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Proposed hospital car park would create green space and ease access – The Daily Gazette

SCHENECTADY — A new eight-story parking structure proposed by Ellis Medicine along Nott and Ulster streets would not only increase parking capacity but also eliminate longstanding confusion that has existed on campus for years, officials said Tuesday. hospital officials in a virtual community meeting.

The hospital is looking to demolish its 700-space, four-level parking garage that was built more than 40 years ago to make way for an eight-story structure that can accommodate up to 1,200 vehicles. The hospital has outgrown the current structure, which requires thousands of dollars in annual maintenance costs.

Plans for the new structure will be reviewed by the city’s Planning Commission on February 16.

But before meeting with the commission, a number of hospital officials, including President and CEO Paul Milton, joined members of the structure’s design team to brief the community on the proposed plans, answer any questions and gather additional feedback on the plans.

“Time is up for the current Nott Street Garage. It’s old,” Milton said. “With our commitment and our mission of what we do, we need to make sure we have good access and a safe way for everyone to approach the hospital.”

A dozen residents attended the meeting, most of whom remained silent during a question-and-answer period. Those who spoke appeared to approve of the proposal and were primarily concerned about the timing of the project and its potential impact on local traffic.

The new structure, expected to cost $30 million, will have the same facade as the hospital’s Rosa Road parking garage and would be located in the same area as the existing structure.

But the new garage would have a reduced footprint of around 45 feet to ensure the remains of the current structure are entirely removed from the site. The narrower structure will create room for additional green space along Ulster Street that will beautify the area and help reduce stormwater runoff, according to David Vander Wal, senior vice president of Walker Consultants, an engineering firm. engineering specializing in parking structures.

The structure would be precast offsite using concrete and will stand six to seven stories high when fully assembled. The assembly will be done in phases using a crane, according to Vander Wal.

Construction plan

The goal is to begin demolishing the existing structure this summer after obtaining the necessary approvals and securing funding for the project. Ellis received a $2 million state grant for the project and expects the savings on maintenance costs to help offset remaining costs.

The project should last around 16 months. The hospital said the savings in maintenance costs and shuttle services will offset the remaining costs of the project.

Currently, hospital employees must use a shuttle service to get to work due to a lack of on-site parking. The hospital is in the process of securing additional parking for the start of construction, but current plans include expanding the use of Hillside Avenue for employee parking and providing enhanced valet parking for patients. and visitors, according to Mark Mesick, the hospital’s chief financial officer. .

It is estimated that 20 lorries would cross Ulster Street each day during assembly, the equivalent of around three lorries per hour during an eight-hour working day. The road will remain open during construction.

“Once they’ve made 80 percent of the parts, they’ll start erecting the prefab,” Vander Wal said. “It will go from a hole in the ground with footings to a fairly complete building in about two to three months.”

Milton said the hospital administration is working closely with the Schenectady City School District to ensure minimal disruption to students at Oneida Middle School, which is directly across from the site of proposed construction.

“Access and security are very important to us. We are very sensitive to being next to school here with children running around,” he said. “We are working with the school system on this project to make sure it is safe in the future.”

Karen Corona, a school district spokeswoman, confirmed the hospital has been in contact.

The new structure will include three tunnels, including an exit and entrance along Ulster Street and an entrance on Nott Street.

According to Daria Mallin, president of Envision Architect, an Albany-based design firm working on the project.

“We are raising the floor … to allow you to enter at the same level compared to A1, the first floor of the hospital, to obtain this continuity, to again reduce the stress of the experience of arriving on campus” , she said.

Milton said the hospital will work to notify the community of any changes once the project has obtained the necessary approvals and plans for parking and construction are finalized.

Contact journalist Chad Arnold at: 518-410-5117 or [email protected]. Follow him on Twitter: @ChadGArnold.

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Categories: News, Schenectady County

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Parking garage

SEPTA will build a car park near Conshohocken station

The Borough of Conshohocken announced today that SEPTA is committed to moving forward with Phase II improvement plans at Conshohocken Station

The Phase I plan is to build a new station just over Oak Street, which is just uphill from its current location. A vehicular/pedestrian crossing at Oak Street is also added.

The Phase II commitment includes the construction of a 3-level parking garage for the station, in addition to surface parking. In Phase II, the surface parking lot and garage will create 534 parking spaces. The garage will also include ADA-accessible parking and two ground floor elevators. No timeline was included in the announcement. You can consult a document on the car park here.

The garage will be built to allow for future expansion of two additional parking levels and with infrastructure to support the potential future installation of electric vehicle charging spaces.

On this section of the waterfront (above the bridge), there are currently three apartment buildings under construction. Closest to the bridge is unit 304 The Birch at 51 Washington (expected to be completed in fall 2022). Just upriver and adjacent to The Birch is the 276-unit Matson Mill community (expected to be completed in fall 2022). Just across the river along West Elm Street is unit 348,400 West Em Street (expected to be completed in fall 2023).

Image: SEPTA

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Parking garage

Application for new St. Jude parking garage denied – FOX13 News Memphis

MEMPHIS, Tennessee – A request from ALSAC, the fundraising and outreach organization for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, to build a controversial new seven-story parking lot on the northeast corner of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. ‘AW Willis and of Third St. was refused.

The Memphis Shelby County Board of Adjustment vote came Wednesday afternoon, dashing ALSAC’s hopes for the structure.

ALSAC sent FOX13 the following statement, indicating that they will continue to work on parking arrangements for a growing workforce.

“We appreciate that the Board of Adjustment is evaluating our proposal today, although we are disappointed with the outcome as it may negatively impact our planned missionary expansion. We will continue to explore our options to expand our campus, including returning to the adjustment board in a timely manner as we have major new construction planned on the west side of campus and the Pinch District and require additional parking to accommodate our growing workforce. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and ALSAC, the fundraising and outreach organization for St. Jude, have created more than 1,200 jobs over the past six years and will likely create about 1,800 more jobs in the over the next six years. This growth will allow us to advance research and life-saving treatments for children around the world and continue to create new opportunities. local investment and employment units.

The decision to deny the new parking garage, which would have approximately 1,500 parking spaces, comes after residents of the Greenlaw and Uptown communities voiced their opposition to the construction of the seven-story garage.

RELATED: Residents voice opposition to proposed parking lot near St. Jude

These community members said the garage would go against the Memphis 3.0 plan developed by St. Jude, the City of Memphis and residents, that the garage would disrupt the beautiful green space in the community where the garage was to be built. and that it would serve traffic better to build it on Danny Thomas where it was originally planned to go.


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Proposal Denied for St. Jude Parking Lot

Neighbors objected to the planned structure, citing traffic hazards on nearby residential streets, but St. Jude said it needed parking for future employees.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – New parking for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in the Uptown neighborhood will have to wait.

The Memphis-Shelby County Board of Adjustment rejected the latest proposal.

Neighbors objected to the planned structure, citing traffic hazards on nearby residential streets, but St. Jude said it needed parking for future employees.

St. Jude, however, is not giving up. A spokeswoman said the proposal rejected on Wednesday had already been revised, addressing concerns from neighbors.

You can read the full statement from ALSAC, the fundraising and awareness organization for St. Jude, below:

“We appreciate that the Board of Adjustment is evaluating our proposal today, although we are disappointed with the outcome as it may negatively impact our planned missionary expansion. We will continue to explore our options to expand our campus, including the return to the Board of Adjustment at the appropriate time, as we have planned major new construction on the west side of campus and the Pinch District and require additional parking to accommodate our growing staff. St. Jude and ALSAC, the fundraising and awareness organization for St. Jude, have created more than 1,200 jobs over the past six years, and likely about 1,800 more jobs over the next six years. growth will allow us to advance research and life-saving treatments for children around the world and continue to create new opportunities locally es of investment and employment.”

Parks Not Parking 901 released the following statement on the decision:

“Residents and supporters of Greenlaw/Uptown applaud yesterday’s decision by the Board of Adjustment to reject ALSAC/St. Jude’s proposed plan to build a 7-level parking lot on green space in our neighborhood. Thanks to this advice for listening to our concerns and setting high expectations for how organizations should engage with community stakeholders when developing large-scale plans that impact quality of life and means livelihood of thousands of people in the city every day. We also expect ALSAC/St. Jude to consider a more thoughtful approach to its growth that will improve both the campus and the surrounding communities.

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Parking spaces

Work begins to increase parking spaces at Radcliffe Metrolink station

Commuters at Radcliffe Metrolink station are warned that the car park is closed because

A new temporary car park has been opened nearby.

It comes as the car park at Whitefield Metrolink station reopens after creating an additional 120 spaces.

Radcliffe will be closed to users other than blue badge holders following the last tram departure yesterday and work to install a new car park, increasing capacity from 369 to 480 spaces, is expected to be completed by summer 2022.

The drop zone will remain open at Radcliffe and blue badge spaces will still be available at this facility during construction.

Other motorists will be redirected to the temporary 250-space site, already set up above the road and accessible via Spring Lane.

Chris Barnes, Projects Group Manager at Transport for Greater Manchester, said: “We are delighted to have completed the work required to provide 123 additional parking spaces at the Whitefield Metrolink stop. This additional capacity will allow more people to access the Metrolink network and use public transport as part of their overall journey.

“We are also very pleased to continue the ongoing Park & ​​Ride expansion work at the Radcliffe stop. The preparatory operations that we have undertaken so far have gone well and we now look forward to taking the work forward in earnest, after the closure of the main facility.

“We ask anyone wishing to park near the Radcliffe stop to proceed to the alternative site opposite the entrance to the existing Radcliffe Park & ​​Ride facility for the duration of the construction work.” For more information regarding the car park expansion works, please visit the TfGM website at: www.tfgm.com/mcip

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Clemson imposes new 15-minute parking spots downtown

By Greg Oliver

The newspaper

CLEMSON — Earlier this week, the city of Clemson reinstated all of its parking regulations that had been suspended for much of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Street parking, which had been extended from one hour to two hours, with all paid parking in garages free, is now limited to one hour, and those parking in city center car parks will be required to supply the meter .

A new parking sign in downtown Clemson tells visitors they can only stay 15 minutes.
EMILIE WILSON | THE NEWSPAPER

But the city also reminded residents to be on the lookout for new 15-minute street parking spots for anyone doing quick tasks, such as picking up orders. These spaces, all clearly marked with a sign in front of the space, were approved by Clemson City Council last year on the recommendation of the Economic Development Advisory Committee.

The resolution states that spaces will be permanently designated for 15-minute parking on a first-come, first-served basis 24 hours a day, with none to be used exclusively by a business or businesses or their suppliers, carriers, employees and / or customers. Rideshare drivers cannot perform pick-up and drop-off using the designated 15-minute parking spots or use the staging or waiting spaces.

The city’s community and economic development co-ordinator Lindsey Newton, who presented the resolution to council, said the spaces “give people access to downtown businesses, especially in a faster way.”

“Thanks to COVID, business models have fundamentally changed,” Newton said. “A year ago the curbside and curbside service – almost no one was offering it. I don’t think it was a problem a year and a half ago, but I don’t think it will change.

City Administrator Andy Blondeau said the city should probably consider hiring an additional parking attendant because of the change, as well as the new hotel being built downtown. Newton said the cost of an additional officer could come from revenue if metered parking spaces are placed downtown.

Newton said there are businesses along College Avenue and on Earle Street, North Clemson Avenue and Sloan Street “who want central space for their businesses.”

“They want it where their customers, their clients, their bosses, grab what they need and walk away,” she said.

Advice on new parking spaces

Councilor Catherine Watt said she felt the recommendation “is definitely reasonable”.

“I know older people who would love to have something downtown and don’t walk at the same pace as you or me, and they would definitely love to have those spaces,” Watt said.

Councilwoman Alesia Smith said adding 15-minute parking spaces “is a good idea.”

“It will help businesses and other members of our community who don’t have to drive around, look for parking and cause more traffic jams,” she said.

[email protected] | (864) 973-6687

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Improvements to government building ‘stone age’ parking lot get green light

January 9 – It’s been seven years since the Government Service Center parking garage was dubbed a ‘Stone Age’ structure, but in a few months, drivers will be able to use it 24/7 and pay in cash or by credit card.

During budget hearings in 2015, Commissioner Cindy Carpenter dubbed the five-story structure at the corner of Court Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard their “Stone Age” garage, but it still took several years for the wheels to turn to automate it. , in part because of the cost.

Now Carpenter is calling it their “new age” garage since she and her fellow Commissioners have given the green light to spend $ 200,000 to fully automate the garage which will be open 24/7 and drivers can use money or credit to pay. The project, which generates more income, is expected to be completed by the end of this quarter.

“I think the key to success is just to make it easy to use, if we achieve that goal we have done something very beneficial to the public…” said Carpenter. “I’m not as worried about the source of income as I want to make it convenient for the public as we were able to generate enough income to maintain this garage.”

The 600-space garage is currently cash-only, payable at the door. Proposals over the years to automate the garage, make it more user-friendly, and generate income through community events several years ago ranged from $ 100,000 to $ 400,000.

Chris Hacker, the county’s director of assets, purchasing and projects, said he didn’t need to bid on the project because the software system that operates the garage systems was already in place. The entrance and exits will look the same, except that there will no longer be a garage attendant to run the stand on Court Street.

There will be a payment kiosk that takes cash or credit in the lobby on the first floor of the garage and another inside the CGC near the covered passage that connects the two buildings on the second floor.

There are a number of different parking arrangements at the garage. People can pay $ 40 per month for a reserved spot, county jurisdiction jurors, law enforcement and firefighters and others park for free, then daily parking lots that pay a maximum of $ 6.50 . There will be an online payment option for monthly parking.

Hacker has said now that they can eliminate the separate daily rate and the monthly parking lanes that go down to the exit, they can add additional parking spaces along that ramp, which will improve the bottom line.

Previously, there were two part-time mechanics who collectively made $ 31,000. According to county administrator Judi Boyko, one has retired and the other has filled a vacant position in the county mail room.

The full-time parking attendant will always be there to “troubleshoot” and make sure everything is working properly.

The other commissioners said early on that the automation project must have a decent return on investment. Boyko said the county estimates “a five-year return on investment based on the cost of automation, increased revenue and reduced costs.” She said she expects earnings to increase by about 18 to 20 percent, or about $ 35,000 per year.

Entertainment and events have intensified dramatically in Hamilton since the county began discussing automation, such as the giant sports and convention site Spooky Nook which is under construction. Commissioner TC Rogers said having a fully automated garage will allow them to capitalize on all the activity.

“I think it’s a solid investment, especially with what’s going on in the city of Hamilton,” said Rogers. “Parking will be more important outside of office hours. “

Another sign of the times that makes automation a particularly interesting project is the severe labor shortage everyone faces due to the fallout from the pandemic, according to Commissioner Don Dixon. He said “it makes sense to take the one headache out” of finding people to work in the garage and the price was right.

Hacker said that once the automation project is completed, the “cash only” signs will drop and there will be a lot of signs to inform people about the new parking process.

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Parking garage

Opinion: It’s time for a downtown parking garage

ThisIt has been almost 10 years since the community expressed its disapproval of a parking garage at the entrance to the village and the council withdrew it from consideration. I was among the poo pooers. But oh what a difference a decade makes.

Riverside County, one of Laguna’s main food markets, has grown 10% over the past decade, adding around a quarter of a million people, according to U.S. census data. Orange County has grown 6% over the same period, adding an estimated 177,000 to its already bloated ranks of 3 million. This was during a period when 53% of all US counties were shrinking. Yeah theyare still coming, despite our taxes, the cost of living, homelessness, natural disasters and liberal tolerance for crime.

Additionally, we have now learned empirically that walking walks do improve the quality of our lives, with pleasant downtown streets for strolling, window shopping and al fresco dining. But we need to replace those 43 parking spaces lost in Forest, as well as the spaces displaced by adjacent parklets, and the nine spaces lost due to the $ 11 million village entrance beautification project. And we need the flexibility to eliminate additional parking if we decide to pedestrianize downtown more in the future.

Additionally, the new downtown-specific plan has reduced the amount of on-site parking that merchants need to obtain clearance, meaning its now more necessary than ever to provide replacement parking. One person who opposed the DSP and expressed disapproval of the Coastal Commission was Council member George Weiss. He said that despite advances in alternative transport, cars were there for the foreseeable future and therefore parking needed to be provided. Well, since Coastal approved the DSP, here isThis is your chance, George.

Right herewhat’s thishas also changed. We now have a better design that incorporates and reuses the historic and temperamental building of the digester. Artist and town planning commissioner Jorg Dubin put his volunteer creativity to work and designed a modest and tasteful three-story rendering of a Spanish Mission garage that uses the digester as a staircase and elevator. The garage is on the right and is thus set back discreetly into the side of the hill, and is below our height limit of 36 feet.

But it doesn’tt must be a single-use building, first of all because we have a mandate from the State for more affordable housing. And also because we have failed to provide our talented young athletes with a safe place to skate, despite the fact that we are home to world class skaters, including world number one Nyjah Huston. This structure could be multifunctional – a skateboard park on the top floor – which could be converted into a parking lot during the summer if required. And if we used the ground floor for affordable housing, we’d have a four-way win, or whatis known in the permaculture world as stacked use. A historic drug rehab, skate park, affordable housing and a parking facility. This funding could be obtained from a variety of sources, including state housing subsidies. And whatever the cost, it will eventually be recovered through parking fees and / or rents.

The reason this location makes so much sense is that cars entering through Laguna Canyon Road would never have to drive through our downtown streets looking for parking. Yet hes within walking distance of everything unlike Act V. And imagine how nice and quaint it would be to one day have a slow cart from the garage to the beach, right in the middle of Ocean Avenue, and travel around the other way around to the Sawdust Festival — a connecting line from our arts district to the beach. But I digress. For now letThis makes it our transportation hub, where buses, trolleys and even an e-bike rental kiosk could be cited, making it easy and appealing to ditch the car and get around town effortlessly.

What made other walks such as Pearl Street in Boulder and Third Street in Santa Monica so successful was the addition of parking lots on the outskirts. The Promenade is just one piece of the puzzle to make our downtown area less congested and more community-focused. To anticipate the continued increase in population and popularity of Laguna, we still need more multimodal transport options and safe cycling infrastructure. We still need to bury power lines on Laguna Canyon Road and a dedicated bicycle and transit lane. We still need parking in the north and south of the Laguna, so that arriving tourists can park and ride. This will make Laguna a model city of the future, relieving us of the burden of fossil fuels while making our commute less stressful for us residents. This will dramatically improve the quality of life for generations to come, and achieve an equally important goal for most of you – increasing the value of your home. If not us, who? If not now when?

Mayor Sue Kempf and Mayor Pro Tem Bob Whalen lead the Senior Parking Subcommittee, which is responsible for developing a parking master plan for the city. If you agree with a downtown parking garage, be sure to express your support.

Billy hosts Laguna Talks Thursday nights on KXFM radio. Hes also the CEO of La Vida Laguna, an e-bike and ocean sports tourism company. E-mail: [email protected]

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More than 60 additional parking spaces arrive at the TPP in time for Christmas

Vance Lewis

Management at the Cyril B. Romney Tortola Pier Park (TPP) is creating an additional 60 parking spaces to accommodate more visitors to the multimillion-dollar facility as the holiday season and cruise ship arrivals gear up.

According to TPP CEO Vance Lewis there have been complaints over the years about the lack of adequate parking spaces at the pier park and he and his team have sought to address this issue with the new car park which is expected to be ready soon.

“You know, because Christmas is coming up, we’re kicking things into high gear. We’re in the process of making sure we have improved parking. Improved parking means we have additional parking options. One of the perennial complaints that we had in the pier park is that parking is limited so just at the entrance there is a space which is cleared, rolled and paved and it is going to be marked to provide some 60 additional parking spaces” , Lewis said.

“Then we will open the gate to allow people to enter the park directly from the pier. Thus, you will be literally a stone’s throw from the park of the pier. This is in addition to the parking we currently have at the facilities,” added the CEO.

Lewis noted that the holiday season, which includes TPP’s annual three-day Christmas event, means there will be a greater influx of patrons into the park. He said that means more and safer parking lots are needed to make park users feel comfortable while they shop and have fun.

The CEO added that the reopening of the cruise ship has also led to increased activity in the pier park, which also requires additional parking spaces for taxi operators; therefore the area is being prepared in time for Christmas.

Lewis hopes the parking lot will be ready for vehicles next week as the postponed three-day Christmas celebration kicks off on Tuesday.

The event, which was to take place from Thursday December 16 to Saturday December 18, has been postponed due to bad weather.

However, according to management, everything should go as planned on December 21.

Copyright 2022 BVI News, Media Expressions Limited. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or distributed.

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Parking garage

Amherst council assaulted as parking garage moves forward

AMHERST – A series of zoning changes, including one that could provide the opportunity for a private developer to build the second parking garage in downtown Amherst, continues to move forward.

Despite numerous oral and written calls for city council to stop the rezoning process – one resident comparing the scheduling of many public meetings during the holiday season to Chicago-style politics ‘shenanigans’ – councilors held the premieres readings on zoning changes Monday.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said when voters adopted the city’s new charter in 2018, they wanted full-time, year-round government. The council, Griesemer said, has an obligation to put each of the zoning changes to positive or negative votes, and not wait for the new council to sit in January.

During the public comment period, which lasted approximately 90 minutes, many residents of the North Prospect Street neighborhood objected to a proposed overlay neighborhood for the construction of a parking lot in the parking lot between North Pleasant and North Pleasant Streets. North Prospect, adjacent to the private CVS Pharmacy lot.

Critics have argued that the rezoning is sponsored by District 3 Councilor George Ryan and District 4 Councilor Evan Ross, whose terms will end in January after being defeated in nominations for re-election. Councilors put forward the idea of ​​a second garage to join the Boltwood parking garage as part of a Destination Amherst plan in coordination with the Amherst Business Improvement District and the Area Chamber of Commerce. ‘Amherst.

Griesemer said there was no evidence the community was against the parking lot.

“The argument that people have spoken needs further consideration,” said Griesemer, observing that Ross and Ryan were only 50 votes combined to win a second term.

The parking facility overlay district would not change the underlying general zoning district from the residence to the business headquarters, but would establish specific guidelines for the use of the site only for a parking garage. Other zoning changes under discussion include extending alfresco dining and other pandemic-related initiatives until 2022, lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space, and lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space and have specific parking requirements for all dwellings.

Senior planner Nathaniel Malloy said that with the parking lot rezoning, a 270-space garage could fit on the site and be similar in size to the one in downtown Greenfield.

General Councilor Andy Steinberg said the rezoning was only to allow the site to be used for a garage. Steinberg said if other sites for a garage were looked at it would be the responsibility of a future council.

Centralizing parking is a concept supported by At Large Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke, who said she wants protections for the city and neighborhoods as well. These could be subject to conditions in the call for tenders for the new car park.

District 4 Councilor Steve Schreiber said a well-designed parking garage could be nicer than a deteriorating paved lot.

But District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam said she would never accept a parking garage built in front of 19th-century homes.

“There is no way to make a parking structure compatible with a historic district,” Pam said, adding that she saw a flawed process. “It’s ruinous for the adjacent residential neighborhood.”

District 1 Councilor Sarah Swartz said councilors must listen to neighbors and moving parking near homes is hypocritical action after councilors voted to eliminate parking in front of town hall as part of the move. the restoration of North Common.

Many who spoke criticized the council for pursuing zoning changes after the election. Barbara Pearson of Paige Street said the busy schedule of meetings reminded her of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s boss-style Chicago politics. “I can’t think of a good reason why this is happening,” Pearson said.

“It doesn’t have to be,” said Rani Parker of 24 North Prospect, who requested a community impact assessment before the zoning change.

Harry Peltz of 32 North Prospect called the zoning changes “hasty judgment” and said too little research was being done. Likewise, Suzannah Muspratt of 38 North Prospect said the board is shortening normal procedures. and Jay Silverstein of 32 North Prospect said the residents were “cheated”.

Ira Bryck of Strong Street said council is making zoning changes without transparency and should take a break until new councilors are sworn in. He was joined by Ken Rosenthal of Sunset Avenue, who said any action should be delayed until January.

Defenders of the parking lot, including Sharon Povinelli, a North Amherst resident who co-owns AJ Hastings, called on councilors to act. “Businesses need destination parking,” Povinelli said.

BID Executive Director Gabrielle Gould said the zoning change was meant to look to the future and more parking could lead to the success of restaurants, performing arts venues, including the relaunched future Drake. and an expanded Jones library.

At Large Councilor Alisa Brewer said one of the lingering questions was whether the Boltwood Parking Garage, opened in September 2002 with a surface level and a basement level, could easily have additional parking floors . It is understood that the garage was built in such a way that it could accommodate such an extension. Planning director Christine Brestrup said the city would likely need to hire a structural engineer to determine the feasibility of adding floors.

Brewer also noted that the idea of ​​building a parking lot in the Amity Street parking lot across from the Jones Library, where the Amherst Academy once stood, is often mentioned. Brewer said it is possible that the deed restrictions prohibit building a garage there. The poet Emily Dickinson and the founder of Mount Holyoke College, Mary Lyon, were both taught at this school.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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Parking garage

Amherst council assaulted as parking lot moves forward

AMHERST – A series of zoning changes, including one that could provide the opportunity for a private developer to build the second parking garage in downtown Amherst, continues to move forward.

Despite numerous oral and written calls for city council to stop the rezoning process – one resident comparing the scheduling of many public meetings during the holiday season to Chicago-style politics ‘shenanigans’ – councilors held the premieres readings on zoning changes Monday.

Council President Lynn Griesemer said when voters adopted the city’s new charter in 2018, they wanted full-time, year-round government. The council, Griesemer said, has an obligation to put each of the zoning changes to positive or negative votes, and not wait for the new council to sit in January.

During the public comment period, which lasted approximately 90 minutes, many residents of the North Prospect Street neighborhood objected to a proposed overlay neighborhood for the construction of a parking lot in the parking lot between North Pleasant and North Pleasant Streets. North Prospect, adjacent to the private CVS Pharmacy lot.

Critics have argued that the rezoning is sponsored by District 3 Councilor George Ryan and District 4 Councilor Evan Ross, whose terms will end in January after being defeated in nominations for re-election. Councilors put forward the idea of ​​a second garage to join the Boltwood parking garage as part of a Destination Amherst plan in coordination with the Amherst Business Improvement District and the Area Chamber of Commerce. ‘Amherst.

Griesemer said there was no evidence the community was against the parking lot.

“The argument that people have spoken needs further consideration,” said Griesemer, observing that Ross and Ryan were only 50 votes combined to win a second term.

The parking facility overlay district would not change the underlying general zoning district from the residence to the business headquarters, but would establish specific guidelines for the use of the site only for a parking garage. Other zoning changes under discussion include extending alfresco dining and other pandemic-related initiatives until 2022, lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space, and lowering the threshold in mixed-use buildings to 30% commercial space and have specific parking requirements for all dwellings.

Senior planner Nathaniel Malloy said that with the parking lot rezoning, a 270-space garage could fit on the site and be similar in size to the one in downtown Greenfield.

General Councilor Andy Steinberg said the rezoning was only to allow the site to be used for a garage. Steinberg said if other sites for a garage were looked at it would be the responsibility of a future council.

Centralizing parking is a concept supported by At Large Councilor Mandi Jo Hanneke, who said she wants protections for the city and neighborhoods as well. These could be subject to conditions in the call for tenders for the new car park.

District 4 Councilor Steve Schreiber said a well-designed parking garage could be nicer than a deteriorating paved lot.

But District 3 Councilor Dorothy Pam said she would never accept a parking garage built in front of 19th-century homes.

“There is no way to make a parking structure compatible with a historic district,” Pam said, adding that she saw a flawed process. “It’s ruinous for the adjacent residential neighborhood.”

District 1 Councilor Sarah Swartz said councilors must listen to neighbors and moving parking near homes is hypocritical action after councilors voted to eliminate parking in front of town hall as part of the move. the restoration of North Common.

Many who spoke criticized the council for pursuing zoning changes after the election. Barbara Pearson of Paige Street said the busy schedule of meetings reminded her of Mayor Richard J. Daley’s boss-style Chicago politics. “I can’t think of a good reason why this is happening,” Pearson said.

“It doesn’t have to be,” said Rani Parker of 24 North Prospect, who requested a community impact assessment before the zoning change.

Harry Peltz of 32 North Prospect called the zoning changes “hasty judgment” and said too little research was being done. Likewise, Suzannah Muspratt of 38 North Prospect said the board is shortening normal procedures. and Jay Silverstein of 32 North Prospect said the residents were “cheated”.

Ira Bryck of Strong Street said council is making zoning changes without transparency and should take a break until new councilors are sworn in. He was joined by Ken Rosenthal of Sunset Avenue, who said any action should be delayed until January.

Defenders of the parking lot, including Sharon Povinelli, a North Amherst resident who co-owns AJ Hastings, called on councilors to act. “Businesses need destination parking,” Povinelli said.

BID Executive Director Gabrielle Gould said the zoning change was meant to look to the future and more parking could lead to the success of restaurants, performing arts venues, including the relaunched future Drake. and an expanded Jones library.

At Large Councilor Alisa Brewer said one of the lingering questions was whether the Boltwood Parking Garage, opened in September 2002 with a surface level and a basement level, could easily have additional parking floors . It is understood that the garage was built in such a way that it could accommodate such an extension. Planning director Christine Brestrup said the city would likely need to hire a structural engineer to determine the feasibility of adding floors.

Brewer also noted that the idea of ​​building a parking lot in the Amity Street parking lot across from the Jones Library, where the Amherst Academy once stood, is often mentioned. Brewer said it is possible that the deed restrictions prohibit building a garage there. The poet Emily Dickinson and the founder of Mount Holyoke College, Mary Lyon, were both taught at this school.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at [email protected]

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Low bid for new downtown Wheeling parking garage is $ 12.3 million | News, Sports, Jobs

This artist’s concept drawing by the Mills Group shows the planned design of the new City of Wheeling parking lot to be built at the corner of 11th and Market streets in the downtown area. (Image provided)

WHEELING – Bids to build the proposed parking structure on Market Street have been received, and Wheeling City Council members are due to meet today to consider a first reading of an order to award to the lowest bidder saying a contract of nearly $ 12.3 million.

A special council meeting was scheduled to take place today at noon in the council chamber of the City-County building for the sole purpose of discussing the new legislation and holding a first reading of the new ordinance. The legislation allows City Manager Robert Herron to spend $ 12,297,777 with Carl Walker Construction of Pittsburgh on the construction of the new Market Street parking garage on the corner of 11th Street in downtown.

A second reading and final approval of the ordinance is expected to take place at the next regular Wheeling City Council meeting on December 7.

On Monday, Herron said the special meeting was being held because timing is crucial in controlling the costs of large projects like this.

“Due to the current construction market and the potential for price changes, we have a 30-day suspension on bids, so the special meeting for the first reading,” Herron said.

In order to generate funds for the project, the city recently approved legislation allowing the issuance of rental income bonds through the newly activated Wheeling Municipal Building Commission. Project bonds are expected to close on Dec. 16, according to the city manager.

Herron described Carl Walker Construction as a highly regarded contractor who submitted the lowest bid among the four companies that submitted bids for the project. Other offers included an offer of $ 16,730,000 from Thomarios, a contractor with offices in Pittsburgh, Pa., And Akron, Ohio; an offer of $ 15,284,000 from Cps Construction Group of Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania; and an offer of $ 17,173,000 from Colaianni Construction of Dillonvale.

“The lowest bidder is an experienced parking structure contractor, and the supply is very good – very close to where we thought it would start out,” Herron said. “The architect’s estimate and our budget for the tenders was $ 13,023,000. “

There are additional costs associated with the construction, the city manager explained. Materials testing costs during construction are estimated at an additional $ 45,000, and garage access and traffic control are expected to cost an additional $ 250,000, he said. This still brings the total construction costs to $ 12,592,000, which is in the original budget.

During recent council meetings, city leaders had received criticism from the public over the escalating costs of the project, which is being completed to facilitate a $ 30 million private investment in the former headquarters. of Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel. The vacant 12-story structure is being converted into an apartment complex that will be known as Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts, a project by owner Access Infrastructure LLC of Dr John Johnson and developer Steve Coon of Coon Restoration and Sealants.

The six-story parking garage will provide necessary parking for tenants in the 120-apartment complex, and it will provide additional parking for other downtown businesses. The ground floor of the parking garage is expected to have retail units that should eventually be filled with businesses that support the additional influx of downtown residents.

Officials have touted the developers’ claim that there is a great need for new residential options in downtown Wheeling.

Initial projections for the overall cost of the Market Street parking structure ranged from $ 13 million to around $ 17 million, as concerns about construction costs during the supply chain crisis and geotechnical issues on the site have resulted in escalating cost projections.

In addition to construction costs, the City authorized an expenditure of $ 194,800 to hire the Mills Group to perform architectural services for the design of the parking structure. The city has also authorized the expenditure of $ 475,000 with Raze International of Shadyside for the asbestos removal and demolition of the vacant Chase Bank building on Market Street, where part of the new parking structure will be installed.

“Asbestos removal is complete and demolition is imminent,” Herron said Monday, noting that a follow-up meeting with Raze officials had been scheduled this afternoon. “Construction of the parking structure, if approved by city council, should start right after the first of the year. “

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Hesperia Park & ​​Ride adds 200 parking spaces – VVNG.com

HESPERIA, CA (VVNG.com) — The Park & ​​Ride located at the southwest corner of US Highway 395 and Joshua Street in Hesperia will soon have additional parking spaces.

Rachel Molina, deputy city manager of Hesperia, told VVNG that the city is expanding by adding 200 more spaces.

Molina said they expect the project to be completed by the end of January 2022.

According to the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, Park & ​​Ride lots provide parking spaces for commuters to park and meet their rideshare or vanpool, or for commuters making transit connections. San Bernardino County Park & ​​Ride lots are free and do not require a permit.

Park & ​​Ride car parks are restricted to daytime use only, overnight parking is not permitted unless carpools are parked in designated carpool overnight parking spaces.

Click on HERE to view the full list of Park & ​​Riee locations.

(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)
hesperia park and ride on joshua street in hesperia
(Hugo C. Valdez, VVNG.com)

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Leighton Hospital plans 312 more parking spaces as part of massive redevelopment

Plans have been submitted which could see an additional 312 parking spaces at a hospital in Cheshire.

Mid-Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has applied to Cheshire East Council to provide additional parking at Leighton Hospital in Crewe.

If plans are approved by council, the car park will include ‘disabled parking spaces’ and electric vehicle charging spaces, as well as additional parking for staff.

Find out more about the best stories from all over Cheshire here.

In September 2021, Leighton Hospital unveiled ambitious plans for a £663m redevelopment as it prepared to bid for government funding.

Now plans for additional parking have been submitted as part of the ‘upgrading’ of the hospital site and aim to ensure appointments do not impact the surrounding area by ‘moving parking away from the site’ .

The proposed car park includes “mainly” staff parking, but will include spaces dedicated to the disabled and areas for electric charging stations (ECP).

In the design and access statement, it is stated that the ECP spaces will be separated from the main car park while the disabled car park will be located close to the hospital to provide easy access to the main entrance.

Of the figure of 312 additional parking spaces, 20 will be parking spaces for people with reduced mobility and 12 will be charging spaces for electric vehicles.

In the design and access statement, the NHS Trust said: “The design confidently meets the requirement to provide additional parking on the site which was historically nursing accommodation, to ensure that with planned improvements to the hospital, some of which are nearing the end of their useful life, the applicant can continue to deal with on-site parking while this occurs, ensuring there is minimal impact , or even zero, on the surrounding areas.

“The program is also expanding and providing better access to disabled spaces, as well as the introduction of electric vehicle charging stations.

“Additional landscaping to the proposals will enhance the nature/appearance of the parking areas.”



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The proposed car park is already based on the existing site where a former nurses accommodation is currently being demolished.

As a result, the plans indicate that the development of the car park will be “staggered” to allow the safe demolition of the existing buildings and that the parking will not be compromised for the duration of this work.

In the design and access statement, the objectives of the car park are defined and read as follows: “The proposed car park will not only add additional parking for staff, but will improve parking facilities for the disabled and add new spaces for electric charging stations, for ever more popular electric cars.

“The proposal will form part of a wider review of traffic management, within the site.”

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Brighton and Hove News »New apartments will need 54 additional parking spaces, developer says

Plans to build dozens of apartments in Brighton will require 54 additional parking spaces, according to the developer.

Hove Spurpoint Ltd has already obtained approval to construct two additional floors on each of the four blocks of Kingsmere, London Road, Brighton.

The additional floors will add 54 apartments to the 120 existing apartments on the estate.

Spurpoint now wants to add additional parking to meet demand from those moving into the new apartments.

Permission has already been granted for 18 additional parking spaces, but a subsequent request for 36 parking spaces was withdrawn after comments from a Brighton and Hove City Council official.

More than 50 neighbors also opposed the parking proposals, prompting Spurpoint to return to the drawing board.

Spurpoint said: “The Planning Officer has raised concerns about the loss of grassed areas to parking… any new parking provided must not come at the expense of open space at Kingsmere.

“Concerns were also raised about… the proximity of the proposed parking spaces to the windows and the negative impact on residents in terms of noise, smoke and light.

“The public comments highlighted objections and concerns about

  • additional traffic
  • negative effects on the (neighboring) conservation area
  • overdevelopment, poor design, detrimental effect on property value
  • impact on residential amenity, including noise and restriction of view
  • impact on trees and loss of green spaces

“In light of the comments received, the application has been withdrawn.

“In response to the comments received, the current revised application details an alternate parking arrangement and is accompanied by parking survey information, a parking management plan and revised landscaping details. “

The latest planning request indicates that the estate currently has 81 parking spaces and 64 garages, although it is not clear how many garages have been used for parking.

The 54 spaces in demand include the 18 that already have a building permit – and four dedicated parking spaces for electric cars with charging points.

The proposal would include the felling of half a dozen trees and a shrub, including a yew, oak, holly, laburnum and a few wart birches.

But new trees could be planted, alongside efforts to encourage Kingsmere residents to use Brighton Bike Share bikes and car club vehicles. The nearest car club bay is approximately 500 meters away.

Spurpoint said: “Bicycle shops are available on site. The existing unit includes 28 Sheffield booths and wall docks.

“Most recently (the council) approved an additional bicycle shop to supply 28 Sheffield stands.”

The site is next to the Sainte-Bernadette Catholic Elementary School which has over 200 students and is highly rated by the official Ofsted watchdog.

Residents have already started to oppose the latest proposal, with one saying, “I strongly oppose this proposal. As a resident of this area the last thing we need is more parking.

“Traffic can already be heavy here due to deliveries and parents of students using the area as a parking lot.

“In addition, we have few green spaces and removing the largest to accommodate concrete makes no sense when it comes to preserving green spaces.

“In addition, apartments which will now have parking spaces right in front of their apartment windows will suffer more from noise and pollution. “

And a neighbor wrote: “I wish to oppose these draft plans. It would be unfair to remove the green space on the estate to make room for other parking spaces.

“There would be pollution and noise from the additional vehicles, and residents would be affected whose apartments would face these parking spaces.

“The estate is not large enough to accommodate these additional parking spaces.”

Spurpoint, of Palmeira Mansions, Church Road, Hove, was founded in 1979 and is run by David Stoner, 82, and Annabel Stoner, 56.

The company is owned by Anstone Securites, which is registered in Jersey, and is reportedly owned by the Stoner family.

To learn more about the scheduling app or to comment, visit the council website and search for BH2021 / 03706.

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Wheeling City Council plans to fund Market Street parking garage | News, Sports, Jobs

This artist’s concept drawing by the Mills Group shows the planned design for the new City of Wheeling parking garage to be built at the corner of 11th and Market streets downtown. (Picture provided)

WHEELING — City of Wheeling officials are moving forward with legislation to put in place funding for the construction of the planned Market Street parking garage.

This week, members of the Wheeling City Council are due to hear a first reading of an ordinance to fund the cost of the new parking lot at Market and 11th streets through the issuance of rental income bonds from an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $19.5 million.

City Manager Robert Herron noted that the ordinance wording for the bonds includes a maximum funding amount relative to the projected cost of the project, which city officials say will likely cost between $16 million and $17 million. dollars.

The new parking structure is being built to accommodate a private investment from Access Infrastructure to create a new apartment complex inside the city’s tallest building, the former headquarters of Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel on Market Street. This private investment is expected to exceed $30 million, and city leaders plan to support retail businesses once tenants begin to fill Wheeling-Pitt’s historic lofts.

A portion of the new parking structure will be dedicated to tenants of the new loft apartment complex, while additional parking will be available within the six-story structure for visitors to downtown Wheeling. Street-level retail spaces have been incorporated into the design of the city’s new parking structure.

The new ordinance to establish funding for the parking structure also provides for the property at 1104 and 1114 Market Street to be transferred from the Ohio Valley Area Development Corporation – the nonprofit entity used by the city to facilitate real estate transactions – to the Wheeling Municipal Building Commission – the newly invigorated committee that is responsible for directing major building projects for the city.

A first reading of the new ordinance is expected to take place at Tuesday evening’s council meeting, with a second and final reading of the legislation scheduled for the November 2 council meeting.

Before construction of the new parking structure could begin, the vacant Chase Bank building on Market Street would have to be demolished and removed. Shadyside’s Raze International has been awarded a $475,000 contract to tear down the building where the new parking lot will be. Officials said asbestos removal was being completed at the site and the building was due to be razed before the end of the year.

During the last meeting of the municipal council, a citizen spoke out against the involvement of the City in the construction of a new parking lot for private development. Wheeling resident Julia Chaplin asked why Coon Restoration and Sealants – the developer of the Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts project by Dr. John Johnson and Access Infrastructure – did not pay for the parking needed by their tenants.

“Why didn’t they include in their proposal to build the installation plans for a garage?” Chaplin asked city leaders. “Basically, we’re as a city paying for its garage that won’t be self-funding, as the mayor said. As taxpayers, we subsidize this development corporation.

Another ordinance involving tax liabilities for a city-owned parking lot is also expected to be introduced on Tuesday. The legislation – described in legal language very similar to the Market Street Parking Garage Project Ordinance – provides for the issuance of rental income bonds in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $3 million for the Center Wheeling parking garage project.

On Friday, Herron explained that planned improvements to Center Wheeling’s parking structure had been underway for some time, and when the Ohio Valley Medical Center was operating, the tax increment funding district around the property generated a potential pool over $4. million for investment. However, after OVMC ownership changed hands from Alecto to MPT and eventually to the City of Wheeling, the TIF District stopped generating the revenue that would be needed to repay the money if it was used for improvements to the car park.

The TIF district is still in place at the OVMC site, and if the buildings are sold to a private developer, additional funding would again be generated, the city manager said.

City leaders continue to seek potential tenants and buyers for vacant buildings on the OVMC campus. A tenant who had maintained occupancy after the city acquired the property last year recently moved out, Herron noted. This summer, Northwood Health Systems opened its new, state-of-the-art, 28,000 square foot behavioral health clinic adjacent to the company’s administrative offices at the corner of 19th and Wood streets. Herron reported earlier this month that Northwood had officially moved out of the space he used at OVMC after moving into his newly built facility.

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Restaurant St. Pete nixes in the parking spaces

ST. PETERSBURG – The Town of St. Pete will no longer allow restaurants to keep tables in parking spaces, effective October 18.


What would you like to know

  • Companies were told last week that the program would end in mid-October
  • Bandit Coffee on Central Avenue launched a changer.org petition in order to get the city to reconsider.
  • The city is considering a long-term solution, but it would not include the concrete barriers
  • More Pinellas County Titles

According to Ben Kirby, a city spokesperson, the concrete barriers marked “Restart St. Pete” will be removed later this month. These barriers were placed in front of nearly two dozen restaurants last year to allow more outdoor seating amid the pandemic.

Businesses were told last week that the program would end in mid-October and that they would have to withdraw their tables.

The city sent surveys to 914 downtown business owners in July asking for their opinions at the tables across the street. They received 18 responses and Kirby said 61% of those businesses were not happy with the tables that cut off the parking lot.

Bandit Coffee on Central Avenue launched a changer.org petition in order to get the city to reconsider. The top of their petition states that “The city has not asked or interviewed small businesses or citizens for comment regarding this measure. This is our chance to let them know how we feel.

The owner of The Lure, also located on Central Avenue, said the city had not asked them for their opinion either. Or if they did, they never saw the email or the notice.

“Just having fewer seats for people will definitely hurt our business a bit. I mean I enjoyed what we have here, ”said owner Tom Golden.

Kirby said the city is considering a long-term solution, but that it will not include the concrete barriers.

“We are currently working on a long-term, permanent program proposal, which will involve establishing minimum design standards, annual license fees and location criteria,” he wrote in an email to Spectrum Bay News 9.

It’s something Golden says he would definitely consider, and he understands why some companies want to reclaim additional parking.

“There is always the flip side in every situation and there is one in this one,” he said.

Tables are still permitted on the sidewalk in various areas of the city center.

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Bloomington’s new parking lot will soon feature artwork and solar panels

The opening of the new Fourth Street parking lot last month eased some space constraints and made life a little easier for downtown employees and customers, according to business groups.

Downtown businesses are emerging from a pandemic-induced malaise, and not having to worry about lack of parking is some relief.

“Parking in general is a part of the daily lives of many downtown employees, businesses and customers,” said Talisha Coppock, executive director of Downtown Bloomington Inc., a non-profit organization.

Bloomington City Council:“A la carte” garbage collection, higher parking fees?

The economic recovery remains fragile, she said, and some customers are still reluctant to join crowded indoor spaces, so not having to worry about parking takes some of the stress away.

Erin Predmore, president and CEO of the Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce, agrees.

“It’s great to have additional parking,” she said.

With the return of students and events like this weekend’s Lotus World Music & Arts Festival, downtown merchants are happy that parking constraints have been reduced, Predmore said.

While the garage receives customers on an hourly basis, she said the spaces primarily help employers who struggle to find adequate, nearby and secure parking for their employees.

Following:How many students have been exempted from IU’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate?

Outside the rented spaces, parking in the garage is supposed to cost 50 cents an hour. But some of the garage’s electronic equipment malfunctioned last week, forcing city officials to allow people to park in the garage for free.

However, Bloomington Public Works Director Adam Wason said a spare should be installed this week, starting on Tuesday.

The garage entrance is on West Fourth Street, between South Walnut Street and South College Avenue.

About 100 of the nearly 540 spaces will be dedicated to hourly parking, while the rest will be rented to downtown employers. There are few places left to rent, Wason said. Some of the rented spaces are booked 24/7, while others are rented 12 hours a day Monday through Friday, opening them up to hourly use at night and on weekends.

He also said the city still needs to complete additional landscaping, artwork that will be incorporated into the facade of the building and a sign indicating whether the garage is full.

Wason said when city officials opened the garage in August, they knew more work needed to take place and they expected to have to fix some issues. Nonetheless, they wanted the structure open to provide additional parking when students arrive for the Indiana University fall semester.

Observation of the Bloomington monkey:Couple catches animal on video near local hotel

Commercial offices and retail space on the garage’s ground floor are currently unoccupied and no lease has been signed, Wason said.

According to a brochure from Cockerham Commercial Real Estate & Consulting, the garage offers four 1,800 square foot spaces, which can be combined. Wason said the spaces could accommodate businesses such as restaurants, retailers or a coffee shop.

Wason also said he expects solar panels to be installed within the next month. City officials are hoping the panels will generate enough electricity to run the garage and businesses, but Wason said that depends a bit on the type of businesses that will occupy the space.

Although the garage has not yet been fully occupied, Wason said he has seen an increase in traffic, and he expects this trend to continue, especially as the nation emerges fully from the pandemic and people come to the city center more often to work, shop, dine or attend events.

The garage replaced a smaller one that the city had originally planned to rehabilitate but then demolished.

In February 2019, a report on additional structural inspections revealed significant deterioration. The council has issued a bond of $ 18.5 million for a new garage. Including interest, the total cost of the garage is expected to increase by almost $ 30 million. The deposit is to be paid through parking fees and income from financing tax increases.

After the city closed the old garage, downtown traders said they saw less foot traffic, though some council members at the time were also concerned about subsidizing parking at a time when the car traffic should be reduced to help combat climate change.

The discussion has erupted again during recent budget discussions, with some council members suggesting that the price of parking in garages, lots and streets should be adjusted in part depending on the popularity of parking spaces.

Boris Ladwig is the municipal government reporter for the Herald-Times. Contact him at [email protected]

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LCC rents 387 on-street parking spaces to the city

LANSING, Michigan – Lansing Community College recently purchased 387 additional street parking spaces in the town of Lansing. The cost of these additional spaces, reserved for LCC students, faculty and staff, was $ 400,000.

The college lost 1,000 parking spaces earlier this year when it demolished the Gannon parking ramp on its downtown campus.

To compensate for this lack of parking, the college spent $ 400,000 on 387 parking spaces on city streets for the following year.

Marguerite Cahill

On-street parking reserved for Lansing Community College

The college is replacing the Gannon Ramp with a five-storey, 1,800-storey structure, slated to open in September 2022.

But in the meantime, even after renting the additional parking on the city street, LCC is still short by 793 spaces compared to what it was previously able to offer students.

Parking lot on Capitol Ave owned by LCC

Marguerite Cahill

Parking lot on Capitol Ave owned by LCC

However, Chris MacKersie, executive director of administrative services at LCC, said parking is not an issue.

“With the combination of COVID and online courses, we are currently in a good position with the parking lot we have in the city,” Mackersie said. “But we would like to have a parking problem, though. The more students the better on campus.

MacKersie said the street parking deal with the city will run until August 2022.

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Joshua Tree National Park Offers New Entrance, More Parking Spaces – Daily Bulletin

Overwhelming attendance at Joshua Tree National Park resulting from a desire for outdoor recreation due to the coronavirus pandemic is causing vehicle backups of several miles at the entrance and a parking crisis for visitors trying to ride. hiking, camping and rock climbing in the desert park.

The park offers two major projects as possible solutions to the long queues and the lack of parking spaces inside the park. But the projects are large and are in their early stages, requiring environmental reviews and public comment before they can move forward.

Cars line up at the western entrance to Joshua Tree National Park in this file photo from May 9, 2015. The long lines of cars have worsened over the years. The National Park Service proposed a new west entrance pay station that would have a longer route and more pay kiosks to better handle increased visitor traffic. (Photo courtesy of Joshua Tree National Park)

First, the National Park Service proposes to demolish the existing west entrance pay station just inside the park boundaries on Park Boulevard and build a new one that would be placed half a mile further into the park to extend the entry route.

In addition, the project would increase the number of fee collection kiosks from one to four and add three inbound traffic lanes. The four new kiosks would be located two per island and would connect to the walkways and shade structures covering the pay kiosks. The project would also add a sanitary block for staff and a nine-space parking lot for staff.

The new entrance station would be powered by a solar panel with battery storage and would include a satellite for data communication. Architecturally, it would be compatible with mid-century buildings, according to the National Park Service project site.

“We have a long-standing problem of severe traffic slowdowns that literally block driveways and homes,” said Jennie Albrinck, spokesperson for the park. “With a new gatehouse, we can improve the staff to allow the public to pass more quickly and eliminate the traffic jams that sometimes extend 2 or 3 miles down the road. “

Construction could begin next summer, she said. The project is expected to last between eight months and a year. AT comment on a developing EA, go to https://parkplanning.nps.gov/West_Entrance. The comment period began August 18 and ends September 17 at midnight.

In this file photo, a U.S. ranger climbs back into his vehicle after opening a side road in Joshua Tree National Park on Thursday, January 10, 2019 (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin / SCNG).

The second project involves converting two land islets of approximately 11,000 square feet within the Barker Dam parking area. The project would add 40 parking spaces. This would involve clearing vegetation, including the removal of 13 Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), which would be replanted somewhere in the park, Albrinck said.

“They will receive the highest level of treatment” and will be under the care of a biologist, she said.

The park accommodates an average of around 4,000 vehicles per day and has 1,500 parking spaces. Lately, motorists have parked vehicles on the shoulders of the road, sometimes passing over sensitive desert habitat, she said. Additional parking spaces would help but not necessarily solve the overall parking deficit.

Barker Dam is a popular use area with several starting points. “The idea is to have more parking spaces in high-traffic areas,” she explained. To find out more and leave a comment, visit: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/barker_dam_parking_expansion. The deadline for comments is September 17th.

The cost of the projects has yet to be determined, Albrinck said. No timetable was available for the expansion of the Barker Dam car park.

Funding for both projects would come from the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, which is partially funded by visitor fees, Albrinck said.

The park receives around 3 million visitors a year, she said. The vehicle charge is $ 30 and is valid for up to seven days. Fees for walking or cycling cost $ 15. An annual pass to Joshua Tree National Park costs $ 55. The park is open but a face covering is required to enter inside any building, including the visitor center.

Joshua Tree National Park straddles the Mojave and Colorado Deserts about 130 miles east of Los Angeles and is known for its rock formations, pristine desert landscapes, and the spiky Dr. Seuss trees from which the park derives its name.

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Condo Smarts: parking spaces in the common property cannot be purchased by owners

Dear Tony: Our Condominium Board Chairman recently posted a notice in our building that there are 10 additional parking spaces available for sale at the Condominium Corporation’s rate of $15,000.


Dear Tony: Our Condominium Board Chairman recently posted a notice in our building that there are 10 additional parking spaces available for sale at the Condominium Corporation rate of $15,000.

Our building is five years old and many of us have purchased a parking space from the developer. All parking is presented as common property, so how do we purchase a parking space that is part of our condominium lot and secure for our future use?


Daniella J. Vancouver

When parking is shown as common property on the condominium plan, an owner/purchaser is not purchasing a parking space. In most transactions, this is some sort of license that gives the owner of the condominium lot exclusive use of those identified parking spaces for a prescribed period, usually 99 years.

Parking spaces can also be designated as limited common property by the owner developer, which provides a better definition of security in the process of a future sale of your condominium lot.

Strata companies are essentially in the same position as the owner-developer. They do not sell the common property parking space; they can grant some sort of license in exchange for the long-term allocation of the parking space to the designated strata lot. These types of transactions do not fall within the jurisdiction of the condominium board. The condominium corporation must approve these transactions by a 3/4 vote resolution at a general meeting and may also authorize a material change in the use of the property.

Although this may be an opportunity for the condominium company to raise additional funds, legal advice is essential to ensure that the condominium company and potential buyers clearly understand the implications of the agreement and the allocation of allocation of parking space.

Additional parking spaces can be a substantial added value asset for a condominium lot. Attribution and use are subject to the bylaws and rules of the Company and any agreements or licenses that may have been created by the Proponent Owner. Developers will frequently issue notices to owners of remaining parking lots that are available for transfer or purchase rights. Before you buy, talk to your lawyer to fully understand if the agreements are valid, how spaces are regulated, if there are any limitations or restrictions on conversions to charging stations, how space allocations are transacted at new owners, how the property is designated, whether there is reliable documentation to verify assignments, and whether it is possible to have parking spaces designated on limited common property.

The parking lot designated by the owner-developer as limited common property can only be changed by the condominium corporation by unanimous vote. In new developments, a developer-owner may, at any time before the first annual general meeting of the condominium corporation, amend the condominium plan to designate parking spaces as common property limited to the exclusive use of the owners of lots. condominium in the condominium plan. The developer-owner may amend the condominium plan to designate up to two additional parking spaces as common property limited to the exclusive use of the owners of each condominium lot in the condominium plan. This is the ideal option for condominium lot owners as it secures their purchase/transaction to land documents.

[email protected]


Tony Gioventu is Executive Director of the Condominium Homeowners Association of BC


Covid-19 Notice: As a precautionary measure to avoid the spread of COVID-19, CHOA staff are working remotely and our offices are temporarily closed. We understand that times are tough for condominium corporations and we are here to help. Even though CHOA Advisors work remotely, we are only a phone call or email away and able to help you arrange meetings and prepare notices.

Tuesday Lunch and Learn Live with CHOA: CHOA is hosting a series of webinars once a week for the next few months. Join us every Tuesday as we bring together industry experts to discuss the many issues affecting BC’s strata community. For more information visit our website at choa.bc.ca/seminars/

Please stay safe and healthy.

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Parking spaces

Neighbors welcome more parking in part of Bestwood used by hospital staff

Residents of Bestwood have spoken about the benefits of having more parking in an area where staff park to get to Nottingham City Hospital.

No less than 10 garages were demolished in Wyton Close, creating more parking spaces for residents.

Neighbors said the area is now much nicer and easier to park.

Carl Thomson, 50, of Wyton Close, said hospital staff tended to park in the area to use a cut through Nottingham City Hospital.

“We find a lot of employees park here to park for free instead of parking at the hospital,” he said.

“It created a lot of parking, it makes it look a lot nicer than it was when the garages were up there.”

He added, “We were thinking ‘where do you want to park.’ You don’t want to park in front because you might have an accident with a passing car.



Wyton Close, Bestwood.

“I saw it coming, cars are turning too fast around the corner and it caught up with one of the cars which is parked.”

Mr Thomson said there was now always a place to park, saying the program had “taken a week or two before people started using” the new parking lot.

He added: “There were 10 garages up there, half of them had nothing in there anyway when they emptied them.”

Local neighborhood councilors worked with Nottingham City Homes to demolish the disused garage and create additional parking.

Mercy Kamau, 35, who works part-time and lives in Wyton Close, said: “It’s good to have more parking lots – and that’s for sure.

“Sometimes you find it is [existing parking facilities] full.

“Sometimes there are two of you and maybe two of us have cars, there is not enough parking space.”

A 50-year-old woman, who lives nearby and asked not to be named, said the double yellow lines could be of benefit in the larger area, saying: “Some people don’t know the rules of the road” .

She said residents tend to park on sidewalks.

“You see people walking in the middle of the road with strollers and mobility scooters because they cannot get on the sidewalks because the cars are parked there.

“Even though it’s 20 miles an hour here, they [drivers] going at 30/40 miles per hour. They have no regard for anyone. “

She added, “You have people parking here for the hospital and the hospital staff as well.”

New parking spaces have also been created at Winterton Rise, Bestwood Park.

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Parking spaces

Wright Street Parking Bridge Opens, Adding 350 Additional Parking Spaces in Downtown | Govt. and politics






The Wright Street parking lot in Auburn opened to the public on Friday afternoon at 3 p.m., bringing 350 additional parking spaces to the city’s downtown core.


Alex Hosey,


The Wright Street parking lot in Auburn opened to the public on Friday afternoon at 3 p.m., bringing 350 additional parking spaces to the city’s downtown core.

The new parking lot, located at 140 Wright Street, has six levels of public parking and a dedicated Baptist Student Union area on the ground floor, according to a statement from the City of Auburn.

The addition of the new Wright Street Bridge as well as the new Auburn Bank Parking Bridge now brings approximately 1,350 public parking spaces to downtown Auburn, according to a city statement.

“In addition to bringing more space to downtown Auburn, the new bridge provides an option for downtown workers and visitors who want to spend more time enjoying all that downtown has to offer. to offer, “said the city’s statement.

Distance learning has brought positive changes for students. Keri Lumm of Buzz60 shares the results of a new study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of TutorMe.



The parking area is accessible to drivers from Wright Street, while pedestrian entrances are included on Wright Street and North College Street. The new parking lot also includes a green space between it and College Street with benches, sidewalk and pedestrian lighting.

Parking on the bridge will be free until August 4, after which spaces will cost $ 1 per hour up to $ 15 per 24 hours, depending on the city. Special rates can be set by the city manager at events such as home football matches, although any changes to parking fees are posted on the city’s website and on social media.

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Parking spaces

Council Moves Forward With Removal Of Two Covered Parking Spaces Requirement When Building ADU – Pasadena Now

The city council proceeded to the second reading of an ordinance which will remove the obligation to provide two covered parking spaces during the construction of an accessory housing (ADU) of more than 150 square feet.

The new construction of an ADU requires two covered parking spaces with a carport or a closed garage. Small additions of up to 150 square feet to single family dwellings are exempt from this requirement.

City Manager Steve Mermell initiated a zoning code change “to eliminate the requirement to provide two covered parking spaces when constructing any addition, regardless of size, to an existing single-family home,” according to a report municipal staff.

Recently enacted state laws limit the types of parking requirements that local agencies can place on ADUs, whether they are detached or converted from existing structures. The zoning code requires two covered parking spaces in a garage or carport. A special arrangement allows for additions of a maximum total of 150 square feet without requiring the requirement of covered parking for two cars.

Therefore, any addition to an existing residence, including the construction of an accessory structure such as a pool house or workshop of more than 150 square feet, results in the requirement to provide two covered spaces inside. a garage or a carport.

The code provides an exception for designated historic resources, in which an owner can request a waiver of the covered parking requirement when adding a floor area if an existing one-car garage contributes to the importance of property and / or neighborhood and is in good condition. or will be restored to good condition as part of the work to add floor space to the dwelling.

The current rules create an injustice for homeowners looking to build additions that often do not generate additional parking demand.

The ordinance removes significant financial barriers for homeowners looking to modernize and improve their properties and bring parking regulations into line with those imposed by state law for ADUs.

State law exempts ADUs from the requirement to construct covered parking and permits the use of driveways to meet off-street parking requirements.

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Parking spaces

Growth required more parking spaces in suburban malls and downtown stores

Getting the perfect parking spot is always a satisfying victory, but we often take for granted what that parking spot, parking lot or garage means to our city and our history. These photographs of the cars parked around the old City Market building and Ellis Square show how the need to park has changed our urban environment.

Automobiles have revolutionized nearly every facet of American culture, providing unprecedented convenience and accessibility, but perhaps with them too much has come. Historic cities like Savannah were not originally designed with the automobile in mind, so the need for a place to store them forced creative solutions at best, and destruction of sites and sites at worst. of historical monuments.

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Parking Park & ​​Shop in Ellis Square surrounded by on-street and above-ground parking, August 1970. MPC Historic Preservation Photo Collection, item 8126-006_01-4-0119.

Downtown businesses at risk of losing customers to suburban malls have argued for more and more parking. Unused lots were converted to surface parking lots, and multi-level parking garages were eventually deemed necessary to house the glut of vehicles that flooded downtown streets.

When it was built in the 1870s, shoppers used to tour the city’s old market building on foot, horseback, and wagon or streetcar. In the 1950s, vehicles were piling up around him on the street. When the market was demolished in the 1950s, it was replaced by the Park & ​​Shop multi-level garage. While the increased parking density offered by Park & ​​Shop has surely made life more convenient for downtown shoppers, Savannah has lost one of its most important landmarks.

Related: Savannah architect Eric Meyerhoff recalled for efforts to improve Savannah

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Related: Retired Architect’s River Street Collection Documents Savannah’s Waterfront Transformation

Cars parked around the old City Market building on Ellis Square, undated.  MPC Historical Preservation Photograph Collection, item 8126-006_01-4-0124.

Another proposal in the 1960s suggested that River Street be turned into an additional parking lot for Broughton Street shoppers. Lucky for us today, architects Eric Meyerhoff and Robert Gunn instead envisioned a pedestrian plaza that transformed the waterfront from a neglected and abandoned harbor into an international destination thanks to the Riverfront Urban Renewal Project.

When the Park & ​​Shop lease expired in 2004, the garage was demolished and, through an extensive public-private partnership, Ellis Square was renovated into a vibrant public gathering place with parking moved to a large underground lot. opened to the public in 2007.

City of Savannah Municipal Archives, [email protected], Discover the Archives: savannahga.gov/MunicipalArchives.

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Parking spaces

A $ 20 million project to build 200 new semi-parking spaces on I-80 in Wyoming will impact travel starting Monday

Traffic was blocked on Wednesday January 13 when I-80 was temporarily closed between Laramie and Rawlins due to the vehicle overturning. (WYDOT)

CASPER, Wyoming – A $ 20 million “winter freight” project along Interstate 80 between Laramie and Rawlins is resuming after a winter hiatus, according to the Wyoming Department of Transportation.

“Traffic on I-80 will begin to impact Monday as crews begin structural work and begin building climbing routes on I-80,” WYDOT said. “The work will impact eastbound lanes above Halleck Ridge (250.5 to 252.5 mile markers) west of Elk Mountain and westbound lanes between Quealy Dome and Cooper. Cove (beacons 281.5 to 279.5) near the Albany / Carbon County line. ”

“Watch for lane closures, reduced speed limits and other traffic changes during construction. Avoid distractions like cell phones when driving in work areas.

The project began in the fall of 2020 and Simon Contractors is resuming efforts to build approximately 100 new tractor-trailer parking spaces in the Fort Steele rest area east of Rawlins and 100 new parking spaces in the area. Quealy Dome parking lot west of Laramie.

“This additional truck parking is essential,” said Wes Bybee, WYDOT District 1 construction engineer. “The additional parking lots can help reduce the number of fall-asleep accidents, reduce accidents and operating costs for trucks looking for parking, and give truck drivers another place to stay.” to park and wait for bad weather conditions. “

The Fort Steele rest area, including parking areas, will be closed during construction.

“Flaggers may be present to direct local traffic through the area,” WYDOT said. “Please avoid parking on the Fort Steele interchange on and off ramps as this will likely interfere with work on the rest area. Once the project is complete, the rest area will reopen.

The project is funded by a federal Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) grant. WYDOT says it should be finished in October 2022.

“Project planning is subject to change, particularly due to inclement weather and the availability of material or equipment,” notes WYDOT

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Parking garage

Des Moines could buy foreclosed The Fifth parking garage for $ 40.5 million

The city of Des Moines could shell out around $ 40.5 million to buy a 751-space parking lot, part of a downtown complex called The Fifth that is in foreclosure after developers fail to pay a loan to construction.

Des Moines has offered to buy the 11-story parking lot, which is now “essentially complete,” at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Walnut Street, according to a petition filed Friday night. The final price will vary as the loan earns $ 3,306.40 in interest daily. The actual value of the structure is also unclear as far fewer employees work and park downtown during the pandemic, and it’s unclear how many will return.

The garage is the first of three buildings, including a 40-story skyscraper, planned for the complex. The future of The Fifth is uncertain amid ongoing legal action.

Bankers Trust Co. and Christensen Development, whom a court appointed to oversee the completion of the garage, filed a fast-track application to have the court allow the sale because “the delays increase costs at a substantial rate given the amounts owed. “, indicates the query. Christensen Development was granted permission to sell the garage when it was appointed receiver in October.

The city also requested an expedited hearing on Monday, according to a statement from City Manager Scott Sanders.

It’s unclear whether the city would operate the parking garage to recoup the $ 40.5 million spent to buy the property or attempt to sell it to another owner.

Sanders declined to comment further.

The progress of the $ 170 million project has been marred by delays, which is the main point of contention for the ongoing legal proceedings.

Plans call for the garage to form the base of the 40-story tower, which would house apartments, a 21C hotel-museum. and a bar. A separate five-story building would house an Alamo Drafthouse cinema as well as two floors of offices and a restaurant on the ground floor.

Mandelbaum Properties won a bid in 2017 to develop the city-owned site, which previously housed a dilapidated parking lot. Under a complex development agreement, the company had to have completed the garage by August 16, 2020 and have started construction of the tower by October 31, 2019. In return, the city granted it a forgivable loan of $ 4 million and up to $ 10 million in tax rebates.

Des Moines filed a notice of default against the developer in June for failing to meet these deadlines.

In September, Bankers Trust Co. filed a foreclosure petition against Justin and Sean Mandelbaum and 5th and Walnut LLC, alleging that they had failed to pay a $ 48 million loan for the garage that was due the previous month. The property was to go up for sale immediately – with the city listed as a junior lien holder – unless the developers ask for a delay, according to the petition.

A week after the lockdown, the Mandelbaum brothers filed a counterclaim seeking $ 101 million in damages from the city. They alleged that Des Moines officials committed “flagrant violations” of the development agreement, falsely declaring the project in default and ultimately triggering the foreclosure petition. The cross-claim seeks a temporary injunction preventing the city from recovering the property.

► More:Faced with default, developers of downtown Des Moines skyscraper sue city for $ 101 million

Todd Lantz, attorney for the Mandelbaums, said in a statement that the proposed sale “comes as no surprise.”

“In fact, it confirms exactly what our clients alleged in their lawsuit against the city last fall – that the city’s multiple and inexcusable violations of its development agreement were designed to get the project back in hand,” said Lantz.

A rendering of the Alamo Drafthouse cinema in "The fifth" in downtown Des Moines.

Justin Mandelbaum previously told the Des Moines Register that his company had requested time extensions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Previous negotiations for the extensions, carried out in late 2019 and throughout 2020 as Justin Mandelbaum said construction documents were being finalized, never resulted in formal agreements approved by city council. The city even offered an additional payment of $ 2 million after the tower was completed, although that provision never received a council vote.

If the sale is approved, the foreclosure petition against the Mandelbaums would be dismissed and Christensen Development would no longer act as receiver.

In the sale proposal, Bankers Trust attorney Mark Rice wrote that neither the bank nor Christensen Development believed they could sell the garage for a higher price if they were to proceed with a foreclosure sale.

The real estate market for this type of property is limited, they argue in the motion. The two declined to comment when contacted by the Registry.

Des Moines currently has seven downtown parking garages. A 2016 analysis showed that aging ramps saw their annual revenues fall by $ 3 million over five years, and garages had a deficit of $ 19.1 million over a decade.

At the time, city leaders talked about reducing the number of city-owned spaces, increasing parking fees, and even subsidizing bus passes and Uber riders. Since then, the COVID-19 pandemic has reduced the number of workers driving downtown, as many businesses have moved to virtual operations. A major downtown employer, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., offered one of their buildings for rent.

It is not known what impact additional parking would have on the city budget, especially one of this price. By comparison, a 600-space parking garage at 402 E. Second St. cost about $ 20 million to build.

Des Moines City Council is expected to authorize the purchase of The Fifth parking lot and a judge is expected to approve the motion before it can go to council. This approval is expected to arrive before January 21 to be included on the January 25 meeting agenda.

The bank hopes to finalize the sale by March 31.

Meanwhile, Lantz, the Mandelbaums’ attorney, said the developers hope to continue working on the rest of the project, including the hotel and the apartment tower. The garage’s sale price is about $ 8 million less than the original loan, which “confirms that the Mandelbaums were on track to complete the parking lot several million dollars less than budget,” he said. -he declares.

“The city’s actions last summer and now are focused on confiscating these savings, even though the savings were contractually promised to the developer,” Lantz said in a statement. “The Mandelbaums expect similar success if they are allowed to build the remainder of this large mixed-use project downtown. “

Kim Norvell covers Growth and Development for the Registry. Contact her at [email protected] or 515-284-8259. Follow her on twitter @KimNorvellDMR.

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Parking garage

University’s new seven-level parking garage will add more than 800 spaces

The University of Nevada, the landscape of Reno and surrounding areas continue to transform as the Gateway District stretches to Interstate 80. The University Gateway, which is part of the master plan of the University, will be a vibrant neighborhood center focused on retail and education developed primarily by the University. It will extend campus life south of the current campus, in the area between 9th Street and Interstate 80.

The Washoe County Regional Transportation Commission began work on Virginia Street between I-80 and the West Stadium Parking Complex this spring to improve sidewalks, redeploy roads, add RAPID bus stations and install a roundabout. . With slower traffic and pedestrian flow this spring due to stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus outbreak, the RTC transit extension project has progressed rapidly in its improvements and is ahead of schedule. schedule with plans to complete construction by mid-fall.

The University issues more than 10,000 parking permits per year with a current surplus of 1,300 permits. Projected growth in students and faculty indicates that by 2021 that number will drop to a surplus of 600 permits. The Gateway parking complex will add 814 additional parking spaces to the south end of the campus. The design concept provides for a seven-story structure with a proposed ADA-compliant pedestrian bridge to connect from the fourth floor of the parking complex.

The architects for the parking complex are Watry Design, Incorporated, and the work is being performed by Clark / Sullivan Construction, a construction manager at the Hazardous Construction Delivery Method.

Construction will begin this fall and is expected to be completed in the spring of 2022. The structure will measure 250,000 square feet at an estimated cost of $ 33.2 million. The cost of the complex will be paid with funds the University receives from the sale of parking permits.

The complex will initially include 40 hourly spaces (with pay-by-number and phone-based options), 17 disabled spaces, two electric vehicle spaces, motorcycle parking, blue light emergency telephones and other features. .

Two memorial trees from the University Arboretum, one in memory of Eugene S. Faust and the other in memory of Jim and Cleo Ronald, which are located at the bottom of the stairs on 9th Street, will remain .

The University continues to limit license increases to adjustments based on inflation and will institute the license fee approved by the Nevada System of Higher Education this fiscal year at three percent. The increase will be included in permits sold as of July 1, 2020.

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Parking spaces

TMC will lose 97 parking spaces due to expansion and plans to add 130 more

Richard A. Todd, Democratic Herald

Texoma Medical Center has announced plans to add 130 new parking spaces in the near future.

The hospital which is on the Denison side of the Sherman/Denison border recently received site plan approval from the Denison Planning and Zoning Commission to expand one of its buildings, which would mean approximately 97 parking spaces should be removed from the current campus. During the meeting, the commissioners raised the issue of parking spaces.

On Friday, TMC media and publicity coordinator Jennifer Reed answered those questions in an email saying the hospital was considering other ways to add parking spaces.

“Texoma Medical Center initially explored the possibility of adding parking,” Reed said in his email. “Since that time, we have acquired new land east of Pool Road for expansion as well as additional parking spaces on our campus. The new Medical Office Building being constructed south of campus will have its own surface parking lot. Additionally, TMC is constructing an additional 130-space surface car park north of the existing MOB.

The site plan for the food expansion was approved by the commission last month. At the time the issue of parking was raised, town planner Bill Medina said the developer had not revealed any plans to address parking issues at the time, and the site plan as presented met the requirements city ​​technology. It was adopted on that basis.

The new addition, a 121,047 square foot extension to the north of the main hospital building, will include a dietary center and energy plant.

The next step before construction begins will involve city staff reviewing the final civil engineering plans.

In June 2018, P&Z approved a site plan that included a 1,400 space parking lot that would have been 4 to 6 stories high. These plans have now been modified and the parking garage is no longer under construction.

Journalist Richard A. Todd can be reached by emailing [email protected] He can also be reached on Facebook and Twitter @RichardAToddHD.

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Parking spaces

The population of the CPP remains greater than the available parking spaces

Finding a parking spot on campus again poses problems for students as the spring semester begins. Cal Poly Pomona students struggle daily to find a spot due to the limited number of parking spaces available on campus.

According to the CPP website, there are just over 26,000 students and 2,000 faculty and staff. The CPP offers several different parking lots, with a total of over 14,000 parking spaces, as The Poly Post previously reported in Issue 1 (September 10, 2019). This is a major drawback given that only 9,000 of these spaces are general student parking spaces, while the rest are reserved for faculty, staff, students with disabilities, and residents. Obviously, there is not enough space for everyone.

Mary Zaarour, a fourth-year psychology student, explains how she has struggled to park since transferring to CPP in the fall of 2018, Zaarour said. “I have to come hours before my class starts just to find a place to park. I was even late for classes a few times due to the lack of available places.

The car parks generally fill up between 7:30 and 10:00 on weekdays.
(Carla Ghafari | The Poly Post)

According to the CPP website, peak times to arrive on campus are Monday through Thursday between 7:30 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Parking Structure 1, located east of Voorhis Alumni Park and west of Police and Parking Services (Building 109), and Parking Structure 2, which is southeast of the school iPoly secondary, are the two most popular places to park at the CPP. Parking Structure 1 has approximately 2,200 spaces, while Parking Structure 2 has approximately 1,600.

Zaarour is not the only one to arrive late to class because of the parking problem. Lilly Lopez, a fourth-year finance student experienced similar challenges. “I feel like there should be more parking structures. I was late not only to some classes but also to exams because of the parking lot,” Lopez said. Like Zaarour and Lopez, many students are frustrated by this situation and hope that additional parking lots or structures will be built to eliminate this complication.

“We haven’t received any complaints about the lack of parking space,” a representative from Parking & Transportation Services said. “We have two overflow lots, as well as a lot on Corporate Center Drive with shuttles running almost every 15 minutes.”

Parking and Transportation Services strongly recommends that students use the two additional lots to avoid traveling by car. The Bronco Shuttle has five routes, AE, all operating during class hours to help students get to campus from overflow lots. For a complete list of Bronco Shuttle times and routes, visit https://www.cpp.edu/transportation/commuting-to-campus/bronco-shuttle.shtml.

As stated on the CPP website, hundreds of new students are admitted to CPP each year. With a greater demand for parking spaces, campus police usually try to help students direct traffic in the morning, Monday through Thursday.

As the semester progressed and the first few weeks passed, the traffic on campus decreased slightly; however, finding parking remains a daily struggle for students.

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Students pay millions of dollars for parking structures | Campus News

This year alone, Cal State Fullerton students paid $ 9.8 million for their campus parking, and they are expected to spend millions more over the next decade.

The $ 9.8 million comes from the sale of approximately 39,000 half-year parking permits. Historically, CSUF is a suburban university and at least 50% of students buy parking permits every semester, according to the Ministry of Parking and Transport.

As of this semester, there are 39,868 students enrolled at CSUF and a total of 8,047 parking spaces available for students. CSUF sold 18,880 permits this semester, more than twice as many permits as there are places.

The parking permit cost $ 236 last semester, then rose to $ 285 this semester and will climb to $ 334 by the 2020 summer session, an increase of over 40% in two years. The daily parking pass will be increased from $ 8 to $ 10, and motorcycle parking permits will be increased from $ 120 to $ 140.

Campus officials justified the increase by stating that it will be used to fund the inbound parking structure on the east side of the campus, alongside the existing structure on the east side. The structure will contain 1,900 new spaces and cost $ 38.8 million, according to Sasha Azoqa, communications specialist for the parking and transportation department.

She added that each parking spot costs $ 20,000, which is used by of them to three students per day.

The new parking structure will be built north of the Eastside parking structure and is expected to be completed by fall 2020. It will include energy efficient LED lighting, elevators, staircase and a solar canopy on the roof.

The structure is meant to help alleviate parking lot overflow, a problem that has worsened over the years. However, some students expressed their dissatisfaction with the increase, acknowledging the problem of on-campus parking, but not wanting it to be paid for by students who are already facing financial hardship.

“It upsets and frustrates me because the students are already food insecure. We have homeless tenants. We can’t afford to pay for their textbooks, ”said Maria Linares, Associated Students board vice president. “Now is not the time to increase parking permit fees. “

Students opposed to increased parking permits have started a petition on the site changer.org which collected nearly 3,000 student signatures more than half of its target of 5,000 signatures. Throughout the comments section, students have expressed concern and disappointment with the increased fees.

A state audit on UHC earlier this year found that the chancellor’s office “has failed to ensure that campuses fully explore alternative transportation options before investing in expensive parking lots. The audit came months after the CSUF announced the construction of a new parking lot.

Kristen Jasko, director of the parking and transportation department, said her department has always looked for alternatives to parking, whether through third-party apps or carpooling to solve the parking problem.

The increase in parking fees supports an even greater cost: structures already built.

In the past 15 years, three parking lots have been added to the CSUF which are still in the process of being reimbursed, according to Danny Kim, Vice President of Administration and Finance.

The $ 25.7 million Nutwood parking structure is expected to be paid off by 2029, and the State College’s $ 24.7 million parking structure is expected to be paid for by 2031. Finally, the parking structure Eastside’s $ 24.9 million is expected to be paid in 2035, according to the Parking and Transportation Department.

The new structure will cost $ 2.6 million per year, bringing the total annual cost of construction bonds to $ 6.9 million, which will remain until at least 2029.

This brings the total cost of the parking structures to just over $ 114 million.

Azoqa noted that the new parking structure is “on track” in terms of development. Bomel Construction, the same contractor who built the State College parking structure, is currently building the third floor.

According to California Education Code 89700, the Department of Parking and Transportation cannot receive any state or university funding to help pay for the costs of operating or developing parking lots, forcing the department to fund itself only. .

“All construction or maintenance of the parking structure must come from the parking permit fee,” Azoqa said.

Jasko said the parking structures are typically funded by a 25-year loan that is paid back with the income from the parking permits.

The revenues from the parking permits are used directly to finance the parking operations, whether it is the operating expenses of the department, any unpaid debt service on the parking structures or simply general operating expenses, ”said Jasko.

To meet the demand for parking during the first three weeks of the school, the department launched an assisted parking program in the spring of 2017, which allowed students to park their vehicles in the aisles after the lots had been filled.

This year the “assisted parking has been placed in areas we didn’t have before, and for an extended period, ”Jasko said. This is due to the 500 parking spaces that were lost in Lot E, due to the construction of the new structure.

The program is available Monday through Thursday in lots A, G, S and Titan Hall South, with a parking attendant available until 10 p.m.

Another effort the department has made to help deal with the parking crisis is offsite parking at EvFree Church. This additional parking was offered for the first time in the spring of 2017 due to the registration record that the university faced in the fall of 2016.

Students can purchase an off-site parking permit for $ 85, with a shuttle service to and from campus available Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

“What’s really cool about this parking lot (EvFree Church) and the shuttle service is that while we have 865 students parking there regularly, we also have a lot of carpool from there,” Jasko said. “So we actually have more passengers using the shuttles than we have license holders. “

President Fram Virjee was unavailable for comment.

Noah Biesiada contributed to this article.

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Parking spaces

Knoxville State Street downtown garage expansion opens parking spaces

State Street Garage Expansion is now open, adding 570 additional parking spaces downtown.

The two new parking lots opened on Wednesday morning, mostly completing an $ 11 million construction project that began in October 2018.

State Street Garage, located behind Regal Cinema on Gay Street, now has approximately 1,600 parking spaces. Including garages and surface lots, the downtown area now has approximately 10,500 public parking spaces.

The entrance to the One State Street garage is still closed

Some small-scale works still need to be completed. The entrance to Clinch Avenue will remain closed until July while it is being upgraded. The entrances and exits of Union Avenue and State Street are open.

Other remaining tasks include caulking, installing entrance canopies, repairing sidewalks and adding landscaping.

“The expansion of the garage is an important step,” Mayor Madeline Rogero said in a press release. “We have created 570 new essential parking spaces in the heart of downtown. We appreciate everyone’s patience and understanding since work began last fall.

This is not the first time that State Street Garage has expanded. The city undertook a $ 6.1 million upgrade in 2013 that added a bridge and 240 spaces.

The Christman Company is the general contractor and the prime contractor is the Public Building Authority. The architect is McCarty Holsaple McCarty Architects.

Where can I park in the city center?

A 3,500 pound shaped, fabricated and painted steel sculpture was recently installed in front of the State Street Garage in downtown Knoxville.

Public parking is also available at locations such as garages in Market Square, Main Avenue and Locust Street, as well as on surface lots on West Jackson Avenue, East Jackson and near World’s Fair Park.

Downtown Knoxville has a live parking availability module that tracks the number of open spaces in downtown lots and garages on its website, centrevilleknoxville.org. Parking in the city center is also monitored in real time on the Parkopedia app, which is available for download.

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Parking spaces

Too many parking spaces in the city center, still thousands more to add

Downtown Memphis is for drivers only, at least for now.

That’s according to the findings of a one-year parking study commissioned by the Downtown Memphis Commission, said Iain Banks of Nelson Nygaard, the California company that conducted the study.

“There is definitely an automotive culture in downtown Memphis,” Banks said in a 90-minute presentation to the DMC board of directors on Thursday morning. “And that’s partly due, obviously, to historical preferences, but also to the fact that the transit system and global mobility is probably not quite where the city would really like it to be right now. “

The study looked at parking between AW Willis Avenue and EH Crump Boulevard and from the riverside at Interstate 69 on the outskirts of the Medical District.

About 83% of downtown workers who responded to a parking survey said they walk to work alone every day, while only 7% said they carpooled. Among downtown residents, the number was only slightly lower. About 69% reported driving alone in the city center.

For these drivers, parking can often seem scarce and expensive, according to the study. But that’s just the perception, Banks said.

In fact, drivers said they can usually find a location after searching for about five minutes and said that location is usually within two blocks of their destination.

Choose 901 employee Taylor Lewis grabs a parking receipt on the way to work in May 2014.

20,000 additional places

There are 71,364 parking spaces in downtown Memphis and the Medical District, according to the Banks study.

Despite perceptions of low parking inventory, banks have found that approximately 50,000 of these spaces are needed to meet parking demand. And even if Memphis’s development continued to grow along with cities like Nashville and Austin, 20 years from now, Memphis would still be able to meet demand with about 5,000 spaces less than there are today.

In the heart of downtown, the excess of available parking spaces over parking demand is most apparent. There are 17,065 parking spaces available downtown, but the immediate growth that is happening downtown only calls for about 8,600 spaces, according to the study.

Despite the excess parking, the members of the board of directors of DMC were reluctant to accept the disappearance of the spaces.

“How do you know how many people are coming downtown for business meetings, how many people are coming downtown to meet someone for lunch, and then have to go back east because that’s where do they live or work? Asked Julie Ellis, DMC board member.

There are 17,065 parking spaces available downtown, but the immediate growth happening downtown only calls for about 8,600 spaces, according to a study.

She said it made sense to try to reduce the need for parking for downtown residents who also work there by making the city more pedestrian-friendly and improving public transportation. But she said reducing parking too much could alienate East Memphis residents.

“What I never want to hear is that being downtown is exclusive to anyone who doesn’t live or work downtown,” Ellis said. “It’s not Memphis. That worries me in a larger context.”

Banks, however, said the change could take years – but even if just 10% of inner-city residents decided to use their cars less frequently, that would mean less space would be needed and more. much of what is available could be used by the people of East Memphis and others. travel to the city center.

Less surfaces, more technology

DMC’s sister councils have already committed to adding thousands of additional parking spaces despite the density of the downtown area.

Part of Union Row’s approved $ 950 million development incentive program that plans to bring apartments, a hotel, offices and more retail – including a grocery store – downtown was a $ 50 million loan to build two parking garages that would add approximately 2,000 spaces.

City officials are in talks to add more parking garages downtown.

Banks said adding more garages isn’t necessarily a bad thing if it means closing surface lots and using prime downtown real estate for more development.

“Maybe a garage makes sense in some places where it opens up three to four to five development blocks and it can serve as a shared parking use for those developments,” he said.

DMC President Jennifer Oswalt said the parking study is already being used to help her organization determine how to allocate limited parking funds to other developments.

“What this has done for us is to show that immediate growth is not a crisis,” Oswalt said. “It has shown that we are not completely immune to challenges, but neither are we in crisis… We can try to change small behaviors.”

These efforts to change behavior are manifested in another type of incentive approved in late 2018 to encourage alternative commuting for the 700 new employees that agricultural technology company Indigo Ag plans to hire over the next three years.

The DMC is also committed to providing parking solutions for AutoZone, which recently announced a Expansion of the city center this will lead to 130 new jobs. No details have been released on what the DMC will offer and how it will impact the existing parking landscape.

An expansion of AutoZone is expected to create 130 well-paying jobs in downtown Memphis.

Preliminary results published with the study suggest that the technology could be a solution to negative perceptions of parking. Banks said using apps or other technology to help downtown visitors determine the location and cost of parking before leaving their homes could be helpful.

He also suggested that improving public transportation, better maintenance of parking garages, working with businesses to make more private parking accessible to the public, and making the city center more pedestrian-friendly could all help. change the habits of those who visit the city center and reduce the need for parking.

A final list of recommendations and a guide to help the DMC make parking development decisions will be released in the coming weeks, Banks said.

Desiree Stennett covers economic development and business at The Commercial Appeal. She can be reached at [email protected], 901-529-2738 or on Twitter: @desi_stennett.

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The Galaxy’s Edge Crowds – Orange County Register

Disneyland plans to open a new parking lot months ahead of schedule as summer crowds descend on the highly anticipated Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge despite a wetter-than-usual rainy season that hasn’t significantly slowed construction .

The 6,500-space Pixar Pals parking structure is expected to open between late June and late July, months ahead of the September opening of the new garage, according to Disneyland officials.

  • The new Pixar Pals parking structure under construction next to the Mickey and Friends structure at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif., on Monday, March 25, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new Pixar Pals parking structure under construction next to the Mickey and Friends structure at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif., on Monday, March 25, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • The new Pixar Pals parking structure under construction next to the Mickey and Friends structure at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif., on Monday, March 25, 2019. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

“We are thrilled to have made improvements to this,” said Disneyland Vice President Kris Theiler. “It’s currently planned for the end of July, but we are working very, very hard with the contractors. We are optimistic that we will be able to bring this forward until the end of June. »

Galaxy’s Edge opens May 31 for a “soft opening” reservation period only. Star Wars fans wanting to explore the new 14-acre themed land between May 31 and June 23 will need a Disneyland ticket and a free advance reservation that grants access to Galaxy’s Edge.

The new Pixar Pals parking lot is under construction next to the 10,000-space Mickey and Friends parking lot. A new pedestrian bridge connecting the two parking structures to Downtown Disney is expected to open in mid-September, Disneyland officials said.

Disneyland also plans to open 2,150 additional visitor parking spaces on the Toy Story grounds by the end of June. Visitors will pass through a new security bag check area on the Toy Story grounds before boarding buses to the main gate plaza between Disneyland and Disney California Adventure.

The Katella Cast Member car park will become the Bullseye visitor car park. Employee parking will be moved to the Pumba parking lot.

Toll lanes and additional parking spaces in the two garages will increase capacity by 50%, officials said. The upgrades will add 16 parking toll lanes, 33 security bag check lanes and electronic parking sensors in both structures.

The addition of the Pixar Pals Garage should drastically reduce the need to redirect cars arriving at the Mickey and Friends parking lot to the Toy Story parking lot, a time-consuming hassle that has plagued Disneyland visitors.

The new $100 million parking structure will feature six levels named after Pixar characters: The Incredibles (level 1), Coco (level 2), Cars (level 3), Monsters Inc. (level 4), Finding Nemo (level 5) and Inside. Exit (level 6).

The new parking lot improvements are part of a Disneyland initiative called Project Stardust, which is taking a comprehensive look at park-wide operations, infrastructure and crowd management with the goal of improving efficiency, traffic and access.

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Houston is growing, but its parking spots may not be – Houston Public Media

Parking meters in downtown Houston on September 20, 2018.

According to one estimate, Greater Houston will exceed 10 million people by 2040. That would mean about three million more people would be added to the region. But so many additional cars may not require additional parking spaces.

“The buildings are not built for today. If you do your job right, you are trying to ask yourself: how is this going to be a good investment over 25 to 50 years? »Declared David Mincberg, general manager, officer of Flagship Properties Company, a company that invests in commercial real estate. He is also president of Houston first, which operates the City of Houston’s underground parking lot, including the George R. Brown Convention Center and Jones Hall.

Mincberg said parking needs are changing because the way people move is changing.

“As rail grows in Houston, Texas, you have more people, and more people, and more people using Uber and Lyft, and maybe autonomous vehicles in the near future; the near future being a decade. A decade for a building is not very long, ”said Mincberg. “And what is the ideal point between” what should an investor-developer do “and” a municipality should she demand? ” “”

Click here for more in-depth features.

How the city is responding to changing developments

City officials are already considering how to deal with Houston’s growing population.

“We have to find ways to get cars off the streets,” said Houston Pro-Tem Mayor Ellen Cohen. She is also a member of the District C council, which includes updated parking systems for busy areas like Washington Avenue and Montrose. “We have to be able to get people to Houston by bus, light rail, integrated transit. And how can we do that so that people aren’t driving cars with one person behind the wheel?”

Mayor Pro-Tem Ellen Cohen in her office on September 20, 2018.

Cohen said parking regulations have changed and the city has tested less in the city center.

“Instead of having regulations requiring restaurants, for example, to have an ‘X’ number of places available, we are testing the idea – which is currently underway downtown – but in the city center where you don’t need to have “X” number of parking spaces. You come to the restaurant, you can park in the adjacent streets. That sort of thing. So that it just leaves more space for people park where they can. “

“A third of its residents in this new apartment did not have a car at all”

Market needs have led downtown Houston to be exempt from parking restrictions for years, said Andy Icken, city of Houston development manager. He said the changes in development have also resulted in changes in the parking needs in the city center.

“Someone built a new multi-family project in the city center, which has a lot of people renting out apartments. And they instituted a one-car-to-apartment unit process, and they actually agreed. to buy it back to the individual, “said Icken.” So what this owner told me was: he discovered that about a third of his residents in this new apartment did not have a car at all. others who have it would make good economic sense. “

Andy Icken, Director of Development for the City of Houston, reviews the documents in his office on October 1, 2018.

Not having a car can be a growing trend in Houston. Icken said many places in the city have evolved into mixed-use development, such as the Galleria district.

“If we look at the total square footage of the Galleria area, which is over 35 million square feet, one-third is commercial office, one-third is residential and one-third is actually retail space,” said Icken. . “It requires fewer cars if people are to go to this area.”

Icken added that they have more projects coming up in the city looking to have mixed use because it’s convenient for people. He said they are considering more rules and regulations to help improve pedestrian communities, like Rice Village. Another factor to consider, Icken said, is the technology.

“Autonomous vehicles are going to play a role, longer term,” said Icken.

the Harris County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (METRO) has already set up a prototype plan for its first autonomous vehicle, in University of South Texas. And Icken said the city supports this plan and is thinking of others.

This is a shuttle currently in use in the Las Vegas Innovation District. METRO says it is potentially considering a similar project for the Texas Southern University campus.

“We actually believe that the rapid bus line in the middle of the Galleria can be converted into a self-driving vehicle. We are planning experimental work on an autonomous vehicle going from the convention center to airports. The technology needs to be improved, but it evolves every day and I think it’s up to us to see how we’re going to adapt to it.

In the years to come, that could mean big changes in a city where, right now, so many people are driving themselves.

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UF campus to lose 600 parking spaces as construction of new parking begins

Parking on the University of Florida campus is about to become much more restricted.

Approximately 600 parking spaces will be demolished in November as construction of a new parking garage is scheduled to begin in the northern section of the suburban lot on Gale Lemerand Drive, leaving an urgent need for temporary parking.

The new garage will have approximately 1,900 parking spaces in total when complete, but the net long-term gain will be minimal due to other planned construction projects, said Scott Fox, director of transportation and parking services.

The Commuter Lot garage will not be finished until February 2020. In the meantime, TAPS is exploring some temporary parking options to compensate for the loss of spaces which will be discussed at the next meeting of the Parking and Transportation Committee in the coming weeks. .

“I can’t give you a timeline for any of them yet, but I can tell you that when the northern part of the suburban lot closes in November 2018, I better have other places to go. park, ”he said.

James Humphrey, a UF junior who parked in the suburban lot this summer semester, said the subclasses would suffer the most from the suburban lot closing because it is one rare lots in the center of the campus where their decals allow them. to park.

“I don’t know how it will work. They might have to reroute some bus lines or something just to get people to and from, ”Humphrey said. “I can’t imagine where on campus they would have even put more temporary parking, so I feel like it would have to be even further from the center of campus.”

Erin Patrick, an assistant research professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UF, will lose her usual parking spot in front of the Union Reitz in the spring of 2019, when the engineering lot is due to be demolished to make way for the new data science and information technology center. . She said it’s hard enough to find parking near the center of the campus, and if UF wants to cut that many parking spaces for staff, they have to find a way to replace them quickly.

“It was a bag of mixed blessings,” said Patrick. “I’m excited about the new infrastructure, but worry about getting to class on time to teach. “

The budget for the garage is $ 32.4 million, or about $ 17,900 per space.

Fox said the new garage is needed because of the campus projects and new buildings that have replaced the parking spaces. The Commuter Lot Garage is how TAPS replaces what has been lost, as well as what will be lost in the near future.

The following list illustrates the projected loss of parking based on projects already planned, according to Fox. While not all projects have a start date, the first three have already started or are expected to start within the next year.

  • Pony Field Lot – 101 places – June 2018
  • Gale Lemerand Promenade North Suburb Lot – 600 – November 2018
  • Engineering land (opposite Reitz Union) – 351 – May 2019
  • Gale Lemerand Drive South Suburb Lot – 472 – TBD
  • Interior road – 128 – To be determined
  • Lot Frazier Rogers – 162 – To be determined

The six projects collectively leave an expected loss of approximately 1,800 spaces on campus, including the 600 spaces in the North Suburb Lot. Fox said the new garage would reverse those losses with 1,900 spaces, but not until its completion in 2020.

A map of all UF car parks currently under demolition. (Matthew Arrojas / WUFT News)

“If there is anything that we want to convey to the university community, it is that it is happening and we know it and we are preparing for it,” he said. “Your experience during the construction process and once the garage is open is important to us. This is why we are trying to make good decisions now.

Temporary car parks

Fox said TAPS currently has five temporary parking plans, pending approval. The plans range from small car parks of just 100 spaces to much larger car parks of more than 500.

The larger lot proposed would provide 532 spaces at Fifield Field and cost TAPS approximately $ 1.5 million. The smallest lot would be on the east side of 13th Street and offer 105 spaces at a cost of $ 250,000, according to the presentation of Fox.

The following five proposed lots would provide 1,233 temporary parking spaces:

  • 13e Rue Est – 105 spaces – $ 250,000
  • Norman field – 196 – $ 525,000
  • Archer Road Field – 277 – $ 1.2 million
  • Fifield Field – 532 – $ 1.5 million
  • Flavet Field – 123 – $ 375,000
(PowerPoint presentation by Scott Fox)

Fox stressed that none of those plans have yet been approved and that some may not go into effect at all. Others, like the Fifield Field, could be built but with less space than what is currently proposed.

In total, the lots would cost around $ 3.9 million to build. Fox is hoping that a plan for the temporary lots will be solidified before the start of the fall semester.

City and UF agreement limit total number of parking spaces on campus

While the Commuter Lot garage will make up for lost spaces in 2020, it won’t do much to increase the amount of parking available on campus as a whole. Fox said it was because of the Campus development agreement UF produced with the city of Gainesville.

The agreement caps the maximum number of parking spaces UF can have at 25,377. Fox said the agreement was put in place because the roads around UF, such as Archer Road and University Avenue, are not equipped for. manage the traffic created by more parking spaces.

“If we were to build 5,000 additional parking spaces and generate 5,000 additional trips, single occupant vehicle trips in the morning and 5,000 additional trips in the evening, these already failing roads would absolutely choke,” he said. he declares.

Due to the agreement, the supply of parking spaces has remained stagnant over the past 20 years. According to Fox’s presentation, the parking lot in 1998 was the same as in 2018, with a range of 23,000 to 24,000 spaces.

Meanwhile, parking demand continues to reach all-time highs, Fox said.

(PowerPoint presentation by Scott Fox)

For the 2016-17 school year, 36,440 automotive decals were issued. That’s about 13,000 more decals than there are actual parking spots on campus.

The current campus development agreement is in effect until 2025 but will be reviewed in 2020. Fox said it is possible that increasing demand will cause the cap to increase, but it is still far too early to make any predictions. .

“Obviously,” he said, “when the parking supply remains essentially stable and the demand continues to rise and we issue more and more parking stickers, it becomes more and more. more difficult to have a satisfactory parking experience. “

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New skyscraper will add more than 1,000 parking spaces above a subway station – Streetsblog Chicago

Yesterday, the Chicago Plan Commission approved a $500 million mixed-use development to be built at the corner of Chicago Ave. and State St. on a parcel now containing surface parking for Holy Name Cathedral. The development, “One Chicago Square”, will contain 795 rental units, 75 condos, multiple floors for commercial use and 1,090 parking spaces.

The existing surface lot has approximately 160 parking spaces, which means parking supply on this lot will increase by 580% in one of the densest, most walkable and busiest neighborhoods in the city. . It’s a shock to see the city’s transit-friendly policies so largely ignored.

Of these parking spaces, 225 are reserved for parishioners of the Saint-Nom Cathedral across the street, or 65 parking spaces more than currently. The remaining 865 spaces would be for residents and commercial uses. It is unclear if a resident parking spot will be attached to the price of the unit, or purchased/rented separately.

Aerial image of the existing surface lot in front of Holy Name Cathedral.
Aerial image of the existing surface lot in front of Holy Name Cathedral. Picture via Google Maps

Just above Chicago’s Red Line station, this development could technically be built without parking spaces thanks to Chicago’s Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Ordinance, which allows developers to cut 100 % commercial parking minimums and 50% residential parking minimums. minimum. Through an additional process, the residential parking minimum can also be reduced to zero spaces.

Since its introduction in 2013, the TOD ordinance has allowed developers to provide fewer parking spaces in residential and commercial developments within 600 feet of “L” and Metra stations. The ordinance was revised in 2015 to allow developers to completely eliminate parking for developments within 1,320 feet (¼ mile) of these stations.

Clearly, to maintain the city’s progressive TOD policy, the ordinance needs another update, especially in the downtown area. Any development this close to public transit should be subject to maximum parking, rather than just eliminating the minimums.

The development site currently sits on land with mixed zoning, DX-7 and DX-12; the proponent is seeking to change the zoning so that the entire parcel is zoned DX-12. The existing parking minimum in the DX-12 zone would require 478 parking spaces for residential use (0.55 spaces per unit) and 0 spaces for commercial use. With or without the TOD ordinance, this development far exceeds the number of parking lots that would need to be built in a downtown neighborhood.

Councilman Brian Hopkins (2nd Ward) posted earlier in the week that he was “inclined to support” the development – already approved by the Planning Commission – through a “Chicago Avenue Transit Improvement Program” which will be required as part of the development. This program will, according to Hopkins, “solve the traffic problems on Chicago Avenue”. The alderman may have misspoken, because the only transit-related commitments made during the planned development process and confirmed by his office involve paying up to $40,000 for the construction of a single “concrete bus pad” on Dearborn St., just north of Chicago Ave. , and move a CTA bus shelter on Michigan Ave., three blocks from the development.

Concrete bus platforms, unfortunately, do nothing for traffic or bus riders.

Access points on the ground floor.  Source: OneChicagoSquare.com/JDL
Access points on the ground floor. Source: OneChicagoSquare.com/JDL

Commitments made as a result of the now approved planned development process also include the requirement for the developer to pay for a Divvy station on the property, but that is where the requirements for sustainable transportation end. The developer will also be responsible for modifying eleven traffic lights and adding left and right turn arrows at several intersections along Chicago Avenue. The neighborhood itself will move several metered parking spaces on Chicago Ave. to unmetered blocks in the 2nd Ward to add more traffic lanes on Chicago Ave.

The zoning committee has yet to approve the planned development.

Hopkins claims that the result of adding additional traffic lanes “will be better traffic conditions”, but that is not true. Many studies find that increasing car traffic capacity – by adding more lanes – ultimately results in the same amount of traffic filling the new capacity, a result called induced demand.

One way to increase the number of people, not just vehicles, moving along Chicago Ave is to implement bus lanes along the corridor. In fact, the CTA provided data showing that its Chicago #66 buses only account for 2% of vehicle traffic on the street, but carry about 30% of all people traveling on the street.

Streetsblog and other local transit advocates have already covered the need for bus lanes on Chicago Ave., one of the city’s busiest bus routes. By improving the level of service, the bus lanes could also bring some riders back onto the route, which saw a 4.9% drop in ridership between 2015 and 2016.

The development approval also comes at a time when CTA is conclusion of a multi-year study regarding the “Bus Slow Zones” on 79th St and Chicago Ave, which it plans to deliver at the end of this month. Although a copy is not yet publicly available, notes from Alderman Hopkins’ office suggest that dedicated bus lanes and locations for queue jump signals are recommended for this route. Unfortunately, these recommendations aren’t currently required as part of development, and while Hopkins’ office has said they will work with the developer to consider CTA’s recommendations, it’s not as strong a commitment as those that end up being integrated into the plan. Development (such as the new Divvy station).

Since the parking spaces to be removed are metered spaces owned by Chicago Parking Meters, LLC, they will be relocated elsewhere in the neighborhood. Normally, moving metered parking is a process the city avoids and has used to justify not putting bus and bike lanes on city streets. Although moving paid parking is a difficult process that the City wants to avoid, it’s obviously a worthwhile move when it comes to moving more cars, but not always when it’s is about moving more people by public transport.

The increased car travel that will occur due to new traffic lanes and all the additional parking also poses an increased threat to people walking or biking on Chicago Ave. From Paulina St to State St, Chicago Ave is designated a “high collision corridor” by the city’s Vision Zero action plan and as such should be given priority when it comes to improvements However, the only major action taken here is to modify traffic lights with the sole aim of improving vehicular traffic – there are no explicit plans to improve walking and cycling safety along along Chicago Ave.

Adding capacity for over 1,000 vehicles and increasing road capacity is a misguided approach to solving traffic problems, especially in a dense, transit-rich neighborhood. The next stage of this development involves approval by the Zoning, Landmarks and Building Standards Committee, which holds regular public meetings at City Hall, and gives you the opportunity to provide feedback regarding Development.

The next meetings are scheduled for January 25 and February 22, but the agenda for the latter has not yet been set. Alderman Hopkins’ office can be reached online, by email at [email protected] or (312) 643-2299.

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Hundreds of new parking spaces towards the old town

A new parking garage has added more than 300 new parking spaces to Old Town Fort Collins.

Of the 323 parking spaces in the new Firehouse Alley garage between Walnut Street and Jefferson Street, 216 are open to the public. The others are reserved for guests of the adjoining Elizabeth Hotel, which opened this week.

The garage opened to the public on Thursday.

Parking in the new garage is more expensive than in the city’s other two parking lots, but drivers can power the meter with a smartphone app called FC Parking. Parking costs $ 1.50 an hour – 50 cents more per hour than the other two garages in the Old Town – and the first hour is not free, unlike other structures.

The parking spaces in the Firehouse Alley garage have sensors that can monitor when someone is parked there and for how long. Drivers pay in advance at a kiosk and can add time through the parking app.

“It’s really important to us to make parking as easy as possible,” said Craig Dubin, director of communications and administration at Transfort, in a press release.

Related:Fort Collins seeks to silence train horns in Old Town again

The $ 12 million parking structure was paid for through a public-private partnership between the city, the Downtown Development Authority and the hotel.

For people looking to save on parking, there’s good news. The city has made parking free at the three garages in the Old City on Saturdays and Sundays for the rest of the year.

Fort Collins has been working to add additional parking spaces to the downtown area since 2013, when city council approved the parking plan for the downtown and surrounding areas. This plan provided for the addition of 1,500 parking spaces in the old town and the increase in infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists.

Alicia Stice covers transportation and the latest news for The Coloradoan. Follow her on twitter @AliciaStice.

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect that the parking lot opened on Thursday.

Local:Fort Collins Reduces Old Town Smoking Ban

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Gold Line park-n-riders get 145 parking spots in downtown Azusa garage – San Gabriel Valley Tribune

AZUSA >> Gold Line users frustrated by a severe lack of parking at the downtown tram station now have access to 145 additional spaces, the result of a one-year municipal agreement in effect on July 1.

The city temporarily ceded 145 spaces in a multi-story parking lot east of Azusa Avenue and north of the station to train passengers in exchange for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) paying $ 31,000 to the city for operation and maintenance.

“We heard from the public and we did something to help improve conditions there,” said Dave Sotero, a spokesperson for Metro.

However, additional places are not free. Newly acquired spots from Metro cost $ 39 per month. Parking permits are available online at metro.thepermitstore.com and go fast, said Frank Ching, director of parking management at Metro.

Metro had sold 73 permits as of Tuesday, Ching said. Metro can sell approximately 100 additional parking permits for the multi-storey garage, known as the Azusa Intermodal Transit Center.

In the 545-space parking structure completed in February, Metro and Foothill Transit each received 200 spaces, while the City of Azusa received 145. The garage was built by the City, Metro and Foothill Transit, the bus agency. City spaces have 3 hour time limits; Foothill Transit spots require permits but no charge. Metro spaces on the fifth and sixth floors are split between permit only and unrestricted.

Metro Gold Line parking lots fill the allotted spaces every weekday between 6 and 7 a.m., while many are forced to find parking elsewhere. The problem began shortly after the opening on March 5 of the 11.5-mile Foothill Gold Line extension between eastern Pasadena and Azusa Pacific University / Citrus College. To stem an overflow on local streets, the city has enacted parking limits near the downtown train station. Now commuters park further away in unrestricted areas and walk several blocks to and from the station, said Troy Butzlaff, Azusa city manager.

The extra spaces are a temporary fix, said Butzlaff, who helped negotiate the deal with Metro. It was unanimously approved by Azusa City Council on June 27.

The city will want to reclaim these spaces when a new mixed-use development adjacent to the station is completed in around 18 to 24 months, he said.

“This will help reduce some of the problem until a more permanent solution is determined,” Butzlaff said. “It won’t eliminate him. There will still be other people who want to use the Gold Line and cannot find parking. “

Metro and Azusa are also looking for offsite parking to resolve the issue. Butzlaff said the city has land that can accommodate around 70 cars. The owner of the Citrus Crossing Mall on North Citrus and East Aosta Avenues may also be interested in leasing 100 parking spaces at Metro, Butzlaff said.

“These solutions will be seriously considered,” he said, but the city and private landowners are unwilling to pay the cost of a shuttle service.

A Glendora Town Shuttle operates to APU / Citrus and Downtown Azusa stations. The shuttle runs every 30 minutes during the morning and evening rush hours for $ 1 per round trip. Residents of Azusa have the first shot at metro parking permits. They can also book a ride to and from the station using the call service, but they must call ahead.

The city and Metro said the parking problems were the result of unforeseen demand.

The Gold Line Foothill Extension is more popular than imagined. In June, the average weekday ridership across the entire gold line from East Los Angeles to Azusa / Glendora reached 50,722, up from 43,000 a year ago, Metro reported. Saturday docks soared to nearly 39,000 from 29,000 a year ago, while Sunday and holiday docks were well above June 2015 levels. The Foothill extension may be responsible for ‘much of the line increases; the extension carried 5,000 passengers on weekdays in April, just one month after opening.

Rush hour ridership on the Foothill Extension is roughly equal to ridership on the Union Station segment in East LA that opened in 2009, according to the Metro The Source blog. The traffic was so heavy, Metro increased the number of trains three weeks ago.

“We weren’t expecting this attendance,” Butzlaff said. “Now that we have seen the traffic, we are making adjustments to adapt it. “

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$ 450 per month parking spots are coming to DUMBO – DUMBO – New York

The spaces will be located in the underground parking garage at 60 Water Street.
See the full legend

Management of two trees

DUMBO – There’s a new option for parking in the car-crowded DUMBO – but it’s not cheap.

The underground garage at 60 Water Street is now open with 300 spaces at a price of $ 450 per month. The 24-hour garage has three levels, has self-parking and drivers do not need to be residents of the luxury building to access it.

The monthly rate appears to be one of the most expensive in the neighborhood, with other garages in the neighborhood costing almost $ 100 less per month.

The lot at 85 Adams St. has 52 seats and costs $ 362.40 per month; 55 Washington St. has 120 spaces at a monthly rate of $ 362.40; and 20 Jay St. offers 120 spots for $ 339.75 per month.

Parking spaces are also available for daily use, relieving a neighborhood that is overrun with visitors on weekends.

“Parking is a major problem here,” said Hide, a DUMBO resident, who wrote a blog about the neighborhood called DUMBONYC. “With the increase in the number of tourists and businesses in the area, additional parking space relieves the burden of cars circling around city blocks looking for limited parking on the street. “

Hide added that many garages have closed in recent years, including the Old Fulton parking lot and the lot at 90 Washington Street which had 250 spaces.

A garage attendant at 60 Water Street said there had been a massive demand for parking spaces on weekends.

“There are a lot of daytime parking lots on weekends,” he said. “The spaces fill up and sometimes we have to push people back.”

Seats are $ 17 for one hour, $ 27 for 10 hours, and $ 34 for 24 hours.

60 Water St. is a 17-story luxury apartment building with 290 residential units and a rooftop terrace designed by High Line architects James Corner Field Operations.

The building, designed by LEESER Architecture, is expected to be completed this year.

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Parking spaces

Commuters concerned about lack of parking at Metrorail garages

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, Florida – Ridership on the Miami-Dade County Metrorail system is on the rise, but parking lots are the same size they were when they were first built in the 1980s.

This has caused frustration among commuters, who say they need more space to park.

Margo Siewert contacted Call Christina, concerned about the lack of Metrorail parking at the Dadeland North and South garages.

Siewert said that since mid-January, Dadeland North, the garage adjacent to the Metrorail was completely full by 8:30 a.m.

“So my day starts around 7:15 am when I drop my son off at school in Homestead,” Siewert said. “By the time I’m here at 8:30 am, I go around until 11 ground and it is completely filled. “

According to Siewert, the increase in ridership stems from the fact that the Brickell area is now the second largest financial district in the country.

“They’re constantly promoting bringing in new business and Miami is doing the same,” Siewert said. “If we don’t have the infrastructure to support this, we have to do it today. We are already too late.”

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“For the very first time we are seeing people use the Metrorail. The ridership, even in the eight years that I have been riding, has increased dramatically. I would say it has even doubled,” said Siewert.

Some of the commuters who spoke to Local 10 News from areas like Palmetto Bay, Pinecrest, Cutler Ridge and Homestead said they had only recently started using public transportation to avoid bumper-to-bumper traffic. ever-increasing shocks along the US-1.

During the first five months of 2015, Metrorail ridership increased at a rate of 2% compared to the previous year, with an average boarding of 76,300 people on weekdays. Over the past five years, total annual rail ridership has increased by 24% and average weekday ridership by 22%.

“We have grown as a community, we have grown as an urbanized area and one of the things is that there are growing pains associated with it,” said the director of transit for the County of County. Miami-Dade, Ysela Llort, “People who chose public transit made a great choice not only for themselves, but also for others in the community.”

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Miami-Dade Transit said that every 72 hours, riders of the Miami-Dade County transit system pay about $ 1 million in fares. On a daily basis, the system costs around $ 1.5 million to operate.

“Just to be clear, the fares charged into the rail system only pay for about 28% of that service. It’s heavily subsidized but it’s a great public service,” Llort said.

Commuters believe their money should go to a new parking lot, but a Metrorail official said the money is being used to run the Metrorail.

Llort said she had been in contact with landowners in the Dadeland area to see if they could build around 100 to 200 additional parking spaces. However, she still urges users to think about alternatives.

“We don’t have a bigger garage in the Dadeland area in our program, but we do have a series of park and ride lots along the bus lines. We urge people to look at the alternatives, or even use a different station, ”Llort says. “This would save money and aggravation.”

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Albert Hernandez, deputy director of engineering, planning and development, said his team is currently working on creating an app to help commuters know how many parking spaces are available in a parking lot before s ‘get there.

“A rider will be able to access his application via his iPhone or Samsung device and know the parking spaces available in each of the garages,” said Hernandez. “Not only through the app, there will be an electronic sign in front of the garage which will also display this information.”

According to Hernandez, the technology won’t be able to tell you exactly what spaces are available due to the cost. However, there are sensors at the entrance that will tell you availability at ground level but not at space level.

“We are advertising the construction this summer,” Hernandez said. “It’s going to take about a year for this to be in service, so we believe that by summer 2016 this technology will be available.”

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Miami-Dade Transit has said it has no plans to build another parking lot, a response Siewert finds insufficient. Siewert also doesn’t think the alternative to the bus will be useful.

“There are only certain bus lines that can accommodate this,” Siewert said. “Living in Homestead, I’m about four miles from the nearest bus parking lot. I should go four miles west instead of just jumping on the toll highway and going north, to get to Dadeland. “

Siewert said: “The problem exists today. It will only get worse and they have to think about the future now.”

South Dadeland Station

Parking spaces available (including surface spaces) 1290
Average use during the week 1,220
Percentage of occupancy 95 percent

Dadeland North Station

Parking spaces available 1 963
Average use during the week 1,846
Percentage of occupancy 94 percent

Miami South Station

Parking spaces available 1729
Average use during the week 831
Percentage of occupancy 48 percent

Follow Christina Vazquez on Twitter @CallChristinaTV

Follow Local 10 news on Twitter @ WPLGLocal10

Copyright 2015 by Local10.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Parking spaces

Re-imagine parking spaces as micro-apartments – streetsblog usa

This 135-square-foot micro-apartment was one of three designed by Savannah art students that were recently set up in an Atlanta parking lot. Photo: SCADpad.com

Can parking lots have a second life? A student project in Atlanta helps demonstrate the possibilities of each booth.

Students at Savannah College of Art and Design created three “SCADpads”: 135 square foot micro-apartments designed to fit the space defined by a single parking spot. Three prototypes of the modular homes, which cost between $ 40,000 and $ 60,000 to build, were installed in an Atlanta garage this spring, to help model what may be a more sustainable paradigm for the city.

Each micro-apartment has been designed by the students to reflect the culture of a different continent: Asia, North America and Europe. Each was equipped with a small kitchen, sofa bed, bathroom, and some high-tech features such as iPad-controlled ‘smart glass’ windows that can be hidden for privacy. . Additionally, each apartment included a ‘porch’ area, the size of an additional parking space, and a shared community garden that collects ‘gray water’ from the sink and shower.

The design of this apartment was inspired by North America.  Photo: SCADpad.com
This is the apartment designed for North America. Photo: SCADpad.com

Since April, the SCAD facility has been welcoming people who spend the night, mainly college students and alumni.

Rebecca Burns, a writer for Guardian whose husband is a member of the SCAD faculty, recently spent the night in a SCADpad. She says it was a bit cramped, but not too bad overall:

I’ve lived in studios before, but nothing that small. However, while small in square footage, the SCADpad felt more spacious, thanks in large part to the airy design and those large, smart glass windows. However, the kitchen is tiny: impossible for two to work side by side. The sofas / beds are spacious: two of us got comfortable watching Italy play England on the iPad (the SCADpads come with fast Wi-Fi). But when friends stopped to visit us, we quickly learned that it was difficult to accommodate four people in one of the units.

There was no room for us to comfortably entertain our guests in our small apartments, but the common living room was relaxing and had great views of the horizon. The community garden provided a calming contrast to all the concrete – and made for salad for dinner.

This micro-apartment was inspired by Asia.  Each apartment came with a patio the size of a parking space.  Photo: SCADpads.com
Each SCAD apartment comes with a terrace the size of a parking space. Photo: SCADpads.com

Apartments 300 square feet or less have become an affordable option for young people in cities like Seattle, Washington, and even Cleveland and Providence, Rhode Island.

Hopefully installing the SCADpads will help enlighten Atlanta residents about a whole new range of possibilities for some of the city’s underused urban spaces.

A mini-kitchen for a mini apartment.
A mini-kitchen for a mini apartment.
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Parking spaces

Forrest General adds 1,024 new parking spaces

HATTIESBURG, MS (WDAM) – THE FOLLOWING IS A NEWS RELEASE FROM FORREST GENERAL HOSPITAL

Thousands of employees, visitors, patients and family members come and go every day at Forrest General, making parking space a valuable commodity. Starting October 1, Forrest General continues its efforts to create a positive experience for visitors and employees with additional parking including over 1,000 new spaces!

Forrest General offers several parking options for patients and visitors, including ground floor parking lots and parking garages. Signage is placed around the parking lot and Forrest General Public Safety Officers patrol regularly and are available to assist you, if needed.

For patients and visitors:

Adeline parking lot (located on the south side of the hospital along Gordon’s Creek)

Forrest General’s newest parking lot; available to patients, visitors and employees:

  • 1,024 new places on five levels!
  • 18 ADA spaces and 3 spaces accessible to ADA vans on level 1, as well as a few spaces reserved for parking motorcycles.
  • Four entrances and two two-level connecting bridges between this and the 28th Avenue parking garage.
  • Level 4 of this garage is reserved for patients and visitors (no staff parking), so that they can access the Pedestrian Walkway.
  • Three elevators that transport to the 5 levels of the garage.
  • An open-air pedestrian walkway connects the 4th level of the Adeline parking garage to the third-floor lobby of the main hospital building.
  • If you are not using the pedestrian bridge, people parking in this garage can use the walkways across Gordon’s Creek to access the sidewalk from the main entrance.

Main entrance parking lot (located off Highway 49)

  • This bundle is for patients and visitors only and is ideal for visitors who will only be in the hospital for a short time.
  • ADA spaces reserved for people with disabilities and several spaces reserved for visiting clergy.
  • Convenient for the cafeteria, gift shop, lobby and for visiting all patient rooms.

28th Avenue parking lot (located in the outpatient registration hall)

  • Reserved for patients and visitors
  • Three levels of parking with ADA spaces reserved for people with disabilities on each level.
  • Convenient level 1 for: outpatient check-in area, medical records and other first floor areas.
  • Convenient level 2 for: surgery waiting rooms and ICU/CCU on the second floor.
  • Upper Level: For those visiting or receiving care at The Family Birthplace, which is on the 4th floor of the hospital.
  • Please note that there is no direct access from the parking garage to the 3rd floor of the hospital.

Central parking lot (adjacent to the 28th Avenue parking garage at the corner of 28th Avenue and Adeline Street)

  • Open to all employees, visitors and patients.
  • Accessible from 28th Avenue and Adeline Street.
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