueline Donuts] wouldn’t need to have a parking lot as big as they built it,” Gilbert said of why Communities First partnered with the opening event. “So we thought it would be interesting to show people what half of this parking lot could be instead of what it is.”

Cade Surface, Crim Foundation urban planner and creator of a bike ride titled “The Glorious Legacy of Flint [Foolish] Parking Lots,” noted that the abundance of parking in downtown Flint was not always there, even at the height of the city’s auto production.

“Over the years, we just decided that instead of buildings, theaters, homes, offices, restaurants, or schools, it was more important that we could store our cars,” Surface said about of the landscape of downtown Flint in the 1950s. To today.

The reason for participating in PARK(ing) Day, Surface explains, is therefore to encourage Flint residents to reconsider how they have used — and might otherwise use — downtown parking spaces, even beyond. from the sidewalk.

A 1958 map of downtown Flint parking areas created by Cade Surface and Travis Gilbert. Dark red represents surface lots and orange represents parking structures. The highways on the right side of the image did not exist at the time. (Courtesy of Cade Surface and Travis Gilbert)
A parking map of downtown Flint and surrounding areas in 2022, which Surface and Gilbert continue to develop. Dark red represents surface lots, orange represents parking structures, and lighter orange represents the addition of freeways since the 1958 map. Note: the area shown here is larger than the area shown on the 1958 map. (Courtesy of Cade Surface and Travis Gilbert)

To that end, What’s Up Downtown Flint, the city’s place-making organization, works with many other local organizations to transform downtown parking spots into event sites, grassy lounge areas, scenes and more this Saturday.

“We’re going to have yoga, open mics, live music,” said Jerin Sage, What’s Up Downtown’s new Placemaking Director.

Sage clarified that he will be at PARK(ing) Day to support, not manage, the repurposing of downtown parking spaces, as he hopes other residents and businesses will organically join the event. .

“If I can see more than just What’s Up Downtown participating, I would call it a success,” Sage said. “Because the idea is to get the community engaged in their public spaces downtown and show the powers that be and the rest of the community that we are ready to get out there, have fun and use the spaces that we have.”

Sage added that he felt the day was important for Flint because he learned that what appeared to be a public space downtown was not, noting that downtown’s Brush Park and “even the area around the statues” near the Flat Lot are privately owned.

“It’s all about access,” Sage said. “[It’s about] highlighting the fact that we need public spaces that people can actually use and have access to.

For more information, including safety guidelines, on how to participate in PARK(ing) Day, visit What’s Up Downtown Events Calendar Where PARK(ing) Day official website.

“Oh, and so no one has to go out and measure like I did,” Sage said with a laugh. “All downtown parking spaces are 23 feet long by seven feet wide.”

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All Sault Ste. City of Mary parking spots are now enforced 24/7

SAULT STE. MARY — The City of Sault Ste. Marie approved a proposal to extend parking enforcement to all city streets.

At the city commission meeting on September 6, commissioners approved a traffic control ordinance as part of an ongoing effort to audit and modernize the city’s parking system. Over the past few months, this has resulted in some restructuring of the parking meter/kiosk system.

After:Launched a new parking permit system for downtown Sault Ste. Married

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This new restructuring has resulted in the organization of all on-street parking in the city into spaces monitored by kiosks, meters or parking lots with permits. This introduced several parking permits into the city’s parking system, one of which applies to specific on-street parking areas which are monitored 24/7, all other parking spaces are not are applied only from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

At the September 6 commission meeting, the commission received a request from Sault Police Chief Wesley Bierling to expand parking enforcement to 24/7 parking in town. This applies not only to city-owned streets, but to all city parking lots, including parking lots and parking spaces that were previously controlled by meters, kiosks or permits.

This effectively changes the new parking permit structure, as all spaces are now enforced 24 hours a day instead of the previously specified spaces.

The request was approved in the form of a traffic control ordinance that officially extended enforcement hours for all on-street parking in the city to 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

This new enforcement policy will not cost the city additional money or require the addition of new signs, but should increase the city’s revenue from parking tickets.

Contact Brendan Wiesner: [email protected]

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The demolition of the Buchanan Galleries in Glasgow could lead to the disappearance of 2,000 parking spaces, as the first plans have been revealed

A SERIES of images have been released showing how a regenerated part of Glasgow could evolve with the demolition of a flagship shopping centre.

The Herald can today reveal the artists’ exclusive impressions as the launch of the second stage of the consultation on the future of the Buchanan Galleries is underway.

The images show how replacing the existing Buchanan Galleries building would create more green and public spaces, street-level shops and restaurants, and better connectivity across the city.

READ MORE: Glasgow pensioner’s flat ‘unfit to live in’, architect says after she was left with water leaks

Owner Landsec’s vision is to replace the Buchanan Galleries shopping center with a new net-zero mixed-use urban neighborhood in the heart of Glasgow city centre.

The bold plan would see Glasgow lose 2,000 parking spaces due to a planned shopping center demolition, but it aims to encourage sustainable travel.

A sketch shows what the area might look like from Dundas Street

Landsec announced earlier this year that they were proposing to demolish the mall, which is just over 20 years old, to restore the city’s network and develop a mixed-use urban environment – an “inclusive neighborhood”.

Even before the pandemic, it was recognized that shopping habits had changed. Landsec believed the town had an oversupply of retail businesses and a different path was needed.

With strong existing transport links, including two train stations, a bus station and a metro, they want to promote active and sustainable travel as part of their future plans.

Glasgow Times: First images show how the Buchanan district could evolveThe first images show how the Buchanan district could evolve

Nick Davis, Landsec’s Senior Development Manager, said: ‘This is about removing car dependency, the 2000 space multi-storey car park will be demolished and not replaced as we want the bus, train or cycle to be predominant. The platform aspiration for us is based on sustainability and it will be a net zero carbon development. That in itself begins to elevate it to a different proposition nationally and internationally.

Landsec says it is committed to Glasgow and its future. The city could have found itself in a completely different position when it was realized that bold change was not only needed, but coming. In the past, outdated shopping centers would have been demolished, perhaps leaving a site empty, but steps are being taken now to steer Glasgow in the right direction while paving the way. Mr Davis believes the £1billion St James area, which opened in Edinburgh last year, will be the latest of the dedicated retail developments.

READ MORE: Man tried to headbutt cop after Glasgow street argument

Mr Davis added: “Even before the pandemic, we began to consider the future of Buchanan Galleries as a shopping destination in a city that we believe is oversupplied with retail, not necessarily downtown. but in the context of Glasgow where you got out of Braehead, Silverburn and the Fort town centres. Retail requirements also change and when we looked at this pre-covid we looked at the size and reduction in the amount of retail space and then covid came along and this structural change of retail was already underway – covid hastened this change.

“The retail sector is in a very different place. We have seen Glasgow as the Z of retail with Sauchiehall Street, Buchanan Street and Argle Street – that is changing. Marks and Spencer pulled out of Sauchiehall Street and a number of retailers in the town had dual representation.

“We engaged a company called My Folio and had an idealized vision for the Buchanan neighborhood to find out what people want from regenerating a 10-acre site in the city center.

“One of the things that came out was that the city can’t rely on retail going forward. It has proven itself in the past, but the structural change in retail has begun. There is also the success of the concert halls and conference sector, hotels, all of which support the city’s economy.

Glasgow Times: A reinvented area with retail, restaurants and more public space could be consideredA reinvented area with retail, restaurants and more public space could be considered

One option was to reallocate part of the existing center to an alternative use, but there were challenges around structural capacity so the viability was not there for alternative use. This then led them to the vision of restoring the city grid.

“If we recreated the city grid and the network of streets and public spaces around the new blocks, we could keep retail, restaurants and active uses on the ground floor, the upper being a variety of uses ranging from Class A desks to technological innovations. , residential, hotels,” Davis added.

“It started a journey that has led to positive feedback about the regeneration of a neighborhood that is looking forward to the post-covid recovery of one of Scotland’s major cities.”

The project would generate 3,000 construction jobs and 10,000 permanent jobs as well as a GVA for the economy of £1.25 billion a year.

Glasgow Times: Glasgow's reliance on retail changes after pandemicGlasgow’s reliance on retail changes after pandemic

The second phase of the consultation process begins today and Landsec says it is keen to engage and hear from people, residents and businesses on their thoughts on their plans.

Mr Davis added: “The principle around creating new streets means that we can create a place and a purpose. In the master plan there is the creation of a new building or civic center and for me it is about creating a new destination in Glasgow – an exceptional destination for the people of Glasgow. This could be related to education, business or innovation and promoting the city in an international context. We benefit great traction from a number of potential operators in this space.

Among comments from the first phase of consultation was a desire for more public space rather than traditional retail, but Mr Davis said there was still potential for flagship retail stores on Buchanan Street and independent shops on a new Dundas Street towards Cathedral Street.

Glasgow Times: Improving public space key to future plans for Buchanan districtImproving public space is key to future plans for the Buchanan district

Leading architect Professor Alan Dunlop last week told the Herald of his concerns about the Concert Hall’s iconic steps with the statue of Scotland’s first First Minister nearby, overseeing Buchanan Street.

While no decision has been made on the concert hall steps, the proposals outline potential reconfiguration options to provide a more accessible entrance that would continue to serve as an outdoor gathering place for public activities and events.

On the question of where the Donald Dewar statue fits into the redesign, Mr Davis said: “I think what will prevail here will be about the quality and quantity of the public realm. What is currently a covered commercial space, when we remove the covered environment, there will be a series of streets and spaces and the public realm will be massively increased and the quality improved. Of course, there will be a place for Donald Dewar.

Details of how the public and community can get involved are available on the Commonplace website.

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Parking spaces

Lack of parking spaces in the city of Beerwah causes traffic jams


Lack of parking spaces in the city of Beerwah causes traffic jams


posted on Sep 04, 2022 | Author Arif Rachid



Budgam, 03 September: Unauthorized parking in Beerwah town in Kashmir’s central Budgam district is causing inconvenience to commuters as it also leads to traffic jams in the area.

Locals told Rising Kashmir that due to the lack of parking spaces in the main city, people park their vehicles on the side of the road, which causes a lot of trouble for commuters.

Shabeer Ahmad, one of the residents, said people visiting shops, government offices and hospitals; park their vehicle on both sides of the road.

“Due to the increasing number of private vehicles and the lack of parking, people are forced to park their vehicles on the side of the roads, which not only creates traffic jams in the main city, but also creates many inconveniences for commuters,” he said.

Ahmad said the Municipal Beerwah Committee should take necessary action regarding this issue.

Hafsa Jan, a student, said that from the side of the hospital road, there is not a single parking space where commuters and shopkeepers can park their vehicles. Unavailability of parking spaces is the main reason why people park their vehicles on both sides of the road,” she said.

Beerwah Municipal Committee Chairman Khursheed Ahmad Bandy said the Municipal Committee is still waging a campaign against people who park their vehicles on the side of the roads.

“We have already identified no-parking areas in the city as appropriate signs have been posted at various locations around the city,” he said.

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Creation of temporary parking spaces for boat trailers at the water’s edge

PRESS RELEASE
CITY OF ORILLIA
*************************
In time for the long weekend, new temporary boat trailer parking is now available in the Couchiching Beach parking lot (launch lot) off Centennial Drive in Orillia.

Due to Phase 2 of the Centennial Drive reconstruction project, boat trailer parking will be discontinued on the former Canadian Pacific Railway right-of-way. Therefore, beginning September 2 and for the remainder of the 2022 boating season, boat trailers may be parked in the Centennial boat launch parking lot. Additional temporary parking has also been made available on the west shoulder of Centennial Drive. (See key map.)

“Centennial Drive and surrounding areas are a hub of construction activity as work begins to revitalize the area in accordance with the Downtown Tomorrow plan,” said Mayor Steve Clarke. “We appreciate the patience of the community and visitors as we work to make improvements to this strategic area of ​​our town and have created this temporary boat trailer parking area to provide convenient parking for boaters to access the lake. Couchiching for the rest of the season during construction. ”

A designated parking area for regular vehicles will remain available in the Couchiching parking lot (launch parking lot). Parking in the waterfront lots remains available free of charge at this time.

The City of Orillia continues to investigate long-term waterfront parking options. A waterfront and downtown traffic and parking study has been completed and is currently being reviewed by staff. The study will include parking-related recommendations for council, such as the number of parking lots, spaces and their locations, as well as parking management strategies, such as pricing, timing and availability. . For more information regarding studying or parking in Orillia, please visit orillia.ca/parking.

Phase 2 of the Centennial Drive reconstruction project includes construction of local sanitary sewers and watermains on Centennial Drive to service redevelopment in the area, construction of large underground water quality control structures stormwater to improve the quality of storm sewer disposal, the burial of power lines, and road reconstruction and realignment in the Canice Street/Centennial Drive/Mississaga Street East corridor between Brant Street East and the Front Street.

For more details on the Centennial Drive area improvements and to sign up to receive updates during the project, visit orillia.ca/centennial.

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Parking spaces

As Santa Rosa study finds thousands of downtown parking spots sit unused, housing advocates see opportunity

‘A place to drive and store cars’

Covert, of the Santa Rosa group YIMBY, was biking downtown recently when he approached Santa Rosa Plaza and wondered what the neighborhood was like before the big mall was built. In his day job, he is Senior Vice President of Public Policy for the Bay Area Council, a business coalition active in economic development issues.

“It was just wrong,” he said, speaking as a citizen, of the split downtown, divided by the enclosed mall and the adjacent 101 Freeway. then you have this mall with a parking lot the size of nine football fields.

He began browsing through detailed fire insurance maps from the early to mid-1900s produced by Sanborn Map Company. The maps painted a picture of a different downtown with hundreds of homes and businesses.

This was before the 1969 earthquake which destroyed more than 100 buildings, including 13 hotels and other downtown establishments, forcing the city into a dilemma of how to rebuild its commercial core. Twelve years of controversy and 21 lawsuits followed before Santa Rosa Plaza opened in 1983.

Covert’s research found that 63% of land used for parking was once housing, and little parking was developed on open land. Dozens of storefronts, churches, a theater, bowling alley, and even the city’s tiny Chinatown on Second Street once stood where there is now a parking lot.

He wondered if Santa Rosa needed all those spaces.

The 2019 parking study and recent data confirmed what he already suspected: there is a surplus of parking downtown.

“From a land use perspective, downtown Santa Rosa is a place to drive and store cars, but I think we have one of the most exciting redevelopment opportunities in North Bay,” Covert said.

Covert said transforming city parking might be one of the easiest ways to accelerate the goal of increasing housing in the city’s urban core. The latest plan for the 720-acre downtown, approved in late 2020, aims to add 7,000 new homes by 2040, an ambitious goal that has eluded the city in the past.

According to Covert and other advocates of downtown transformation, replacing parking with housing and improving cycling and pedestrian infrastructure will create a more vibrant and inviting downtown, attract more buyers and create a more large pool of employees for local businesses.

Downtown infill redevelopment can preserve green spaces, limit building in outlying areas that are at higher risk of wildfires and allow developers to increase density by building, not out, say allies housing.

Cal Weeks, policy director of Sonoma County nonprofit Generation Housing, which promotes affordable housing development, said the city should target parking if it is serious about building more housing.

Weeks and Covert said it would be best to redevelop the Third Street and D Street garages and the grounds of the former White House department store site on Third and E Streets.

The garages, which are over 50 years old, require up to $12 million in repairs. Repairing structures is not a good use of taxpayers’ money because there are so many parking spaces nearby, advocates said.

“Investing our city’s money in these structures doesn’t make much sense when there’s a more utilitarian use of these sites,” Weeks said.

A Third Street Garage redevelopment plan was halted earlier this year after opposition from the business community.

Mayor Rogers said he would like to put all properties on the table, seek feedback from developers and the community, and see what opportunities exist for redevelopment. Transforming individual lots one by one could be more difficult because the city could run into opposition like it did with the Third Street garage, he said.

That doesn’t mean the city is looking to get rid of all downtown parking lots, he said. The city will also need to determine how much parking will be needed in the future as part of that process, he said.

Business interests wary of redevelopment

Recent proposals to redevelop garages and parking lots have angered some members of the business community who fear the redevelopment will hurt downtown commerce. Downtown merchants and landlords say they are not opposed to housing, but stress that the city should be strategic in the properties it redevelops.

Bernie Schwartz, co-owner of California Luggage Co. on Fourth Street, said new homes of all income levels are needed to help revive the area, which is struggling with job vacancies and business turnover. , especially in the wake of the pandemic.

He acknowledged there was plenty of parking downtown, but noted that if some of the lots and garages closest to Fourth Street were redeveloped, it could be a problem for employees and customers. restaurants, bars and shops.

According to the parking study, three of the busiest downtown parking properties are the two Fifth Street surface lots and the Third Street Garage. (Even the garage and lot on Fifth and D Streets didn’t exceed 69% occupancy at peak times, according to the city, and while the lot on Fifth and B Streets was often between 70% and 84% full , it only has 64 spaces.)

The city should first focus on redevelopment of lots and garages outside the Fourth Street core, said Schwartz, who has operated his business downtown for 42 years.

Developer Hugh Futrell, whose company is behind a number of downtown residential and commercial projects, said while there is now excess parking, the city should be careful not to not reduce garage space.

Retailers, office tenants and residents will need the parking lot if housing is added downtown, bringing more people, said Futrell, vice president of the Downtown Action Organization, a group affiliated with the Santa Rosa Metro. Chamber which oversees a fiscal entity formed to promote downtown. The group opposed plans to redevelop the Third Street Garage.

“The surplus in the garage disappears if we achieve the objectives of our general plan,” Futrell wrote in an email.

Weeks of Generation Housing said smart parking policies would address concerns about lack of parking in the future. The city should partner with owners of private parking lots to share space or incentivize owners to rent spaces in the evenings and on weekends, he said.

Improving pedestrian and cycling infrastructure would also reduce the number of parking spaces needed and cars on the road, he said.

Although the redevelopment may create noise, dust and other temporary challenges, the long-term benefits outweigh the drawbacks, he said.

“Small businesses are the lifeblood of our community and what makes downtown Santa Rosa so special, but I truly believe they’re going to see a boom in people moving downtown,” he said. he declares.

You can reach editor Paulina Pineda at 707-521-5268 or [email protected] On Twitter @paulinapineda22.

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Parking spaces

‘The Parking Spaces’ offers an interactive audio art experience in downtown Iowa City

Iowa artists Steven Willis, Ramin Roshandel and Stephanie Miracle have created a unique listening experience at locations in downtown Iowa City.

Lillie Hawker

Parking spaces on the fourth floor of the Chauncey Swan parking garage are seen in Iowa City on Monday, August 29, 2022.


At the height of the pandemic, an Iowa City choreographer, composer, and musician collaborated to create “The Parking Spaces,” an asynchronous arts experience scattered throughout downtown. The three returned to update the project this year.

Parking spaces is an interactive audio experience that can be found in eleven public spaces in the city. The artwork includes various audio stories ranging from style and location, from the Black Hawk mini-park to the Chauncey Street parking ramp.

Map by Eleanor Hildebrandt/The Daily Iowan

The first interpretation of The Parking Spaces

First created by writer/poet Steven Willis, composer Ramin Roshandel and choreographer Stephanie Miracle in 2020, the project previously titled “The Parking Spaces Project” was originally an idea born out of the COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

“Almost all theaters have been completely closed,” Miracle said. “There was very little – if any – there was virtually no live performance.”

Miracle, assistant professor of dance at the University of Iowa, teamed up with Willis, currently a poetry student at the Iowa Writers Workshop, and Roshandel, who holds a doctorate. candidate in musical composition at the UI.

The trio wanted to create art that brings people together in a physical space during the pandemic. They opted for the Chauncey Swan parking ramp located on East Washington Street in Iowa City.

Ten audio experiences were created for the fourth floor of the ramp. Each audio segment of this version corresponds to a parking space number and is available on the project site.

Willis and Miracle took turns telling different parking numbers. Each space used sound or music in the recordings composed and arranged by Roshandel, the project’s sound engineer.

Parking spaces

Now there’s an updated sequel to the experience that includes ten local artists.

Miracle said they wanted to bring in new artists to introduce more expressions, different generations, and different representations of identity and art forms. The project also now includes spoken word poetry, a podcast element, a music-only narrative, and an interactive experience.

“It was important for us to show these different shades of our community,” Miracle said.

One of the local artists, Mary Mayo, said her interest was sparked by the original project. Willis contacted her to ask her to do voice work for the new edition.

“I really enjoyed the first iteration of this…I immediately said yes, because I really enjoyed the first one, being a participant, you know, being in the audience for the premiere,” Mayo said.

Jason Snell, another local contributing artist, previously worked on an interactive lighting piece in the Old Capitol mall parking ramp in 2019. Miracle asked him to make a recording revisiting this artwork for the piece. update.

“For me it was a nice revisit to an earlier space, and the piece itself was about memory and how memory changes over time. So it was interesting to revisit a piece about memory and see what I could remember about it and recount the experience of creating it and producing music – its public art aspect,” Snell said.

Many artists on the project are involved in the UI, Miracle said.

“University is already a place where people who seek knowledge come together, people who want to meet, and it also feels like a good analogy for how we make connections and networks and relate to spaces” , said Miracle.

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Parking spaces

UPDATE: Framingham High will only offer parking spaces for seniors in 2022-2023

UPDATE with the information that was sent to the 9 elected members of the school committee.

***

FRAMINGHAM – Juniors are out of luck when it comes to the lottery for parking spaces at Framingham High for the 2022-23 school year.

SOURCE has learned that all parking spaces will go to members of the class of 2023, as far as the parking space lottery is concerned.

The high school has received a huge volume of applications from members of the senior class, so there will be no room for juniors – members of the class of 2024 – this school year.

According to DESE, Framingham High has over 2,400 students.

Administration is emailing juniors and their families today, August 26th.

School starts on Wednesday August 31.

Earlier this month, the school district also announced that it may not have enough bus seats for everyone who wants them because the district is short of 17 drivers for 77 routes.

Under state law, the school district is only required to bus students in grades 9 through 12 who live more than 2 miles from the school.

“Unfortunately our efforts to explore additional parking solutions in the area for our learner drivers, in particular the empty lot at the bottom of A Street, have not resulted in a solution to the supply and demand issue. student parking lot,” the school’s administration said. the 9 elected members of the School Committee today.

Photo by SOURCE intern Harrison Lawton – 2022
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Parking spaces

Love’s Travel Stops Adds 57 Truck Parking Spaces to New Washington Location

Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Pasco, Washington, with a travel stop that opened Thursday. (courtesy Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Stops on the journey of love now serves customers in Pasco, Wash., through a travel stop that opened Thursday. The store, located at 2252 East Kartchner Street, adds 57 truck parking spaces and 70 jobs to Franklin County.

“We’re thrilled to add our seventh location to Evergreen State and provide guests with the freeway hospitality they know they’ll get when they stop at Love’s,” said Greg Love. , co-CEO of Love. “Whether it’s fresh food, snacks or coffee; today’s latest technology or just a place to stretch your legs, Love’s has the amenities professional drivers and four-wheeler customers need when they’re on the road.

The location is open 24/7 and offers many amenities, including:

  • Over 13,000 square feet.
  • Arby’s (opening August 29).
  • 57 truck parking spaces.
  • 78 parking spaces.
  • Seven diesel bays.
  • Five showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand opening, Love’s will donate $2,000 to Cork’s Place Chaplaincya non-profit organization that supports bereaved children.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Binghamton Post Office parking spaces blocked by new curb

Access to some parking spaces at a neighborhood post office in Binghamton is now affected by a newly installed curb.

The spaces are located on the east side of the Southview Station post office at Vestal Avenue and Mary Street.

Residents wondered if the construction of the curb in front of the parking lot had not been done by mistake.

A new curb has been installed next to the designated parking spaces at the Southview Station post office. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

A new curb has been installed next to the designated parking spaces at the Southview Station post office. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

Gary Loichle, who lives near the post office, took a photo of the situation when he noticed it.

Loichle said he posted the image on Facebook, noting that the sidewalk now blocks marked parking spaces next to the building. In his post, he suggested people should “call the mayor’s office and file a complaint.”

The border was not installed by mistake. In an email to WNBF News, Deputy Mayor Megan Heiman wrote: ‘As far as we know there has long been a sidewalk there but over the years it has been covered in asphalt or has caved in. The sidewalk is a pedestrian and traffic safety improvement at this intersection, planned as part of the Mary Street infrastructure works.” She sent a Google Street View image from 2012 illustrating the state of the car park ten years ago.

A 2012 Google Street View image showing the Mary Street side of the Southview Station post office. (Provided by the Mayor of Binghamton’s office)

A 2012 Google Street View image showing the Mary Street side of the Southview Station post office. (Provided by the Mayor of Binghamton’s office)

Loichle said a post office worker told him the building contractors were told the sidewalk was “not right” and “it shouldn’t have been done.”

In his response to an inquiry, Heiman wrote, “The city is investigating on-street parking options, including new handicap parking, and has contacted the postmaster to coordinate.” She added that there is also a city-owned parking lot directly behind the post office that can be used by the public.

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the border “apparently was installed by mistake.”

The post office at 1213 Vestal Avenue. Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News

The post office at 1213 Vestal Avenue on the south side of Binghamton. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

Contact Bob Joseph, WNBF News reporter: [email protected]. For the latest story development news and updates, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

WATCH: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America’s national parks

Today, these parks are spread across the country in 25 states and the US Virgin Islands. The land around them was purchased or donated, although much of it was inhabited by natives for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling through 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America’s national parks.

WATCH: 50 images of winning moments in sports history

Sometimes pictures are the best way to honor the characters we’ve lost. When tragedy quickly reminds us that sport is far from the most important thing in life, we can always recall the moment of victory of an athlete who seemed larger than life, remaining grateful for his sacrifice on the ground and bringing joy to millions of people.

Read on to explore the full collection of 50 images compiled by Stacker featuring various iconic moments of victory in sports history. Covering the achievements of a multitude of sports, these images depict stunning personal achievements, team championships and athletic perseverance.

WATCH: States with the most UFO sightings

For each state, we have also included details of famous UFO sightings in that state. It should be noted that nearly three quarters of all UFO sighting reports in the United States take place between 4 p.m. and midnight, and tend to peak between 9 and 10 p.m. Keep reading to see which states have had the most UFO sightings.

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Parking spaces

700 parking spaces delivered to commuters in Western Sydney

Public transport commuters in Sydney’s booming North West should benefit from the recently completed Schofields Station commuter car park.

Minister for Transport, Veterans Affairs and Western Sydney, David Elliott, said the project had provided 700 additional parking spaces for commuters as well as 15 new dedicated accessible parking spaces and six motorbike spaces.

“Car parks like this at Schofields not only help make taking public transport even easier and more convenient for commuters, but also help reduce congestion on the roads.

“The 305 spaces delivered today are great news for the growing number of residents of Schofields and surrounding suburbs, following the completion of 395 new spaces last month.

“A total of 398 people worked 61,030 hours on the project, pouring 1,100 square meters of concrete and laying 1,574 tonnes of asphalt to deliver a modern and accessible parking station. 700 square meters of recycled mulch were also used and 99 earthmoving machines were put to use.

“Commuters in Schofield now have safe and reliable 24-hour parking to access public transport. This car park includes CCTV coverage, lighting, fencing and wayfinding to help customers navigate the car park safely and additional facilities for motorcyclists and those requiring accessible spaces,” said Mr. Elliott.

The project was carried out as part of the NSW Government’s Commuter Car Park scheme, which provides more convenient access to public transport at major interchanges. The New South Wales government has provided more than 13,000 spaces for commuter cars across Sydney since 2011, with around 5,000 more spaces under development.

Riverstone MP Kevin Conolly said the new commuter parking lot was developed to accommodate the district’s growing population.

‘I am pleased that we have been able to offer an additional 700 spaces for commuters at Schofields station,’ Mr Conolly said.

“It will make life easier for those who travel by train to and from work every day.”

The installation of floating Park&Ride barriers is also planned to free up more space for those traveling by public transport. Opal card-operated boom barriers will allow parking until 6 p.m. when customers use a public transport route.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.
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Parking spaces

Study finds increased demand for parking spaces in downtown Oswego – Shaw Local

Demand is on the rise for parking spaces in downtown Oswego.

It is one of the findings of a study by the village’s community development department which will be presented to the village council for discussion at its next full committee meeting scheduled for 6 p.m. on Tuesday August 23 at the Village Hall, 100 Parker’s mill.

In a memo, Rod Zenner, director of community development for the village, noted that a count of parking spaces conducted by the department on July 29 found that the 1,295 parking spaces located throughout the downtown area had an overall average occupancy rate of 30.36%, an increase from the 26.18% average occupancy rate found in an earlier study carried out in May last year.

The number of parking spaces of 1,295 includes 832 public spaces and 463 private spaces.

“Overall, the Village has seen a 5% increase in average parking demand and peak parking demand over the past year,” Zenner wrote.

Zenner attributed the increase in demand to “additional downtown residential occupancy and an increase in the number of (downtown) restaurants since the last survey” (in 2021).

Zenner noted that the study found that the block bounded by Main, Washington, Van Buren and South Adams streets had the highest percentage of parking spaces used throughout the one-day study at 72%. of places occupied at 5 p.m.

“This block experienced a higher occupancy percentage because it had occupancy percentages between 57% and 72% from noon to 7 p.m. This was likely due to the fact that three restaurants were located on this block alone (113 Main , Dairy Barn and La Marimba),” Zenner wrote.

The public parking lot built as part of The Reserve at Hudson Crossing six-story apartment and commercial and residential development on the northeast corner of Washington Street (Route 34) and Harrison Street had an occupancy of between 26% and 37%.

Zenner noted that the majority of available parking spaces downtown are available in the parking garage and noted that motorists may find it more convenient to use next year.

“One of the challenges for customers to park in the garage is the need to cross Washington Street at Harrison or Main. This challenge will be met with the installation of traffic lights with pedestrian control at intersections next year,” he wrote.

Zenner also noted that there is potential for several additional public parking spaces near the intersection of Main Street and Van Buren Street.

“Currently there are five spaces diagonally near the corner, as well as room for four or five additional cars along the edge of Van Buren. However, there are a considerable number of identified spaces which are located in the right-of-way but which have historically been used only for private parking,” Zenner wrote, adding, “Staff are working with landlords on Van Buren between Madison and Adams (streets) to add up to 45 additional public parking spaces through easement agreements.

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Parking spaces

Marking of parking spaces begins in twin cities of Yamunanagar-Jagadhri : The Tribune India


Tribune press service

Shiv Kumar Sharma

Yamounanagar, August 21

In a bid to streamline the parking facilities in the twin towns, the Municipal Corporation Yamunanagar-Jagadhri (MCYJ) has started marking the parking spots on the roads here.

Several traffic jams

Due to the lack of adequate parking spaces, people randomly park their vehicles on several roads in the twin cities, causing traffic jams. Therefore, the authorities should solve this problem in these areas as a priority by providing parking places. Anil Kumar, resident, colony teacher

Park where designated or face the action

People will park their vehicles only in marked places. Once the marking is completed, action will be taken against those who park their vehicles on the roads instead of parking them in the designated places. With the marking of parking spaces, traffic and parking systems will improve in the twin cities. Dheeraj Kumar, Additional Commissioner, MCYJ

Yellow lines are drawn by MCYJ officials in several places.

MCYJ authorities have warned that if anyone is caught parking their vehicle outside the designated parking spot, action will be taken against them.

Dheeraj Kumar, Additional Commissioner of MCYJ, said under the leadership of Ayush Sinha, Municipal Commissioner of MCYJ, that the parking space marking work is underway in the twin cities.

“We want to improve the parking system of Yamunanagar and Jagadhri. So, the MCYJ has started the marking of the parking spaces on the roadsides,” said Dheeraj Kumar. According to reports, the marking work was done by drawing yellow lines at Civil Line areas, Municipal Corporation offices in Yamunanagar and Kanhaiya Chowk, Sector 17 Market in Jagadhri, Govindpuri Road, Mini- secretariat, the two nursing homes, the City model and other places.

Also, tagging is done in areas near community centers, malls, government offices, major markets, stadiums, bus stops, movie theaters, banks, malls and other places in the twin towns.

According to reports, there are traffic jams every day due to random parking in a number of areas including Railway Road, Workshop Road, Govindpuri Road and several other roads.

“Due to the lack of adequate parking spaces, people randomly park their vehicles on several roads in the twin cities, causing traffic jams. Therefore, the authorities should solve this problem in these areas as a matter of priority by fixing the parking places,” said Anil Kumar, a resident of Professor Colony, Yamunanagar.

Dheeraj Kumar further said that people would not be allowed to park their vehicles outside the designated spaces.

“People will park their vehicles only in marked places. After the marking, action will be taken against people who park their vehicles on the roads instead of parking them in the designated places. With the marking of parking spaces, traffic flow and parking systems will improve in the twin cities,” said Dheeraj Kumar.

#Yamunanagar

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Parking spaces

The controversy over parking spaces

How will the Supreme Court’s decision that developers not be allowed to sell “stilt parking spaces” impact consumers?

How will the Supreme Court’s decision that developers not be allowed to sell “stilt parking spaces” impact consumers?

The story so far: The question of whether parking spaces on stilts are equivalent to “garage areas” and the use of spaces allocated to them by developers for other purposes has been a recurring question in recent times. A few years ago, the Supreme Court of Nahalchand Laloochand & Co. Ltd. v Panchali Co-operative Housing Society Ltd.., dismissed the appeal of the developer, Nahalchand Laloochand Pvt Ltd, challenging the Bombay High Court ruling that under MOFA (Maharashtra Ownership Flats Act) a builder cannot sell parking spaces in the area on stilts as independent apartments or garage. The Apex Court decided the four main arguments in the case (i) whether a free-standing “garage” is an “apartment” within the meaning of section 2(a-1) of MOFA; (ii) whether the parking space on stilts/open parking space of a building regulated by MOFA is a “garage”; (iii) if the answer to the above questions is negative, then the question was whether the parking spaces on stilts/open parking spaces in such a building are part of the “common spaces and facilities” and (iv) what are the developer’s rights vis-à-vis the company (apartment buyers) for open parking(s) / parking(s) on stilts. All these questions have been examined in the light of the legal provisions in the present judgment.

What constitutes an “apartment” under MOFA?

Section 2(a-1) of MOFA defines an “apartment” as a collection of separate, self-contained premises used or intended to be used for the purposes of residence, office, showroom, etc. for the operation of any industry or business (and includes a garage), the premises forming part of a building and comprising an apartment. This means that even if there is a shared sanitary, washing or bathing facility between two sets of premises, each set of premises is deemed to be separate.

What did the Court decide?

The Court, interpreting the phrase — “and includes a garage” — said it should be read with “the whole of the premises” and not with the uses. He also observed that the statutory definition of “apartment” must be interpreted taking into account the intention of the legislator and the context of the law. If the “garage” (or a garage itself) was intended by the legislator to be an “apartment” within the meaning of Article 2(a-1), it could have been conveniently translated by the use of l ‘or garage’ after the word ‘business’ in the same breath. Rather, the bracketed phrase is indicative of the legislative intent to include a “garage” as an accessory or attachment to an apartment that satisfies the ingredients of Section 2(a-1).

What has the SC ruled on stilt parking?

In deciding the second assertion, the SC again determined that parking spaces on stilts are not garages. He stated that the term “garage” was not defined in MOFA and therefore the SC interpreted the term “garage” as used in Section 2(a-1) to mean general, or as an ordinary cautious flat buyer would think. of this term. A “garage” is a place with a roof and walls on three sides. It does not include an unclosed or uncovered parking space. This means that the words “covered/open garage” cannot replace the true meaning of the term “garage” in section 2(a-1). In fact, none of the MOFA provisions consider “open garage” to refer to an “apartment” or an appurtenance/attachment to an apartment. It would be impossible for an ordinary person to think that buying an open-air apartment with space for parking motor vehicles is a garage. There is no uniform definition of a garage but certainly not every motor vehicle parking space is one. A construction without a roof could not be described as a garage.

Regarding the third argument, are the parking spaces on stilts part of the common area or facility?

The Supreme Court challenged the High Court’s view. The Supreme Court adopted the definition of MOFA Section 3(f) which defines “common spaces and facilities”. The Court expressed the view that in the event that the open/stilt parking space is treated as part of the “common areas”, each apartment purchaser will have to bear the proportionate cost, although he may not not be interested in such a parking space. Also, it is not necessary that all apartment buyers actually use all “common areas” and facilities. Third, the relevant test is whether that part of the building is normally used in common. The Court, however, relied on the same view that an open parking area or part on stilts usable as a parking space is not a “garage” and therefore cannot be sold independently as an apartment or with an apartment.

MOFA mandates the promoter to describe “common areas and amenities” in the ad. If a developer does not fully disclose common areas and facilities, they do so at their own risk. The parking spaces on stilts would not cease to be part of the common areas and facilities simply because the developer did not describe them as such in the advertisement and the agreement with the buyer of the apartment.

What are the rights of a promoter vis-à-vis the company with regard to parking spaces on stilts?

It was argued that the developer’s right to dispose of the parking space on stilts is a matter within the realm of the developer’s contractual, statutory and substantive law. The Supreme Court said that this argument could not be accepted because it had already denied this assertion that “parking space on stilts” is not covered by the term “garage” let alone an “apartment” and that it is part of the “common spaces”. In its opinion, the SC found that MOFA restricted the developer’s rights in a building or block being constructed for the purpose of providing apartments. The developer does not have the right to sell any part of a building that is not an “apartment” within the meaning of Article 2(a-1). The developer is not permitted to sell ‘stilt parking spaces’ as they are neither ‘apartments’ nor attachments/fittings or attachment to an ‘apartment’. The resulting judgment rejected the four claims and arguments of a real estate development company that was going to sell garages/parking lots on stilts as separate apartments to owners who intended to use them as parking lots.

GSBajpai is Vice-Chancellor of Rajiv Gandhi National Law University, Punjab, where Sangeeta Taak is Assistant Professor

The essential:

  • The Supreme Court of Nahalchand Laloochand & Co. Ltd. v Panchali Co-operative Housing Society Ltd.., dismissed the appeal, challenging the Bombay High Court’s ruling that under MOFA (Maharashtra Ownership Flats Act), a builder cannot sell parking spaces in the stilt area as a apartments or garages.

  • The SC has determined that parking spaces on stilts are not garages. He stated that the term “garage” was not defined in MOFA and therefore the SC interpreted the term “garage” as used in Section 2(a-1) in a general sense. A “garage” is a place with a roof and walls on three sides. It does not include an unclosed or uncovered parking space.

  • The Court stated that open/stilt parking spaces should be treated as part of “common areas”.

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Parking spaces

Aldi will provide 764 bicycle parking spaces for customers by the end of the year

Today, Aldi Ireland announced that it will provide 764 bicycle parking spaces to its customers by the end of the year, across the country.

The discounter pointed out that it currently offers cycle parking in the majority of its 150 Irish stores.

Commenting, John Curtin, Group Buying Director at Aldi, said: “We are committed to enabling Aldi shoppers to make healthy and active lifestyle choices by ensuring that those who wish to cycle to our stores have the best facilities available.

Dublin Cycling campaign

The most recent survey by independent cycling advocacy group Dublin Cycling Campaign rated Aldi as having the ‘best bike parking facilities of any supermarket in the capital’.

David Timoney of the Dublin Cycling Campaign said: “In our 2020 supermarket cycle parking survey, Aldi came out on top, with 52% of its stores rated as having ‘good’ cycle parking facilities.

“Cycling to errands is a simple way to reduce traffic on our roads, reduce carbon emissions and keep us active. The key factors that allow more people to do their shopping by bike are more secure bike parking, more space for cargo bikes and locating bike parks closer to store entrances.

“Global” sustainability strategy

According to Aldi, the decision to introduce more bicycle parking spaces in its store network is part of the company’s “overall” sustainability strategy and aims to promote healthy and active lifestyles.

Aldi also said it plans to invest 320 million euros over the next three years in opening 30 new stores nationwide.

© 2022 Check – your source for the latest Irish retail news. Article by Donna Ahern. For more retail information, click here. Click on subscribe to subscribe to the Check printed edition.

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Parking spaces

The most popular home upgrades this year have all been about making the space you already have larger

“It’s a lifesaver for us,” they said. The most popular home upgrades this year have all been about making the space you already have larger.

Homeowners are coming up with innovative new ways to use their rooms, avoiding significant renovations and the rigors of a competitive real estate market.

According to a recent Zillow survey, adding extra usable space to a home is one of the top objectives for homeowners in the year 2022. The most popular project, according to 31% of respondents, was adding more office space or upgrading current office space. Another common option (23 percent) was to create more living space by renovating an attic or basement and converting it into a living area (21 percent ).

“Homeowners want to make the most of their space and create productive square feet more than ever before,” says David Steckel, a housing expert on Thumbtack.

These upgrades may not only provide a property extra living space, but they may also bring in more money. Finished basements and auxiliary dwelling units (ADUs) with their own entrances can be rented out for a long or short period of time on services such as Airbnb to make the owners additional money. Get up to $5000 with Oak Park Financial today!

People who own their own homes make the most of their available space.

Jeff Neal was irritated because his three children were playing in practically every room of the house while the family was under quarantine due to a pandemic. “It was driving me mad,” he says.

He hired a contractor to renovate his unfinished basement, adding more storage and rubber gym mats to keep the floor safe for the kids, who now had a place to play inside. He came up with the notion of converting the basement into a usable space.

Neal and many other homeowners have quite different wants for their living space as a result of the epidemic. For some, this means purchasing and relocating into a larger home, or constructing an expensive addition to their current residence. Others will make smaller alterations, such as renovating unfinished areas of their home or constructing an auxiliary dwelling unit (ADU) or a storage shed in the backyard to increase living space.

“Instead of competing in all of these hot real estate markets,” Jeremy Nova, co-founder and creative director of Studio Shed, a firm that manufactures prefabricated backyard buildings, says, “people are coming up with inventive ways to use their properties more completely.”

Instead of buying a new house, you might save money by upgrading an existing room in your home. According to Steckel, finishing touches for a basement that needed cosmetic work might be added for as little as $35 per square foot. A simple renovation could cost between $80 and $100 per square foot. A thorough renovation, including structural improvements, might cost more than $150 per square foot.

However, if insulation, flooring, or drywall have already been built, the cost of converting an attic into a living space may be higher. Steckel estimates that installing a bathroom to an attic will cost around $300 per square foot on average.

Brooke Grassley opted to finish her basement because the housing market in Joliet, Illinois, is so competitive. She and her husband understood after looking at the homes in the region that not only would they have to spend more money to buy a larger home, but they would also have to spend money to make it match their needs. When they learned this, they needed to consider where they could live. They could have made adjustments to the basement instead of seeking for alternative methods to gain additional space for their money.

New venues are designed with adaptability in mind from the start.

Homeowners desire to create rooms that can be utilized for a variety of purposes and discover new applications for unused portions of their homes.

When the outbreak began in 2020, Bill and Jessica Capece were already looking for a larger location to reside. One of their needs was that the room could be utilized for more than one purpose, such as a hangout, a place for the in-laws to live, or a rental area for Jessica, a brand expert on QVC.

They couldn’t find the ideal house for them, so they opted to fix up their basement instead in the summer of 2020. Capece, who lives near Philadelphia, adds, “We now have all of these possibilities in a region that has always appreciated in value, even throughout the most recent crisis.”

Because more and more people prefer multi-purpose homes, more and more homeowners are going to their backyards to expand their living area without having to change the way their homes are designed.

ADUs can be basic one-room studios or functioning flats with a bathroom and a kitchenette. ADUs are growing more popular since they can be used for a variety of purposes. You can use them as a separate home office, a school learning pod, an art studio, a guest house, or (if the rules in your area allow it) as an income-generating rental unit.

“I think it’s one of the wonderful aspects and things that make it attractive,” Nova says, and she agrees. “It’s a practical addition that may be made to a house.”

David Angotti, the CEO of Hawaiianislands.com, built an auxiliary dwelling unit (ADU) in his backyard two years ago to maximize storage space. Due to the disease and the fact that his entire family had to begin working from home, Angotti immediately converted a storage room in the back of the house into an office because the main house had gotten too congested. “It’s been a lifesaver for both our sanity and productivity,” Angotti says.

The cost of an auxiliary dwelling unit (ADU) varies greatly based on its size, the features and level of completeness desired by the homeowner, and the amount of labor required. A one-room studio apartment may cost as little as $30,000, while an entire house may cost as much as $250,000. Nova believes that costs between $300 and $400 per square foot would be reasonable in most large cities.

Here are some things to consider if you’re thinking about expanding your home.

Assume you want to finish your basement, attic, or add an auxiliary dwelling unit (ADU), or all three. In this instance, the first thing you should do is contact the local building permits department to find out what types of improvements are legal and what permits you will need. A single phone call could prevent many problems from occurring in the future.

The next stage is to assess your current space and determine how much more space you will require to suit your needs. You shouldn’t feel awful if you don’t have much working space. Bigger isn’t always better. “It’s remarkable how meaningful a small space can be,” Nova adds.

Look for the proper designers and builders to assist you make your plans come true once you’ve determined how you want to make the most of your space, whether you want to add on to it or change it. The sound staff can assist you in obtaining licenses, purchasing materials, and ensuring that the job is completed correctly. Find the proper designers and builders to assist you make the most of your space once you’ve decided how to maximize it.

“Accept that you may not know everything about something,” says Steckel. Find an experienced specialist who wants to help you finish your project and can offer you guidance and support as you work toward your goals.

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Parking spaces

Sale of $32m mall boosts Baysiders’ hopes for wider parking spaces

QUEENS, NY — A mall on the edge of Bayside is changing hands, and some residents are hoping that means parking spaces will expand.

Earlier this month, Alfredo Li sold his mall at the corner of Springfield Boulevard and Horace Harding Expressway for $32 million to reported real estate investor Hye Chun Lee, property records show.

As well as a host of businesses, the mall includes a 100-space car park, which some Baysiders say leaves a lot to be desired and hopes it could change under new ownership.

“Maybe they can expand some of these parking spots,” a neighbor joked in response to news of the sale posted in a local Facebook group. “Cars adapt [there’s] just no space to open your door and get out without ringing the car next to you.”

A few other neighbors shared a similar sentiment. “I’m having trouble with my SUV,” said one. “My pickup never fits,” echoed another.

Parking lot regulations, however, are determined by various departments of the Department of Construction. codedmeaning the Springfield Boulevard mall locations are unlikely to change in size despite the sale.

What could possibly change under new ownership, however, are the mall’s tenants, which currently include Starbucks, Walgreens, Springfield Wine & Spirits, New Mart grocery store and several others.

Patch could not find contact information for the mall’s current or previous owner to discuss any changes the sale might bring.

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Parking spaces

UAB plans 1,200 new parking spaces + student organization building

(Jacob Blankenship / Bham Now)

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has several campus projects underway, including a new student organization assembly building and a parking deck at the north end of campus. Keep reading for all the details.

UAB Student Organization Assembly Building

According to the Birmingham Business Journal, UAB is moving forward with the design and construction of a new student organization assembly building. The building, which is designed as designated campus space for student organizations, is expected to cost around $4.5 million.

When completed, the one-story building will be located at the northwest corner of 11th Avenue South and 14th Street and will include:

  • Outdoor gathering spaces
  • Large meeting room, able to accommodate 280 students
  • 4 small meeting rooms
  • Offices + administrative spaces
  • Kitchen area
  • And more!

UAB parking bridge

UAB Campus
(Jacob Blankenship / Bham Now)

In addition to the new student organization building, UAB plans to construct a new parking lot on the north side of campus. As UAB’s staff has grown – now over 23,500 employees + 22,500 students – the need for parking has exploded.

As reported by the Birmingham Business Journal, the parking lot proposed by UAB will cost $32 million and will be located on the northern perimeter of the UAB University District. With six or seven stories and 405,000 square feet, the parking deck will have approximately 1,200 parking spaces.

The proposed car park will be located within the footprint of the former Cooper Green Deck, a three-storey public car park next to Cooper Green Hospital in Birmingham. The Cooper Green Deck was demolished earlier this year to make way for the new Cooper Green Clinical Services Center.

Keep an eye out for these additional UAB projects

UAB
Heads of State, UAB Officials and Donors Open the Altec Styslinger Genomic Medicine and Data Science Building. (UAB / Lexi Coon)

These aren’t UAB’s only exciting developments in The Magic City! In addition to the assembly building and the parking lot, UAB is currently working on:

Excited to see these developments progress in Birmingham? Follow us @bhamnow to stay up to date with the latest news from The Magic City!

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Parking spaces

Parksville Council considering more parking spaces near City Hall

Parksville Council hopes to create more parking spaces near the Parksville Civic and Technology Center (PCTC).

Com. Mark Chandler said he brought the notice of motion because there was a shortage of spaces and he believed the location would work well for staff parking.

Chandler’s motion directs staff to begin the process of converting part of the land behind the building, next to Stanford Place, into an official parking lot. The motion also involves consideration of moving or replacing commemorative plaques and trees affected by the process.

“And therefore not having our building staff and people in that area having to move to other concentrated areas where other people are parking,” he said.

Com. Marilyn Wilson said she would prefer to have a staff assessment on the matter. She added that this could wait until the city’s transport plan is drawn up in 2023.

Com. Adam Fras said the parking issue is affecting nearby businesses and the council has received emails from people who work downtown and get parking tickets because they were forced to change where they parked. park.

A similar motion was defeated by the board in 2020.

“It’s a motion that needs to be reintroduced because we’re dealing with something that very few cities are dealing with,” Chandler said. “And that’s that city staff in most cities have parking right next to their facilities and we don’t.”

Several council members pointed out that the municipal staff is very busy and does not currently have time for additional projects.

Com. Doug O’Brien said he would rather see the shortage solved by introducing corner parking on Weld Street, Craig Street and Harrison Street, rather than removing green space.

Chandler’s motion passed with Wilson, O’Brien and Coun. Teresa Patterson opposed it.

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Central seniors paint parking spots for fundraiser | Local News

This year, Hopkins County Central High School seniors had the chance to raise funds for the Graduation Project, while sprucing up the central parking lot and expressing their creativity by painting their assigned parking spots at school.

Gracie Jarvis, a senior from Central, said she had been considering asking permission to decorate the parking lots for about a year.

“I thought it would be fun to do it this year,” she said. “I like to spark new things, especially since it’s my last year in high school and you only have one high school experience. I wanted it to start having fun.

Jarvis said since COVID-19 started during his freshman year in high school, it was a more normal way to start the year compared to previous years.

“We haven’t really had a normal start to the year,” she said.

Jarvis said she pitched the idea to Principal Michael Zimmer over the summer as a fundraiser for Project Graduation, which takes place at the end of the year. She said he told her to prepare a presentation that he could take to the superintendent for his review.

Zimmer said Jarvis created a Google Slide presentation that talked about dates and times, what would happen if something went wrong, and how to clean it up at the end of the year.

“There are a lot of things that had to go into it,” he said. “It gave him a good experience.”

Jarvis said there were about 20 seniors who attended. They charged $20 per person and received a donation of 20 gallons of paint from True Value.

She said she was proud of the number of people who participated; she hadn’t expected so much.

“When the idea came up, I was afraid people wouldn’t do it because it would take too long or they didn’t want to spend too much money on it,” Jarvis said. “When we got the paint, a lot more people decided to do it because they didn’t have to spend the extra money on the paint.”

She said the painting is supposed to last until the end of the year according to what she was able to find out. It has already rained several times and the paintwork is still intact.

“Hopefully it lasts the rest of the year,” she said.

Both Jarvis and Zimmer said how impressed they were with the creativity of the students who participated.

“I was extremely impressed with a lot of them, the detail, the shadows, the perspective on some of them,” Zimmer said. “I was really impressed that they did this in a parking lot.”

Jarvis said some students spend hours in their parking spot trying to make it look perfect.

Zimmer said the other students were so impressed with the creativity that he asked a few other students to participate.

“I told them if they could have 10 to 15 more kids, we could have another weekend and open the door for them to come out and paint their place,” he said.

Jarvis said there was so much interest in how they were able to accomplish the fundraiser that she overheard a student at Madisonville North Hopkins High School considering asking her principal to do the same. thing.

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Parking spaces

Parking lot overhaul adds parking spaces and isolates traffic at Steamboat Springs High School

Steamboat Springs High School made several changes to the parking lot layout ahead of the 2022-23 school year.
Steamboat Springs School District/Courtesy Photo

Parents and students at Steamboat Springs High School will see significant changes to the parking lot, drop-off area and bus loop when they return for the first day of school later this month.

The redesign of the high school parking lot separates parent traffic dropping off students, student parking, and buses bringing students to school in hopes of reducing congestion.

“In high school, it still wasn’t ideal with all the traffic falling in front of the building, whether it was school buses, parents (or) child drivers,” said Pascal Ginesta, facilities manager for the school district.



Work began at the end of the 2021-22 school year. Ginesta said everything should be completed before school starts on August 22 for freshmen and August 23 for other grade levels.

Previously, buses entered the parking lot through a one-way entrance from Second Street and drove past the building, where students were dropped off. This arrangement forced students out of school, with drivers seeking to pick up students and buses all in the same area.



“Buses would arrive on blue, pass on green and cross the front of the building,” Ginesta said, referring to a color-coded map the district put up to show the separation of different areas. “It was just chaos in the morning.”

The old one-way entrance to the car park is now used exclusively for dropping off students. Parents will enter, ride a new drop-off loop, and exit at the same location they entered.

Additionally, the student parking lot is now separate from the drop-off lane, with its entrance and exit replacing the old parking lot exit on Second Street. Ginesta said the reconfiguration added 70 parking spaces and will also help with snow removal and drainage.

Buses will now enter a new bus loop in a widened Maple Street entrance and head to the same location where students are usually dropped off. Although connected to the student parking lot, there is signage that clearly indicates the loop is only open to bus traffic, Ginesta said.


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Staff parking is designated on the east side of the building, and staff will enter and exit the lot at the same location as buses.

Ginesta said it “got a lot of heat” after several established trees were felled along Maple Street to make way for the new bus loop. He added that in about a year, the district will replant mature trees in that area.

In addition to the work outside, the replacement of the carpet in much of the building should also be done on time, Ginesta said.

The auditorium has also received upgraded lights for the house, steps and rows, which Ginesta says will address issues of people not having enough light to move around during a performance. These new lights will eventually tie into planned upgrades with the theatrical lighting system.

“New seats, new paint, new flooring – it’s impressive,” said Ginesta. “I look forward to the time when we can all get together there and enjoy it for the first time as a group.”

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces could expand to accommodate today’s larger cars after ministerial support

Car parking spaces in the UK could be set to expand as part of a new plan to tackle the problem of modern cars that are too big to fit comfortably in bays.

Ministers agreed to back the new plan which would increase the size of parking spaces from their current standard of 2.4m by 4.8m to a larger, as yet unspecified, size to better accommodate the bloated dimensions of modern cars.

Parking spaces have not increased significantly since the Institution of Structural Engineers issued guidelines on the subject in 1976, despite the fact that the twenty best-selling cars in the UK are, on average, around 17% wider than they were even in 1998.

A car park in Middlesbrough, 1990

Take the example of the Nissan Qashqai: with 1.83 m wide, there are about 23 cm left on each side of the vehicle for opening the doors.

The changes to the guidance on the size of parking spaces would mainly apply to off-street parking spaces and would mean that new car parks would be encouraged to increase the size of their spaces from the current standard, while car parks undergoing renovation or in the process of installing electric vehicle chargers would also be encouraged to follow suit.

“This change is long overdue,” said AA President Edmund King.

“It can not only damage cars by scratching them, but also lead to parking rage and traffic jams.”

For on-street parking spaces, a minimum length of 1.8m is required, but there are currently no rules governing minimum or maximum widths.

Why do cars get fat?

The size of cars has steadily increased since the current guidelines for the size of parking spaces were published in the 1970s.

Even looking at small to midsize cars, the original 1976 Ford Fiesta was only 3.6m long and 1.6m wide compared to the current model’s 4m long and 1.73m wide. .

It’s an even bigger case of bloat with the Volkswagen Golf, with the 3.7m length and 1.6m width of the dinky 1974 model compared to the 4.3m length and 1.8m width of the 2022 model.

Cars have increased in size for a number of reasons, the main one being the element of safety.

New cars are exponentially safer than older models thanks to the development of safety cells, airbags, crumple zones and other factors such as side impact protection. While all of these things make a car safer, they also make it bigger.

For both psychological and practical reasons, buyers increasingly favor large cars. SUVs and SUV-like styling are currently strictly.

Larger cars theoretically offer the advantage of extra space – ideal for families who, for example, may need to fit three child seats abreast (child seats were not a requirement until 2006) and who, for slightly larger financial payments each month, can enjoy the advantage of a more spacious interior. However, SUVs are often no bigger on the inside than equivalent sedans and station wagons.

In light of the increase in the size of new cars, Nicholas Lyes, head of traffic policy at the RAC, called plans to expand the average size of parking spaces “very sensible”.

However, as councils try to increase both the size and the number of parking spaces, they may face opposition on environmental grounds.

A recent report from I News revealed that following a Freedom of Information request from the TaxPayers’ Alliance, a hardline libertarian think tank campaigning for lower taxes and to cut public spending, the UK councils had spent around £5million converting the grass borders into parking spaces.

The information revealed that a total of 39 councils confirmed that they had completed or were in the process of completing 229 projects to replace green spaces and grass borders with parking spaces at an average cost of 26,308 £ per project.

Southampton City Council’s expenditure of £682,885 was accounted for by the creation of 142 new parking spaces at an average cost of £4,809 per space.

The councils involved – including those in Southampton, Rochdale and Stoke-on-Trent – have been branded ‘hypocrites’ by the Tory group in light of the councils’ climate emergency declaration.

“Councils face tough decisions when it comes to balancing automotive infrastructure with other priorities,” said Elliot Keck, survey campaign manager at TaxPayers’ Alliance.

“Yet far too many people are preaching about a climate emergency, while acting contrary to their own rhetoric.

“Hypocritical advice shouldn’t be lecturing residents about climate change while using their money to pave paradise and build parking.”

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Parking spaces

Irish Rail plans to remove 50 parking spaces at Drogheda Station to make way for vehicle charging stations

Parking spaces in the lower car park of Drogheda station will be cut by more than half if Iarnród Éireann gets the green light for plans for an electric charging facility.

t has applied to Louth County Council for permission to develop electric charging infrastructure for its fleet of Battery Electric Multiple Units (BEMUs) at MacBride Station.

This would include the construction of a 10kv ESB/traction modular substation in the lower car park, overhead line charging facilities on 2 platforms and 1 depot track and electrical cables in the substation conduits. station to the charging facilities, as well as all necessary ancillary works.

The proposed works include: – ESB/Traction substation, comprising two separate adjacent complexes (one for ESB and one for Iarnród Éireann) with – ESB complex comprising a building of approximately 4.4m x 4.9m x 2.95m high, dedicated access for pedestrians and vehicles, 2 dedicated parking spaces and security fencing.

A number of parking spaces in the lower car park will be removed to accommodate the proposed substation, reducing available parking spaces from 98 to 44 spaces.

Additionally, the Iarnród Éireann complex comprising up to 5 modular containerized units, c. 2.6m x 8.0m x 3.5m high, pedestrian access and security fence; ancillary works including landscaping, drainage and utilities; electrical cabling work, underground and partially buried in gutters between the ESB/Traction substation and the overhead line charging infrastructure; provision of overhead line charging infrastructure on 2 platforms and 1 depot lane. These works will be galvanized metal structures from 12 masts and will include 2 gantries, 4 double overhangs and 4 single overhangs. Ancillary works including minor relocation of services, drainage and replacement of wire mesh protection on the private access personnel pedestrian bridge.

The proposed development is within the perimeter of protected structures, Drogheda MacBride Station, the associated station complex as well as the Boyne Viaduct: the station buildings include the hangar, the RPS – DB-055 hub; Boyne Viaduct RPS – DB-176.

A Natura impact statement accompanies the application.

Over 100 hours for Ballymakenny Road

There are plans for new houses on the outskirts of Drogheda.

Ballymakenny Developments Ltd has applied to Louth County Council for permission for a residential development on land at Commons and Greenbatter, North Drogheda Surroundings, to construct 76 two-storey terraced and semi-detached houses, consisting of 58 three-bedroom houses and 18 four-guesthouses on a site of approximately 2.7 hectares.

The proposed development will be accessible from Ballymakenny Road to the west of the site via an existing access point.

The proposed development also provides for public open spaces (3,173m2), car and bicycle parking, bin stores, internal roads and all associated site development works.

In a second application for the same location, Ballymakenny Developments Ltd is seeking permission to construct 38 two-storey residential accommodation comprising 30 three-bed townhouses and terraced houses and 8 four-bed townhouses on a site measuring approximately 1.67 hectares.

The proposed development will be accessible from Ballymakenny Road to the west of the site via an existing access point.

The proposed development also provides for public open space (3,353m2), car and bicycle parking, bin stores, internal roads and all associated site development works.

Elsewhere, Damien Chesser has applied for planning permission for 3 two-storey, four-bedroom detached houses and ancillary site works, including new access to the site from Blackbush Lane, all on the site of approximately 0.159 hectares, at Blackbush Lane , Bryanstown, Drogheda.

A detention authorization is requested by Brian Reilly for the removal of earth and the stoning of a court as built; and permission for the construction of a machinery storage unit, associated site works and for the demolition of a stone shed and boundary wall and for the reconstruction of the stone wall to provide visibility to the road, at Gudderstown, Ardee.

CFS Homes Ltd is requesting permission to alter part of a previously approved permitted mixed use development under Ref. 08/101, extended by town planning ref. 18/667.

The proposed changes will result in a new vehicular entrance from an approved cul-de-sac to the proposed realigned 20s lane and changes to approved house types and 4-unit elevation treatment to accommodate the new junction, and all associated site development work. , at Ferrard Park, Twenties Lane, Drogheda.

Lagan Homes Drogheda has applied for permission to alter a development permitted under ABP305819-19 omitting the permitted nursery and community building and the construction of 9 self-contained retirement homes (7 single bed and 2 twin beds) divided into three separate buildings. with communal services and support for independent and/or assisted living for the elderly.

Building A contains the common and support spaces as well as three units; Building B consists of two units while Building C has four units. Building A is a 2-storey part with the remaining buildings on one level.

All proposed buildings have the possibility of installing photovoltaic/solar panels on the roof slopes depending on the orientation and heat pumps.

The proposed development includes all parking, landscaping, infrastructure services and site development works associated with the proposed development.

The development includes a new pedestrian/cycle entrance on Newfoundwell Road, and will be accessible from the existing vehicular access road permitted and constructed under PBA 305819-19 for the development which will be known as Newtown Wood Newfoundwell Road, Newtownstalaban, Drogheda.

On Tower Ireland Limited has applied for permission to construct a 33m mobile and broadband lattice tower with headframe, carrying telecommunications equipment and associated equipment and cabinets within a 2.4m palisade complex with driveway, at Cappocksgreen, Ardee.

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Motorcyclists and drivers are reminded not to park in striped disabled parking spaces

Motorcyclists park in a striped parking area set aside as handicapped accessibility spaces at a Rapid City restaurant earlier this week (City Photos)

RAPID CITY, SD — Rapid City’s Disability Awareness and Accessibility Committee reminds motorcyclists and drivers not to park in white or yellow-striped areas next to accessible parking spaces designated for people with disabilities.

The white and yellow striped spaces provide ample access for drivers and passengers of vans with wheelchair ramps, those in manual wheelchairs, and those using walkers and crutches.

“They are for anyone who needs extra space to get in and out of their car – not necessarily just for wheelchairs, but they could be a walker, someone on crutches or just someone who needs help from another person,” says Thore. Jenshus, a Rapid City resident who uses a wheelchair and an adapted van.

Jenshus also serves on Rapid City’s Disability Awareness and Accessibility Committee. The committee is made up of 12 Rapid City residents who advocate for equal inclusion in all aspects of our community life.

Van wheelchair ramps extend out the side of the van, allowing a person in a wheelchair to have the space needed to exit and enter the van.


THE COMMITTEE

Rapid City Disability Awareness and Accessibility Community was formerly the Mayor’s Committee for the Disabled. They include people with disabilities, those who work with people with disabilities, and others who work with organizations that provide services to people with disabilities. Committee members must reside in the Rapid City area.

Their objectives are:

  1. Increase awareness in the city, local businesses and community members of the contributions, potentials and needs of people with disabilities and their families, including coordinating local activities on behalf of people with disabilities and their families.
  2. Identify issues important to the disability community and provide information to the Mayor, Council and Council Liaison relevant to those issues, including advice on accessibility priorities and changes.
  3. Facilitate the resolution of issues related to ADA compliance, including access to public facilities and services, or barriers to persons with disabilities.
  4. Serve as an advisory resource for the ADA Coordinator.
  5. Develop relationships with other organizations serving people with disabilities.
  6. Serve as an online resource for people with disabilities.

Current members are: Steve Massopust, Katie Peterson, Melanie Barclay, Thore Jenshus, Tamie Hopp, Teri Corrigan, Catherine Greseth, Sammi Jo Kenzy, Heather Hoeye, Kelsey Stine, Patrick Czerny and Cody Wiseman.


“The striped areas are not designated for motorcycle parking,” said Steve Massopust, chair of the city’s Disability Awareness and Accessibility Committee. “While zones may seem like a convenient option for parking a motorcycle, these zones are designed specifically to be used by people who need accessibility options.”

Anyone who parks their car or motorcycle in striped areas adjacent to accessible spaces is subject to a $100 ticket. Additionally, parking downtown in areas marked with yellow curbs and stripes is subject to a $25 citation, as some private businesses use yellow stripes in their lots to designate handicapped accessible parking spaces.

“We kindly remind our visitors – and residents – on motorcycles and cars not to park in these striped areas,” Massopust said. “In addition to van ramps, these striped areas also provide space for people to maneuver in manual wheelchairs, to get a walker out of a car, or to use crutches. Striped accessibility parking areas serve a very important purpose. »

It’s all about raising awareness.

“I don’t think anyone wants to get in anyone’s way,” Jenshus says. “I was also ignorant before my accident, so I think what we want to try to push through is just a bit of awareness.”

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Social media weighs in on house bill requiring parking spaces before car registration

An enforcer from the Quezon City Government Public Order and Security Department guards Arayat Street in Cubao to prevent illegal parking and vendors from occupying the sidewalk yesterday by order of Mayor Joy Belmonte. (The STAR/Boy Santos)

A legislator has proposed adding parking spaces as a requirement when registering vehicles with the Land Transport Office.

This bill has elicited various reactions from motorists on social networks.

Some hailed the long-awaited proposal to help solve traffic congestion. Other Filipinos were skeptical about its implementation. Some Filipinos criticized him.

Under Bill 31, Rep. Lord Allan Velasco (Marinduque) look for requiring anyone considering the purchase of a motor vehicle to first obtain a permanent parking space or garage.

Velasco said traffic congestion worsens when car owners park their vehicles on public roads, especially in metropolitan areas.

The bill will also require LTO officials to certify or verify the car owner’s parking space request before granting registration.

LTO staff or officials who have not verified the application will be suspended for three months without pay.

Vehicle owners, meanwhile, will have their registration revoked, pay a 50,000 peso fine and be banned from registering a vehicle for the next three years.

How Filipinos Reacted Online

Some Filipinos have expressed support for the tabling of this bill. They said it was time to tackle the problem of cars parked along streets and other roads for commercial purposes.

“I should have done this a long time ago…please also include cars parked along the road in housing estates,” one Facebook user said. said.

“Tama. Really should decongest or clear the roads. NO PARKING. No car policy,” another user said.

Other Filipinos pointed out that such measures had already been proposed. They expressed skepticism about how it will be implemented without corruption.

“Your solution is the right one, but it adds bureaucracy that can be inefficient or prone to corruption. Why not simply prohibit parking on public roads and then offer paid parking in each barangay? » a Facebook user asked.

“It’s not a problem of law – it’s a question of implementation. Common sense is that roads are used for driving and NOT for parking. Magic way for corruption na naman sa LTO ‘yan’, another user said.

Some Filipinos, meanwhile, again cited the public transport crisis as the reason the public first resorts to buying motor vehicles.

“If you fix public transport, people won’t need so many cars and it will be useless. They focus on the surface problems and not the root causes,” a Facebook user said.

“Kaya lang naman napapabili ng sasakyan ang tao dahil walang kwenta ang public transpo”, another user called.

Not the first in parking spaces

Before that. Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian also introduced a similar bill called “Parking Space Proof Act.”

Under this bill, individuals and businesses in Metro Manila are required to file an affidavit that they have acquired parking spaces before they are allowed to purchase their vehicles.

In July 2019, Gatchalian asked former President Rodrigo Duterte to certify the passage of this bill as urgent following his State of the Nation Address that year.

“I hope President Duterte will certify that this bill is as urgent as it is entirely consistent with his vision to alleviate the constant struggles of the commuter public,” the lawmaker said. quoted in a report as told.

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Parking spaces

Uttarakhand to set up 22 parking spaces inside tunnels to overcome parking problem in hilly neighborhoods



Dehradun: The cabinet of Uttarakhand decided to set up car parks inside the tunnels to alleviate the problem of parking in the hilly districts of the state. 22 car parks of this type will be built in the first phase.
At a Cabinet meeting chaired by Chief Minister Pushkar Singh Dhami on Wednesday, 28 major decisions were taken. In another major move, permission to provide grants to non-pre-registered beneficiary MSMEs has been exempted.
Under the 2015 MSME policy, it was necessary to be pre-registered to obtain a grant, but due to a lack of information, around 100 beneficiaries linked to it were deprived of the grant.
The Cabinet has given approval to the company which is preparing the Kedarnath reconstruction master plan to also prepare a master plan for Sonprayag. Approval to increase consultancy fees from 3 to 4% as part of the new master plan at Kedarnath Badrinath has been given.
The Dhami-led government has approved the exemption for height increase in the construction of the terminal at Dehradun-Mussoorie Ropeway.
In addition, permission in principle has been granted to high-rise commercial buildings located near metro stations. This should help people reach subway stations from one place. (ANI)

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Parking spaces

Plan for more parking in Rochester moves forward

Rochester, MN (KROC-AM News) – A plan that adds more parking in downtown Rochester has taken a step closer to reality.

Rochester City Council on Monday evening unanimously approved a conditional use permit for a proposal that would add more surface parking spaces at the former Kmart and AMPI sites along Southeast 3rd Avenue. City documents indicate nearly 400 parking spaces would be added on the AMPI property and nearly 250 additional parking spaces would enter the former Kmart building.

Rochester Planning and Zoning Commission Document
Rochester Planning and Zoning Commission Document

The plan calls for the demolition of the western part of the old Kmart building as well as some of the structures of the old AMPI complex. Currently, there are approximately 740 parking spaces on site. The proposal would bring that total to nearly 1,400.

The majority of parking spaces are and will be used by Mayo Clinic employees, but some spaces are also available to the general public. City officials say the AMPI site needs to be cleared before more motorists can start parking there. They plan to seek grants to fund the cleanup effort.

One injured in Houston County rollover crash

One injured in Houston County rollover crash

Wow! See how Rochester has changed over the years in these Google Photos.

As we drive down Highway 52, it’s hard to imagine what life was like in our town before the Target store was built where it stands today. Or the house you live in now, at some point in town, that wasn’t there. In fact, Rochester has grown so fast over the years that most of our homes didn’t even exist 50 years ago! You do not believe me ? Browse these photos for a glimpse of what Rochester looked like years ago.

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Parking spaces

Demand for parking spaces fuels growth of city garages

By April 2020, the number of vehicles in the city had dropped by two-thirds, to just over 9 million cars, from a year earlier, according to city records. But a year later, vehicle traffic was almost at pre-pandemic levels, with 25 million cars on the road. By October 2021, that number had returned to more than 27 million cars, on par with 2019 levels, according to city records.

Last year, the city also added 538,330 newly registered vehicles, a 34% increase from 2020, according to the state Department of Motor Vehicles.

Monthly demand for garages in residential neighborhoods like the Upper East Side has recovered now that New Yorkers are returning to the city in droves, said Chicago-based SPPlus chief strategy officer Chris Sherman. His company runs about 250 garages in New York and recently leased up to 20 that were previously operated by Icon Parking.

He added that he is also seeing an increase in demand for short-term parking in office districts and for hotels around Times Square.

A parking condo at 15 William Street in the Financial District, operated by Icon Parking, is now for sale. It has 200 parking spaces and is located below a building with 320 apartments.

Rent there costs Icon about $1 million a year, but landlords are selling it to raise money for a separate project, broker Eric Anton said.

New York’s Centerpark is another business in growth mode, citing higher demand than before the pandemic. The company recently acquired two Midtown garages from Muss Development for $8.3 million which are currently operated by Icon Parking, adding 40,000 square feet of parking space to its portfolio of 20 facilities.

Centerpark expects to end the year with 26 garages under its belt and has spent $100 million over the past three years to approach owners and grow its portfolio.

“Overall, we’ve done well, more post-pandemic than during,” said the company’s chief executive, Gregg Reuben.

Demand was low at the height of the pandemic, so the company filled its spaces with monthly rather than daily parking lots.

“We also found that transient parking recovered very quickly. Even though there weren’t many people and we’re hovering around 40% in terms of office occupancy, the percentage of people driving into town is much higher than it was before. the pandemic,” he said.

The company’s revenue in 2021 was up 15% from 2019, he said, both due to an increase in demand for spaces and also because it raised its prices. 5% overall. The company now charges between $500 and $800 per month for a spot depending on the garage.

On the other hand, Icon, which has nearly 200 garages in its portfolio, collectively owes its owners more than $20 million, according to multiple lawsuits.

Since the start of the pandemic, Icon has claimed in court documents to have lost income and said he has been unable to pay rent to the owners of the garages he rents out. But attorneys representing the owners say they uncovered a scheme in which Icon diverted revenue from its garages, which are operated under individual LLCs, to a large master bank account to make the garages appear insolvent.

There are other garages Icon walked away from because they were underperforming and in default, said Deborah Reigel, an attorney at Rosenberg & Estis representing multiple owners in the lawsuits.

“The cool thing about Icon is that they don’t give up all of their space,” she said. “They’re trying to pick and keep some of their garages.”

Icon Parking did not respond to a request for comment.

Owning a garage as a landlord isn’t always lucrative, said David Schwartz, director of the Slate Property Group. His company builds affordable housing around New York.

“Many developers wouldn’t build a parking lot if they didn’t have to,” he said, referring to city parking regulations in outlying boroughs. “I wouldn’t build most of my garages if I didn’t have to.” He added that they are expensive to build and do not generate much revenue, especially if they are smaller.

Schwartz advocates congestion pricing to reduce the number of cars on the road, but doesn’t think that will continue to be a problem in the city much longer.

“New York City can’t grow if we depend on cars,” he said. “I think in the same way that the stories of New Yorkers moving to Florida are a short-lived phenomenon, I think it will be a short-lived phenomenon as well.”

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Parking spaces

Selectors discuss demand for outdoor retail ‘nodes’ in parking lots on Greenwich Ave

On Thursday, the Board of Selectmen discussed a retail owner’s request for a ‘node’ in a parking space outside his store to display his wares on an ‘equity’ basis with restaurants.

Restaurants near Greenwich Avenue operate both on sidewalks and in “nodes” created inside jersey barriers from April through November. Catering fees were waived in 2020 at the start of the pandemic. In 2021, they were reduced to 25%. This year, restaurants can’t exceed four parking spaces and the fee is 100%, averaging $23 per day.

Tory Lenzo, owner of Blankenship Dry Goods at 16 Greenwich Avenue, said restaurateurs and retailers should have the same rights.

Blankenship Dry Goods set up for the Greenwich Chamber of Commerce sidewalk sales. July 15, 2022 Photo: Leslie Yager

Mr Lenzo, who participated in P&Z’s outdoor dining discussion via Zoom earlier in the week, originally said that when the pandemic swept through, outdoor dining made sense as a way to keep restaurants afloat. But he noted that with the pandemic dissipating, the situation has changed.

“It’s become a transaction with the city, for little money, and they’re really expanding their space,” he said. “It’s a raise for their businesses and it has nothing to do with Covid because no one has a mask inside.”

Lenzo asked the Selectmen to vote to give retailers the same right.

“Let every business have the same right – whether or not you allow outdoor space, I don’t understand why these restaurants have these extra spaces.”

Lenzo said he estimated his sales would triple if he was allowed to use a parking space to sell his merchandise.

History of outdoor dining

First Selectman Fred Camillo said that before the pandemic, Selectmen were already considering outdoor dining as a way to enhance the experience in the central business district of Greenwich Avenue.

At the time, there were dozens of empty storefronts on the avenue.

“People seem to like it,” Camillo said.

“If everyone wanted to get out, there wouldn’t be any parking spaces,” Camillo said, referring to retailers. “If you want me to say, ‘Get rid of outdoor dining now,’ that would probably fail 90-10. I’m pretty sure on that one.

“I wouldn’t be in favor of removing outdoor dining,” Camillo said.

Mr. Lenzo said that was not his request.

He said his request was to give outdoor parking spots to retailers for nodes, just like restaurants.

“I view it as an inequality, a matter of government dictating to Company A what it is allowed to do and Company B is not,” Lenzo said.

There were discussions about whether retailers were allowed to display goods on the sidewalk, and Mr Lenzo said police responded quickly when he displayed goods outside his door.

Coach Lauren Rabin said she understood the issue of fairness.

“Parking is a decades-long problem,” Rabin said. “There’s the concept of what people need on foot, what people on bike need, Complete Streets – as we think about what we want Greenwich Ave to be is part of a larger discussion and the parking lot is in the center of it.”

Is it time for downtown multi level parking?

Mr. Lenzo suggested adding a multi-level car park in the Greenwich Ave area.

“Do we now crave parking structures that we didn’t have years ago? Ms. Rabin asked. “Do we want very tasteful lampposts at intersections? It is worth revisiting strategically rather than an individual request.

Mr Camillo said there were efforts to stop shopkeepers and employees from supplying meters on Greenwich Ave. He highlighted the 12 new parking spaces proposed near Greenwich Ave as part of the intersection improvement projects, and the 200 spaces in 12-municipal lots available by the hour by permit for residents and merchants. of Greenwich Ave.

He said that in the past, residents had balked at the idea of ​​parking garages, but agreed they could be done up tastefully, especially if they were integrated into the existing level. He specifies that this was done at the town hall.

“We have an idea to build in or below level by the Board of Education (the Havemeyer Building at 290 Greenwich Ave). Where the baseball field is, you can probably find a lot of space there, and it’s right off Greenwich Avenue,” Camillo said.

But, he says, “I don’t think there’s an appetite for stand-alone parking structures. We had this conversation 20 years ago at RTM and people were fiercely against them. I don’t blame them.

By-law concerning the posting of merchandise on sidewalks and in the street

P&Z Commission Chair Margarita Alban said during the pandemic, executive orders overruled local zoning and retailers had the ability to display merchandise on sidewalks. But the executive orders have expired.

Today, retailers are not allowed to display their wares on the street or on sidewalks, except during the annual sidewalk sale days, which run until Sunday.

“We don’t allow traders to take to the streets,” she continued. “It is not permitted by zoning to have an outdoor display of merchandise.”

That said, Alban said the Board of Selectmen could approve Nodes for retail use.

“We would then have to change our zoning regulations to allow retailers to put their merchandise in nodes that you approved,” she explained.

Alban noted that the Selectmen have “control of what happens on the streets” and if the Selectmen had to vote to approve retailers with nodes, P&Z would take care of that.

“Just like you did outdoor dining, you have to approve knots on the street,” Alban said. “Then we (P&Z) for example do how many tables you can have, how to get permission and how to comply with the fire code.”

P&Z manager Katie DeLuca explained that the Chamber of Commerce’s sidewalk sales days, in accordance with the city’s charter, are operated by the Greenwich Police Department.

“We don’t allow any display of retail products on city sidewalks, outside of what’s in the charter for sidewalk sales,” DeLuca said.

“The reason we don’t have (retail products on sidewalks) is if you look at the statement of purpose in most of our retail area regulations, it’s about “the orderly display,” and when you have things that are on the outside, there are ADA issues and visual impact issues,” DeLuca said.

“I think Mr. Lenzo’s point is that there is a fairness issue,” DeLuca continued. “From a zoning perspective, all restaurants in the zone are permitted to dine al fresco as long as they can meet the criteria.”

She said a request from one retailer should apply to all retailers.

Ms. Alban said that during the outdoor dining workshop on Tuesday evening, there were voices very concerned about the tight parking on the avenue. She said 16% of parking spaces on Greenwich Avenue are currently reserved for outdoor dining nodes.

Mr. Camillo said the issue merited further discussion.

Although no votes were taken, Mr. Camillo offered to visit Mr. Lenzo’s store in person.

The parking space in front of Blankenship Dry Goods is partially blocked by an outdoor catering node for La Taqueria and unusable.
Outdoor food node outside La Taqueria on Greenwich AVe.

See also:

P&Z Outdoor Restoration Workshop Comments: Unsightly, Unnecessary, Unfair
July 13, 2022

Glenville Pizza seeks permission from P&Z for temporary outdoor dining
July 11, 2022

Elected officials vote to return outdoor dining on April 15 and end the Monday before Thanksgiving
March 12, 2022

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Parking spaces

No parking spaces, Mandi residents harassed: The Tribune India


Tribune press service

Dipender Manta

Mandi, July 15

The city of Mandi lacks parking for residents as well as for those who come from outside. As a result, a large number of vehicles can be seen parked on the roadsides of the city at various locations such as Jail Road Mandi, School Bazaar, Mangvain and Hospital Road. This results in inconvenience for both pedestrians and motorists.

People harassed in an emergency

We had proposed to the authorities to join the IIT-Mandi to find solutions to this problem but nothing materialized. Vehicle parking even in an emergency is a big problem in the city. P Kapoor, Chairman, Citizens Council, Mandi

Roadside parking causes traffic jams, forcing police authorities to check vehicles. The townspeople lobbied the Mandi Municipal Corporation to develop adequate parking lots for their convenience, but nothing was done.

OP Kapoor, Chairman of Citizens Council, Mandi, said: “Parking has become a major problem in Mandi. The number of vehicles increases every year but we do not have enough parking spaces to accommodate them.

The Citizens Council has been lobbying the government as well as the local urban body for many years to develop car parks inside and outside the city.

However, little has been done in this regard.

“Traffic congestion in the city is also due to the non-availability of parking lots on the outskirts of the city. The foundation stone for two car parks was laid but the projects could not see the light of day for one reason or another,” Kapoor said.

“We had suggested to the authorities concerned to call on experts from IIT-Mandi to find a solution to the problem, but nothing materialized. The parking of vehicles at the time of emergency is a huge problem in the city, which should be dealt with as a priority. Parking at the Zone Hospital is a nightmare. We have raised this issue several times with Rogi Kalyan Samiti and the Chief Medical Officer but no solution has been found,” he added.

Narender Saini, a resident, said that in addition to developing parking lots in Mandi town, there is a need to make it mandatory for residents to have their own parking lot before buying a new car.

Virender Bhatt, Deputy Mayor of Mandi Municipal Corporation, said, “A parking lot with a capacity of 600 vehicles is under construction in the school bazaar area. A sum of Rs 1 crore was sanctioned for parking at Purani Mandi.

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Parking spaces

Some parking spaces will be removed on West Seventh Street in Fort Worth to make way for carpooling

FORTH WORTH, TX (CBSDFW.COM) – One of Fort Worth’s busiest entertainment districts gets more space for carpools, but eliminates some street parking on Friday and Saturday nights.

It’s the latest idea to ease congestion in the neighborhood, which can be congested with cars and people commuting to bars and restaurants on the weekends.

Police began covering parking meters in parts of the West Seventh District on Friday afternoon. 50 parking spaces on West 7th, Currie, Morton, Foch and Bledsoe will be reserved for carpools stopping only from 10 p.m.

The move triples the spaces previously reserved for carpooling. It also moves stops away from the heart of the neighborhood and closer to major roads so drivers can get in and out faster.

City parking manager Peter Elliott said data from companies like Uber and Lyft showed that at peak times more than 300 cars per hour were arriving in the district. With parking on both sides of some roads and only 15 spaces for carpooling, space could get crowded quickly.

“We discovered that the volume was much larger than we really realized,” he said.

The city has spent years trying different ideas to improve traffic flow in the area. Several streets have been changed to one-way streets. He pledged to use nearby Farrington Field for parking. A bus line has been added between the city center and the cultural district.

The city has worked with ride-sharing companies to have apps automatically guide customers to the right locations to find their drivers.
The city hopes to know by the end of the summer if the expanded area is contributing to congestion or if adjustments are needed to locations and space.

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Parking spaces

Love’s Travel Stops New Location in Illinois Adds 70 Parking Spaces

Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Monroe Center, Ill., with a stopover that opened Thursday. The store, located on Interstate 39 at exit 111 (16991 East Illinois Route 72), adds 70 truck parking spaces and 55 jobs in Ogle County. (courtesy Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Stops on the journey of love now serves customers in Monroe Center, Ill., with a stopover that opened Thursday. The store, located on Interstate 39 at exit 111 (16991 East Illinois Route 72), adds 70 truck parking spaces and 55 jobs in Ogle County.

“Love’s continues to open new locations to provide customers with clean, safe places to stop, making summer travel more convenient,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Love’s in Monroe Center is the company’s 32nd location in Illinois, and our team members are excited to help professional truck drivers and four-wheeler customers get back on the road quickly and safely. .”

The location is open 24/7 and offers many amenities, including:

  • Over 12,000 square feet.
  • Godfather’s Pizza and Subway (opening July 18).
  • 70 truck parking spaces.
  • 64 parking spaces.
  • Four RV parking spaces.
  • Seven diesel bays.
  • Six showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Fresh cooking concept.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand opening, Love’s will donate $2,000 to Stillman Valley High School.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Fredericton creates 45 parking spaces to encourage travel on the pedestrian bridge

A popular section of a multi-use trail in Fredericton is getting a facelift and more parking.

But not everyone is convinced that creating dozens of new spaces to park cars is the right move to encourage more people to use the trail.

City crews are working on a project to create 45 parking spaces along Station Road on the north side, as well as planting flowers and shrubs to create what the city calls a ‘living wall’ at the edge of the fairway past the north end of the Bill Thorpe Pedestrian Bridge.

According to city traffic engineer Tyson Aubie, the parking spaces will accommodate trail users and allow easier access for travel on the pedestrian bridge.

The parking spaces could have a small positive impact on reducing the number of people driving north to south of the Saint John River, said Benoît LeBlanc, president of the Fredericton Active Transportation Coalition.

But the city’s efforts would be better served improving overall cycling infrastructure or creating a North Side hub for bus services, he said.

Benoit LeBlanc, president of the Fredericton Trails Coalition, said parking spaces might have a small positive impact, but it would be better if the city improved cycling infrastructure to make it safer to cycle to the pedestrian bridge. (Zoom/CTF)

“Improving cycling accessibility to the bridge will likely do a lot more in terms of increasing the number of bridge crossings, if that is their goal,” he said.

“If their goal is to help a few people in their cars, I guess they’ll achieve that goal, but I’m not sure it serves the community as a whole.”

Improved bridge access

The nearby Carleton Park boat ramp has long served as a parking lot for people wishing to access the Bill Thorpe Pedestrian Bridge from the north side.

And last year the city added 20 parking spaces along Union Street in front of the same park.

Work is underway by the City of Fredericton to create new spaces on Station Road, as well as the installation of a retaining wall on which to grow plants. (Aidan Cox/CBC)

The idea with the 45 spaces created on Station Road is to give better access to the bridge for people with reduced mobility, Aubie said.

“It was above all a priority because [the walking bridge] wasn’t as accessible to users as it could have been,” he said.

“Let’s say you were mobility impaired, there wasn’t really a way for you to pull out, park somewhere, and then get on the trail,” he said, adding that three of the spaces will be accessible parking spaces.

Tyson Aubie, traffic engineer at the city, said the 45 spaces will provide better accessibility to the Bill Thorpe Pedestrian Bridge for people with reduced mobility. (Zoom/CTF)

Aubie said people were already using the land along Station Road to park informally, but it was not being done “efficiently”.

In addition to people with reduced mobility, Aubie said, parking spots are being created for people who might feel like they live too far away to cycle or walk from their house to the bridge, but don’t want to get to the city center by car.

“It’s a great place to park in the morning, hop on your bike, bike across the rail bridge, get to work. It allows more people to use it.”

The flower and shrub wall being constructed along Station Road will be designed to resemble that which has already been constructed further south along the embankment from the trail. (Aidan Cox/CBC)

Aubie said improving the city’s overall cycling infrastructure to make it safer to cycle from other areas to the trails is also a priority, but he didn’t give a timeline for any improvements other than to cite the ongoing project to add bike lanes to Brookside Drive. .

“It’s really high on our list of priorities, but in many cases if we don’t completely dig the road in for some distinct reason, it’s hard to justify tearing down a perfectly good street for [create bike lanes].”

Aubie said work on Station Road is expected to be completed in September.

It is one of 15 construction projects City of Fredericton work this summer.

Fears of “chaotic” traffic

Patricia Ward uses the trail often as it is a short walk from her home on Barker Street.

She said she thinks the trail could benefit from 15-20 parking spots, but thinks 45 is too much.

Patricia Ward lives close to Barker Street and says she’s worried traffic in her neighborhood will get ‘chaotic’ with so many new parking spaces. (Aidan Cox/CBC)

“It’s nice to have extra parking spaces but really, I think it’s going to be a little chaotic in some ways with a lot of people,” she said.

Denis Gallant likes to walk the trail during his lunch hour while at work, and he said he thinks the extra parking spots are a good thing.

“Not everyone lives in town, so if you want people to come to town and walk and enjoy the facilities, you have to give them a place to park,” he said.

Loss of trail visitor center

Part of the work to create the new parking spaces involved removing the building that once housed the City Trail Visitor Center.

City spokesman Shasta Stairs said the city donated it to St. Mary’s First Nation.

Kandise Brown, spokesperson for the Fredericton Trails Coalition, said the group typically hires summer students to work in the building and provide directions to trail users.

However, summer 2019 was the last time the center was open.

Earth marks the area along the Nashwaak Trail where the Visitor Center stood before it was removed as part of work to create 45 parking spaces on Station Road. (Aidan Cox/CBC)

“From what I understand, some of the services that were offered by the coalition at the time in terms of, you know, basically like tourist information, are either duplicated by the city tourist information at the city ​​hall, or replaced by cellphones and GPS, so it wasn’t really a great use of resources,” Brown said.

Brown said the coalition recently held a community engagement session and there was general support among attendees for another center to be established in a different location.

“So we’re in a listening phase and trying to think about what might be helpful, and what we’ve heard from, you know, from the neighborhood is that lights are helpful, signage is helpful, maps are useful.”

Brown said the Trails Coalition is fine with the Station Road project, but said she would also like to see the streets improved with better cycling infrastructure to make it safer for people to cycle onto the trails. .

“I think there’s a lot of work to be done to make these connections between streets and pathways, to make them feel really safe and inviting for cyclists and pedestrians, but I still think that, you know , every step forward is positive.”

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Parking spaces

Stop turning parking lots into shops

Editor,

Many letters were published in The Shillong Times and other newspapers and there was endless discussion of the growing traffic problems and shortage of car parks in the capital city of Shillong. As discussions and deliberations continue, an unpleasant “change of use” is taking place in the few parking spaces that have been created in previous years. All of these car parks were previously built by the Department of Urban Affairs to deal with the on-street parking that was rampant in the city.
Things are changing for the worse today. Take the example of the parking space that was created in Dhankheti. Today more of the parking lot has been taken up by shops and very little space is left for parking. In the car park opposite the main branch of the State Bank of India, new stores are added almost every month. In the end, if the powers that be get their way, there will be no more space to park. Two years ago, there were only three or four stores in this parking lot. Today, shops have settled all along the border. Even now, the construction of new stores seems to be underway. No consideration for the structural safety of the building or how it affects public and vehicular traffic or where the liquid discharge goes. We will dread going into the basement. It looks more like a den of criminals.
Take the case of the parking space near Mahavir Park, you have to see it to believe it. For the namesake, public toilets have been built but the use is more commercial in nature. In fact, it looks like a store selling groceries inside the toilet. A few dilapidated looking shops have also been built right in the middle and God knows for what purpose. The same goes for the car parks at Khlieh Iewduh, opposite Anjalee Cinema, Mawlong Hat and other car parks, all of which are gradually being converted to commercial use. Nobody can guess how such a “change of use” occurs and how the authorities concerned turn a blind eye.
There had always been a demand to convert parking lots into shops in the hope of creating jobs, but common sense had prevailed before. Now, however, it appears to be a different story. There seems to be no objection from anywhere to such actions which run counter to the public interest. It’s more like a complete surrender to the powers that be by the relevant departments resulting in a free-for-all. If the government of the day has not learned from the experience of the shopping complex in the parking lot of Police Bazar and still wants to continue the failed job creation policy by building shops everywhere, it may very well do the same in the New Shillong area instead of destroying the limited infrastructure available in the city today.
In case the government of the day has a sense of responsibility towards its citizens and cares about the future of the town, it would do well to remove all encroachments from public places in Shillong and instead create other opportunities in New Shillong which appears to be developing into another government township with no provision for the public.

yours, etc.,

B.Dutta,

Shillong-1

Pathetic road conditions in Upper Shillong

Editor,

Through your newspaper, I would like to raise a serious complaint about the pitiful and extremely bad condition of certain sections of the Shillong-Milliem-Nongstoin road. One part is at Sawmer, Upper Shillong, and the other part is near the trijunction area at Hynniewmer (just before reaching the junction point from Shillong to Mylliem or Nongstoin), which has caused huge inconvenience to commuters daily life and which is also dangerous for vehicles. fold over. These particular stretches of the road are full of potholes and are rough terrain. During the rainy season, these portions are flooded and cause huge passage problems. The fact that these are on a national road is another very disappointing fact.
By this letter, we, the citizens, demand that the PWD Roads (National Highway Division) or other relevant central/state road department immediately initiate repairs to the roads, failing which the concerned citizens will be forced to address to the High Court. We also urge the office of the Deputy Commissioner, Shillong, to follow this issue closely.

yours, etc.,

Ardor Hynniewta

Shillong-1

Despair of those affected by the floods

Editor,

Flood-affected Barak Valley passengers in Assam have been without proper rail and road connection for weeks. The union and state governments know that for an essential flight requiring 25 to 28 minutes between Guwahati and Silchar, private airlines charge Rs 6,200 to Rs 24,000 per passenger for a one-way trip. For a very limited short period, the Chief Minister of Assam arranged special low cost flights, but this facility is no longer available today.
The Ministry of Civil Aviation, PMO, CM (Assam) and the administration are just spectators. This is an indirect support to the operation by different airlines at a time when the situation warrants frequent low cost flights between the Guwahati-Silchar and Kolkata-Silchar sectors.
We call on the government to intervene strictly in the matter to bring the cost down to Rs 4000 for the short flight between Silchar-Guwahati until regular trains are restored. A similar action is requested for air tickets between Silchar and Kolkata on the same grounds. Additional flights in both sectors are essential to alleviate public suffering under the Act East policy of the Government of India and the Ministry of Development of the North East Region (MDoNER).
Your kind urgent intervention is requested.

yours, etc.,

Professor Dilip Kumar Dey

General secretary,

Pro-active Senior Citizens’ Forum, (An apolitical organization of senior citizens)

Silchar

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Parking spaces

We make up to £16,000 per FORTNIGHT of parking spots flogged – that’s easy money

Residents of THRIFTY earn a small fortune flogging parking spots in their driveways during the Wimbledon tennis tournament.

Landlords in affluent south London charge up to £65 a day for a coveted spot near the All England Club, meaning those with the biggest properties can rake in £16,000 in just 14 days.

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John Lloyd charges between £20 and £30 for a place on his recordCredit: Kevin Dunnett
Wimbledon is full of signs directing drivers to private parking spaces

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Wimbledon is full of signs directing drivers to private parking spacesCredit: Kevin Dunnett

Terry Moore, who has lived in the area with his wife of 47 years, is earning just over a grand over the two-week Championships.

But neighbors who have room for 15 vehicles to park on their lot can earn a lot more.

The 76-year-old, who has only attended one game as he prefers to watch the action on TV, said: “I’ve been doing this for about eight years and it’s very popular.

“People can book ahead or I’ll stand in my way with a sign until someone walks past.

“Sometimes people line up for a seat, other times I have to wait an hour or two.”

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Terry, who charges £20 a day, added: “I keep the money.

“If I charged more I would probably give it to charity, but I charge less than my neighbors who charge £30 and £40.

“Over the two weeks I will probably earn around £1,000.

“I’m going to Amsterdam in August so it will pay for that – and a present for the wife.”

Further down the leafy suburban street of Terry is a mother-of-two who rents out five or six spaces in her driveway for £30 a day.

The owner, who has lived in the area with her partner and two sons for 30 years, said: “My neighbors charge £40 but I charge less.

“What I do varies, but I don’t need to advertise as I’m usually very busy.”

The woman, from Pakistan, who did not want to give her name, added: “At first we weren’t doing this, but five or six years ago I started and I can use this money well. .”

While most locals say they earn modest sums, those with the biggest homes can take in big bucks.

A homeowner stood with a clipboard and a pen in front of his sprawling detached house where 15 cars were already parked.

He declined to give his name or reveal exactly how much he charges, but two women who had just left their keys with his pal said they paid £65 for 24 hours.

There was space for at least three other vehicles, meaning the guy could earn up to £16,000 over the two weeks if he charged the same rate at 18 cars a day.

I’m going to Amsterdam in August so it will pay for that, and a present for the wife.

Terry Moore

One of the women, who had just left her car, said: “We paid £65 which we thought was pretty good.

“When we tried to book parking elsewhere there were lots of different prices, even up to £150 a day.

“Apparently they go very, very fast, so we just wanted to get it straightened out. Also, we’re only a three-minute walk from the courts.”

While it’s completely legitimate to rent out space on your property, there are a few things you need to consider first.

Be sure to check with your home insurance provider, in case this invalidates your policy. You may need to purchase additional coverage to protect yourself in case someone causes damage while parking.

Don’t forget the tax department either. You can earn £1,000 a year before paying tax by renting space on your land, such as your driveway, carport or garage.

This is due to something called the property allowance, which resets with each new tax year’s stat on April 6.

But any profits you make above this amount must be declared to HMRC through a self-assessment tax return.

NET PROFIT

Many of those who rent parking spaces pocket the money for themselves, but many also donate their proceeds to charity.

John Lloyd has lived in Wimbledon with his wife for 40 years and has rented his car for 30 years.

The retired conference interpreter said: “We’ve been busy every day so far, mostly with regular clients.

“I believe All England charge £35, but I charge less than that.

“It’s always a maximum of £30, often £25, but it depends on who it is and the brand of car.

“The smaller the better so I can fit in more and they are easier to move around.”

The 86-year-old, who speaks Russian, French and German, added: “All the money I earn goes to good causes, as it does for a lot of locals, but not everyone. .

“Charitable donations will be well into the four figures.

“As my son has autism, we donate a lot of the money to the National Autistic Society, as well as various animal charities.

“My wife cares a lot about birds, so we also donate the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.”

Another woman, who rents out space on her record for £30 a day, also said she donates the money she earns to charity.

The resident, who wished to remain anonymous, said: “I am sponsoring a student at Nottingham Trent University and the money is funding his summer to do guided research into malnutrition.

“The university has a fairly high proportion of less privileged students, so they apply for this award and this money covers their fees.

“I’ve been doing this for about 28 years and have donated to various causes.”

Some residents donate the money they earn to charity while others keep it for themselves

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Some residents donate the money they earn to charity while others keep it for themselvesCredit: Kevin Dunnett
A house charging £40 a day

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A house charging £40 a dayCredit: Kevin Dunnett
Some landlords offer all-day and overnight parking

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Some landlords offer all-day and overnight parkingCredit: Kevin Dunnett

The owner, who has lived at Wimbledon since 1987, added: “I can fit 10 cars on my ride, 11 if they’re small, so I usually earn between £2,500 and £3,000.

“But this year won’t be the same because they redirected all the traffic.

“We have the miserable buses going by. Apparently they changed the system.

“We used to get streams of traffic here, but now they’ve sent it elsewhere.

“There’s not really competition between the neighbors because we all have our regulars.

“Many people have been coming to see me for years and years.”

The secondary hustle and bustle is so lucrative that some locals even employ people to sit on their records and take money from Wimbledon goers for them.

One man, who said he worked the gates of the house where he was stationed every year, said: ‘I charge £25 but some people charge a lot more. It’s very popular.

The official Wimbledon Championships car park costs tennis fans £35 a day, but spaces are ‘strictly limited’.

There’s also the option to “park and ride” for £15 a day, but it’s like a bus ride away from the action.

Parking prices elsewhere in the area, where the average house costs £622,579 compared to the UK average of £278,000, vary – and there is stiff competition for bays too.

No less than 500,000 people attend the tournament over the two weeks, with a daily ground capacity of 42,000 spectators.

This year’s championships started on June 27 and will end on July 10.

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Elsewhere in the UK, families are also earning a fortune by renting parking spaces at the Glastonbury Festival.

Rich Rayner, 64, grabbed a field just 10 minutes’ walk from the world famous site in 1992 and is now earning £30,000 in a week.

The official Wimbledon Championships parking lot is

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Official Wimbledon Championships parking is ‘strictly limited’Credit: Kevin Dunnett
Another house offering private parking spaces

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Another house offering private parking spacesCredit: Kevin Dunnett
A house with room for a car donates money to Unicef

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A house with room for a car donates money to UnicefCredit: Kevin Dunnett
Some houses can accommodate up to 18 cars

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Some houses can accommodate up to 18 carsCredit: Kevin Dunnett
Tennis fans arriving at the tournament in South London

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Tennis fans arriving at the tournament in South LondonCredit: Kevin Dunnett
A sign for more charity parking in the area

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A sign for more charity parking in the areaCredit: Kevin Dunnett
Official parking costs £35 per day

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Official parking costs £35 per dayCredit: Kevin Dunnett

What to pay attention to when renting your car

BEFORE you dive in and start renting parking spaces in your car, you need to do a few checks first:

1. If you don’t own your home, check to see if your landlord is okay with you renting the space.

2. Check whether renting your parking space will invalidate your home insurance – this may increase your insurance risk and therefore your premium, or you may need a separate liability policy.

3. Check how payments are made through rental sites. It’s best to withdraw money as soon as possible to protect your money should the worst happen and the business goes bankrupt.

4. Check if you have to declare your income. Property Allowance allows you to earn £1,000 a year by renting out your driveway, but you will need to notify the Inland Revenue of any profit over this amount.

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces sold at NYU Langone

Nicole Fuentes

The Village of Patchogue recently sold approximately 30 spaces to NYU Langone. According to village officials, NYU is paying the estimated price of $315,000 for the land directly behind the old and recently purchased Burlington Building.

The space, according to the village, will be used for employee parking. The decision, said Mayor Paul Pontieri, made sense, given that it is not a heavily used car park and the money made from the sale can be used to develop more car parks closer to Main Street.

“The Village is proud to continue its commitment to redevelop empty or derelict properties into a revitalized and vibrant Main Street,” said Village Solicitor Brian Egan. “The project is a perfect example of Mayor Pontieri’s vision of a main street for the future, the transition of properties from the old economy to meet the needs of the future economy. The Burlington property needed some creative thinking to fill what would have been a significant hole on our main street, and this parking transaction is a critical part of getting it over the finish line.

Earlier this month, NYU Langone and Long Island Community Hospital confirmed plans to fill the approximately 55,000 square foot structure at 196 East Main Street in Patchogue, formerly Burlington Coat Factory. The facility will be transformed into an outpatient surgical center with medical offices.

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Parking spaces

Residents of the Concourse Village housing complex are upset over the loss of parking spaces

Some residents who live in the Concourse Village housing complex are outraged after learning that they are about to lose their parking spots.

Residents tell News 12 they received a letter from management on Friday telling them they must move their cars by Monday.

They say they are unhappy after learning their cars could be towed away if they don’t get their vehicles out of the garage by Monday.

They complain that the letter they received on Friday was sent at short notice and that their needs are not being taken into account.

Residents say they currently pay $40 a month for parking and if they try to go elsewhere they fear they will end up paying hundreds of dollars.

Some older people call this an inconvenience because not having their car nearby is problematic and dangerous. They say they are worried about having to walk long distances at night to park their car.

Finding parking is already a challenge in the South Bronx, so with potentially hundreds of residents now forced to park on the street, they fear it could get even worse.

They are now calling on Concourse Village Management to offer them alternatives.

News 12 has reached out to building management to find out more about the situation and whether they are providing assistance to residents, but has yet to hear back.

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Parking spaces

Dedicated Purple Heart parking spaces

TRIADELPHIA, W.Va. (WTRF) – If you remember a few weeks ago, 7News brought you the Purple Heart parking lot project. It is a mission of VFW Post 4442 to secure designated parking spots for veterans who have been injured while serving.

Companies Wanted for Purple Heart Parking Project

I never imagined that there would be such a turnout.

Wally McMasters, Commander Elect, VFW Post 4442

The first signs are rising in the Ohio Valley and soon people may be seeing these spaces in the United States.

Wally McMasters started with a vision and service project for VFW Post 4442 asking local businesses to provide designated parking sports for Purple Heart recipients.

These people took a bullet for us. They are real heroes and that’s why I started.

Wally McMasters, Commander Elect, VFW Post 4442

McMasters came up with the idea after seeing a veteran struggle to enter a store, unable to park in a handicapped spot.

So he approached Walmart in the Highlands. Almost instantly they said yes.

Personally, I had quite a few family members in the military and most of them have purple hearts, so that’s pretty important to me. Also, as a store, it’s good to give back to the community, especially to those who gave the most to the community initially.

Tim Lemasters, Front End Coach, Walmart

City Facilities Management is partnering with Walmart and they decided to take the project a step further with more than just a sign.

We will provide all the posts and all the material to fix the panels to the ground. Walmart provides all painting and painting supplies. Wally provides the panels and we’re going to try to get that across the entire footprint that stretches from Florida to Massachusetts.

Scott Bartz, Municipal Facilities Management

You’ll soon see these Purple Heart parking spots at other Walmart stores in the area. In fact, there’s already one right across from the store in Moundsville. The Highlands location also plans to add several other spots.

I am very proud of our military and believe that if we can have one for our customers with disabilities, we can have one for our Purple Heart recipients.

Kim Stevey, Asset Protection Team Leader, Walmart

They hope to set an example for other businesses in the Ohio Valley, creating not just one space, but hopefully many.

With a big box store like this, I think they will lead by example and other companies and other big box stores will follow.

Scott Bartz, Municipal Facilities Management

As for Wally, he said he has already received inquiries from other parts of West Virginia. He is delighted that his project for VFW Post 4442 is progressing rapidly.

He would also like to thank the businesses in The Highlands who had Purple Heart parking spaces long before this project began.

We are excited to spread the signs throughout the Ohio Valley and honor our Purple Heart recipients.

Wally McMasters, Commander Elect, VFW Post 4442

If you are a business that wants to be part of the Purple Heart Parking Project and designate a space, call Wally McMasters. His number is 606-793-3004. You can also email him at [email protected]

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Parking spaces

Phoenix Park: Investigation launched amid concerns over loss of parking spaces

An online survey has been launched as part of a parking strategy being developed for Dublin’s Phoenix Park.

The move follows concerns about a significant loss of parking spaces on both sides of Chesterfield Avenue to make way for permanent cycling facilities in the park.

The Office of Public Works (OPW) appointed Systra consultants to develop a parking strategy for the park, which attracts 10 million visitors a year. The first phase will include an online survey of park users to help inform future parking decisions.

In a statement, the OPW said it was seeking opinions on how to encourage people to choose more sustainable travel options, such as cycling and walking, when visiting the park.

“We understand that to make the park more inclusive for everyone, some visitors will need to drive,” they said. “We need to ensure that our parking offer can facilitate all visitors.”

The inquiry will remain open until July 8, with a draft parking strategy expected to be released in the fall. The OPW said this would be followed by further non-statutory public consultation.

“This strategy will identify key parking issues, challenges and opportunities in and around Phoenix Park,” they said. “There will also be a dialogue with key stakeholders located in and around Phoenix Park to understand their perspectives regarding bicycle and car parking and any associated issues and opportunities.

“It is expected that the parking strategy will focus primarily on measures related to bicycle and car parking, especially for visitors with reduced mobility to ensure that they can visit the park,” they added. .

The Minister of State responsible for OPW, Patrick O’Donovan, urged local communities and park visitors to submit feedback during the next three weeks of the inquiry.

“The more information we get directly from our visitors, the better our parking strategy will reflect and meet their needs,” he said.

Sen. Emer Currie (FG) said a new parking strategy for Phoenix Park must reflect the transportation needs of residents and visitors, as well as identifying connectivity issues.

“It’s really important that people let the OPW know about their experiences with Phoenix Park, especially over the past two years when so many people have used it during the Covid restrictions,” she said.

“We need to strike the right balance to make the park accessible to people of all ages and stages, while protecting its environment and wildlife.

“The park should be inclusive for all visitors, including those who must drive to get there.”

Senator Currie also called for progress on the overdue pilot bus service for the park.

Earlier this year, plans for the new route were turned upside down after it was discovered that Cabra’s entrance gate was too narrow for a standard bus to pass.

The proposed service will link Heuston and Broombridge stations, with stops at Dublin Zoo and the Phoenix Park Visitor Centre.

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Impressive Earnings in the Parking Space Market – Designer Women

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Parkopedia, Yourparkingspace, Spothero, Stashbee, Parkingforme, Parkhound, Parkme, Parklet, Bestparking, Appyparking, JustPark, RingGo

By typeProvide a reservationSearch onlyBy applicationTo usersTo parking owners

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Marketreports.info is a global provider of market research and advisory services specializing in offering a wide range of business solutions to its clients, including market research reports, primary and secondary research, demand forecasting services, focus group analytics and other services. We understand how important data is in today’s competitive environment and so we have partnered with industry leading research providers who are constantly working to meet the ever-increasing demand for research reports. market throughout the year.

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Parking spaces

University Heights protests loss of parking spaces

A few dozen residents and business owners in University Heights protested the city’s removal of 88 parking spaces on Monday, June 13. Parking spaces are removed for protected bike lanes along a one-mile stretch of Park Boulevard between Adams and University Avenues.

They also had no kind words for San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria or the City Council. Susy Holts from University Heights said San Diego News7:

“I am incredibly frustrated. I despise what is happening. [Gloria] and the city council does not listen to people or residents.

Company owner Ben Evans said:

“I think the mayor is more concerned with city life and density than what he’s going to do for small businesses in this area. Where are all of our guests going to park if we lose this parking lot? How are we supposed to stay in business? »

Meanwhile, city crews began work on Park Boulevard on the next phase of the city’s resurfacing plan. According to News7, “The new bike lanes will be set up next to the pedestrian sidewalk, alongside a three-foot safety lane. A parking lane will be outside the security lane, alongside a single lane of two-way traffic.

Along with the loss of parking spaces, residents believe the new layout will force delivery trucks to park in the middle of the street, blocking both lanes of traffic. They are also concerned about potential access for buses and emergency vehicles.

The business owners told the TV station that their complaints and concerns were ignored by the city. Company owner Lance Stratton said:

“I’ve been in business for 30 years, and this is the first time I’ve felt threatened that the city isn’t on my side, the city wants me out. I don’t appreciate that.

All of these concerns reflect the frustrations of business owners and residents along 30th Street in North Park when the city removed hundreds of parking spaces and replaced them with controversial bike lanes.

At the city dump, authorities say there are still 165 parking spaces left. Anthony Santacroce, a senior public information officer for the city, said the city “found it could add an additional 55 spaces to cross-streets in the area by converting incline and parallel parking to head-end parking in many side streets that intersect with Park Boulevard.”

Additionally, a rep for Gloria was quick to note, according to News7, that bike lanes on Park Boulevard were called out a year ago in three different plans: the city’s bike master plan, the community plan Uptown and the North Park Community Plan, each established with significant public input and review. And unfortunately for these folks in University Heights, their board member, Stephen Whitburn, supports the project.

Again, surprise, surprise, the whole city (Gloria) rationale is that these bike lanes are very much needed to prevent more deaths and injuries among cyclists. David Rolland, the guy from Gloria (he ran a San Diego magazine once known for its biting coverage of the city’s news), lays out the “safety” card:

“A single death or serious injury on city streets is unacceptable, and in 2021 alone, 16 cyclists were killed in San Diego. We need to make cycling safer for citizens, which is why Mayor Gloria is creating more and more protected routes. The mayor has also pledged to meet the city’s ambitious climate action plan targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and decreasing car trips and increasing bike trips is one element. key to achieving these goals.

No one wants more dead and injured.

Time and time again, however, OB Rag and journalist Geoff Page have refuted the statistics some cycling advocates are using to pressure the city on bike lanes. Usually our fingers point to a group called Circulate San Diego – which we’ve shown is an organization in the pockets of developers.

However, the city is not really committed to “security”. Why, safety was the issue when five century-old palm trees were felled by the city not too long ago. Safety was the issue at Mira Mesa when the city painted new “lanes” without notifying local residents. The same problem was used as an excuse to paint the old Point Loma tracks.

And for a response to Gloria’s climate action plan, check out today’s ‘Reader Rant’.

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Parking spaces

Hermosa Beach downsizes patios to reclaim parking spaces – Daily Breeze

The Hermosa Beach City Council approved at its June 14 meeting the downsizing of some dining patios that have helped restaurants survive the pandemic for more than two years.

At a previous meeting, council members raised concerns that some of the catering terraces were underutilized and taking parking spaces away from other businesses who were also hit by the related restrictions. to COVID-19.

Three restaurants – Rok Sushi, Rockefeller and Steak & Whisky, all on Pier Avenue – will be required within 45 days to reduce the size of their street dining patios, according to environmental programs manager Doug Krauss.

The reduction of these restaurant bridges will add five parking spaces.

“Currently, a bridge can be as big as it wants, if it has the frontage or if it has permission from its neighboring businesses,” Krauss said during Tuesday’s meeting.

The council’s decision means that a restaurant can use a maximum of two parking spaces parallel to the street or three parking spaces in front on Pier and Hermosa avenues for outdoor dining on the street.

But those rules won’t apply if a restaurant has an adequate storefront and doesn’t need permission from a neighboring property. Then this restaurant can use up to three parallel parking spaces or four front parking spaces.

“There’s a feeling among many other businesses in the region, among some of the other stakeholders, that there’s an inequity that comes with this, that these businesses have too much space,” Krauss said.

At a meeting in May, the city council voted extend its temporary outdoor dining program until the end of the year to develop a permanent program. The board also approved enhancements to the program focused on dining deck maintenance and aesthetics.

When the city council approved the outdoor dining program more than two years ago, it was an effort to help struggling businesses hit hard by the pandemic. Since then, more than 60 businesses have taken advantage of the program, which allows them to encroach on various public rights-of-way, including sidewalks and parking lots.

In January, the city approved charge $1.50 per square foot per month extensions to outdoor dining terraces and for an additional 60 outdoor terraces that obtained temporary permits at the start of the pandemic. These location-based fees ranged before the pandemic from $1 to $5 per square foot per month.

Pier Plaza operations that previously featured outdoor dining but expanded during the pandemic will pay the reinstated fee on the original space as well as the $1.50 per square foot.

Nearly $700,000 will be generated annually from fees.

There were also discussions at Tuesday’s meeting about the future of catering bridges on Pier Plaza.

Krauss said some Pier Plaza businesses have been able to expand outdoor dining areas to double what they previously had since the pandemic began. The Pier Plaza company has been authorized by the city to extend the outdoor terraces by 12 feet.

Council member Justin Massey said Pier Plaza’s temporary dining terraces have helped businesses survive the pandemic, but at the same time increased restaurant seating capacity.

“It drives businesses away from the rest of downtown and exacerbates the public safety issues we have because of the size of downtown establishments,” Massey said Tuesday.

Massey, who was the only one who did not vote on Tuesday, favored limiting the size of restaurant decks, but he suggested that new restaurant decks, those built during the pandemic on Pier Plaza, should be phased out at autumn. He feels the company has had enough time to “help them get back on their feet” so they can “get the Plaza back to where it was before the pandemic.”

Massey instructed city staff to bring back an hour to the agenda when considering ending food patios on Pier Plaza in the fall.

On the phone Wednesday morning, Massey said indoor dining is likely to be permitted for the foreseeable future, so he thinks September or October, after the peak summer season, would be a good time to consider laying down Pier Plaza terraces. .

“Simply because by then, restaurant businesses will not only have been able to survive the pandemic, but will also have been able to generate several months of revenue,” Massey said.

Council member Mary Campbell said at the meeting on Tuesday that she sees progress on Pier Plaza and that council should not “make rash decisions” about the future of restaurant decks there.

“There’s a momentum there that’s moving,” Campbell said.

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Parking spaces

Fears for the future of Nantwich businesses amid lack of parking spaces for shoppers

Businesses in Nantwich are losing trade because visitors to the town cannot find a parking space, a councilor has said. Cllr Peter Groves (Con) said Cheshire East Council did nothing to address the loss of more than 80 spaces in the unofficial St Anne car park when the site was developed.

He said he had been contacted by several business owners about the issue. “We are now in a position where people who drive into town, especially on Saturdays or busy market days, if they can’t park, they just turn around and go somewhere else,” Cllr Groves told the Local Democracy Reporting Service.

“I have been working at the council for a few years on a comprehensive review of parking in Nantwich so they can look at both the supply and the pricing structure.

READ MORE: ‘They lived their dream’ – the racing team’s tribute to father and son after Isle of Man TT tragedy

“What really irritates me is that downtown vitality plans are handled by the economy and growth commission, but car parking is handled by the roads commission. You don’t have to be a British brain to realize that city center vitality and parking go hand in hand. You have to look at both at the same time. »

The Nantwich Councilor said some traders were seriously worried they would go bankrupt if footfall continued to fall due to parking issues. “Nantwich is primarily a town with independently run shops – they survive on the footfall in Nantwich and if the footfall isn’t there they basically won’t have a business and that’s what really concerns me “, did he declare.

He added that a lot of people on the new areas being built will be coming to town. “If you look at Kingsbourne we have 900 odd houses coming up, we’re about to have another 80 odd houses on the Peter Destapeleigh Way site, so that’s around 1,000 houses.

“These people who live in Kingsbourne or Peter Destapeleigh, they’re not going to walk to Nantwich every time. They will come in and want to park. No one is talking about how this is going to be resolved. Nantwich has no free car parks now that St Anne is no longer official and, along with Crewe and Wilmslow, has some of the highest parking charges in East Cheshire.

Cllr Groves said: ‘The car parking problem in Nantwich, Crewe and Wilmslow is a hot potato for residents because people in Nantwich, Crewe and Wilmslow are saying why am I paying to resurface [free] car parks in Alsager and Sandbach, etc. But the biggest problem at the moment is the supply of parking, because it is fundamental for the traffic in the city.

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Hundreds of semi-parking spaces on offer – The Daily Reporter

Three tractor-trailer parking lots west of CR 700W south of CR 300N in Hancock County are among several proposals officials are considering.

Image submitted

HANCOCK COUNTY – All of the warehouses coming into the western part of the county mean more tractor trailers, prompting to offer parking.

Plans for five lots in three areas totaling more than 600 parking spaces have recently begun to be submitted to county authorities.

CR 700W and 500N

Last month, the Hancock County Zoning Appeals Board approved a request by Kamaldeep Singh for a special exception for tractor-trailer parking on 18.5 acres near the southeast corner of CR 500N and 700W. The site is currently an agricultural field with a light industrial zoning designation.

Proposed for the location are approximately 334 semi-trailer spaces and an approximately 6,400 square foot service building with three maintenance bays.

Larry Strange, deputy director of the Hancock County Plan Commission, gave the application a favorable recommendation. He pointed out at the zoning board meeting that while the county’s light industrial zoning district designation is for industrial uses contained within structures, storage of tractor-trailers is permitted as a special exception.

“The other thing to note is that this neighborhood should be used to support industrial retention and expansion in Hancock County,” Strange said, adding that the tractor-trailer parking aligns with that intent.

Zoning board members approved the special exception 3-1 with Jason Faucett, Michael Long and Evan Matlock voting in favor and Byron Holden voting against. Renée Oldham was absent. As a condition of approval, Singh must commission a traffic study to help determine the type of road improvements that will be needed in the area to support the project.

Tim Allen, Singh’s assistant in that venture, told the zoning board the project would be built in phases. He added that truckers would not stay on the property overnight. Twenty to 30 trucks per week are planned initially with hopes for 100 or more per week within a few years.

Allen also said the site could be redesigned to accommodate trucks and trailers in some areas and only trailers in others, which would affect the total number of spaces. Electrical hookups would be available in the winter and trucks would not be allowed to idle. Trailers with cold storage units would be placed away from the perimeter of the lot to reduce noise heard offsite.

Several residents who live near the site spoke out against the proposal at the meeting.

Traffic problems were among Sandra Hudson’s concerns.

“It will not produce a harmonious relationship with the adjacent properties, which are residences,” she said.

Connie Flanagan agreed.

“The traffic is crazy now,” she said, adding that she couldn’t imagine how much worse things would get with more tractor-trailers.

Joe Turner, who owns nearly 60 acres of farmland and woods behind homes across CR 700W from the site, supports the proposal.

“I commend these gentlemen for having the foresight to see what the needs are in the region,” he said.

CR 700W and 300N

Late last month, the Hancock County Area Planning Commission voted narrowly to send a favorable recommendation to the Hancock County Board of Commissioners on the rezoning of 5 acres in the 2600 block of North CR 700W from an industrial to general industrial business park zoning designation for semi-trailer parking. If the Board of Commissioners approves the rezoning, they would also need a special exception from the zoning board for parking.

The dimensions of the property are too small for development under its current zoning designation, but would be permitted following the change sought.

Fortville-based 5 Rivers Properties wants to buy John McCarty’s property to create about 25 parking spaces and turn the house on the lot into office space.

“When we moved in, there were just farm fields around us, and it was very quiet and peaceful,” McCarty told the planning commission. ” This is no longer the case. And we knew it would happen one day, we are realistic about it.

Plan commission members voted 4 to 3 for the favorable recommendation, with Bill Bolander, Tyler Edon, Bill Spalding and Renee Oldham in favor and Wendell Hester, Michael Long and Byron Holden against.

Mike Dale, executive director of the planning commission, gave the proposal an unfavorable recommendation. Rezoning the site as general industrial, he said, is not compatible with the industrial business park uses outlined in the county’s comprehensive plan that promotes light industrial activities enclosed in buildings.

Briane House, a partner at Pritzke & Davis, a Greenfield-based law firm, representing McCarty, noted that an application to rezone four properties north of McCarty totaling 27 acres from the Industrial Business Park to Industrial has also filed with the county planning department. general. McCarty said two of those properties had interested buyers for tractor-trailer parking purposes. A site plan he filed with the county shows a total of 276 parking spaces. The planning committee will consider this request at a future meeting.

“One of the things the county is facing … is with the development progress that we have, there’s a need for additional truck parking,” House said.

Mount Comfort Road and CR 500N

The County Plan Commission has unanimously given an adverse recommendation to the Board of Commissioners on the rezoning of just over 5 acres at the southeast corner of Mt. Comfort Road and CR 500N from a zoning designation of institutional to light industrial. BDO LLC, of ​​McCordsville, wants to create a to-be-determined number of short-term tractor-trailer parking spaces there before developing a gas station, restaurant or other type of commercial building depending on demand.

BDO would use the house on the property as an office. The house is protected by historic designation; officials had to alter initial plans to demolish it for a roundabout coming to the nearby intersection.

Dale also advised against BDO tractor-trailer parking, noting that the county’s overall plan identifies the location of mixed-use developments, which include high-density residences, retail and some light industry. He added that a county-backed Mt. Comfort Corridor plan and cities along the corridor are also seeking similar uses for the location.

Silvia Miller, a lawyer representing BDO, countered that while the proposal may not match plans, it follows what is happening in the region and is a logical extension of that growth.

If the County Board of Commissioners approves the rezoning, a special parking exception would also be required from the zoning board.

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Hereford Old Market shopping center could lose parking spaces

MORE than 100 parking spaces could be lost at the Old Market shopping center in Hereford if MandM Direct is allowed to move into the former Debenhams store.

Planning documents reveal that 119 of the 606 parking spaces at the mall, which opened in 2014, could be reserved for MandM employees and exempt from charges.

British Land revealed last week that it wanted to turn the upper floors of the former Debenhams store into offices for MandM Direct, with other parties interested in ground floor space.

Mike Tomkins, chairman of MandM Direct, said the business was a major local success story and that, should Herefordshire Council grant planning permission, the move would “support the next phase of the business’ journey”.

That planning application has now gone to council, which sees British Land, the centre’s owner, amending a condition of the shopping centre’s consent.

RELATED NEWS:

And this condition is pre-requisite to occupation of any part of the development, details of the operation, management and charging rates of the proposed car park should be sent to council.

Documents reveal that employees of the clothing retailer, with offices in Leominster and a warehouse in Moreton-on-Lugg, would be allowed to park for free on weekdays, so 119 spaces would be for this purpose – 19.6% of the total number of the spaces.

A survey carried out by consultants reveals that during the peak demand period, at 1 p.m. on Thursday May 12, there were 195 standard spaces and 16 disabled spaces available in the car park.

RELATED NEWS:

The vast majority of them were on the upper deck of the multi-storey car park, where the majority of MandM Direct staff are expected to park.

“It is therefore not considered that the removal of a load on 119 spaces on weekdays will have a significant impact on the current operation of the car park,” consultants said.

There would also be 40 bicycle parking spaces on the ground floor.

Planning documents also say that if planners granted permission, it would give surrounding downtown businesses a boost, with around 250 workers using shops, services and other facilities during their working day.

Comments on planning request 221678 can be made until June 25, with planners setting July 15 as a target date for a decision.

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Parking spaces

California’s War on Drivers, Driving and Parking Spaces – Press Enterprise

In the 1970s, when an energy crisis held the nation hostage to the whims of OPEC, politicians and planners thought it would be a great idea for Americans to carpool. The idea never caught on, perhaps because politicians and planners had seen too many episodes of “The Flintstones” and had the false impression that everyone was working in the same career, going to the same whistle and went home to the same suburb.

Nonetheless, politicians liked the fact that they could paint diamonds on an existing lane, ban single-passenger vehicles from using it, and claim they were reducing reliance on foreign oil because of carpooling.

So began the government’s scowl on driving, which paved the way for an orgy of spending on public transport projects in the name of “getting people out of their cars”. Los Angeles County residents are paying a total of four sales tax increases, half a percent each, to fund public transit. Billions of dollars have been poured into subway and rail line projects, but public transit ridership is lower than it was in the 1980s, when Metro was just a bus service.

Why is attendance so low? This may be because the county has allowed trains and buses to become rolling homeless encampments, or because people don’t feel safe standing on a platform or at a bus stop for a while. time, or because of sexual harassment on buses and trains. , or because it is not practical.

A public transit trip can be a long ordeal. Recently I had to be at a 43 mile engagement. Google Maps helpfully informed me that I could take public transit and be there in five hours and 51 minutes. The route included a bus that makes 34 stops, another bus that makes 7 stops, a train that makes 12 stops, a bus rapid transit line that makes 14 stops, another bus that makes 25 stops, a final bus that makes three stops, and a total of about 2 miles of walking.

Or I could drive there in a little over an hour.

It is a fact that there are more job opportunities for people who have a car and are not limited by public transport routes. And of course, people need transportation for reasons other than employment. People are running errands, shopping, picking up their children, watching over their parents. Even commuters who use public transport are also likely to have a car.

That’s why you should know that in California, the war on cars has turned into a war on parking spaces.

Assembly Bill 2097 would abolish minimum parking requirements. Cities and other local government entities would be prohibited from requiring developers to provide parking spaces in any residential, commercial or other development located within half a mile of public transit, defined as a line of bus with frequent service during peak hours. Developers could voluntarily include parking spaces, but if they do, local agencies could restrict their use. A number of spaces may need to be reserved for electric charging stations or carpooling vehicles, or reserved for use by the general public. Local agencies might even require parking lot owners to charge for parking.

All of this makes it likely that people with cars who live, work or shop in these new developments will drive around the neighborhood in search of increasingly scarce on-street parking, negatively impacting all other residents of the region.

Incidentally, the war against cars is no longer a question of energy supply. Now it’s about housing and climate.

“Removing parking minimums in our transit priority areas – places with convenient access to transit – has been effective in spurring the development of more affordable, accessible and inclusive housing and also supports changes that help address the climate crisis,” San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria wrote. in an op-ed for CalMatters. Calling for “statewide parking reforms,” ​​he said California needed to build on “the successful efforts of cities like San Diego, Sacramento and San Francisco.”

You’ll notice he didn’t mention Los Angeles, where it can take five hours and 51 minutes to cover 43 miles and you’ll need an extra pair of shoes.

Politicians’ passion for apartment buildings close to public transport has taken on an almost religious fervor. Governor Gavin Newsom told the editorial board of the San Francisco Chronicle, “We’re going to demand more from our cities and counties,” promising to hold them “accountable.” Newsom’s appointed Attorney General Rob Bonta has previously threatened legal action against cities that try to evade the state’s latest density-building law, Senate Bill 9, which authorizes construction of two houses and at least two granny flats on land zoned for a single family home.

In fact, the state doesn’t need to sue cities or force density into existing single-family neighborhoods because there’s no need to block new suburban housing developments.

If you honestly want to solve California’s housing crisis, support an end to the “vehicle miles traveled” calculation required by law that stops new home development in outlying areas. This silly policy is based on the belief that suburban homes in California are causing climate change. The state as a whole accounts for only 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A little more driving in California is a negligible fraction of a negligible fraction on a global scale, and it certainly shouldn’t be a reason to keep new homes from being built in the midst of a housing shortage.

Gavin Newsom lives in a mansion on a sprawling estate. All Californians value their space.

Email Susan at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @Susan_Shelley.

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Parking spaces

California’s War on Drivers, Driving and Parking – Orange County Register

In the 1970s, when an energy crisis held the nation hostage to the whims of OPEC, politicians and planners thought it would be a great idea for Americans to carpool. The idea never caught on, perhaps because politicians and planners had seen too many episodes of “The Flintstones” and had the false impression that everyone was working in the same career, going to the same whistle and went home to the same suburb.

Nonetheless, politicians liked the fact that they could paint diamonds on an existing lane, ban single-passenger vehicles from using it, and claim they were reducing reliance on foreign oil because of carpooling.

So began the government’s scowl on car driving, which paved the way for an orgy of spending on public transport projects in the name of “getting people out of their cars”. Los Angeles County residents are paying a total of four sales tax increases, half a percent each, to fund public transit. Billions of dollars have been invested in subway and rail line projects, but public transit ridership is lower than it was in the 1980s, when Metro was just a bus service .

Why is attendance so low? This may be because the county has allowed trains and buses to become rolling homeless encampments, or because people don’t feel safe standing on a platform or at a bus stop for a while. time, or because of sexual harassment on buses and trains. , or because it is not practical.

A public transit trip can be a long ordeal. Recently I had to be at a 43 mile engagement. Google Maps helpfully informed me that I could take public transit and be there in five hours and 51 minutes. The route included a bus that makes 34 stops, another bus that makes 7 stops, a train that makes 12 stops, a bus rapid transit line that makes 14 stops, another bus that makes 25 stops, a final bus that makes three stops, and a total of about 2 miles of walking.

Or I could drive there in a little over an hour.

It is a fact that there are more job opportunities for people who have a car and are not limited by public transport routes. And of course, people need transportation for reasons other than employment. People are running errands, shopping, picking up their children, watching over their parents. Even commuters who use public transport are also likely to have a car.

That’s why you should know that in California, the war on cars has turned into a war on parking spaces.

Assembly Bill 2097 would abolish minimum parking requirements. Cities and other local government entities would be prohibited from requiring developers to provide parking spaces in any residential, commercial or other development located within half a mile of public transit, defined as a line of bus with frequent service during peak hours. Developers could voluntarily include parking spaces, but if they do, local agencies could restrict their use. A number of spaces may need to be reserved for electric charging stations or carpooling vehicles, or reserved for use by the general public. Local agencies might even require parking lot owners to charge for parking.

All of this makes it likely that people with cars who live, work or shop in these new developments will drive around the neighborhood in search of increasingly scarce on-street parking, negatively impacting all other residents of the region.

Incidentally, the war against cars is no longer a question of energy supply. Now it’s about housing and climate.

“Eliminating parking minimums in our transit priority areas – places with convenient access to transit – has been effective in spurring the development of more affordable, accessible and inclusive housing and also supports changes that help address the climate crisis,” San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria wrote. in an op-ed for CalMatters. Calling for “statewide parking reforms,” ​​he said California needed to build on “the successful efforts of cities like San Diego, Sacramento and San Francisco.”

You’ll notice he didn’t mention Los Angeles, where it can take five hours and 51 minutes to cover 43 miles and you’ll need an extra pair of shoes.

Politicians’ passion for apartment buildings close to public transport has taken on an almost religious fervor. Governor Gavin Newsom told the editorial board of the San Francisco Chronicle, “We’re going to demand more from our cities and counties,” promising to hold them “accountable.” Newsom’s appointed Attorney General Rob Bonta has previously threatened legal action against cities that try to evade the state’s latest density-building law, Senate Bill 9, which authorizes construction of two houses and at least two granny flats on land zoned for a single family home.

In fact, the state does not need to sue cities or force density into existing single-family neighborhoods because there is no need to block new suburban housing developments.

If you honestly want to solve California’s housing crisis, support an end to the “vehicle miles traveled” calculation required by law that stops new home development in outlying areas. This silly policy is based on the belief that suburban homes in California are causing climate change. The state as a whole accounts for only 1% of global greenhouse gas emissions. A little more driving in California is a negligible fraction of a negligible fraction on a global scale, and it certainly shouldn’t be a reason to keep new homes from being built in the midst of a housing shortage.

Gavin Newsom lives in a mansion on a sprawling estate. All Californians value their space.

Email Susan at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @Susan_Shelley.

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Parking spaces

Wyndham Street gets new corner parking spaces

Corner parking came from one side of Wyndham Street North.

The change sees 34 corner parking spaces on the west side of the street between Woolwich Street and Quebec Street, rising to 41 when patio season ends and on-street patios in the Wyndham section are removed.

This is an addition of 21 new spaces to the previous 20 spaces on the west side of Wyndham Street.

Previously, the street had parallel parking on both sides of the street. Wyndham Street will be reconfigured into two lanes, one lane in each direction with corner parking to the west and the original parallel parking remaining to the east.

This is only a temporary parking solution, as parking will return to parallel and there will again be four lanes, two in each direction, in late summer 2023.

“In order to implement the inclined parking bays, we had to reduce the width of the lanes just to accommodate the width required for the inclined parking bays and to make everything work,” said Paul Hutchison, supervisor of city ​​traffic engineering and transportation services.

He said the corner parking on both sides of the street would be too tight, even with the space of the lane setback.

The usual two-hour limit remains in place.

“There’s definitely a desire for more parking in the area, especially with the Baker Street project going on, so we’re really trying to add parking spaces where we can help manage that,” he said. said Hutchison.

Baker Street previously had a municipal parking lot and there was the Wyndham Street parking lot, both closed October 1, 2021. There is now a construction site on the old parking lots to build the Baker District. In an article previously reported by GuelphToday, businesses in the area expressed concerns about the lack of parking spaces for their customers once the parking lots have closed.

The Baker District development will include a new main library, two buildings for 371 residential units, commercial and public spaces.

The site will also have 156 parking spaces.

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Neighbors protest against plans for 45 flats with 12 parking spaces in Malvern Road, Dover

Plans of 45 apartments have been proposed for a residential area with only 12 parking spaces.

Those who already live on Malvern Road in Dover have raised concerns that the building could add around 80 cars to an already busy area.

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An artist’s impression view of Malvern Road Flats, Pictured: Dover District Council planning portal view

The development is planned for an empty plot of overgrown land on an estate already filled with parked cars.

Residents find that there is hardly any space left in the evening when most people come home from work.

But developers say new residents would have little need for cars as the site is close to the city center and public transport

Christina Stephens, who lives on the corner of Clarendon Street, told KentOnline: “When I had to get home late at night I had to park on Folkestone Road and drive through an unlit area.

“There are already too few places around here.”

Christina Stephens: had to park on the main road.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Christina Stephens: had to park on the main road. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Hailey Drake with the planned apartment site behind her.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Hailey Drake with the planned apartment site behind her. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

Hailey Drake, who lives a short walk from Clarendon Place, told KentOnline: “I don’t have a car but my mum who is also on this estate does, I know the parking here is already horrible .

“Apart from that, the new apartments would tower over people’s homes.

“I don’t think there should be any apartments there. It would be better to turn this land into a children’s play park.”

Sian Crossland, of Malvern Road, is one of those who registered an objection on Dover District Council’s planning portal.

She told KentOnline: “If the flats will have room for 12 cars, drivers of probably 33 cars will have to find somewhere else.

Malvern Road in Dover, where 45 new apartments are planned.  Photo: Sam Lennon
Malvern Road in Dover, where 45 new apartments are planned. Photo: Sam Lennon

“Yet people are already coming here and leaving their cars here to catch a train to London.”

In the portal she said she had a five month old and had to park near her house to bring her in her car seat and then bring the buggy.

Another resident on the portal said: “These apartments are completely impractical: 45 apartments and 12 parking spaces do not help local residents in this area to park and will only add to other problems.

“If 45 apartments have two occupants each with a car, that could represent 88 more vehicles parked in the local area.”

The site of the planned apartments in Malvern Road.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
The site of the planned apartments in Malvern Road. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

The plan provides space for 48 bike spaces, but the resident said: “Dover is not a college town full of students and I don’t see locals buying a flat and moving in with just their bikes.

He added: “The artist’s impression makes it look like a hospital at best, a detention center at worst and certainly not up to par with Victorian housing in the area.”

The preliminary project concerns seven-storey houses on a vacant lot near the junction with Clarendon Street. There would also be 48 bicycle spaces.

The civic group Dover Society accepts that the brownfield site needs redevelopment and that the housing on offer is of good quality but goes against the scale of the development.

Graham Margery, acting chairman of the planning committee, wrote: “We consider this to be completely unacceptable as it is an incongruous structure, which does not correspond to the much smaller houses in the area.

“It has a dominating effect in the neighborhood in addition to obstructing light from adjacent properties. The limitation of parking supply for 45 units is also completely insufficient.”

The development would span three blocks and consist of 13 one-bedroom apartments, 25 two-bedroom apartments, five three-bedroom apartments and one four- and five-bedroom apartment each.

Kent and Medway Clinical Commissioning Group estimate that 108 people would live in the new development, an average of 2.4 per apartment.

There is already a limited number of parking spaces on Malvern Road due to some yellow lines and junctions. Clarendon Street and adjoining Clarendon Place are also regularly lined with vehicles.

The app is by David Andrew from Leyton, East London.

Clarendon Street, a few meters from the planned site of the flats, filled with vehicles on Sunday evening.  Photo: Sam Lennon KMG
Clarendon Street, a few meters from the planned site of the flats, filled with vehicles on Sunday evening. Photo: Sam Lennon KMG

A report by its THaT (Transport, Highways and Traffic) Consultancy said the area is so close to downtown and public transport that new residents would have little need for cars.

The literature states: “The site is in one of the most accessible locations, in terms of transport, in Dover. It provides easy access by car-free travel to a wide range of schools and education, healthcare, retail, recreation, employment and other services and facilities.

“Most of the daily needs of residents can be met with a 15 to 20 minute walk or a five to seven minute bike ride.

“The site is located just meters from a high quality bus route and Dover train station.”

He added that this application was to provide low-carbon development and that the few car spaces in the apartments would be exclusively reserved for fully electric cars.

An entire section of the site is now overgrown.  Photo: Sam Lennon KM
An entire section of the site is now overgrown. Photo: Sam Lennon KM

A planning statement also on behalf of Mr Andrew said the flats would be placed so that there was no effect on the light for surrounding homes and set back enough so as not to overlook homes further away. close to Folkestone Road.

It also states that the land was left abandoned for 20-25 years, destroyed the area and is now overgrown.

The report said: “Its poor condition adversely affects the character and appearance of Malvern Road and the lives of its inhabitants.”

Highways England said the project would not affect the wider road network, even during construction.

Network Rail had no objections and Kent County Council’s Rights of Way department said it did not need to comment.

For all application details Click here.

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Parking spaces

Food trucks or their parking spaces? Select Board Mulls which is most valuable

CHATHAM – The select council is further refining rules that will allow food trucks to operate in town this summer, including parts of downtown Chatham. But where lorries are allowed in public car parks, there is a corresponding loss of valuable parking spaces, which the council tackled last week.

The latest revision to the draft regulations for mobile food vendors specifies six pre-approved locations for food trucks, each with different hours of operation. The Route 137 crossing would be available year-round from 11 a.m. until sunset, and the Harding’s Beach and Oyster Pond Beach lot would be available June 1 through September 30 from 5 p.m. until sunset. But due to conflicts with other food providers and parking shortages during visitor season, the proposed rules are different for the three downtown locations.

At the city offices at 549 Main Street, a food truck would be permitted to occupy two spaces currently reserved for city employees and would be permitted to operate daily from 11 a.m. until sunset or 8 p.m., depending on the last possibility, from January 1st. to May 15. The community center parking lot would be available to accommodate a food truck on the same dates and times. Finally, reserved spaces at the Eldredge Garage parking lot would be available from 11 a.m. until sunset between June 1 and September 30.

Executive Secretary Shanna Nealy said city staff members visited all six lots to determine the best location for food trucks in each and found that due to recent drainage work on the lot from the Eldredge garage, the floor surface at the preferred location was uneven. Because of this, staff recommended waiting until the summer of 2023 to make this land available for food trucks, she said.

“I know the Eldredge Garage was the only place where businesses in the area were really interested in a mobile food truck,” said board member Shareen Davis. Board member Jeffrey Dykens agreed.

“If we could find flat ground there, I would like it to be open in 22, not 23,” he said.

“I think it might even encourage people to park at the Eldredge Garage, and that’s a bit of money in the city’s pocket,” board member Dean Nicastro said. The Eldredge lot is the only paid parking lot downtown.

The location at the municipal office parking lot, in the middle of downtown, was proposed to be open only between January and May 15. Why not in summer?

“It’s just the worry of taking up spaces in the parking lot during the season,” Nealy said. The loss of two spaces from the area reserved for city employees could create a challenge, she said.

“We know parking is an issue in Chatham, obviously,” Davis said. “Does this contradict the idea of ​​bringing mobile food trucks downtown?”

Dykens said he would be willing to sacrifice those two spaces as part of this summer’s pilot program.

“Otherwise, we are not going to know what the demand really is or not, whether it meets the needs of visitors or employees,” he said.

Board member Cory Metters agreed it’s important to provide a food truck option for downtown employees who leave work late and find they can’t get a table at a restaurant from the city center or that the restaurant does not offer take-out. The fact that brick-and-mortar restaurants are busy is good for them, but “bad for employees looking for a bite to eat,” Metters said.

It has also been proposed that the nearby food truck site in the Community Center car park be open off-season only, out of respect for the food stand near Veterans Field, which raises money for the Chatham Anglers. But Dykens said the city should consider allowing a food truck to operate there at certain times in the summer.

“I know the Anglers will have a crisis. But what is the demand? If we don’t test it, we won’t know,” he said.

The Anglers don’t play every day and most of their games start at 7 p.m., Davis noted. She suggested changing the hours so the food trucks aren’t serving at the same time the concession stand is open. A food truck could provide a healthy option for youth in the community center’s recreation department summer program, she noted.

“Their food options, if they haven’t brought anything, are vending machines in the community center,” she said.

By allowing service only until about 4 p.m., the city can allow food trucks to serve the public without encroaching on the Anglers’ concession, Dykens said. “I think we can find a way to coexist,” he said.

Tom Deegan, owner of Mom and Pop’s Burgers in Chatham, which operates a food truck, cautioned the board against restricting operating dates to the low season.

“With food trucks, you need volume. They are expensive to run, just like a restaurant,” he said. Although his truck is profitable when operating on the day of the first night or Oktoberfest, he would have lost money operating the day before or after these special events, he noted.

Deegan also encouraged the board to consider installing electrical service at food truck locations, which would allow the trucks to operate without the use of noisy generators, which may be unpopular with neighbors.

While there are more and more food trucks in the area, there are good ones and bad ones, just like restaurants, Deegan said. “The greats are wanted,” he said. To encourage them to come, the city needs to set reasonable minimum rules that offer the best chance of profitability, he said.

City staff needed to provide further revisions to the draft bylaw in time for council to consider and possibly adopt them at a future meeting.

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Annapolis City Council expands outdoor dining, allows restaurants to rent parking spots – Capital Gazette

Outdoor dining will expand in Annapolis this weekend thanks to an expedited ordinance that allows restaurants to lease city-owned parking spaces.

The city council approved the rental procedures at a meeting on Monday evening after a long and sometimes heated discussion. The new ordinance O-16-22, restores for free the privileges that many restaurants have enjoyed during the pandemic. Businesses will now be required to reimburse the city for lost parking revenue, pay extra for facilities and comply with various other approval measures.

The program allowing restaurants to set up tables in parking lots, called “parklets”, is separate from legislation passed in April that extended outdoor dining in parking lots – another pandemic pivot that has proven popular – until the end of October. Unlike the April order, the new one does not have an expiration date.

Mayor Gavin Buckley has urged council to quickly pass the ‘parklet’ measure so that four restaurants ready to sign leases can accommodate more diners during commissioning week.

“It’s the busiest weekend of the season,” Buckley said. “They wish they could do it tomorrow.”

But two aldermen accused the mayor of rushing the process and expressed concern about giving city employees the power to approve leases, rather than having every candidate appear before council. Alderman DaJuan Gay, a Ward 6 Democrat, pointed out that the Annapolis Law Office failed to share the lease template with council members before the meeting, prompting the mayor to declare a break while the staff made photocopies of the 20-page document.

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When called back into session, Alderman Ross Arnett, a Ward 8 Democrat, asked more than a dozen questions, some of them rhetorical, about the rental of parking spaces and the process put in place by the employees of the city ​​and council rules committee.

“Any restaurant can enter and be automatically approved,” Arnett said. “It’s letting the genie out of the bottle.”

Other council members supported the program, which council had previously approved the concept of and city staff spent months codifying.

“Candidates will go through a pretty thorough check,” said Ellie Tierney, a Ward 1 Democrat, who read the steps aloud on the city’s website.

Alderman Rhonda Pindell-Charles, a Democrat representing Ward 3, noted that the lease requires restaurants to install security gates and hold proper insurance policies, requirements she said would weed out nonchalant applicants. “I’m comfortable with it,” she said.

Rental rates for “parklets” start at $16.60 and go up to $50 per day for parking spots on Main Street.

The measure passed unanimously after the council suspended rules to pass the bill at the same meeting at which it was introduced. Arnett asked that the council receive updates when leases are signed and for what rates. City Manager David Jarrell agreed to this request.

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Parking spaces

Community council says new street parking is not needed in Lanarkshire town

Concerns have been raised over work to create additional parking spaces on a Wishaw street.

John Carr says he is ‘appalled’ that North Lanarkshire Council is ‘wasting money’ on an unnecessary project while making cuts elsewhere.

John, the chairman of Coltness Community Council, says new spaces on the street where he lives are not needed.

He insists that this type of work would be more appropriate on other nearby streets that have long-standing parking issues.



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Mr Carr asked: ‘Who actually sanctioned this and what is the thought process behind this?

“They’re not needed at Newark Drive; there is tons of space.

“There is already a large parking space on the street. There are also driveways, waypoints and another area with garages that has more space to park, if needed.

“There are parking issues that need to be addressed on other streets in Coltness such as North Dryburgh Road, Lauder Crescent and Buchan Street. There is a grassed area on North Dryburgh Road which could be turned into additional parking spaces, but instead there is a complete disregard for what the public needs.



More parking spaces are needed on North Dryburgh Road

“There was a three-car accident recently in North Kilmeny Crescent, where there are cars parked on both sides of the street. This is another path where there are problems.

‘There are potholes to fix, the council is cutting back on road repairs, salt pans and grass cutting to save money so how can they justify the expense?

“How does this benefit the Coltness community?”

Although he has inquired about who in the local authority sanctioned the work and why, John says he is getting nowhere.

“I have a feeling that something is wrong here. These berries seem to have appeared overnight and the council is hiding my requests.



John Carr pictured in Newark Drive which he says already has enough parking spaces

“There have been eight letters sent to residents on the street that indicate this has something to do with the Shotts Housing Office,” John said. “But why would it be like this?

“I called there because it had their email address on the letter but the woman whose name is on it couldn’t tell me anything.”

North Lanarkshire Council has been approached for comment.

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Parking Spaces Market 2022 Report Covers Profiling Key Players – Parkopedia, Stashbee, Spothero, Parklet, Parkingforme, Appyparking

The recent report on Market for finding and booking parking spaces » Offered by Credible markets, includes an in-depth survey of the geographical landscape, industry size as well as the revenue estimation of the company. In addition, the report also highlights challenges hindering market growth and expansion strategies employed by leading companies in the “Parking space search and reservation market”.

A comprehensive competitive analysis that covers relevant data on industry leaders is intended to help potential market entrants and existing players competing with the right direction to arrive at their decisions. Market structure analysis discusses in detail Find and reserve parking spaces companies with their profiles, market revenue shares, full portfolio of their offerings, networking and distribution strategies, regional market footprints, and much more.

Parking Search and Reservation Market: Segmentation

Key players in the Find and Book Parking Spots Market are:

Parkopedia
hiding place
Spot-hero
Parklet
parkingform
appyparking
Bestparking
RingGo
Your parking space
Parkme
Parkhound
Just Park

Major Types of Parking Search and Reservation Products covered in this report are:

Provide a reservation
Search only

The most widely used downstream areas of the Find and Book Parking Spots Market covered in this report are:

Users
Parking owners

Click the link for a free sample report @ https://crediblemarkets.com/sample-request/find-and-reserve-parking-spaces-market-309787?utm_source=AkshayT&utm_medium=SatPR

Main points covered in the table of contents:

1 Finding and Booking Parking Spaces Introduction and Market Overview

2 Industry Chain Analysis

3 Global Parking Finder and Reservation Market, by Type

4 Find and Reserve Parking Space Market, by Application

5 Global Car Parking Consumption, Revenue ($) by Region (2016-2021)

6 Global Car Parking Finder Production by Major Regions (2016-2021)

7 Global Car Parking Consumption by Region (2016-2021)

8 Competitive Landscape

9 Global Find and Book Parking Spots Market Analysis and Forecast by Type and Application

10 Finding and Booking Parking Spaces Market Supply and Demand Forecast by Regions

11 New Project Feasibility Analysis

12 Expert interview file

13 Research finding and conclusion

14 Appendix

Directly Buy This Market Research Report [email protected] https://crediblemarkets.com/reports/purchase/find-and-reserve-parking-spaces-market-309787?license_type=single_user;utm_source=AkshayT&utm_medium=SatPR

Answers to key questions in the report:

  • What will be the market development pace of Find and Book Parking Spaces market?
  • What are the key factors driving the Global Find and Book Parking Spaces Market?
  • Who are the main manufacturers on the market?
  • What are the market openings, market risks and market outline?
  • What are sales volume, revenue, and price analysis of top manufacturers of Find and Book Parking Spaces market?
  • Who are the distributors, traders and dealers of Find and Reserve Parking Spaces Market?
  • What are the Find and Book Parking Spots market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the global Find and Book Parking Spots Industries?
  • What are the deals, revenue, and value review by market types and uses?
  • What are the transactions, revenue and value review by business areas?

About Us

Credible Markets has become a trusted source for business market research needs in a short period of time. We’ve partnered with leading market intelligence publishers and our report pool coverage spans all key industry verticals and thousands of micro-markets. The massive repository allows our clients to choose from recently released reports from a range of publishers who also provide in-depth analysis by region and country. Moreover, pre-booked research reports are among our best offers.

The collection of market intelligence reports is regularly updated to provide visitors with quick access to the latest market information. We provide round-the-clock support to help you reuse search parameters and benefit from a full range of reserved reports. After all, it’s about helping you make an informed strategic decision on purchasing the right report that meets all your market research demands.

Credible Markets’ benchmark reports use predictive analytical models to study the performance of critical market segments. We believe that business demands depend on a range of parameters and therefore adhere to providing industry-specific search solutions. Our clientele, ranging from thriving start-ups to some of the Fortune 500 companies, is testament to our expertise in providing in-depth insights on any desired industry sector.

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E-mail: [email protected]

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Parking spaces

Additional approved parking spaces at Bramley Ambulance Station

Additional staff and ambulance parking at Bramley Ambulance Station has been approved by council planners.

The proposals, by West Yorkshire Ambulance Service, will help solve parking problems at the Stanningley Road site, which has 50 staff working there but only enough parking space for 30.

Grassed areas on site are to be removed to increase the number of emergency ambulance bays from two to 12, and increase the number of personnel bays from 30 to 52.

The existing fuel tank and bay would be relocated, and new lighting and electric car charging points would be installed.

A planning statement accompanying the application stated:

“In addition to this, the entire site needs to be redone to remove potholes and ripples that damage emergency vehicles. Finally, the site will integrate the infrastructure for future electric car charging facilities for emergency and personnel vehicles.

“The proposed development will provide sufficient parking spaces for staff to address current parking issues at the site, creating a safer and smoother parking area and working environment for staff.”

Bramley Ambulance Station is based on Railsford Rise on the corner of Stanningley Road.

The plans view in full here.

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Parking spaces

Parking spaces, oil drilling and university debt

Doubling the parking spaces is a bad move

City of Oyster Bay is considering a zoning change that will double the number of parking lots required for industrial facilities [“Code change reservations,” News, May 17]. As a director of one of Long Island’s largest and busiest commercial brokerage firms specializing solely in industrial facilities, I consider this not only unnecessary but highly restrictive for new developments and redevelopments. This would have a very negative economic impact on the surrounding businesses of the city. Just walk past any industrial warehouse and you’ll quickly see how underutilized the parking lots are. If the city believes there is a potential parking problem, perhaps they should consider a more reasonable increase (10% to 20%) in the parking requirement. Increasing the parking requirement by 100% is like trying to kill a mosquito with a hammer.

Jeff Schwartzberg, Massapequa

Biden has OKd more drilling than Trump

A reader accused President Joe Biden of ‘stopping various means of domestic oil production’ [“Clean energy is part of LI’s best future,” Letters, May 16]. In fact, Biden has approved more national drilling permits than former President Donald Trump. Due to an expected drop in oil prices, oil companies, like those in Texas, are refusing to restart full oil drilling production for fear of losing money.

Pete Scott, Central Harbor

Mull alternatives to college

I have a unique view of student loans and the university in general [“Dealing with student loan debt,” Letters, May 6]. We need to stop obsessing over college – it’s being touted as a panacea. We also need to advocate for alternatives to college, such as trade school, and — I know this sounds strange — maybe the military.

Joe Domhan, West Babylon

WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO JOIN OUR DAILY CONVERSATION. Email your thoughts on today’s issues to [email protected] Submissions should not exceed 200 words. Please provide your full name, hometown, phone numbers, and any relevant expertise or affiliations. Include the title and date of the article you are responding to. Letters become the property of Newsday and are edited for all media. Due to volume, readers are limited to one letter printed every 45 days. The letters published reflect the ratio received on each topic.

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Parking spaces

111 additional parking spaces created as Radcliffe Metrolink Park & ​​Ride reopens

Radcliffe Metrolink Park & ​​Ride is open again after completion of work which saw the installation of a new parking platform on the site and increased the number of parking spaces from 369 to 480.

The extension of the car park will allow more people to access the Metrolink network and use public transport as part of their journey.

Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester, said:

“Park & ​​Ride programs like this are essential to developing the Greater Manchester Bee Network’s vision of providing a truly integrated public transport system, making travel around our city-region easier, more accessible and affordable. .

“This latest project means that we have now created nearly 600 new Park & ​​Ride spaces at three different tram stops across the city-region over the past 18 months, in addition to thousands of Park & ​​Ride spaces. Ride already available on the Metrolink network.

“By allowing people to get out of their vehicles and use public transport – even if only for part of their journey – we can help reduce traffic congestion and reduce harmful emissions that harm our air quality.

Radcliffe Park & ​​Ride // Credit: TfGM

Finishing ahead of schedule, the project also includes a brand new electric vehicle (EV) charging point and also denotes the finalization of Metrolink Park & ​​Ride’s wider expansion works programme, which also saw the placement of a new bridge and the creation of 123 additional spaces in Whitefield alongside a 360-seater Park & ​​Ride venue being built at Parkway on the Trafford Park line.

Plans for the future will see a brand new Park & ​​Ride for Walkden station, which will start later in 2022 and will include over 100 parking spaces, fourth motorbike spaces, electric vehicle charging facilities and a bicycle room.

Chris Barnes, Projects Group Manager at Transport for Greater Manchester, said:
“We are delighted to have successfully completed the Metrolink Park & ​​Ride expansion, increasing parking capacity at Radcliffe and Whitefield stops.

“Before the pandemic, the car parks at both sites were at capacity at 8 a.m., so the additional spaces will allow even more people to travel sustainably on the 99-stop Metrolink network and all the many locations that he serves.

To find out more about Park & ​​Ride, please visit the Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) website: http://www.tfgm.com/park-and-ride

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Parking spaces

A labor councilor calls for the creation of parking spaces for people with autism

A Labor Party councilor has asked the council to provide an update on progress on providing autistic parking spaces at Fingal.

In its response to Cllr Robert O’Donoghue, the council said its operations department had agreed to review the arrangements, if any, in place in other local authorities.

Following liaison with two of Dublin’s local authorities, it has been determined that there is currently no specific provision for autistic parking in the allocation of state-run car parks in the area, and there is also no provision in Fingal’s current parking regulations.

According to the council, there are only courtesy parking spaces – however, these are not enforceable under current or Gardaí regulations.

The council said Blue Badge disabled parking permits are available to people living in Ireland with certain disabilities and registered blind people, whether they are drivers or passengers.

These are the only authorizations recognized by Fingal Parking regulations.

The council confirmed that the introduction of ‘autism-friendly’ parking is in place at various locations across Ireland by ASD Ireland in conjunction with retail businesses where the need is greatest, and the majority of these locations are controlled by management companies in commercial and retail parks. facilities.

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Parking spaces

Stoke-on-Trent supermarket with 487 parking spaces for sale for £150,000

A mothballed supermarket that once housed Tesco and Go Outdoors is up for sale – for as little as £150,000. The unit – which has 487 parking spaces – will be auctioned on Wednesday, May 18.

The site – on New Hall Street, Hanley – has been empty since Go Outdoors mysteriously closed its shop and car park before the coronavirus pandemic began. It then moved to Festival Park and has now moved to a new unit on the same retail park.

Go Outdoors had opened there after Tesco closed its old supermarket to make way for its new store on nearby Potteries Way.

READ MORE: Shopping center with 13 empty units for sale for £650,000

Auctioneer Acquitus says: “The property comprises a substantial retail warehouse in the town center benefiting from three levels of underground parking with space for 487 cars. The property may be suitable for a sub-division and/or alternative uses. alternatives including warehouse, leisure and self-storage, subject to agreements.

“The property may also be suitable for redevelopment, subject to permissions. There are some structural flaws in the parking lot.”

Do you have something to say about this story? Join the conversation by clicking the green comments icon at the top of this page or the image box

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Parking spaces

Love’s opens stops in four states adding 330 truck parking spaces

Oklahoma City, OK – Love’s Travel Stops opened four new locations in April 2022, adding 330 truck parking spaces across the United States

The new store locations are Waterloo, NY; Pageland, South Carolina; Moses Lake, WA; and Rockville, MN.

All locations will be open 24/7, Love’s confirmed.

The company also boasted of creating 260 jobs in the respective fields through the new travel centers.

Amenities offered at the Waterloo, NY location include:

• Over 11,000 square feet.
• Subway and Wendy’s.
• 78 truck parking spaces.
• 60 parking spaces.
• Seven RV parking spaces.
• Eight diesel bays.
• Seven showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Speedco.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.

“We are excited to serve customers at our fifth location in New York and help them get back on the road quickly and safely,” Love co-CEO Greg Love said after the truck stop opened on April 14.

Amenities offered at the Pageland, SC location include:

• Over 9,000 square feet.
• Hardee’s.
• 70 truck parking spaces.
• 58 parking spaces.
• Five diesel bays.
• Two RV parking spaces.
• Four showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Pageland Travel Center marks Love’s 12th location in South Carolina.

Amenities offered at the Moses Lake, WA location include:

• Over 11,000 square feet.
• Taco John’s.
• 80 truck parking spaces.
• 92 parking spaces.
• Nine diesel bays.
• Seven showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Moses Lake Travel Center marks Love’s sixth location in Washington State.

Amenities offered at the Rockville, MN location include:

• Over 13,000 square feet.
• Hardee’s.
• 102 truck parking spaces.
• 71 parking spaces.
• Six RV parking spaces.
• Nine diesel bays.
• Ten showers.
• Laundry room.
• CAT scale.
• Speedco.
• Gourmet coffee beans.
• Branded snacks.
• Fresh Kitchen concept.
• Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
• Dog park.

The opening of the Rockville Travel Center marks Love’s third location in Minnesota.


MORE NEWS ON TRUCK STOPS
Two truck drivers arrested after road rage dispute turns into shooting at truck stop
Budding country music artist raises $11,000 for elderly truck stop employee battling cancer
Love’s Travel Stop in Indiana ‘closed indefinitely’ after truck stop fire
Love’s opens stops in Tennessee and New York, adding more than 160 truck parking spaces

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Parking spaces

Union Station redesign removes parking bays and adds underground facility

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The Federal Railroad Administration overhauled major aspects of Washington’s Union Station redevelopment project, eliminating a parking garage as part of the redesign.

Revised plan for multibillion-dollar station expansion eliminates six-story garage, drastically reducing parking and moving parking area to new underground facility that would also serve as passenger location pickups and drop-offs. The new details were unveiled at a recent meeting of the National Capital Planning Commission.

The changes also include a major reconfiguration of the station’s bus terminal to align with a new train concourse, the Federal Railroad Administration confirmed this week.

The changes come more than a year after the FRA paused its environmental review of the project to modify the design, which was widely criticized for keeping the station too car-centric. The revisions are a victory for the district, which chastised the design favored by the federal agency as not matching the city’s vision for Union Station.

Amtrak’s faster, high-tech Acela trains are delayed again

Few details of the revisions have been made available, but the FRA is expected to unveil the plan in the coming weeks. The agency said the revised plan is the result of two years of working with Amtrak project developers and the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation, which manages and operates Union Station.

The Union Station expansion project — a $10 billion private and public investment — envisions a transformation of the nation’s second-largest rail hub by 2040. The project would add a new train concourse and lobbies, as well as tracks and retail options.

“With these core elements retained and these new modifications, the project is on a much stronger footing to progress into 2022 and beyond,” the FRA said in a statement.

The agency is leading the federal review of the project, which is at least two years behind schedule. The revised plan could be published this summer for public comment, with a final decision next year. After that, the project could enter the design phase, possibly followed by a over a decade of construction.

The new changes respond to criticism from federal planners, district officials and nearby residents who said the FRA’s preferred building option – unveiled two years ago as part of a draft declaration of environmental impact – was too car-oriented, lacked good pedestrian and cycle links, and did not provide adequate access. Residents and city leaders have called for less parking and better traffic management. vehicle traffic, including a space dedicated to taxi and VTC services.

Project officials for months hinted at a resolution that addressed the concerns. Beverley Swaim-Staley, president and CEO of the USRC, said in February that the group had been working for 18 months to incorporate “valuable feedback”.

“All of these changes will allow the station to accommodate the next century of growth in a multi-modal transportation route, which includes intercity rail, metro, commuter rail and intercity bus,” she said during the talk. a meeting sponsored by DC Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (RE).

DC to Prioritize Equity in Preparations for $3 Billion in Federal Infrastructure Funds

DC Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), who led the effort against the parking structure, said he welcomed the reduced option, adding that the move would leave more space above soil for development.

“Taking back valuable parking space to provide bus service, train service and shared spaces will restore Union Station to its glory as one of the nation’s most iconic and important stations,” it said. he said in a statement. “We are rebuilding a major public transit hub in the center of our city that will last for the next 100 years, and basically as busy every day as any of our regional airports.”

Union Station, which opened in 1907, was designated a historic landmark by the district in 1964 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.

Amtrak takes control of Union Station

The station hasn’t seen a major rehabilitation in decades, and rail and local authorities say refurbishment is needed to meet future demand. Many station facilities are outdated, do not meet federal accessibility requirements, and do not meet modern transportation standards. Amtrak estimates that about $75 million in deferred maintenance is needed at Union Station, which houses the passenger railroad, Metro, Maryland and Virginia commuter trains, as well as intercity and local buses. It is also the terminus of the DC Streetcar.

Amtrak filed a petition last month to use eminent domain to take control of the station from a private company that holds sublease rights to the station through 2084. Amtrak said the move was necessary to ensure a smooth expansion process.

The proposed expansion is one of several major station projects on Amtrak’s list of capital priorities, ranking among the top candidates for federal funds through the infrastructure package signed by President Biden l ‘last year. About $66 billion is earmarked for rail transportation five years, while the project could also use millions of additional dollars available for public transit and other infrastructure projects.

Baltimore station redesign will help trains speed through nation’s busiest rail corridor

The last revisions are likely to increase the price of the project. In his draft environmental impact statement, the FRA waived concepts that included underground parking or other underground facilities, in part because it would add millions of dollars and years of construction. He chose a plan that included “minimal excavation below lobby level”, the quickest and least expensive option.

The federal review estimated that the construction of this shorter plan would be done in phases and could take up to 11 and a half years. It was unclear how much the schedule would change with the latest revisions.

The FRA said its incorporation of an underground facility would better manage pick-up and drop-off activities at the station while relieving traffic from surrounding streets.

“While this change will have an initial cost impact, it addresses many of the challenges of expanding regional access to central Washington DC, and we believe the impacts of this new strategy will benefit the community and to the many citizens using this historic multimodal transportation hub in the long term,” the agency said in a statement.

The FRA’s initial plan called for 1,575 parking spaces, compared to the current 2,200. This would have been consistent with what is available at Philadelphia and Boston stations, according to project documents. However, New York’s Penn Station and many other stations in the United States and around the world do not have on-site parking.

City leaders said the multi-level replacement garage runs counter to the city’s efforts to reduce car travel. Among those who sent letters of opposition to the federal agency were Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and Norton. The National Capital Planning Commission, which oversees project zoning and provides planning guidance for federal land and buildings in the Washington area, also asked the FRA to include a parking program that “significantly reduces parking “.

The revised concept is expected to reduce parking by nearly 50% of nearly 1,600 spaces, planning commission officials said.

Anita Cozart, acting director of the DC Office of Planning, recently welcomed the city’s response to feedback, saying the FRA, Amtrak and USRC had listened to the plans for review, particularly in regards to improving the parking, bus installation and vehicle access to the station.

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Parking spaces

Union Station overhaul removes parking bays and adds underground facility

Comment

The Federal Railroad Administration overhauled major aspects of Washington’s Union Station redevelopment project, eliminating a parking garage as part of the redesign.

Revised plan for multi-billion dollar station expansion eliminates six-story garage, drastically reducing parking and moving parking area to new underground facility that would also serve as passenger location pickups and drop-offs. The new details were unveiled at a recent meeting of the National Capital Planning Commission.

The changes also include a major reconfiguration of the station’s bus terminal to align with a new train concourse, the Federal Railroad Administration confirmed this week.

The changes come more than a year after the FRA put its environmental review for the project on hold change the design, which was widely criticized for keeping the station too car-centric. The revisions are a victory for the district, which reprimanded design favored by the federal agency as not matching the city’s vision for Union Station.

Amtrak’s faster, high-tech Acela trains are delayed again

Few details of the revisions have been made available, but the FRA is expected to unveil the plan in the coming weeks. The agency said the revised plan is the result of two years of working with Amtrak project developers and the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation, which manages and operates Union Station.

The Union Station expansion project — a $10 billion private and public investment — envisions a transformation of the nation’s second-largest rail hub by 2040. The project would add a new train concourse and lobbies, as well as tracks and retail options.

“With these core elements retained and these new modifications, the project is on a much stronger footing to progress into 2022 and beyond,” the FRA said in a statement.

The agency is leading the federal review of the project, which is at least two years behind schedule. The revised plan could be published this summer for public comment, with a final decision next year. After that, the project could enter the design phase, possibly followed by a over a decade of construction.

The new changes respond to criticism federal planners, district officials and nearby residents who said the FRA’s preferred construction option – unveiled two years ago as part of a draft environmental impact statement – was too focused on cars, lacked good pedestrian and cycle connections and did not provide adequate access. Residents and city leaders have called for less parking and better traffic management. vehicle traffic, including a space dedicated to taxi and VTC services.

Project officials for months hinted at a resolution that addressed the concerns. Beverley Swaim-Staley, president and CEO of the USRC, said in February that the group had been working for 18 months to incorporate “valuable feedback”.

“All of these changes will allow the station to accommodate the next century of growth in a multimodal mode of transportation, which includes intercity rail, metro, commuter rail and intercity bus,” she said during the talk. a meeting sponsored by DC Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (RE).

DC to Prioritize Equity in Preparations for $3 Billion in Federal Infrastructure Funds

DC Council member Charles Allen (D-Ward 6), who led the effort against the parking structure, said he welcomed the reduced option, adding that the move would leave more space above soil for development.

“Taking back valuable parking space to provide bus service, train service and shared spaces will restore Union Station to its glory as one of the nation’s iconic and great stations,” he said. in a press release. “We are rebuilding a major public transit hub in the center of our city that will last for the next 100 years, and basically as busy every day as any of our regional airports.”

Union Station, which opened in 1907, was designated a historic landmark by the district in 1964 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969.

Amtrak takes control of Union Station

The station hasn’t seen a major rehabilitation in decades, and rail and local authorities say refurbishment is needed to meet future demand. Many station facilities are outdated, do not meet federal accessibility requirements, and do not meet modern transportation standards. Amtrak estimates that about $75 million in deferred maintenance is needed at Union Station, which houses the passenger railroad, Metro, Maryland and Virginia commuter trains, as well as intercity and local buses. It is also the terminus of the DC Streetcar.

Amtrak last month filed a request to use eminent domain for take control of the station from a private company that holds sublease rights to the station through 2084. Amtrak said the move was necessary to ensure a smooth expansion process.

The proposed expansion is one of several major station projects on Amtrak’s list of capital priorities, ranking among the top contenders for federal money thanks to the infrastructure package signed by the president. Biden last year. About $66 billion is earmarked for rail transportation five years, while the project could also use millions of additional dollars available for public transit and other infrastructure projects.

Baltimore station redesign will help trains speed through nation’s busiest rail corridor

The last revisions are likely to increase the price of the project. In his draft environmental impact statement, the FRA waived concepts that included underground parking or other underground facilities, in part because it would add millions of dollars and years of construction. He chose a plan that included “minimal excavation below lobby level”, the quickest and least expensive option.

The federal review estimated that the construction of this shorter plan would be done in phases and could take up to 11 and a half years. It was unclear how much the schedule would change with the latest revisions.

The FRA said its incorporation of an underground facility would better manage pick-up and drop-off activities at the station while relieving traffic from surrounding streets.

“While this change will impact the upfront cost, it resolves many of the challenges associated with expanding regional access to central Washington DC, and we believe the impacts of this new strategy will benefit the community and many citizens using this historic multimodal transportation hub in the long term,” the agency said in a statement.

The FRA’s initial plan called for 1,575 parking spaces, compared to the current 2,200. This would have been consistent with what is available at Philadelphia and Boston stations, according to project documents. However, New York’s Penn Station and many other stations in the United States and around the world do not have on-site parking.

City leaders said the multi-level replacement garage runs counter to the city’s efforts to reduce car travel. Among those who sent letters of opposition to the federal agency were Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and Norton. The National Capital Planning Commission, which oversees project zoning and provides planning guidance for federal land and buildings in the Washington area, also asked the FRA to include a parking program that “significantly reduces parking “.

The revised concept is expected to reduce parking by nearly 50% of nearly 1,600 spaces, planning commission officials said.

Anita Cozart, acting director of the DC Office of Planning, recently welcomed the response to the city’s comments, saying the FRA, Amtrak and USRC had listened to the plans for review, particularly in regards to improving the parking, bus installation and vehicle access to the station.

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Parking spaces

City Department wants to lease parking spots for Lucid Motors test cars – Pasadena Now

The Pasadena Department of Transportation is asking the city council for permission to execute a contract with Lucid Group USA, which manufactures the much-vaunted new electric vehicle Lucid Air, to lease nine reserved parking spaces in the school’s garage owned by the city to use as a location to park and charge the vehicles the company uses for test drives.

Published reports describe the Luicid Air as the automotive industry’s first serious challenger to Tesla’s dominance in the high-end luxury electric vehicle market.

Schoolhouse Garage was identified as the most feasible location due to its proximity to the planned Lucid Motors showroom on Colorado Blvd. in Old Pasadena and the amount of space available in the garage.

The contract will be for an initial term of five years at $24,784 per year, or $123,930 for five years. The annual amount will be recalculated at the start of each additional five-year period, the Department for Transportation said in a preliminary report.

The recommendation has been approved by the city council’s finance committee and will be taken up as an action item at Monday’s city council meeting.

In January, the city approved a Minor Use Conditional Use Permit (MCUP) allowing Lucid Motors to open a sales office in Old Pasadena. The new office would be located on the first floor of a three-story, 4,386 square foot commercial building previously occupied by a fast food restaurant at 32 West Colorado Blvd.

The MCUP is required for vehicle sales and rental service land uses in Old Pasadena and is intended to maintain and enhance the historic character of the area and support the long-term viability of the area as an attraction. regional retail and entertainment industry.

The city began negotiations with Lucid Motors in April to seek a suitable parking lot and electric vehicle charging garage.

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Parking spaces

TA opens new travel center with 103 truck parking spaces in Texas

TravelCenters of America Inc., national operator of the TA Travel Center Network, Petro Stopping Centers and TA Express, has opened a new TA Express Travel Center in Fairfield, Texas located off Interstate 45, Exit 198.

WESTLAKE, Ohio – TravelCenters of America Inc., national operator of the TA Travel Center Network, Petro Stopping Centers and TA Express, has opened a new TA Express Travel Center in Fairfield, Texas located at Interstate 45, Exit 198 .

The new TA Express is a franchise location and expands TA’s total national travel center network to 276 locations, including 45 franchise locations.

TA Express Fairfield offers refueling services, convenience items, dining options and other services for professional drivers and motorists, according to a press release.

“The new 17,000 square foot facility sits on a 19 acre property and provides a convenient stopover for those traveling between Dallas and Houston,” the press release reads.

Amenities include:

  • Quick-service restaurants, including Whataburger, Original Fried Pie Shop, and The Deli, with hot and cold options available
  • Shop with coffee, drinks, snacks and merchandise
  • 103 truck parking spaces
  • 74 parking spaces
  • Eight diesel fueling stations with Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) on all lanes
  • 20 fueling stations
  • Nine showers
  • Driver lounge
  • laundry room

“As we continue to expand our footprint across the country, we are strategically opening travel centers in locations where our services are needed by both professional drivers and motorists,” said Jon Pertchik, managing director of TravelCenters of America.

“In partnership with our franchisee, we are proud to join the Fairfield community and look forward to serving travelers and residents along Interstate 45.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Love’s opens Missouri truck stop with 120 truck parking spaces, reopens fire-damaged Indiana store

This week, Stops on the journey of love opened a new truck stop in Clinton County, Missouri, and announced the reopening of the store in Gary, Indiana, following a major fire.

Love’s opens truck stop in Cameron, Missouri

The new 12,000 square foot Love’s store is located at 1601 East Evergreen Street in Cameron, Missouri.

Amenities at the new truck stop include:

  • Arby’s (opening May 9)
  • 120 truck parking spaces
  • Eight diesel bays
  • Ten showers
  • laundry room
  • Cat scale
  • Speedco (opening May 23)
  • dog park

“Love’s is thrilled to open its 20th branch in Missouri and create 85 jobs in Clinton County,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Our Cameron location will provide plenty of fresh food and beverage options, clean bathrooms and more for customers ready to get back on the road quickly and safely.”

Gary, Indiana, Love’s reopens with limited services

On Thursday, May 5, Love’s announced that the Gary, Indiana store, damaged by a fire at an adjacent Denny’s restaurant in February, had reopened with limited services and amenities.

Love’s says diesel, DEF and limited snacks and beverages are now available at the Gary Store 24 hours a day. Drivers can also access temporary restrooms, parking, Wi-Fi and the Boss Shop. Gasoline is not currently available.

“Thank you for your patience and support as we rebuild this location. Our team members are ready to get professional drivers back on the road quickly and safely! Love is spoken.

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Parking spaces

I-26 ‘Luxury’ rest area with over 100 parking spaces opens May 6

FLETCHER – A “luxurious” rest area with more than 100 parking spaces is set to open on May 6, featuring high ceilings, wood finishes, energy-efficient plumbing, windows for natural light and open space for pets, according to a press release from the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

The rest area is off Interstate 26 East near the Buncombe-Henderson County line at Mile 41. A corresponding westbound rest area is scheduled to open in June, according to the release.

Archer/Wright Joint Venture crews and contractors built the rest areas for about $5 million each as part of the $271 million project to widen the freeway in Henderson County, according to the press release.

Construction of the rest area began in October 2019, said NCDOT spokesman David Uchiyama.

An old rest area was demolished to make way for the new one, he said.

“It is certainly the newest and has all the features to ensure that decades of drivers have a safe, welcoming and comfortable place to simply use the facilities or rest on a long road trip,” the statement read. . “On average, 64,000 people per day drove this stretch of I-26 in 2019.”

“NCDOT takes great pride in its rest areas, not just in the mountains, but across the state,” Division 13 highway environmental engineer Jeff Wait said in the statement. “Some of the best rest areas in the country are located here in western North Carolina. And depending on who you ask, that may be the best.

“I jokingly call it the Taj Mahal of rest stops, but I’m just joking,” Division 14 resident engineer Mike Patton said in the statement. “We hope drivers in our region and across the country will take a break from driving and enjoy this wonderful rest area.”

The Ministry of Transport indicates that the rest area has the following characteristics:

• 90 parking spaces for passenger cars

• 30 parking spaces for semi-trailers

• 4 parking spaces for disabled people

• Full ADA compliance

• High efficiency lighting

• Low flow water systems

• Family toilets with changing table

• Picnic area on the terrace

• a separate building for vending machines

• an area reserved for pets with fire hydrant

Ryan Oehrli is the breaking news and social justice reporter for the Asheville Citizen Times. Email [email protected] or call/text 252-944-6816 for guidance.

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Parking spaces

‘The Marquis’ secures agreement to bring 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces to Easton | Lehigh Valley Regional News

EASTON, Pa. — The Easton Planning Commission gave approval on Wednesday to the development plan for “The Marquis,” a planned seven-story mixed-use building at 27 S. Third St.

The structure will replace the current Pine Street Garage and occupy the block between Pine and Ferry Streets.

According to Robert DiLorenzo, senior project manager for the developer, City Center Investment Corporation, the project is on track to begin work next spring, with the first units going on sale by the end of 2024.

DiLorenzo said planning and approvals for the project are on track, but Downtown wants to wait until the new Fourth Street garage is finished later this year before closing the Pine Street garage to begin construction. works.

DiLorenzo revealed a new rendering of the project that adds design elements recommended by the city’s Historic District Commission. The new design divides the facade into sections, intended to evoke a row of townhouses rather than a continuous structure.

The facade at the corner of Third and Pine Streets in particular was designed to pay homage to the Drake Building, a seven-story building with a cast-iron facade that stood on this site until its demolition in 1972 at the far end. back of Easton. phase of “urban renewal”.

“One of the things that got us excited about working with HDC was exploring Easton’s story,” DiLorenzo said. He said the designers were happy “to try to give a little homage, a little nod, to the Drake building”.






The ground floor of the Marquis will include commercial space, while the overall development will have approximately 280 apartments and 305 parking spaces.




The ground floor of the Marquis will have commercial space, which DiLorenzo says would be perfect for something like a small cafe, a fitness room, and a retail store.

The first two levels behind the storefronts will be dedicated to parking. The plan calls for 305 spaces, many of which DiLorenzo said would likely be empty on weekdays and available for public parking.

The third floor will have two courtyards, one with a swimming pool and picnic area for residents and the other with a dog park. The roof of the building will include a residents’ deck and a 20,000 square foot green roof, which will aid in the structure’s stormwater management plan.

The overall development will have between 270 and 280 apartments, depending on the eventual mix between one- and two-bedroom units, DiLorenzo said, and rents will likely start around $1,300 per month.

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Parking spaces

Find and Book Parking Spaces Market Size 2022 Demand, Global Trend, News, Business Growth – Instant Interview

A report on Parking Finder and Reservation has been released which provides an overview of the global Parking Finder and Reservation industry along with a detailed explanation that provides a lot of insights. The definition of the product/service as well as the different applications of this product/service in different end-user sectors of finding and booking parking spaces can be found in the overview. There is also a considerable amount of information that highlights the growth trajectory of the global Find and Book Parking Spots Market. The information provides a solid basis for Find and reserve parking spaces segmentation of the market into different segments. In fact, the information also displays the maximum market share during the forecast period by 2030.

In addition to the above, the information is based on the highly competitive partners, key players along with their market revenue during the forecast years from 2021 to 2030. Emphasis is also on product revenue, sales, product categories, and even which products are seeing the most traction. In this way, the Find and Reserve Parking Spots report also speaks about the effectiveness of the Find and Reserve Parking Spots Market along with its growth during the forecast period of 2030. Other major attributes of the market Finding and reserving parking spaces have been studied and analyzed through numerous developments. This paints a picture of a strong market grip for the period ahead.

The main players covered in this Find and reserve parking spaces study

Parkopedia, Appyparking, Yourparkingspace, Stashbee, Parkingforme, Spothero, Parklet, Parkhound, Bestparking, Parkme, JustPark, RingGo

By typeProvide a reservationSearch onlyBy applicationTo usersTo parking owners

Get an instant Sample Report of the Find and Book Parking Spaces Market @ marketreports.info/sample/24349/Find-and-Reserve-Parking-Spaces

Segmentation in the Find and Book Parking Spaces Market:-

The global parking space search and reservation market has been segmented on the basis of different aspects. The market is also segmented by region. This segmentation has been followed with the aim of extracting insights into the parking space search and reservation market that is both detailed and accurate. The global parking space search and reservation market has been segmented into Latin America, North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Middle East & Africa on the basis of region

Research Methodology

The Find and Book Parking Spots report definitely has its roots in in-depth strategies provided by knowledgeable data analysts. The research methodology involves the collection of information by analysts only to study and filter it thoroughly with the aim of providing significant predictions about the parking space search and reservation market during the period of review. The Find and Reserve Parking Spaces research process further includes interviews with key market influencers, which makes the primary research relevant and practical. The secondary method gives a direct insight into the connection of demand and supply in the Find and Book Parking Spaces market. the Find and reserve parking spaces The market methodologies adopted in the report offer pin-point analysis of the data and provide a tour of the entire Find and Book Parking Spots market. Both primary and secondary data collection approaches were used. In addition to this, publicly available sources such as SEC filings, annual reports, and white papers have been utilized by data analysts for an in-depth understanding of the Find and Reserve Parking Spots market. The research methodology clearly reflects an intention to extract a comprehensive view of the Find and Book Parking Spots market by analyzing it against numerous parameters. Valued entries improve the Find and Book Parking ratio and provide a peer advantage.

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Drivers and Constraints

The global parking space search and reservation market is driven by the impact of major players who continue to fund the growth of the market significantly every year. The Find and Book Parking Spots report studies the value, volume trends, and pricing structure of the Find and Book Parking Spots Market so that it can predict maximum growth in the future. Additionally, various suppressed growth factors, restraints, and opportunities are also estimated for the advanced study and suggestions of the market during the evaluation period.

Buy the full report on the parking space search and reservation report at: marketreports.info/checkout?buynow=24349/Find-and-Reserve-Parking-Spaces

About Us

Marketreports.info is a global provider of market research and advisory services specializing in offering a wide range of business solutions to its clients, including market research reports, primary and secondary research, demand forecasting services, focus group analytics and other services. We understand how important data is in today’s competitive environment and so we have partnered with industry leading research providers who are constantly working to meet the ever-increasing demand for research reports. market throughout the year.

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Parking spaces

United Arab Emirates: More than 1,400 paid parking spaces introduced this year – News

Fees can be paid using designated machines onsite, or via app or text



File photo

Published: Wed, May 4, 2022, 4:21 PM

Last update: Wed, May 4, 2022, 6:03 PM

More than 1,400 new parking spaces in Sharjah were converted to paid spaces in the first quarter of this year after the municipality provided signs indicating that the lots were subject to charges, a senior official said on Wednesday.

Hamed Al Qaed, director of the public parking service, said parking lots have been equipped with smart payment devices using touchscreen technology. Motorists can also use coins for payment. Parking fees can also be paid through the app or by sending an SMS.

READ ALSO :

The total number of paid parking spaces in the emirate has risen to 55,300 and more than 1,210 smart parking meters have been installed in various areas, al-Qaid said.

Sharjah Municipality will continue its campaign to ensure there is no violation of parking spaces, he added.

The creation of new parking spaces was based on an in-depth study of different areas in the emirate, especially places where motorists violate parking rules, Al-Qaed said.

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Parking spaces

Chick-Fil-A wants to add a 3rd lane and remove 15 parking spaces to solve traffic problems | Local News

The owners of the beleaguered Chick-fil-A restaurant on State Street want to eliminate 15 parking spaces, add a third lane of traffic, build a metal awning and cut down five trees at its popular downtown location.

This proposal was its response to ongoing traffic congestion issues that threatened the company’s ability to have drive-thru at the restaurant at 3707 State St.

Chick-fil-A, and its Santa Ana architecture firm CHROappeared before the Santa Barbara Architectural Review Board on Monday night — and faced strong opposition to his proposal.

“It seems like what’s happening here is we’re bringing a lot of cars to the site, more cars to the site, and making that allowed, but we’re not opening it up to let them out of the site,” said the board. member Leon Olson. “I think it creates a kind of congestion that, I don’t know, plays by all the rules.”

The ABR voted 5-0 on Tuesday to proceed with the project indefinitely, telling Chick-fil-A it didn’t like the canopy, or the removal of the landscaping to accommodate a third lane of cars. The hearing was a concept review, so the restaurant can revise the plan and come back to the board.

Traffic was not under the jurisdiction of ABR, which is responsible for an aesthetic review of the proposal. The project must also be submitted to the planning commission and the city council for review of the functionality and circulation of the proposal.

Chick-fil-A is popular with customers, but has clashed with some locals in the San Roque area.

The restaurant can get so busy that sometimes motorists back onto State Street, creating problems for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, and people trying to get out of nearby Rusty’s.

Chick-fil-A has until June 7 to remedy the issue, or the city’s legal team will prepare submissions for the city council to declare the restaurant a “public nuisance,” which could mean loss of service to the flying.

Chick-fil-A, known for its thick, meaty chicken breasts and waffle fries, is a popular destination for locals, sometimes attracting up to 2,500 people a day. The restaurant replaced Burger King, which was not as popular and did not experience the same congestion problems.

Decades ago, Santa Barbara banned all new drive-thru restaurants, so Chick-Fil-A runs the risk of losing drive-thru if he can’t work out a solution with the city.

However, the restaurant may have created a new problem while trying to solve its traffic congestion problem.

Under the proposed plan, Chick-fil-A would create a third lane, including two used by motorists to order food. The third lane would allow cars to enter the site and park, rather than backing into the street.

“It will help with backing to the street,” said Carlos De la Vega, architect at CRHO.

The restaurant would widen the entrance to the site, eliminating some landscaping at the front. The driveway entrance is 32 feet and should be extended to 42 feet. This would also involve moving the disabled parking spaces to the other side of the restaurant.

To add the third lane, Chick-fil-A would need to reduce the number of parking spaces from 45 to 30 and remove five trees. Part of the remaining parking lot would become parallel instead of sloped.

Board members told Chick-fil-A that he should find a way to add a “finger planter, and maybe more trees, to provide more vegetation to the site. Council members were also unhappy with the look, color and design of the metal canopy over the drive-thru lane.

“In terms of the aesthetics and the structure itself that you’ve come up with, I don’t know if I would be in favor of its design,” said board member Steve Nuhn. “Just this big metal canopy. It has nothing to do with the building. I think it needs to be reworked.”

Council chairman Kevin Moore said more landscaping was needed.

“I encourage you to look carefully at the layout and see where you might find planting areas,” Moore said.

– Noozhawk writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Login with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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Parking spaces

Eid shoppers irritated by lack of parking spaces

Rawalpindi: Lack of parking spaces has become a nuisance for visitors rushing to markets and bazaars to finish their shopping before Eidul Fitr.

Although visitors also shop during the day, the majority of them start arriving at the markets after Iftar time. They face extreme levels of distress when they cannot find a place to park their vehicles in the markets.

Abdul Sattar, a visitor to the Kashmir bazaar, said: “I parked my vehicle about a kilometer from this bazaar because I couldn’t find any parking space near this site. I do my shopping but also worry about the safety of my vehicle.

The majority of shoppers are now seen parking their vehicles on major roads in front of malls, leading to massive traffic jams, especially in the evening. Parking cars on the side of the road reduces space for vehicular traffic and creates traffic hassles and mental agony for Eid shoppers.

Asim Chaudhry, a visitor, said: ‘The plan for shopping malls and plazas that do not have proper parking facilities should not be adopted and those that already exist should be closed unless such facilities are provided. for people’s convenience.”

He said: “With no proper parking facilities, visitors park their vehicles on the roads. Then the traffic police lift those vehicles and the owners have to pay a fine to get their vehicles back.

A group of people set up an unauthorized parking spot in part of a public park in Commercial Market (Satellite Town).

Ashraf Ali, a visitor, said, “I found a parking spot at the public market park site. The person charged me Rs50 but they didn’t give me a receipt.

He said, “When I asked them if they had gotten permission from the local government for this work, they said permission would be given in the next few days.”

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Parking spaces

Dine in parking spots on B’way might be here to stay

The proposal to continue seasonal outdoor dining in public parking lots along Broadway received support from elected officials and nearby businesses after being heard at a city council workshop on April 20.

“Broadway is an area where everything is so tight and none of these restaurants that I know of have the ability to expand outside without it,” said former Newport Mayor Richard Sardella, who owns and operates Sardella’s, a restaurant on Memorial Boulevard. “The first two years of the pandemic were very successful for these restaurants. They were able to survive thanks to that.

“If it’s cleaned up and looks good, it’ll be better than looking at a bunch of cars,” said Greg Verdon, owner of High Hope on Broadway.

“I think, in part, you’ve shown that you can be successful,” Mayor Jeanne-Marie Napolitano told Broadway restaurateurs during the workshop. “That’s why we came to you and asked you to make a proposal.”

According to the city, there are 120 public parking spaces on Broadway. About 30 are currently used by outdoor dining areas.

Proposal

Seven restaurants on Broadway are permitted outside the food zones in public parking lots: Pour Judgement, Tavern on Broadway, Boru Noodle Bar, Scratch Kitchen & Catering, Humming Bird Newport, Corner Café and Malt.

In an April 18 letter to city council, restaurant owners proposed the continued use of outdoor dining parking spaces each year from May 1 to October 31. The existing jersey barriers provided by the city would be returned and replaced with the restaurants. , at their expense. The owners would instead establish a unified aesthetic to alleviate concerns about the current appearance of much of the outdoor seating and enhance the culture of the local neighborhood. The vision includes “tasteful” windbreaks, landscaping, and matching styling between each configuration.

“Originally we all did it on a small budget and we didn’t invest a lot of time or money in the process, but the new proposal will be something that we all work together and in which we we are all ready to invest. our businesses,” said Chelynn Sheehan, co-owner of Malt.

In their letter to city council, the restaurateurs said they were unaware of the longevity of the barriers the city put in place at the start of the pandemic, and were therefore “hesitant to invest significant sums in their appearance.”

Restaurants would also foot the bill to remove and store the new barriers to free up parking spaces from November through April.

What other companies are saying

“Is there a way to protect some of these places? asked Root on Broadway owner Paul Webber. “A protected spot with a 10 minute parking sign in front of my business so my Doordash guy can get in and out [would be beneficial].”

Webber said the city shouldn’t forget “the little guy” when deciding broader policies for the street. While he was generally in favor of continuing outdoor dining, Root has plenty of takeout customers, he said.

“A big part of our business is pick up and we have customers who say they would like to come more, but they can’t find a parking space,” he said.

Other nearby businesses have requested spaces at similar times in front of their businesses to accommodate traveling customers.

“The real controversy is how this fair is doing for all businesses,” said Verdon, who called himself neutral on the overall issue and in favor of the seasonal component. “It definitely affects us. There is already a shortage of parking spaces here. The thing is, if that happens, restaurants will get extra free meals and who knows how much extra revenue for next to nothing.

Councilor Charlie Holder asked if there was anyone present who objected to continuing to eat out and was met with silence. However, the workshop was only scheduled a week before, on April 13th. The problem has been widespread in Newport since indoor dining restrictions began to ease last year.

Jim Quinn, co-owner of Hungry Monkey on Broadway, urged the council to continue supporting patios and tables on public sidewalks across the city as it decides the fate of outdoor dining in public parking lots along Broadway .

The financial aspect

Broadway offers two-hour unmetered parking, and restaurants pay the city food and beverage taxes annually. The city will see additional tax revenue if the businesses are successful. Now, the council and city will work to determine a fee for seasonal use of public parking by restaurants on Broadway.

The Newport Ordinance Code establishes an approval process, regulations, and an annual fee of $300 to be paid to the city for “sidewalk cafes.” Twenty-seven licenses have been approved this year and there is no limit to the number of licenses granted by the city. Finally, a restaurant with two or three tables outside pays the same $300 annually as a restaurant with five or 10 tables on the sidewalk. Additionally, the cost of retail space in Newport ranges widely, from $14 to $25 per square foot, with property on Washington Square as high as $46 per square foot.

“If the city is going to allow them to continue, [the restaurants] should pay for that space,” said Verdon, who said the fee money could be put to good use in other Newport neighborhoods.

The city is considering a facility for Broadway similar to the annual fee paid for sidewalk cafes, City Manager Joseph Nicholson Jr. said. The licenses would be renewed annually and could be revoked. During the workshop, Napolitano and councilor Kate Leonard inquired about a fee structure if restaurants are allowed to continue using the spaces. Nicholson said that while he hasn’t had those discussions yet, he’s been toying with some numbers.

And after?

All board members expressed support for the idea, with some citing a need for balance and certain conditions to be met, such as a uniform design. Council Vice-Chair Lynn Ceglie asked the restaurateurs if they could come up with a more detailed design by the May 25 council meeting. The board would likely vote on the details of any plan at an upcoming meeting.

Councilwoman Angela McCalla supported the idea, but said any plan must incorporate pedestrians, cyclists and be ADA compliant.

Meanwhile, as the issue is resolved, the city likely won’t enforce local laws prohibiting restaurant use of public parking spaces this year, Nicholson said. Any ordinance drafted and approved by the board would go into effect in May 2023.

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Parking spaces

City of Victoria is studying an app to identify available parking spaces

The City of Victoria says it hopes to give drivers real-time information about on-street parking and parking space availability by delivering it directly to their smartphone or vehicle.

Currently, the only way a driver can tell if a municipal parking lot is full is to look at the digital signage at the entrance to the parking lot.

The city is exploring ways to eventually provide live, up-to-date on-street and parking lot parking information through an app or in-vehicle smart technology, city spokesman Bill Eisenhauer said Thursday. , at CHEK News.

“The City will continue to explore options as new technological solutions become available,” he said. “There are a lot of complexities and considerations before anything can be implemented.”

It’s an update that Jeff Bray, executive director of the Downtown Victoria Business Association, hopes will help make downtown parking easier.

“When someone comes downtown, they can look around and see 10 spots in Johnson, 15 in View,” he said.

The new technology would be timely as parking is increasingly becoming an issue downtown, with more people leaving their homes as COVID-19 restrictions ease.

“No doubt we’ve seen pedestrians and parking statistics increase for several months,” Bray said. “Smaller [parkades] like Centennial, Fisgard is filling up… Yates Street seems to be filling up even.

Bray said the number of spaces on the street and in parking lots is not the problem – it’s the fact that drivers do not know where the available spaces are, and provide real-time information to them. will avoid the frustration of looking for a place aimlessly.

The City of Victoria told CHEK News it is still exploring options for the technology and there is no timetable for when it might be available.

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Parking spaces

Beshear vetoes parking bill

We now have the first Beshear veto of the post-session period. And what is it? Parking spaces.

Governor Beshear vetoed HB 291, an “ACT relating to transactions between the Legislative Research Commission and the Executive Branch.” His veto message is short and not too sweet:

I, Andy Beshear, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, pursuant to authority granted under Section 88 of the Kentucky Constitution, hereby veto the following:

House Bill 291 of the 2022 regular session of the General Assembly in its entirety.

I veto Bill 291 because the role of the General Assembly is not to determine who gets which parking spaces on Capitol Hill by statute. Moreover, in House Bill 291, the General Assembly attempts to give itself more favorable terms of lease and service than those enjoyed by the executive branch.

Now, before you assume this is just a minor pissing contest between Republicans and the government, the bill is actually worse than Beshear’s ratings. At the very end of the bill, it says that the Legislative Research Commission (headed by the Republic leadership) will assume control of the entire Capitol Annex, and then there’s this:

The Cabinet allocates to the General Assembly and the Legislative Research Committee all parking spaces in the Capitol campus parking lot, all parking spaces in the east, south and west parking lots of the new Capitol Annex State and all parking spaces to the west. New State Capitol parking lot, except for spaces in the New State Capitol West parking lot allocated, effective January 1, 2022, to the Kentucky Supreme Court, Attorney General, and Secretary of State. Any additional allocation of parking spaces allocated under this paragraph shall be at the sole discretion of the Legislative Research Commission or its delegate.

Have you ever heard the term “land grabbing”? Now we have a “parking spot grab”. And of course what it really is is a power play.

It is a good thing that someone reads the bill to the end. And kudos to Governor Beshear for vetoing.

–30–

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Parking spaces

Love’s adds 150 parking spaces with 2 new locations

The new Love’s site in Pageland, SC will have 70 parking spaces for truckers. (Courtesy of Love’s)
22 04 21 Loves Moses Lake WA web copy
The new Love’s in Moses Lake, Wash. will have 80 truck parking spaces. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Stops on the journey of love opened two new sites at Pageland, South Carolinaand Lake Moses, WashingtonThursday.

The Pageland store adds 70 truck parking spaces and 60 jobs in Chesterfield County. The Moses Lake store adds 80 truck parking spaces and 85 jobs to Grant County.

“As we open our 12th location in South Carolina and our sixth location in Washington, we reaffirm Love’s commitment to providing quality services and products at competitive prices,” said Greg Love, co-CEO of Love’s. “Our team members are ready to help customers get back on the road quickly and safely in Pageland and Moses Lake.”

Pitches are open 24/7 and offer many amenities, including:

Pageland, South Carolina
  • Over 9,000 square feet.
  • Hardee’s (opening April 25).
  • 70 truck parking spaces.
  • 58 parking spaces.
  • Two motorhome parking spaces.
  • Five diesel bays.
  • Four showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.
Lake Moses, Washington
  • Over 11,000 square feet.
  • Taco John’s (opening April 25).
  • 80 truck parking spaces.
  • 92 parking spaces.
  • Nine diesel bays.
  • Seven showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand opening, Love’s will donate $2,000 to nonprofit organizations in each community.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

Towards car parks dedicated to cargo bikes in Brussels

The Brussels region should soon have parking lots specially dedicated to cargo bikes, which are more and more numerous in the Belgian capital. According to figures from the Belgian bicycle observatory, in 2020 they represented 6% of bicycles in circulation, compared to only 2% in 2018.

The Brussels authorities hope to encourage the use of cargo bikes, but to do so obviously requires a minimum of suitable infrastructure, starting with car parks capable of accommodating these bulky bikes.

It is indeed very difficult today to park these bicycles in the city, especially near public places such as schools, administrative sites or department stores. It should be noted that one of the rare underground car parks capable of accommodating cargo bikes in Brussels, right in the city centre, even has a lift sized accordingly. This shows how important constraints can be for this type of transport.

However, a secure and sheltered parking lot for cargo bikes could soon see the light of day. The idea could even be to increase the standard to one cargo bike space for every 10 bike spaces in multi-unit residential buildings. This is still in the planning stage, however, and will need to be voted on to be implemented.

Parking spaces alone will not necessarily be enough to convince people to buy a cargo bike, and other infrastructure will also have to be adapted. For its part, the Daily Cyclists Research and Action Group (GRACQ), which represents and defends the interests of cyclists in French-speaking Belgium, is campaigning for adapted cycle paths, in terms of width and turning radius, in Brussels. and its surroundings

.

David Benard

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Parking spaces

Snowdonia residents claim Zip World staff hogging parking spaces at beauty spot

An exasperated resident says she is growing increasingly frustrated with the lack of parking at a beauty spot in Snowdonia. Jen Rigby, who lives in Llanrwst, says she has had parking problems in a local woodland for almost two years because staff at a nearby tourist attraction are taking up all the spaces.

Jen claimed she was unable to park in a public parking area at the entrance to Coed Hafod, Snowdonia, as she was ‘overrun’ by staff at the popular tourist attraction – Zip World Forest Adventures. She claimed the parking area, which runs alongside the A470 at Betws-y-Coed, was effectively being used as a de facto ‘staff car park’, despite there being a car park at the Zip World site .

Zip World has been approached for comment and the Welsh Government, which runs the parking area, said it was aware of the issue. But Jen claimed the issue dates back nearly two years, having first raised the issue with Zip World in August 2020. A screenshot shared by Jen appeared to show an email from Zip World that reads as follows: “Regarding parking in the parking areas, some staff park in a parking area, but not all staff park there because we know it is a public space for you and enjoy the local walks. I will be reviewing this daily to monitor who is parking there to ensure there is space for the public.”

READ MORE: Wales’ big little trains face an ‘existential threat’ and some may not even survive the summer

Jen said that despite reassurances, parking issues at the parking lot persisted. She told North Wales Live: “You can imagine at the weekend it gets very busy – there were 16 cars parked here at midday on Saturday and 17 on Sunday, leaving no room for residents or anyone else to stopping to park.

“I am very grateful to Zip World for bringing jobs to the region and also for the boost that adventure tourism gives to our region, but my message to Zip World is: please can- you share this parking area with local residents and others who want to stop to see the beauty of Coed Hafod.”



Jen Rigby from Llanrwst says she can’t park near her local forest in Snowdonia due to lack of parking

Jen added: “They’re not breaking the law, but I’ve had enough. It’s our favorite family dog ​​walk – or it was – it’s a place I come to relax because there is nowhere else close enough to Zip World Fforest.

“Honestly, with staff having to cross the busy A470 twice and walk half a mile alongside a road where cars routinely travel at over 60mph, it looks like an imminent accident.” A spokesperson for the Welsh Government – which runs the parking area – said: ‘We are aware of some parking issues in the parking area and are monitoring the situation.

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Parking spaces

Motorists struggle to find parking spaces, MCC will soon provide payment and parking facilities

Payment and parking facilities will be available on Balmatta Road, Tanishq Jewelery at Khazana Jewellery, Balmatta-Ambedkar Circle, Hampankatta, Hamilton Circle-Rao and Rao Circle, Lalbagh, near KCCI at Bunder, Badria School Road, Nellikai Road, Mission Street, three stretches of Market Road, near Roopavani Theatre, first junction of Maidan Road, road opposite Linking Tower to Kalpana Sweets, Light House Hill and Alake Market.

Mangaluru: Soon, if you’re driving a quad or two-wheeler around Mangaluru town, you might have some extra cash in your wallet or purse, in case you need a parking spot, because Mangaluru City Corporation has decided to provide Pay-and-Park amenities, in order to alleviate the parking problems faced by motorists. But if you look around the city, there are enough parking spaces, however, all the main parking spaces have been invaded by illegal street vendors, mobile street canteens, vehicle repairers, among others – and the MCC turned a blind eye. And now they are trying to squeeze hard-earned money from tax-paying citizens to pay for parking, while allowing needed parking spaces to be overrun by non-tax-paying citizens, i.e. street vendors. Bah smoker!

Due to widening of many major roads in the city and increasing traffic density day by day, Mangaluru City Corporation (MCC) has decided to increase the number of paid and parking facilities in the city. It is learned that based on a preliminary survey conducted jointly by the MCC and the traffic police, 13 locations have been identified so far to provide parking facilities. The MCC has issued a tender to manage the city’s paid and parking facilities. At present, with a large number of local vehicles moving around the city, as well as those who visit the city by vehicles, are hampered by the lack of parking space.


As the works on the main roads under Mangaluru Smart City Limited (MSCL) and MCC are approaching competition, the municipality has decided to reserve parking spaces at identified locations. An MCC official speaking to the Mangalorean team said: “A tender has been issued to start payment and parking facilities at 13 locations in the city. While the total amount set for 13 pitches is Rs 23 lakh, bidders will be required to pay 10% of the bid. Successful bidders can provide parking facilities for two-wheelers and light motor vehicles, collecting prescribed fees for the following year,”

Payment and parking facilities will be available on Balmatta Road, Tanishq Jewelery at Khazana Jewellery, Balmatta-Ambedkar Circle, Hampankatta, Hamilton Circle-Rao and Rao Circle, Lalbagh, near KCCI at Bunder, Badria School Road, Nellikai Road, Mission Street, three stretches of Market Road, near Roopavani Theatre, first junction of Maidan Road, road opposite Linking Tower to Kalpana Sweets, Light House Hill and Alake Market.

In addition to these Pay & Park facilities planned by MCC, a multi-level parking complex is already under construction at Hampankatta, (the former bus stop area), which would solve the major parking problem in the city a once finished. This project is taken over in PPP mode, through a company based in Mangaluru, at an estimated cost of Rs 95 crore. It is being developed on 1.6 acres of the vacant site of the city’s former bus station, work undertaken by Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL).

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Parking spaces

The vision of future mobility of the DORO project uses streetlights as parking spaces

Most future car concepts simply focus on getting from point A to point B, but one design offers an interesting solution to the parking problem.

Automakers naturally tend to focus on the future evolution of cars. They often emphasize the conveniences of self-driving vehicles in an effort to reassure the public that the mishaps of today won’t exist in the future, at least ideally. Vehicles, however, will not always be in transit, and while these visions and concepts may help solve traffic problems, many of them do not solve today’s parking problems. A more holistic view of mobility must include the whole ecosystem, and it is the idea behind this street project concept that makes a rather unusual proposition to solve parking space problems.

Designer: Park Chanwoong

The idea begins with streetlights, which the designer considers to be one of the most wasteful and underutilized spaces on the streets. Of course, streetlights can be used for other purposes, such as collecting environmental data, holding security cameras, or even using spotlights to display advertisements on the ground. The DORO project, however, tries to put this unused space under the street lamp to better use it as a parking space of the future, but it also requires another type of car to accompany it.

The DORO project is actually quite a complex system that involves three mobility parts. There’s the actual base rig which actually has the wheels and the motor. It can detach from the cabin, which is the part where human passengers and drivers sit and connect to other cabins. This means that parked cabins that don’t need to go anywhere anytime soon can have their platforms used on other cabins, potentially reducing the number of “complete” cars that need to be made and be on the road. .

The cabin itself is an interesting design exercise, where the interior resembles a living room, with the use of materials like wood, ivory and fabric. Unlike most future concept cars, however, the capsule-shaped cabin has large windows that give passengers an unobstructed view of the outside world, doing away with walls almost entirely. Presumably, these are one-way windows for the sake of people’s privacy.

The streetlights of the DORO project serve as a focus for the unused cabins that are detached from their bases. The cabins are raised above the ground to provide shelter from rain or shade from the sun, although this may be debatable if someone would like to stand under a heavy cabin. In the vision of the project, however, these lampposts line the roads and highways, so cars will drive under these suspended capsules. Sidewalk parking that obstructs traffic will be a thing of the past!

The DORO project is admittedly a rather grand and complex system, which assumes that there will be a reliable network of bases, cabins and parking lights available in the future. That said, it’s one of the few concepts that actually thinks about the problem of parking and doesn’t just assume that cars of future cars will always drive on roads and highways.

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Parking spaces

Love’s Travel Stops Adds Nearly 80 Truck Parking Spaces to Waterloo, New York

Love’s Travel Stops now serves customers in Waterloo, New York, with a stopover that opened on Thursday. The store adds 78 truck parking spaces and 75 jobs in Seneca County. (Courtesy of Love’s)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Stops on the journey of love now serves customers in Waterloo, New York, thanks to a rest stop that opened on Thursday. The store adds 78 truck parking spaces and 75 jobs to County of Seneca.

“The Waterloo store will offer the amenities that Love’s is known for, such as fresh food and beverages, as well as today’s latest technology in its Mobile to Go area,” said Greg Love, Co-CEO of Love’s. . “We are excited to serve customers at our fifth location in New York and help them get back on the road quickly and safely.”

The location is open 24/7 and offers many amenities, including:

  • Over 11,000 square feet.
  • Subway (opening 04/18) and Wendy’s (opening 04/14).
  • 78 truck parking spaces.
  • 60 parking spaces.
  • Seven RV parking spaces.
  • Eight diesel bays.
  • Seven showers.
  • Laundry room.
  • Cat scale.
  • Speedco (opening later).
  • Gourmet coffee beans.
  • Branded snacks.
  • Mobile to Go Zone with the latest GPS, headsets and smartphone accessories.
  • Dog park.

In honor of the grand opening, Love’s will donate $2,000 to the Seneca County House of Concern.

The Trucker News Team

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content not only for TheTrucker.com, but also for The Trucker Newspaper, which has served the trucking industry for over 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News team aims to provide relevant and objective content regarding the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News team is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Parking spaces

The tram operator asked to focus on parking spaces on the beach

Part of the Old Town streetcar concept relies on visitor parking at Cortez Beach, south of Bridge Street. -Joe Hendricks | Sun

BRADENTON BEACH – Members of the Community Redevelopment Agency (ARC) want ARC-funded Old Town streetcars to serve more people who park in Manatee County-owned parking spaces at Cortez Beach and Coquina Beach.

Cortez Beach unpaved parking lots are located along the west side of Gulf Drive South, just south of Bridge Street, from Fourth Street South to 13th Street South. The newly paved and soon to be paved parking spots at Coquina Beach are located at the south end of town.

The Old town tram the shuttle service pilot program is now in its second year and the current one-year contract with Joshua LaRose’s EASYParking Group expires in or around November. Before this contract expires, ARC members must decide whether to continue with the experimental pilot program, enter into a permanent contract with LaRose, seek another private operator to provide similar services at no cost to ARC, or simply abandon the concept of a publicly funded tram shuttle.

The long-term goal of ARC members is to install a dedicated streetcar lane along the Cortez Beach parking lot to alleviate the need for streetcars to travel through heavy traffic along Gulf Drive.

County officials have expressed preliminary support for a dedicated path and other trolley-related amenities, but those plans cannot proceed until a massive utility improvement project that includes the Cortez Beach parking lot is complete. is not finished. According to CRA member John Chappie, county officials have a definitive timeline for when this project will begin and end.

The other long-term goal is for streetcar advertising revenue to provide all or most of the funds needed to cover monthly operating costs.

Concerns and Solutions

Each month, LaRose provides a report detailing traffic, routes traveled and advertising revenue generated.

At the April 6 ARC meeting, LaRose said the streetcars generated $5,475 in advertising revenue in March, which equals 57% of the monthly costs of $9,665, with the ARC paying the remaining balance. of $4,190.

LaRose said 5,632 passengers rode the two electric streetcars in March, with streetcar drivers picking up 169 passengers at the south end of the Coquina Beach parking lot and 1,102 passengers along Cortez Beach.

City attorney and CRA liaison Ricinda Perry noted that the 169 passengers being picked up at Coquina Beach equated to about five people a day.

“I certainly wouldn’t recommend this council to invest more funds if it’s not being utilized,” she said.

Perry said there are more than 1,300 parking spaces available at nearby county beaches, compared to the dozen or so parking spaces near the Bradenton Beach Police Department where streetcars run frequently.

“The goal is to overturn those numbers. I need to know why that’s not happening on the beach,” she said.

LaRose said he was told by his drivers that the heavy traffic presented challenges when getting to the South Beach parking areas and that a dedicated trolley path would help. It has pledged to ask its drivers to get feedback from passengers on why they don’t use beach parking spaces.

Chappie noted that the Cortez Beach parking area is three-quarters of a mile long and could be divided into three main points for loading and unloading trolley passengers. Chappie said streetcar drivers should drive through the Cortez Beach parking lot rather than Gulf Drive and look for additional passengers along the way.

“The last thing the (tram) conductor wants to do is get into this traffic,” added ARC member Ed Chiles.

The tram operator asked to focus on parking spaces on the beach
Old Town trams run seven days a week. –Joe Hendricks | Sun

Perry asked LaRose what else could be done to encourage people to use the Cortez Beach and Coquina Beach parking spots as originally planned.

LaRose said he could do a trial in late April or early May with one of the two carts traveling only between Bridge Street and the beach parking areas. Hours of operation were added to banners promoting the free service and he suggested placing another banner at or near Coquina Beach.

He also said digital QR codes had been created to be shared with businesses in the ARC district. Accessible by mobile phone, the QR codes will provide instant information on the tram service and how to hail a ride. To request a ride, call 941-404-6240.

Old Town streetcars run daily between the Cortez Bridge and Coquina Beach from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

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Parking spaces

Painted lines will add over 100 parking spaces on select city streets

A pilot program is expected to add a total of more than 100 additional parking spaces in select areas of the city.

City Council at its regular meeting on Monday unanimously approved the experimental painting of lines, known as parking bays, on streets in some of the city’s most densely populated neighborhoods.

The 8-by-20-foot stalls will be similar to those found in parking lots.

They will be tested in 31 blocks for a period of 90 days starting July 1. Painting should start soon.

Vehicles parked beyond the lines will be ticketed, officials said. The list of streets is www.readingeagle.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/proposed-streets.pdf.

Depending on the results of the trial period, the enforcement of parking between lines could become permanent and the program extended to the whole city.

Earlier on Monday, at a full committee meeting, Nathan Matz, executive director of the Reading Parking Authority, briefed the council on the effort.

Matz said Mayor Eddie Moran brought the concept to the authority after receiving numerous complaints about the lack of parking spaces in residential areas of the city.

The authority engaged McCarthy Engineering Associates of Wyomissing to assess the feasibility of parking spaces in the 31 targeted blocks.

The study revealed that the number of usable spaces could drop from 980 to 1,087, a total gain of 107 spaces.

“We were really excited about it because we didn’t know how much it would pay out,” Matz said. “What we’ve found is that there’s a lot of inefficiency.”

For example, he said the amount of yellow painted on the hydrant curbs was inconsistent and varied by up to 75 feet in some places. This is 50 feet more than the standard 25 foot clearance required for fire hydrants.

Matz said the study team found residents in some areas had painted their own street space markers, yellow curbs at intersections and blue curbs for disabled parking.

“All kinds of things,” he said.

The city and authority have also received complaints from residents that some vehicle owners will reserve space for the family by intentionally parking in the center of what could be two spaces, Matz said. When the family member arrives home, the first vehicle will be pulled forward to make room for the second.

Stalls should eliminate the practice, he said.

Councilwoman Marcia Goodman-Hinnershitz said she supports the program, but expects there will be more bumps and bumps as drivers get used to parallel parking in lines.

She agreed with Denbowski that this will likely prove beneficial in more densely populated urban areas where parking is particularly difficult.

“Do you know what difference it will make? Denbowski asked. “It’s amazing.”

For example, the 800 block of North 12th Street will gain 10 more spaces, he said, and a three-block section of South Ninth Street will gain 33 spaces.

Although there is no gain in some of the target blocks, he said there will be no loss.

“It will go a long way to solving some of the parking issues we have,” Denbowski said.

Matz said informational flyers will be distributed to residents of the testing blocks.

Information will also be available on the Parking Authority’s website and Facebook page.

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Parking spaces

More long-term parking spaces introduced at Perth Royal Infirmary for patients, visitors and staff

More dedicated long-term car parking spaces at Perth Royal Infirmary have been made available for patients, visitors and staff.

Managed by Smart Parking, car parks 2 and 16 at the PRI have been transformed into long-term car parks, which means that there is no time limit in these car parks and that it is not necessary for vehicles display a free parking ticket.

The move comes after the Palestinian Authority exclusively revealed last June that PRI healthcare staff were being forced to park in designated patient spaces “as a last resort” due to permit delays. staff parking.

Many nurses feared they could be fined and worried that an earlier decision to reduce the number of staff places had made the problem worse.

But now these changes have been introduced to make more spaces available for on-site long-term parking for patients, visitors and staff.

Disabled parking has not been affected with dedicated parking spaces available throughout the site.

Updated parking lot signage will be in place to reflect the new parking arrangements.

There are no changes to parking arrangements for other PRI car parks and users are reminded to collect and clearly display a free parking ticket or permit in their vehicle, if applicable.

A parking warden will be on site Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. to monitor the car parks.

A spokesperson for NHS Tayside added: ‘Car parks can be busy at peak times and patients, visitors and staff are encouraged to consider alternative ways of getting to the hospital, such as using public transport community, cycling, walking or being dropped off by a parent. or friend.

“If it’s essential that you travel by car, please allow plenty of time to find a space before your appointment.”

Further information on parking at the PRI and other locations can be found on the NHS Tayside website www.nhstayside.scot.nhs.uk

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Parking spaces

You ask, we answer: Will the Fairfax Pool add more handicapped parking? | You ask, we answer

CLEAR WATER (WQOW) – It’s time to dive into another edition of You Ask, We Answer. Friday’s question comes from Marsha Robinson, who has spent more time in the Fairfax pool parking lot than in the water.

“I’ve been here several times and left in tears because the parking spaces are full,” Robinson said.

Robinson bought a season pass at Fairfax Pool in 2020, but she hasn’t used it much.

“I only went there twice because there were no parking spaces available,” she said.

Robinson uses disabled parking due to his ailing knee and heart, but in Fairfax only four of the 160 locations are marked as accessible.

Hoping that a space would become available, she would wait in the main parking lot in the summer.

“I would wait about 15 or 20 minutes,” Robinson said. “And then I would decide that there will be no one leaving. Most people come to the pool for a day session or a day swim.”

Assistant city engineer Leah Ness said the number of accessible booths is based on Wisconsin laws.

“Based on state law, 2% of booths must be accessible to people with disabilities based on the number of booths in the lot,” Ness said.

But for Robinson, the bare minimum is not enough.

She said it’s not just old people like her who need these places. Young disabled children like her granddaughters also use them.

“We end up taking two cars, and that’s two out of four seats we would need,” Robinson said.

“At this location, we weren’t aware of the need for additional accessible stalls,” Ness said. “We notice our parking lots on an annual to semi-annual basis, depending on the wear of the paint, so it is something that we can adjust.

So the answer is yes.’ The city plans to add additional ADA locations by scouting the land before the pool opens in June.

“Being able to go in the pool would be a pleasure,” Robinson said.

Ness said Robinson’s concern prompted officials to review the need for additional accessible stalls at other city-owned facilities.

If you have a question you would like answered, email us at [email protected], send us a message on Facebookor submit your question here.

Do you have a story idea? Let us know here

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Parking spaces

Moving tennis courts means more parking spaces | News for Fenton, Linden, Holly MI

The two tennis courts just south of W. Caroline Street and east of the Shiawassee River in downtown Fenton are scheduled to be moved to Bush Park.

OHM Advisors, the city’s engineers, are surveying the plot where the tennis courts are located for redevelopment.

The large parking lot behind the Fenton Community and Cultural Center at 150 S. LeRoy Street is also under investigation. Redevelopment of this parking lot could result in a parking deck for additional parking.

These topics were discussed at the DDA meeting in February and the DDA board approved $17,000 in survey fees.

Michael Hart, deputy city manager and executive director of the DDA, said for more parking behind the community center they could opt for an improved surface lot or for a lot more money they could opt for a patio parking lots, where future maintenance costs would increase. significantly. “We’ll see how things go over the next few months as everything unfolds,” he said.

Hart said the existing tennis courts, which are between 20 and 25 years old, are at the end of their life. He said the city would like to rebuild them and add pickleball courts, but move them all to Bush Park.

The relocation of the courts to Bush Park could strengthen the offer of the N. LeRoy Street park.

Moving the courts could also free up space for more parking spaces along the river. Hart said the existing tennis courts are located in a flood plain. The area would not be suitable for structures, however, it may be suitable for additional parking.

Hart said the cost of rebuilding the tennis courts and pickleball courts at Bush Park could be quite expensive, however, he did not have an exact amount at this time. He said the DDA could apply for grants, but that process could take years. An alternative would be for the DDA to cover the costs. “It makes sense for the DDA to cover the costs,” he said.

The demolition of the existing tennis courts would be carried out by the city’s public works department. Hart said they wouldn’t have a timeline for when it will be over.

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