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Covington begins mandating metered parking spaces on nights and weekends to protect small businesses

Seeking to preserve on-street parking for small businesses that need it to survive, the City of Covington will begin enforcing parking meters in the evenings and on Saturdays.

The long-awaited change brings Covington in line with surrounding towns and responds in part to complaints from business owners about spaces being monopolized by drivers who leave their cars parked throughout the weekend and into the evening.

(Photo by City of Covington)

“As downtown grows and gets busier, we want to make sure our businesses have parking available for their patrons and customers,” City Manager Ken Smith said. “These metered spotlights are designed for constant rolling. This is their goal. If a car is left in one place every late afternoon or from Friday afternoon to Monday morning, it harms surrounding businesses.

The change takes effect immediately, although there will be a grace period – i.e. “courtesy tickets” or warnings – while the public gets used to the new rules and meters are recalibrated and relabeled. The City will work with merchants near metered parking lots to find ways to educate their customers.

The new hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Previously, meters were not applied on Saturdays and after 5 p.m. on weekdays.

The new app was approved by the Board of Commissioners on Tuesday evening as part of a series of parking-related changes. These changes include:

• Increase in metered rates from $1.10 to $1.50 per hour, matching the rate in other urban areas this side of the Ohio River. Drivers will be able to continue to pay in cash at meters or via the free PassportParking® app available for download on the App Store and Google Play.

• $5 increase in monthly passes at many public parking lots and surface lots (bringing most to $55 or $60 per month).

• “Clean up” the language in the ordinances to continue to refine the authority of the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority and its legal status as “owner” and manager of parking lots. (The authority was established in 2018 to operate and maintain public on- and off-street parking in Covington. Its five members are approved by the Board of Commissioners. The City contracts with ABM Parking Services for day-to-day operation. )

• Hired a first-ever Executive Director to handle the administrative duties of the parking authority and help the City take a more strategic and analytical approach to its parking issues. Kyle Snyder will split his duties between this position and his duties as the City’s infrastructure development specialist.

Other changes are possible on the road, including the return of parking meters in commercial areas like the MainStrasse Village, and better signage.

The changes were recommended by consultants who undertook a comprehensive analysis of the City’s parking, by the parking authority itself, and by City staff working in areas such as economic development and public works.

(Photo by City of Covington)

The City is in the process of updating a web page at www.covingtonky.gov to reflect changes and show available public parking locations in Covington.

Invest in the future

Although modest, the fee increases will allow the city to begin making more robust investments in improving its parking lot, Smith said.

“We definitely need more parking space, and we need to improve amenities, such as kiosks,” he said. “But you can’t upgrade or add facilities and options without revenue, and we’ve fallen behind.”

The perceived lack of parking is an ongoing source of complaints in Covington. As in urban areas across the country, however, some of the complaints are based on unrealistic expectations that parking should be free and always available right outside a destination. For example, people who are comfortable walking from the confines of a mall parking lot are not willing to walk the same distance from a garage or lot to a restaurant or bar.

“Street parking is a commodity, plain and simple,” Smith said. “We have plenty of parking spaces downtown, if you know where to look, but there will never be enough spaces along a busy street to accommodate three to four cars per household, the more visitors, the more customers entering and leaving stores.

The city manager called the parking changes “growing pains” as Covington’s economy continues to grow.

“If you have an abundance of parking spaces downtown, that’s a sign of a ‘dead’ city,” he said.

From the town of Covington

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Parking garage

The West New York Planning Board reviews plans for a parking garage on the 57th Street lot

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A rendering of what the parking lot will look like when completed.

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The architect incorporated embroidery designs into the brick facade as a tribute to WNY’s history.

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Another view of the 57th Street parking lot.

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The parking garage could have three or four stories depending on how contractors place bids to build the project.


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A rendering of what the parking lot will look like when completed.

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The architect incorporated embroidery designs into the brick facade as a tribute to WNY’s history.

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Another view of the 57th Street parking lot.

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The parking garage could have three or four stories depending on how contractors place bids to build the project.


The West New York Planning Board reviewed city plans to build a parking lot on the site of the surface parking lot on 57th Street. The garage is one of the few the city plans to build on its current municipal lands to alleviate parking issues, including at 51st Street and 54th Street.

Michael Nelson, project architect, presented the preliminary plans for the parking garage to council. The presentation was a courtesy review and discussion, and no action was taken other than a draft letter confirming to the Western New York Board of Commissioners that the Planning Board had reviewed the project.

The existing car park is approximately 94 parking spaces. The planned new garage will contain approximately 197 parking spaces.

“Planned structure parking is 197 parking spaces with potentially spaces beyond pending the supply environment and if we are able to award an alternative supply to the project,” Nelson said.

North of the parking lot is 58and Street, to the west is Bergenline Avenue, to the south is 57and Street, and to the east are buildings. The entrance would be at 57and Street. Under the ramp to the first floor is storage space for the city, according to Nelson. The three-storey car park has several stairs and an elevator.

Three or four floors depending on the offers

While the current render and plans call for three stories, West New York is also exploring the possibility of a four-story parking lot. The city asked the architects of the project to study an alternative offer for an additional floor.

“There is this option, if the numbers are competitive enough, to have another floor,” Nelson said. “This has been incorporated into the tender documents.”

The architect incorporated embroidery designs into the brick facade as a tribute to WNY’s history.

However, the number of floors selected for the parking garage will depend on the nature of the bids received for the project. According to Nelson, the structure can be built to have additional floors in the future, but the road layout would prevent this.

“The difficulty of adding floors to parking lots is the very tight logistics,” Nelson said. “This site in particular is very constrained due to the tight fabric of the street… We could design the structure to support future seams, but the reality is that it is not possible to get a crane from the order of magnitude required to lift the additional loads 120 foot pieces on the building.

Integrate the history of the textile industry

According to Nelson, the city’s history was considered when designing the parking lot’s facade.

“When we started working on the project, one of our first efforts was to review the site in the context of the neighborhood, as well as the building’s relevance to the city. We were inspired by the city’s rich textile industry and history. This began to blend in with some of the neighborhood’s residential vernacular, brick structures and brick patterns.

Another view of the 57th Street parking lot.

The brick design is intended to highlight Western New York’s history as a former center of the textile industry. The brick patterns aim to mimic this and the surrounding neighborhood.

“The precast concrete structure with brick veneer, brick patterns, tones and colors was derived from early studies spent in the neighborhood and research into the city’s history,” Nelson said.

Pedestrian walkways approximately 13 feet wide will run around the perimeter of the building.

Council promotes parking plans

President Clara Brito Herrera praised the project, but was in favor of the larger car park option.

“Nice project,” said Herrera. “It’s definitely going to improve the neighborhood and it’s very much needed… One of the things I love the most about the design is the safety with the glass as you walk through the building and the walkways from street to street. other. It’s easy to get to and it’s a great project.

Vice President Jorge Gomez echoed Herrera that the rendering of the parking lot was “beautiful” and that he was also in favor of the larger option.

“If there’s a way to add more parking to it, like another level, that would be even better,” Gomez said. “But it looks great and it’s excited for the city.”

The parking garage could have three or four stories depending on how contractors place bids to build the project.

Commissioner Marguerite Guzman expressed his enthusiasm for the project.

“I really like the embroidery pattern,” Guzman said. “I know this is going to be very well received by the community as one of the issues we are facing is parking. And that’s one of our promises and we keep it.

Commissioner Andrea Bounsiar noted: “It’s aesthetically pleasing, very necessary, and I like the features of glass for safety.”

Commissioner Jonathon Castaneda called him a “gbig project” and Commissioner Ignacio Amaro added that it was “very beautiful”.

Project timeline

According to Nelson, in terms of chronology, tThe aim is to present bids for the project to the council of commissioners on April 20. He added that the structure and aesthetics of the building are the drivers of the program.

“Once the project has been tendered, the contractor will mobilize shortly thereafter,” Nelson said. “Hopefully in June the schedule would start with early tenders with the contractor eventually awarding the project to whoever is needed to fabricate the precast concrete components in the works.”

Nelson said the city is “save the calendar so that the site does not remain inactive for a period of time.”

He added that he expects completion by mid-November 2023. This garage, along with the others, aims to add hundreds of parking spaces in Western New York.

For updates on this story and others, visit www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at [email protected]

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Parking spaces

Cities are forcing businesses to overstock parking spaces. A lawsuit says it’s unconstitutional.

Zoning laws have recently received a lot of (well-deserved) bad press for driving up housing costs, driving out residents, and generally prohibiting people from putting their properties to their best use. Even in the precious few municipalities that don’t have a comprehensive zoning code, city officials still have plenty of tools to make life difficult for budding entrepreneurs.

This includes unzoned Pasadena, Texas. The city will not allow local business owner Azael Sepulveda to open a body shop on his own property unless he adds 23 more parking spaces. Sepulveda says a lot of parking spaces won’t fit on his property, and even if it did, the cost of creating it would be ruinous.

“I put everything on the line to develop my business and support my family,” he said. noted. “I have operated with a handful of parking spaces for years and had no problems. Now the city is preventing me from achieving my dream and is threatening to put me out of business.”

In December, Sepulveda sued Pasadena in Harris County District Court. His complaint argues that the city’s parking regulations violate the Texas Constitution’s guarantees of economic freedom and equal protection.

Earlier this week, a Harris County judge granted Sepulveda a temporary injunction against the city, allowing it to open at its new location while the trial unfolds. It’s a good sign for the trial and a welcome break for his business, says Tori Clark, an attorney at the Institute for Justice, the public interest law firm representing Sepulveda.

“It gives him a reprieve from paying both the mortgage on his property and the lease on the property he currently operates,” Clark said. Raison. “It is true that this is only a temporary injunction. There is a risk that our client will open his new shop and eventually have to close.”

Sepulveda opened its first body shop, Oz Mechanics, in 2013 in a rented storefront in Pasadena. In July 2021, he invested all his savings in buying his own garage.

The previous owner also had a body shop that had operated smoothly through the city for decades, leading Sepulveda to assume he would have no problem moving his own business there.

But when he applied for the permit he needed to open his business, the city told him that Pasadena’s recently updated parking ordinance required body shops to contain 5.5 spaces for every 1,000 feet. of ground surface. This meant that his company would have to have 28 spaces in total, which is 23 more than it currently has.

According to his complaint, Sepulveda customers rarely occupy more than two parking spaces per day, which the existing five spaces on his property could easily accommodate. Adding the extra 23 spaces would cost $40,000 that he doesn’t have, and they wouldn’t even fit on the property.

This economic burden that these parking requirements placed on Sepulveda’s business and the physical impossibility of complying with them should have been enough to earn it a gap with the city. Indeed, planning staff encouraged him to apply, which he dutifully did in October 2021.

That’s when things started to get weird.

City staff initially did not confirm that he had received his application. When Sepulveda attempted to file a $400 filing fee, the city refused to accept it. This initial silence precipitated a month of back and forth between Sepulveda’s lawyers and the city; the first continually asking what the status of the request was, and the second refusing to say why it was not being considered.

Left with no other option, Sepulveda sued Pasadena in December. The lawsuit comes at a time when parking requirements are under intense scrutiny.

libertarian leaning experts argue that these regulations force developers and business owners to create more parking spaces than a free market would provide. Regulatory compliance progressive don’t like them for supposedly encouraging people to drive more and use public transport less.

Either way, the result of parking minimums is overconsumption of land and higher development costs overall. Some projects, be it a new apartment complex or a new restaurant, are rendered completely unprofitable.

Due to these adverse effects, cities begin reduce or even completely repeal their minimum parking regulations. The results are lower rents and more commercially viable Properties.

Clark notes that neighboring Houston manages to do just fine while requiring half the number of parking spaces for auto repair shops. The fact that other cities survive with much lower parking minimums makes Pasadena’s regulations not only unnecessary but also unconstitutional, she says.

“The city cannot point to any evidence why auto repair shops in general, and Mr. Sepulveda’s shop in particular, need as many parking spaces as they need,” he said. she.

This lack of evidence, combined with the burden placed on Sepulveda’s activities, constitutes a violation of the Texas Constitution’s guarantees of economic freedom and private property rights, its lawsuit argues. The complaint also alleges that the city’s requirement that its business have more parking spaces than hotels or gymnasiums violates Texas’ guarantee of equal protection under the law.

Clark says a trial date is set for early June. The case presents an opportunity to protect his client and other Pasadena business owners from regulations that impose significant costs with no real benefit.

“The city has no good reason to make these demands” on Sepulveda, she said. “Complying with these demands is physically impossible, and it prevents him from opening his shop and ensuring that his family is taken care of.”

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Parking garage

New downtown Clarksville parking lot planned by Franklin Street

Downtown Clarksville is in the midst of a construction boom.

The F&M Bank Arena is under construction and when completed will attract up to 6,000 people for some events.

There is also a host of surrounding private commercial developments, either in the construction phase or on the drawing board.

It begs the question, “Where are all these people going to park their cars to eat, shop, and hold events in the arena?”

At a town hall meeting Wednesday at the Roxy Theater, Clarksville Mayor Joe Pitts and the Clarksville Parking Commission shared some responses.

There are a few new things.

Linda Gerron, director of communications for the City of Clarksville, introduces Mayor Joe Pitts, right, and Michael Palmore, the city's parking officer, at City Hall on Wednesday.

Primarily, Pitts said, a site is chosen for a potential parking garage that would be accessible primarily to Franklin Street and surrounding areas.

The goal, he said, is to have it ready for use by the summer of 2023.

It is still early in this process, but it is now moving forward after discussions with several stakeholders.

“We are talking about making this proposal public after presenting it first to the Parking Commission and then to City Council because they would be required to issue debt,” Pitts said during a full-capacity rally at the Roxy.

“There is a lot of interest in our downtown area. We understand that the arena project and the private development in our downtown area makes it crucial for us to do this and meet our parking needs.”

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After conversations with Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett, the county government will be “in some way” involved in the parking lot project, Pitts added.

The county initially paved the way and authorized funding for the F&M Bank Arena.

Pitts also touched on two other topics surrounding the parking lot conversation.

“We’ve spent the last few months brainstorming ideas related to this discussion,” he said. “One idea that we have eliminated is that of building a parking lot in the town hall parking lot.

“We have also eliminated the idea of ​​privatizing our car parks.”

Park Mobile app

City parking manager Michael Palmore provided an update on the new ParkMobile phone app, now available for use downtown.

Through the app, users pay for street or garage parking, find vacancies, track time left in their spot and more, without using a parking meter or kiosk.

Park Mobile app logo

Monthly parking permits will also be issued through ParkMobile’s payment system, making it quick and easy to renew them, according to Palmore.

As part of this partnership, ParkMobile will service 234 on-street and off-street parking spaces throughout the downtown core.

First and Second Streets will be mixed-use, allowing users to pay at the meter or via ParkMobile.

Cumberland Garages in downtown Clarksville will also be mixed-use with new ParkMobile-enabled payment machines, soon to be installed.

With unpaid parking tickets piling up at City Hall, Palmore said he hopes the new systems being implemented, along with a return to “evicting” excessive parking violators, will bring back more great solvency in the Parking Commission and that more motorists would follow the city. parking rules.

Members of the Clarksville Parking Commission include Andrea Herrera, Andy Kean, David Shelton, Ryan Bowie and Councilman Travis Holleman.

Contact Jimmy Settle at [email protected] or 931-245-0247. To support his work, sign up for a digital subscription to TheLeafChronicle.com.

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Parking spaces

Why Salisbury has too many parking spaces

The Journal reported on January 13 that 61.9% of online respondents to the Salisbury Neighborhood Development Plan consultation opposed plans for housing in the Brown Street car park.

The intention was always, when the five Park and Ride locations opened, to reduce downtown parking.

However, this plan was never implemented, instead the long-term car parks were replaced with short-term car parks, which led to more traffic movements in the city and a failure of the Park and Ride to achieve the traffic reduction for which it was intended.

We are now left with a city that has far too many parking spaces taking up valuable space, an underutilized park and ride, congested streets and poor air quality.

For the past 20 years the intention has remained for Brown Street and Salt Lane car parks to be redeveloped for housing and other commercial uses, but once again Salisbury residents have opposed any restrictions their right to drive and park where they want. and in this they are supported by some of our elected councillors, including the head of the Departmental Council.

I cannot agree with Cllr Clewer’s statement that removing parking on Brown Street would increase travel times and carbon emissions for those who live on the south side of town.

The Culver Street car park is in need of refurbishment, it is directly accessible from the Ring Road and would avoid congestion on Exeter Street which causes poor air quality for residents and schoolchildren along this busy road.

When will Salisbury follow the example of many other cities in this country and move towards streets for people not cars and encourage active travel and public transport for the benefit of all?

We seemed to be heading in the right direction with the central area setting and the friendly streets, both approved by our elected councils, but abandoned due to strident objectors.

Councilors react to the wishes of voters so let’s make our voice heard, the neighborhood plan is that opportunity, we all have a right to clean air and safe streets, if not with more and more housing generating more car journeys, Salisbury is heading for disaster.

Pam Rouquette

Salisbury

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Parking garage

A giant, luminous octopus takes over the parking lot in the city center

LAURENT COSENTINO

One of the largest works of public art ever erected in greater Lansing has quietly crept into the heart of downtown in the final weeks of 2021.

An undulating ribbon of anodized aluminum hundreds of feet long, designed by St. Johns artist Ivan Iler of Netflix “Metal Masters” fame, now spans the colossal west and north faces Capitol Avenue parking ramp between Shiawassee and Ionia streets.

At night, hundreds of LED lights embedded in the aluminum flash in programmed patterns, as if a phosphorescent octopus has taken over the garage for good.

City officials say the unnamed sculpture is meant to distract from the raw concrete brutalism of the huge ramp, built in 1972 in the widely despised style named after raw concrete, or concrete slabs crude cast in place.

“It’s brutal, for sure,” said director of economic development and planning Brian McGrain. “The name speaks for itself.”

Chad Gamble, the city’s parking manager when the project was conceived three years ago, called the garage “monstrous.”

“It breaks up downtown,” Gamble said.

But the artist is not one of the haters.

“There are some very beautiful things about brutalism,” Iler said. “I wanted to contrast with them rather than hide them.”

The Greater Lansing Arts Council and city officials chose Iler’s vision over several competing designs.

“The ramp has all these beautiful architectural lines and a really amazing shape,” Iler said. “He has a simple beauty. At the same time, it’s a lot of straight edges and a lot of straight lines. My thought was to add a more natural element to it.

Iler’s organic vision dovetailed with Lansing’s multi-year, $7 million bond-funded effort to renovate the three downtown parking structures and make them more welcoming to residents and visitors.

Iler already had several huge sculptures to his credit, including a 25-foot-tall leaping fish installed at Baldwin in 2018, billed as the “world’s largest brown trout sculpture” (beating the previous record holder in New York by a few feet). Zealand), and “Portrait of a Dreamer”, also known as “The Gearbox”, a 15-foot-tall bust of a man with gears extending a further 20 feet from his skull above Museum Drive in downtown Lansing.

Iler has just started work on a new sculpture, ‘Bridge Between Banks’, after winning a competition to design the first public sculpture to be installed at Dimondale in December.

But the Capital Avenue octopus is by far the greatest thing he’s ever worked on.

The obvious choice for material was aluminum, which is light (about a third the weight of stainless steel), corrosion resistant and good at reflecting light. It also stands out well, even during the day, when layered on raw concrete.

“The beauty is in the contrast between the two,” Iler said. “We’re not trying to hide either; only to show one using the other.

Iler appreciated the pure geometric shapes of the ramp even more when a colleague created a 3D computer model that he could manipulate.

“I could fly around it like I was Peter Pan, able to look in any direction, from any angle,” he said. “I went over there and took pictures, but realized I wasn’t going to get what I needed out of it.”

He liked to work within the confines of the site.

“It’s the first I’ve ever done that’s been integrated into a building,” he said. “Sometimes having constraints can drive creativity. Without this building, I would never have designed something like this.

Gamble, project manager for the now-retired parking lot renovations, said he was inspired by recent improvements to the campus of nearby Lansing Community College, where former LCC president Brent Knight launched an all-out assault on the brutalist look of campus.

“I had the honor of riding around campus in Dr. Knight’s golf cart, and that was the seed,” Gamble said. Knight added dozens of sculptures, panels, flowerbeds, trees, shrubs and a clock tower, splashing the raw 70s concrete with light and color at every turn.

Gamble pointed out a factor that most people don’t consider when thinking about a parking garage.

“From a visitor perspective, it’s the first and last thing people will see when they come to downtown,” he said.

It took a statewide team of engineers and makers, and numerous Zoom meetings, to bring Iler’s design to life.

Engineers at Walker Consultants, based in Ann Arbor and Kalamazoo, transformed the design into three dimensions.

“We had electrical engineers looking at configurations and power consumptions, making sure we could power everything,” Gamble said. “You don’t normally think of putting a sculpture on the side of a building.”

The octopus came to life, section by section, in the Detroit workshop of America’s Green Line, an LED lighting company based under the direction of Aaron Mohr.

The lights are about 5 feet apart and the foil tape varies in width from about eight to 14 inches.

“It has to look good when you look at it from the front, but also if you look at it from an angle,” Iler said. “I needed to make it wider and thinner to give it a feeling of fluidity and movement as you walk past it.”

Chris Revis of Detroit and Grand Rapids-based Ram Construction called the sculpture a “descent tape.”

“I’m in the concrete business and I’ve never worked on anything like this,” Revis said. “It was fascinating to see everything come to fruition, from a scratch drawing on a piece of paper to seeing the side of a building. It was a very special project.”

“It was good, like a team effort,” Iler said.

Late in the fall, Revis, McGrain, Iler, and other major players converged in Detroit to view the finished sections and give the go-ahead for delivery to Lansing.

The sculpture was secured to the garage with approximately 500 Tapcon carbon steel screws of the same type that you might use to mount shelves to your cement basement wall.

Revis said the design only needed “a few tweaks here and there” as it goes. The biggest issue the team faced was negotiating the supply chain delays that occurred in the second half of 2021.

“I think it will leave a lasting impression on a lot of people,” he said.

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Impact on the website! With the new parking action plan, the non-scientific parking spaces on the LHH road have been removed


Impact on the website! With the new Parking Action Plan, the unscientific parking spaces on Light House Hill Road (LHH) have been removed

Mangaluru: Talk about the magic that the issues highlighted on Mangalorean.com are fixed in no time. civic issues and within hours or days the authorities concerned, who cannot stand criticism of their negligence, swiftly step into action and rectify civic issues. In the past, Mangalorean.com has highlighted various civic issues on our website, and there has been a huge effect with most issues resolved in no time, from the rectification of dilapidated roads, open drainage, unfriendly trails, dog threat, neglect, garbage, illegal palisades, potholes, dying trees, etc.

Following the report (Ref: Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY! ), Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL) officials have now removed non-science parking spaces near the Ladies Club / across from Tagore Park on Light House Hill Road, Mangaluru, after developing a new action plan for the parking.

BEFORE WEBSITE IMPACT….

As the construction works on the section of Light House Hill Road to Dr Ambedkar Circle (Jyothi Circle) widened, although the project was progressing slowly, it was good news for the citizens of Mangaluru and tourists in Mangaluru. . Unfortunately, the bad news was that providing unscientific parking spaces for all four wheels on this widening road, which was just a silly idea. All of the educated people and people of common sense that the Mangalorean team interacted with all said that the parking spaces that had been provided were nothing but foolish and absolutely a stupid idea, of the from those responsible behind the plan.

These car parks are close to the Ladies Club and opposite Tagore Park, on the stretch of LHH Road, where four-wheelers parked in these spaces with their bumpers extending out onto the road, imagine what the situation would be like on the road. traffic on this road during rush hour. Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces. A few days after the publication of our report, Sincerely, from the Mangalorean team, received a call from the General Manager (Technical) of MSCL stating that the parking spaces will be removed and the new parking action plan will be given to us. notified soon.

AFTER IMPACT ON THE WEBSITE….

Once again, on January 7, 2022, Er Arun Prabha, the Managing Director of MSCL, said that with the new action plan for parking, instead of allowing four-wheeled vehicles to park on the side right of the road adjacent to the wall of the Ladies Club, a parking space will be provided for two-wheelers, with marked lines. And now, where the two-wheelers are parked next to the Tagore Park, this space will be provided for the parking of four-wheelers, with marked lines (only). This is the new action plan on the parking issue, and I hope it will serve the purpose without objections or complaints from motorists and citizens.

Either way, I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

Vehicles parked along the road can create a similar bottleneck and sometimes accentuate a pre-existing bottleneck due to the conflict and blockages they create for the flow of traffic. Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every now and then the meters can divide the congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.

As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to get people to get out their cars and vehicles more often, but to provide more convenience for those who choose to bring their vehicles and remove bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.

Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more informed for drivers to choose the right mode of transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! .

MSCL CLARIFIES ON THE DIGGING / CUTTING OF THE NEW LIGHT HOUSE HILL ROAD:

In response to the report published in Mangalorean.com (Ref: OH MY GOD! Total nonsense yet again dig / cut all new Light House Hill Road ), Er Arun Prabha – General Manager (Technical) of Mangaluru Smart City Ltd clarified by stating

“MSCL dismantled about 50m of this section at the end of the road for a lane width to build a retaining wall. This became necessary due to the (free) U-turn to the right. We also had to realign the UGD line here. This is old concrete, not new concrete.

ALSO, READ RELATED ARTICLES ON WEBSITE IMPACT:

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Parking facilities

DC Srinagar reviews measures for adequate parking facilities, traffic decongestion in the city

To ensure adequate parking facilities in highly congested areas of Srinagar city, Srinagar Deputy Commissioner Mohammad Aijaz Asad on Friday chaired a joint meeting of all stakeholders at the meeting hall of the office complex of Srinagar. DC here.

During the meeting, a discussion took place on the issue of providing adequate parking space for traders in Lal Chowk, Residency Road, Poloview, Batmaloo, Hari Sing High Street, Goni Khan, Shaheed Gunj and other adjacent areas to overcome traffic congestion. in the city.

The meeting also discussed the measure undertaken to streamline and improve the traffic system, apart from the measures taken to reduce the nuisances of improper parking and road encroachments in the city.

On occasion, the Deputy Commissioner stressed the need to coordinate the efforts of the district administration, traffic police, SMC, SDA and all stakeholders including traders and customers , strictly following traffic rules in letter and spirit for the greater good of the public.

The DC has also focused on making the best use of existing parking and simultaneously identifying and developing new parking spaces to accommodate merchant and customer vehicles. He also asked to reserve adequate parking spaces for traders at a reasonable monthly fee.

While interacting with the representatives of various trades, the DC asked them to cooperate with the Administration to ensure smooth regulation of traffic in the city especially on congested and dense traffic lanes to overcome traffic jams.

The DC also asked them to motivate other traders and the general public to use paid parking lots to overcome traffic jams.

Regarding the merchants’ request to provide parking for merchants at preferential rates, the Deputy Commissioner requested the concerned authorities of SDA to consider the merchants’ demand as a matter of priority and review the parking fees for merchants because they must use daily.

The Deputy Commissioner also requested the SDA authorities to submit the land allocation requisitions for new parking sites in the city so that enough parking space is made available to accommodate more vehicles.

The Deputy Chairman of Srinagar Development Authority also addressed the occasion and briefed the Chairman on the current parking capacity available in Srinagar.

Vice President, SDA, Bashir Ahmad, Additional Deputy Commissioner Srinagar, Dr. Syed Hanief Balkhi, SP Traffic, Zaffar Ahmad, Director of Planning, SDA Secretary, Tehsildar South and other concerned persons were present at the meeting.

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Parking spaces

How Oslo is recycling its old parking spaces for cyclists

In recent years, Oslo has seen a proliferation of pedestrian streets, public transport now serves all corners of the city, and parking spaces, usually reserved for cars, have transformed over time into cycle paths. When they don’t end up like this, they are replaced by green spaces or bicycle parking lots.

The trend is now for the transformation of old car parks into cycle paths, easily recognizable by their red color. Bikes (including cargo bikes) are available through bike-share systems to help those without their own bike get around the city center, which is fully geared up for them.

However, there are still a few parking spaces, reserved primarily for disabled drivers, emergency vehicles or delivery drivers (even if the latter are generally only allowed to drive in the morning). Others are dedicated to charging electric vehicles. In addition, there are still many parking lots on the outskirts of the center.

It should also be noted that the few cars still circulating in the center of Oslo are mostly electric. The Norwegian capital is now one of the European cities with the highest rates of electric vehicles on the road, according to a recent report by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT).

All of these changes are being made to help improve air quality and combat climate change. But another advantage is the safety of road users. A pioneer in the pedestrianization of its city center, Oslo recorded no deaths of pedestrians or cyclists in 2019, a unique case in the world for a city of its size.

While Oslo began its transformation decades ago, other major European capitals, such as Paris, Madrid and Berlin, often face greater opposition from residents when imposing this type of policy. – AFP Relax news

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IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out


IMPACT OF THE WEBSITE! Unscientific parking spaces on LHH road will soon be phased out

Mangaluru: Talk about the magic that the issues highlighted on Mangalorean.com are fixed in no time. civic issues and within hours or days the authorities concerned, who cannot stand criticism of their negligence, swiftly step into action and rectify civic issues. In the past, Mangalorean.com has highlighted various civic issues on our website, and there has been a huge effect with most issues resolved in no time, from the rectification of dilapidated roads, open drainage, unfriendly trails, dog threat, neglect, garbage, illegal palisades, potholes, dying trees, etc.

Following the report (Ref: Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!) posted in Mangalorean.com, relevant officials at Mangaluru Smart City Ltd have decided to remove unscientific parking spaces and come up with better parking facilities, and details of this plan will be updated soon when we have it. . After the report was highlighted on our website, many of our avid readers forwarded the links of the report to officials at MSCL as well as to the Commissioner and Mayor of Mangaluru City Corporation, who received affirmative action.


One reader praising the efforts of the Mangalorean team to highlight civic issues commented, saying, “This is why I love the Mangalorean.com web for news that is unbiased. Your website is totally different from other web news in Mangalore history. So much social awareness that inspires others to follow in your footsteps. Thank you for the various civic issues reports and also for keeping Mangaluru clean through much of your news. Continue like this and we are with you ”. Thank you, dear reader, for your kind words of wisdom.

Providing such unscientific parking spaces for four-wheelers on this LHH road is nothing but a dumb idea. Every educated person the Mangalorean team interacted with all said the parking spaces made here were nothing but foolish and an absolutely stupid idea, on the part of the officials behind the plan. . Did the SMART CITY engineers and managers believe that four-wheeled vehicles parked in these spaces with their bumpers sprawling across the road would create problems for traffic on that road during rush hour? Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces? Aside from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have become extensive parking spaces for vehicles instead of taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

Yet another reader of our website, Praveen Chandra Shetty, a social worker and auto insurance claims adjuster, followed our report on this matter with Er Arun Prabha, the General (Technical) Director of MSCL, and he managed to get the good news. from Er Arun that unscientific parking spaces will soon be phased out and better parking facilities with a better plan will be implemented soon. I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every few meters can divide congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.
As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to encourage people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to make it easier for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove the bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.
Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more enlightened drivers to choose the appropriate mode. transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! So until the new parking system is implemented on the LHH road, drive or ride safely on the LHH road and don’t run into those unscientific parking barriers.

ALSO READ RELATED ARTICLES ON WEBSITE IMPACT:

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Parking spaces

Unscientific parking spaces on the LHH road Not a SMART IDEA by the people in charge of SMART CITY!

Unscientific parking spaces on Light House Hill Road (LHH) are not a SMART IDEA by the SMART CITY managers of Mangaluru Smart City Ltd (MSCL)!

Mangaluru: The good news for the citizens of Mangaluru and tourists to Mangaluru is that the section of Light House Hill Road to Dr Ambedkar Circle (Jyothi Circle) is widening and about 80% of the work is complete, although the project is in progress. a slow pace. Unfortunately, the bad news is that providing unscientific parking spaces for all four wheels of this widening road, which is just a silly idea. Every educated person and common sense person the Mangalorean team interacted with, they all said the parking spots that are being made are nothing but foolish and absolutely a stupid idea, on the part of the officials who are behind the plan.

These parking spaces are prepared near the Ladies Club and in front of Tagore Park, on the section of LHH Road. As the four-wheelers park in these spaces with their bumpers extending out onto the road, imagine what the traffic situation would be like on that road at rush hour. Also, how would parked vehicles move in heavy traffic? Did any of the MSCL officials consider all of these drawbacks when planning these unscientific parking spaces. Apart from this road widening project, if you look around the city, the majority of the recently widened roads have been ample parking spaces for vehicles rather than taking advantage of the flow of traffic.

I’m sure many of us have faced similar delays on busy streets just because of vehicles parked in weird places in already narrow lanes. It will not be surprising to see such sites in areas with shopping malls, markets and malls. Roadside parking is a necessity in any city’s traffic ecosystem. Unfortunately, he is so underestimated on bigger issues that he is put aside. Considering the high percentage of four-wheeled vehicles among the total vehicle population in Mangaluru, apart from two-wheelers, it becomes essential to be able to manage the availability and proper use of parking spaces on the main arteries of the city.

The growing city of Mangaluru has the unfortunate distinction of having one of the highest vehicles per capita in the state. To put it in layman’s terms, there are more vehicles per 1,000 people compared to many of its peers. Adding to the total numbers, a very high percentage of almost 20% of the traffic is four-wheeled vehicles, which requires a much larger space to park these long vehicles. Managing parking space is therefore a crucial element in solving traffic problems.

Traffic delays have multiple reasons: high volume of vehicles, potholes slowing traffic, ineffective coordination of traffic lights, unhealthy driving practices, infrastructure failures, etc. previous section. The presence of a building as a religious institution, or a natural obstacle through trees, are common examples of bottlenecks. Vehicles parked along the road can create a similar bottleneck and sometimes accentuate a pre-existing bottleneck due to the conflict and blockages they create for the flow of traffic.

Street curb parking can be streamlined by making simple changes to the way we view parking as a whole. Reserving specific sections of a busy road to open for parking will provide much needed structure to parking availability, but certainly not on that LHH road. Making only one side of the road open for parking and alternating the two sides every now and then the meters can divide the congestion evenly. This is not a popular solution for a crowded city like Mangaluru. However, this would not produce any advantage on small stretches in some streets of Mangaluru. On such roads, having a clear demarcation on an open side for parking is a welcome respite.

As we try to solve the city’s parking problems, it is important to note that at the heart of this problem lies the paradox of balancing means and ends to achieve systematic and well enforced parking at the edge of the road. road. The ultimate goal is not to make the parking experience easier to get people to exit their cars and vehicles more often, but to provide more convenience for those who choose to bring their vehicles in and remove bottlenecks. throttling caused by random parking. Solutions to parking problems should be designed with the end results in mind. Making traffic and the parking experience smoother should be the order of the day.

Ultimately, a well-managed parking space scenario in the city will not only provide a comfortable option for drivers to park quickly and save time, it will also lead to a clear list of available parking spaces and decisions. more informed for drivers to choose the right mode of transport. Given the demand for total removal of parking spaces from some of the city’s busy roads, a better parking environment will require discipline and informed decisions about daily commuting. Let’s hope that the management of parking spaces gets the importance it deserves in the long battle for improved and safe mobility in Mangaluru! .

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Parking facilities

Car parks remain a pipe dream – The New Indian Express

Express news service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: It has been more than two years since multi-level parking was offered at Putharikandam Maidan and Medical College Hospital (MCH) as part of the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) program. With the deadline for using AMRUT funds fast approaching, the civic body is on guard to find a way to complete the project one way or another.

Deputy mayor and chairman of the standing committee on works, Dr Anil, said the civic body has decided to cancel the current contract awarded for the projects.

“We tendered and awarded both projects. Due to the pandemic and the lockdowns, the contractors were unable to start the work. It has been almost two years and now the cost of steel has increased exponentially and they cannot undertake the work according to current estimates.

There is no way in front of us because AMRUT cannot grant more funds without the permission of the state government. Therefore, we have decided to cancel the contracts and take new estimates to implement the project, ”said Anil.

The civic organization plans to launch new calls for tenders with new estimates soon. However, the delay in obtaining permission from the state government is likely to further delay the project and could cause the AMRUT funds to expire, the deadline for which would end in March 2022. “We cannot launch a new call for tenders without obtaining authorization. We hope that the government will give the green light soon to avoid further delays, ”said a senior official from the engineering wing. The Putharikandam project is expected to cost 12 crore and would be the largest car park that can provide parking space for 210 cars and 240 two-wheelers.

“Some of the mandatory components of the MLCP were missing from the old estimates. Fire safety devices are a mandatory item and without them we will not get the NoC from the fire department to operate these facilities, ”the official said.

The MCH implantation project was also launched almost two years ago. The plan was to set up the facility in the field in front of the super specialized block.

Collection of unauthorized parking fees continues

Complaints are growing about the levying of huge parking fees in shopping malls, hospitals and other commercial establishments in the capital. According to officials, charging parking fees for using legal parking spaces in shops, malls and hospitals is against Kerala Municipal Law. However, despite the complaints, the civic body has yet to take concrete action. Some malls and other commercial establishments impose huge user fees on customers.

“It is illegal to charge parking fees in statutory parking areas of commercial establishments and if a commercial organization provides a private parking area other than the statutory parking space, it should obtain a license from the civic body.” , said a senior company official. Recently, the civic body issued licenses to around 15 establishments. “It is not practical to introduce unified parking fees. In the central area of ​​the city, parking fees could be higher than in other areas, ”added the official.

Deputy mayor and chairman of the standing committee on work, Dr Anil, said the civic body noticed the problem. He admitted that people are being robbed in the name of user fees and that the civic body would take adequate intervention to prevent such violations. He said the civic body is in the process of developing a regulation.

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Parking garage

Public meeting on parking improvements scheduled for Wednesday | Local news

LACONIA – The public will have the opportunity next week to view and comment on plans for the reconstruction and improvement of the city’s parking lot in the city center.

A public information session is scheduled for Wednesday, December 8, starting at 7 p.m. The forum will take place at the Rose Chertok Gallery in Belknap Mill, on the third floor.

The consultants, Dubois and King, and Stewart Associates Architects, will present the scope of the project based on their most recent design, including representations of the proposed improvements to the exterior of the parking garage.

After the presentation, members of the public will have the opportunity to comment on the improvements they would like to see included in the scope of the project, explained the city’s public works director, Wes Anderson.

The cost of any improvement suggestions will be worked out by Public Works and Consultants for future presentation to City Council for consideration for inclusion in the project.

The 50-year-old structure was built to accommodate 250 vehicles. But only around 110 places are currently usable for security reasons. Repairing the parking garage has become a priority recently due to the need to provide more parking downtown for those attending the restored Colonial Theater events or frequenting the growing number of downtown businesses.

An initial estimate for rebuilding the facility, correcting structural flaws and improving safety was estimated to be around $ 6.5 million.

The Lake District Public Access will record the meeting for broadcast on dates and times set by the station.

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Parking spaces

Bombay: Eight shopping malls open their car parks to the public at night

In a bid to address the lack of parking space in Mumbai, locals, visitors and commercial vehicle owners will be allowed to park their vehicles between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. at eight malls in the city from of December 1.

According to a plan drawn up by Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and the new Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA), 6,500 new parking spaces will be available. The MPA, responsible for regulating parking in the city, had met with shopping center owners in 2019 to discuss the idea of ​​using vacant parking spaces on their premises during non-working shopping center hours.

While five malls charge for parking on a monthly basis, others have opted for weekly or overnight charges. The largest number of parking spaces, over 1,100, is available at the Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel at Rs 3,500 per month. The parking rates have been decided by the mall authorities. “This will be particularly beneficial for crowded residential settlements where parking spills out into the streets and adequate parking is not available on their premises. Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility,” MPA said.

Earlier, MPA opened the BEST bus depots for private bus parking. BMC had also declared 100 meters around 29 public car parks as no-parking zones. Sections along five thoroughfares in different parts of the city have also been turned into no-parking zones. However, the plan was later withdrawn,

The MPA, formed in January this year, won the approval of the BMC Standing Committee in May and is headed by Additional Municipal Commissioner P Velrasu. Based on the suggestion of Municipal Commissioner IS Chahal, MPA is in the process of creating a Municipal Parking Pool – which will be an online aggregation platform that will contain details of all available parking spaces in the city.

Chahal had appealed: “All other government agencies, which have parking areas under them, should be encouraged to participate in the City Parking Pool (CPP) to ensure that citizens can reserve any parking in the city using a single platform”.

Under the CPP, owners (commercial spaces, shopping malls) will be free to open their premises as they wish and will have the flexibility to keep schedules, prices and rules to their liking.

The authority also made recommendations on the planning and control of all on-road and roadside parking in the city.

Experts appointed by the authority will carry out nine tasks, including studying legal issues relating to the implementation of the workforce, preparing a comprehensive plan for parking management in the 24 districts, drafting of a parking policy, uniform signage and consideration of appropriate parking rates, officials said.

To meet the growing demands for affordable parking spaces in every neighborhood, the MPA team also actively identifies open and vacant lots that can be converted into surface or underground parking.

The eight malls that have opened their car park are – Growels 101 in Kandivali, Infinity malls in Andheri and Malad, R City mall Ghatkopar, R mall in Mulund, Inorbit Mall in Malad, Phoenix Market City in Kurla and Phoenix Palladium in Lower Parel.

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Several shopping malls open their parking spaces to the public at night in Mumbai

About eight malls in the city will offer their parking lots to car owners overnight, for a weekly or overnight fee.

Bringing relief to Mumbaikars, vehicle owners in the city will soon be able to park their cars overnight at no less than 8 multiplexes, spread across the city.

According to the Times of India (TOI) report, the Mumbai Parking Authority (MPA) has recently unveiled its plan to provide parking lots for companies and buildings near several shopping malls. About eight malls such as Growels 101 Mall in Kandivli (E), Infiniti Mall in Andheri (W) and Malad (W), Inorbit Mall (Malad), Phoenix Market City Mall (Kurla), R-City Mall (Ghatkopar), RMall (Mulund) and Phoenix Mall (Lower Parel) will have parking lots for residents.

The report says malls will charge between Rs 2,500 and Rs 3,500 per month for installation. For the uninitiated, around 6,500 vehicles can be parked in the eight malls each night. It will be available between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. and some malls will only offer weekly passes.

The official said, “Malls will also be open to accommodate Ola/Uber fleet owners for this facility.”

“This will be especially beneficial for crowded residential settlements where adequate parking is not available and people park their vehicles on the street or at the side of the road,” he added.

City planner Prachi Merchant, a member of the proposed MPA, told TOI, “The plan is ready and the facility should be launched soon. It will take off organically as people learn about it.”

“This effort is part of the proposed MPA’s efforts to create a City Parking Pool (CPP), where all city parking lots will be accessible through a common IT platform in the future. Until then, the BMC is working to get private and commercial entities, residential corporations and government organizations to share their parking spaces for public parking,” she added.

READ| Business trip turns tragic as Ukrainian woman falls to death from 12th floor in Mumbai

Click here for IndiaToday.in’s full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Start of construction of a new car park in downtown Temple

Construction of the buildings began in October and is expected to take around 18 months.

TEMPLE, Texas – Construction on the new Temple downtown parking lot began on November 10, according to a press release.

According to officials, construction of the parking lot is expected to take 13 months.

In addition to the city’s parking garages, visitors to downtown will see a variety of private projects take shape this year, such as the Hawn Hotel, the Arcadia Theater and the Sears Building and several new and expanded businesses.

The City will also make improvements to roads and landscaping from Central Avenue to Adams Avenue.

“As the revitalization of the Downtown Temple continues, we look forward to an increase in the number of visitors to the area,” said City Manager Brynn Myers. “We will be ready with an expanded parking lot to provide a practical and dynamic downtown experience”

On September 23, the City of Temple announced its partnership with real estate developer Waco Turner Behringer Development to transform buildings into apartments, shops and restaurants, offices, as well as a function and event hall.

“The Hawn Hotel and the Arcadia Theater have been mainstays of Temple’s historic downtown for nearly a century, so we are delighted to see these monuments get a second life,” said the Director of Temple City, Brynn Myers. “There have been so many dedicated people who have worked to make this a reality, and we can’t wait to see what the end result will be. “

Turner Behringer plans:

  • 57 one to two bedroom apartments in the Hawn and Sears buildings, totaling approximately 45,000 square feet
  • Approximately 32,000 square feet of commercial retail space, which will include storefronts, new restaurants and offices

“Adaptive reuse refers to the conservation attempt to reuse an existing structure for purposes other than what it was originally built for,” said Shane Turner, partner and broker at Turner Behringer. “We have had great success with our adaptive reuse projects at Waco … and we are excited to be expanding at Temple,” continued Turner.

All projects are expected to be completed by spring 2023.

The real estate developer’s past projects have included the Hippodrome Theater, Madison Apartments and Altura Lofts.

No traffic slowdown is expected at this time. But some road closures are planned as this work progresses. The City will coordinate with local businesses to minimize the impact.

For updates on these and other key downtown construction projects, visit siteletstalktemple.com. Those with additional questions can contact the Temple City Engineering Department at 254-298-5660.

RELATED: Temple’s Downtown Hawn Hotel Revitalization Project, Arcadia Theater Includes New Apartments and Restaurants

RELATED: More Road Closures for Killeen in November

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Parking garage problem progresses despite mayor’s call to slow down | Local News

LACONIA – Plans for a multi-million dollar upgrade to the city’s downtown parking lot are advancing. But if this project will prove to be the best long-term solution, spirits were heated at Monday’s city council meeting.

The city council voted unanimously to allow a design office to develop more detailed plans to correct the structural problems that forced the closure of much of the structure and to make the facility more user-friendly. Once completed, downtown businesses, property owners and members of the general public will have the opportunity to comment on the plans and make suggestions starting next month.

But ahead of the vote, Mayor Andrew Hosmer said any work on the 50-year-old parking lot should wait until there has been a thorough study of the parking situation in the city center to determine whether the cost of upgrading Garage level – estimated at $ 6 million – would be a good investment and part of a good long-term solution to parking problems downtown.

The council concluded in previous meetings that due to the resumption of commercial activity in the city center, restoring the parking garage to its full capacity of 250 vehicles has become an urgent priority. At present, only around 110 spaces are usable. The others are closed for security reasons.

Hosmer said what he deemed necessary was a comprehensive study of overall downtown parking needs, including up-to-date traffic studies, hiring of consultants who specialize in parking issues and design. , and obtaining new cost estimates for alternatives to repairing the parking garage, such as building a brand new parking structure in a different location.

He said he believed the council was taking a piecemeal approach to the parking issue and that there had not been enough outreach to downtown business owners to get their opinion on the best solution. to the parking problem.

“I have reservations,” Hosmer said of the board’s preferred direction. “I think we should recruit the right people and guide the city through this process. “

Several advisers quickly pushed back.

“This is just the start of the process,” said Councilor Bob Hamel, chair of the council’s land and buildings committee, who had previously met with engineer Bob Durfee of Dubois and King, and architect Peter Stewart. . Hamel assured Hosmer that the public, including those with a vested interest in the city center, would be consulted on what they think of any changes that may be proposed to the parking lot.

“We started this long enough,” Hamel added, noting that the engineering and architectural studies for the garage modernization had started several years ago, to be suspended in 2016. “We did studies. At the moment, we can fix it.

Councilor Henry Lipman was even more blunt, criticizing Hosmer for “ambushing” the council by calling for a slower approach.

“It is not fair to drop this bomb on us. It’s a low blow, “he said, adding:” Mayor Ed Engler wouldn’t have done that. “

Hosmer bristled at Lipman’s remark and said the adviser was out of order.

The owner of a downtown business, Bree Neal, told council she wants the city to look at parking issues in the city center in general.

“I want to see more vision and creativity so that we can solve the parking problem as a whole and not just the garage,” she said.

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Utah could build 10 story parking lot with new downtown liquor store

The state of Utah is preparing to bid on a project that would include a new two-story liquor store on Broadway and a parking garage up to 10 stories behind.

The liquor store would be built just over a block from another existing liquor store in downtown Salt Lake City. It would replace the one-storey store at 200 West 400 South, a property the state would likely sell.

The new store would fill what is currently a state-owned surface parking lot. The parking garage would add hundreds of cars parked on Edison, which would otherwise become a pedestrian street halfway through 300 blocks south.

Jim Russell, head of the state agency overseeing the construction of new buildings, confirmed plans to build Salt Lake on Thursday evening.

Four of the 10 floors would be used by customers and loading trucks for the new liquor store on the east corner of 300 S. Edison St. The remaining six, if built, would be used by residents in a neighborhood that has not yet been revealed. residential building by Ivory Homes, Russell said.

“The state will have 118 booths and Ivory for their development will have 204,” Russell said. “I must warn you that we are planning with Ivory on this. However, when we go out for construction tenders, that’s when [Ivory will] determine if they are interested in the construction part.

An Ivory Coast representative did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the plans Thursday evening.

Since the state takes the initiative in the development of the parking structure, it does not have to follow municipal regulations for land use. This will allow him to build a structure that could reach 110 feet high on the street that has been revitalized in recent years.

It will also add to the glut of parking downtown.

An independent Salt Lake City parking study in 2016 found that there was an unsanitary amount of parking in the urban core. The city had enough parking spaces to support decades of unbridled growth without the need to build more.

This type of structure is the most expensive type of parking lot to build, estimated at $ 4,135 per space in 2016 (likely higher today), according to Nelson Nygaard’s study.

The report showed that Salt Lake City has about 33,000 places in its downtown area, almost as many as Denver, although it is several times smaller than the capital of Colorado. Parking use, meanwhile, was only around 60%.

The Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (DABC) referred all questions to the Department of Construction and Facilities Management (DFCM), which oversees construction.

DFCM said it plans to put the project out to tender probably before the end of the year. If he can find a contractor within budget, the project would likely be built before the end of 2022, potentially in time for the holiday rush that begins with Thanksgiving.

The parking structure would sit on top of a portion of an existing surface parking lot that could accommodate 66 cars owned by state employees working in the Heber Wells building across the street, Russell said. He said he needed to maintain these stalls and add space for an additional 50 to 60 cars for customers at the new liquor store.

The first level of the new parking garage will be used primarily by trucks delivering to the store, as well as garbage and other services.

Russell noted that the state had considered options for allowing car drivers to access the parking lot directly from 300 South, but was unable to do so for various reasons.

“The city didn’t like that outing on Edison Street. We looked at how could we go 300 south and how could we go east, ”he said. “And they said, ‘How about you put the store north? If we had done that you would obviously have a parking structure on 300 South and they didn’t like that either.

Nick Norris, Salt Lake City’s chief planning officer, declined to comment, saying he had not seen the state’s plans on the 4-10 story parking lot.

Inclusion of Ivory’s six stories in the final structure, Russell said, will depend on offers received.

This rendering shows what would be a two-story state-run liquor store overlooking 300 South near 150 East and a 10-story parking lot, accessible from Edison Street. The garage could be shared between the state and Ivory Homes, which is considering redeveloping buildings along the 200 East and 300 South. Rendered courtesy of Jacoby Architects.

Ivory Development

These are among the first details of a project on a key remaining plot on Downtown Broadway.

Ken Sanders, owner of Ken Sanders Rare Books, said he had to leave his long-standing site due to redevelopment by Ivory, the owner of his building. He led a long-standing crowdfunding effort that raised nearly $ 160,000.

The developer also owns the retail stores that face 300 southwest of 200 east, including The Green Ant furniture store, Urban Vintage, Shadowplay, City Creek Antiques, a picture frame store and others.

Although Ivory did not share any details on the plans for the two-story buildings, the site was included in an annual design competition hosted by students at the David Eccles School of Business in 2020.

The presentation of the winning student group makes it clear that the state has known since at least 2019 that it would be moving the liquor store to the 300 S. Edison plot.

The students noted that they were to include an 11,000 square foot state liquor store as part of their mock proposal, which also included a food hall, offices and an 11-story residential tower.

The actual liquor store will be slightly larger, at 15,000 square feet, and will not include the two floors of office space above as offered by the students.

The package the students followed said the state would work with the developer on the site and needed around 100 parking spaces for Heber Wells and liquor store customers.

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“You Could Buy A Mansion In Tulsa”: Boston Parking Spaces Listed At $ 225,000 Gets Attention On TikTok, Twitter

A pair of Boston parking spots listed for $ 225,000 grabbed attention on TikTok and Twitter this week.

“Two parking spaces in a tandem space located on the upper level in the garage of the Wilkes passage”, the Red end list of states.

Social media users quickly spotted the list.

“What’s going on in Boston these days,” Zillowgonewild account creator TikTok said. “Why is it so expensive? You could buy a mansion in Tulsa instead of this one if you wanted.

The account also tweeted about the parking spots, getting a number of reactions.

“I can’t understand the concept of 2 parking spots in Boston selling for the estimated value of my entire 1,700 square foot 4-bedroom home,” one person tweeted.

“If I had $ 225,000 available to pay for a parking space, I would just buy a new car whenever I needed to drive somewhere and leave it on the street whenever I was done driving.” , another person tweeted.

Some have also noted the HOA fee of $ 178.86.

“So wait until it’s $ 225,000 for the spaces and then pay $ 179 per month for the ‘HOA’ fees,” one person asked. “Besides, you have to shuffle your cars if you have to drive the one in the front slot …”

Boston.com noted that it was originally classified as a ‘rare find’ by Redfin.com.

“This house is $ 774,000 less than most South End homes – visit it before it goes missing!” the SEO site said earlier this week, which has since been deleted, according to Boston.com.

“Me, looking at real estate in Boston: oh yes, here is an affordable place near Longwood! * after clicking * oop, no it’s a parking spot, nvm, ”a Twitter user said.

Of course, the $ 225 parking spot isn’t the most expensive the city has known.

In 2015, a parking spot was listed for $ 650,000.

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Pasadena May End 90 Minute Free Parking City Owned Parking Structures – Pasadena Now

The City of Pasadena may terminate the 90-minute free parking privilege at the nine city-owned public parking structures by charging a minimum charge of $ 1, effective July 2022, to fund repairs and repairs. maintenance of installations.

This is what the Department of Transportation recommends after a recent assessment showed that all City-owned parking structures are in need of repair and that most of the repair work must be completed by the end of the year. year 2024 to maintain these facilities. in operation.

Funds for these repairs are not – and will not be – available unless the City increases parking rates.

The new recommended parking rates are $ 1 for the first two hours, $ 2 for each hour thereafter, and $ 12 for the maximum daily rate.

The assessment by engineering firm Wiss, Janney, Elstner (WJE) Associates Inc. identified more than $ 12.15 million in needed repairs across the city’s entire garage portfolio. About $ 9.5 million of these repairs are expected to be completed in 2024.

The assessment showed that the priority for urgent repairs was based on the age of the current equipment that needs to be replaced and the parts of the structures that need to be repaired to ensure the future viability of the structures.

Some of the work to be done before the end of 2024 includes repairs and updates to carbon monoxide exhaust systems at three city-owned garages, upgrading cars and aging elevator systems. in eight garages, the installation of a new roof covering in a garage, and the improvement of the lighting systems in the nine structures.

The recommendation of the Transport Service will be taken up by the municipal services committee of the municipal council on Tuesday, October 26, before being taken up in plenary meeting of the municipal council on Monday, November 1.

Noting that the City’s Parking Garage Fund (Fund 407) does not have funds available for necessary repairs, the Department said parking rates at City garages have remained stable over the past 20 years. recent years, while spending – mostly on salary increases, materials and supplies, and the cost of repairs and upgrades – has grown by around three percent a year.

“Fund 407 closed fiscal 2020 with a balance of $ 429,186, a decrease of approximately $ 5,000,000. Fund 407 is expected to close fiscal 2022 with a negative fund balance of $ -1,519,796, ”the transportation department said in an agenda report for city council.

The report also states that transportation department staff will work with local businesses near municipal garages to create a validation program so that these businesses can provide parking for their customers. The Ministry has also carried out outreach efforts to engage the local community and business owners and collect inputs to propose recommended actions.

The report says that if the recommended changes are approved, the Parking Garage Fund could potentially increase by about $ 2.9 million per year.

Department of Transportation staff will explain the details of the recommendations at Tuesday’s municipal service committee meeting, which begins at 4 p.m.

Members of the public can access the meeting through http://pasadena.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php? Publish_id = 9 and www.pasadenamedia.org.

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Wheeling City Council plans to fund Market Street parking garage | News, Sports, Jobs

This artist’s concept drawing by the Mills Group shows the planned design for the new City of Wheeling parking garage to be built at the corner of 11th and Market streets downtown. (Picture provided)

WHEELING — City of Wheeling officials are moving forward with legislation to put in place funding for the construction of the planned Market Street parking garage.

This week, members of the Wheeling City Council are due to hear a first reading of an ordinance to fund the cost of the new parking lot at Market and 11th streets through the issuance of rental income bonds from an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $19.5 million.

City Manager Robert Herron noted that the ordinance wording for the bonds includes a maximum funding amount relative to the projected cost of the project, which city officials say will likely cost between $16 million and $17 million. dollars.

The new parking structure is being built to accommodate a private investment from Access Infrastructure to create a new apartment complex inside the city’s tallest building, the former headquarters of Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel on Market Street. This private investment is expected to exceed $30 million, and city leaders plan to support retail businesses once tenants begin to fill Wheeling-Pitt’s historic lofts.

A portion of the new parking structure will be dedicated to tenants of the new loft apartment complex, while additional parking will be available within the six-story structure for visitors to downtown Wheeling. Street-level retail spaces have been incorporated into the design of the city’s new parking structure.

The new ordinance to establish funding for the parking structure also provides for the property at 1104 and 1114 Market Street to be transferred from the Ohio Valley Area Development Corporation – the nonprofit entity used by the city to facilitate real estate transactions – to the Wheeling Municipal Building Commission – the newly invigorated committee that is responsible for directing major building projects for the city.

A first reading of the new ordinance is expected to take place at Tuesday evening’s council meeting, with a second and final reading of the legislation scheduled for the November 2 council meeting.

Before construction of the new parking structure could begin, the vacant Chase Bank building on Market Street would have to be demolished and removed. Shadyside’s Raze International has been awarded a $475,000 contract to tear down the building where the new parking lot will be. Officials said asbestos removal was being completed at the site and the building was due to be razed before the end of the year.

During the last meeting of the municipal council, a citizen spoke out against the involvement of the City in the construction of a new parking lot for private development. Wheeling resident Julia Chaplin asked why Coon Restoration and Sealants – the developer of the Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts project by Dr. John Johnson and Access Infrastructure – did not pay for the parking needed by their tenants.

“Why didn’t they include in their proposal to build the installation plans for a garage?” Chaplin asked city leaders. “Basically, we’re as a city paying for its garage that won’t be self-funding, as the mayor said. As taxpayers, we subsidize this development corporation.

Another ordinance involving tax liabilities for a city-owned parking lot is also expected to be introduced on Tuesday. The legislation – described in legal language very similar to the Market Street Parking Garage Project Ordinance – provides for the issuance of rental income bonds in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $3 million for the Center Wheeling parking garage project.

On Friday, Herron explained that planned improvements to Center Wheeling’s parking structure had been underway for some time, and when the Ohio Valley Medical Center was operating, the tax increment funding district around the property generated a potential pool over $4. million for investment. However, after OVMC ownership changed hands from Alecto to MPT and eventually to the City of Wheeling, the TIF District stopped generating the revenue that would be needed to repay the money if it was used for improvements to the car park.

The TIF district is still in place at the OVMC site, and if the buildings are sold to a private developer, additional funding would again be generated, the city manager said.

City leaders continue to seek potential tenants and buyers for vacant buildings on the OVMC campus. A tenant who had maintained occupancy after the city acquired the property last year recently moved out, Herron noted. This summer, Northwood Health Systems opened its new, state-of-the-art, 28,000 square foot behavioral health clinic adjacent to the company’s administrative offices at the corner of 19th and Wood streets. Herron reported earlier this month that Northwood had officially moved out of the space he used at OVMC after moving into his newly built facility.

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Downtown Parking Garage Reconstruction Plans Advance | Local news

LACONIA – The city parking lot, called both an eyesore and a potential downtown growth accelerator, is expected to cost more than $ 6 million to rehabilitate. The project could be funded by the city’s economic development and would provide parking for two more decades, the city council learned Monday evening.

The extensive reconstruction of the largely underused and deteriorating structure received a first green light on Monday.

City Council unanimously asked City Manager Scott Myers to prepare an overview of the engineering, construction and financing of the multi-million dollar project that Mayor Andrew Hosmer has called critical to support economic revitalization downtown.

Hosmer, who called the garage in its current state an “albatross and horror,” and several advisers said rehabilitation of the facility was urgent.

“We need to act quickly,” said Councilor Bruce Cheney.

“We need to vote and fix the problem,” said Councilor Bob Hamel, who chairs the council’s land and construction committee.

The deterioration of the condition of the 48-year-old parking structure has rendered much of the garage unusable in recent years. About 140 of the 250 spaces, including all those on the top floor, have been closed for security reasons.

Myers called the repairs the city has made to the structure in recent years as interim measures.

“These dressings are big dressings that have become tourniquets,” he said.

A 2019 technical study estimated it would cost $ 4.5 million to correct structural deficiencies and make the facility safer and more accessible for users. Myers now estimates the job could cost around $ 6.6 million, he told council.

He said the growing tax base in the city center alone would provide the city with additional income that would offset the cost of the project. He estimated that with reconstruction, along with regular preventive maintenance, the lifespan of the renovated facility should be 20 to 25 years.

The council’s decision came after a public hearing during which everyone spoke in favor of the project.

“We need the spaces that are in the garage and this is the only place that has covered parking spaces,” said Bob Sawyer, who owns a commercial block on Canal Street.

By its action on Monday, the city council did not commit to spending money on the project. But councilor Robert Soucy said he hopes council will approve the financing soon to take advantage of the low interest rates currently available on municipal bonds.

According to the New Hampshire Municipal Bond Bank, during the last bond sale in July, interest rates ranged from 0.96% on a 10-year loan to 2.01% on a 25-year loan.

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Amid declining revenues, city modernizes parking structures

(TNS) – With fewer people parking downtown due to COVID-19, new technologies will be added to city parking lots that officials say should be more convenient for drivers.

“We’re getting totally modern,” said Debbie Pacific, director of the Danbury Parking Authority, a quasi-municipal agency in charge of downtown garages, meters and public land.

The barriers at the Patriot and Bardo garages will be removed. Instead of paying an attendant, drivers will enter their license plate and payment into a kiosk or new mobile app. The cameras will recognize the license plate of license holders, who will not need to use the kiosk or the app. Bollards will be installed for on-street parking, the mayor said.


Danbury City Council was due to discuss at its Thursday meeting changes to the parking ordinances to reflect the new technology.

The city included $ 100,000 in its approved capital budget for the project, with the authority contributing an additional $ 10,000. Pacific expects the new technology to go live by November 1.

“In the long run, it will also help us generate more income,” she said.

Parking revenues have been hit due to the coronavirus pandemic, with fewer people heading downtown to shop, eat and work, she said. Pacific estimated that the number of monthly permits fell by 25 to 30 percent.

“As soon as we felt things were starting to go up we got the new delta variant and that set us back a bit,” Pacific said. “We remain hopeful. We are always waiting for things to change.

Revenue fell 24% from $ 200,000 from June 2020 to June 2021, she said. The authority also cut salaries by about as much, she said.

Some employees were put on leave at the start of the pandemic, with staff, including Pacific, taking reduced hours and pay. Only two employees are returning full time, she said. Employees always have their benefits.

The authority has grown from 16 pre-COVID employees to nine, with a few retiring and some part-time workers finding other jobs, she said.

The garages have been operating on reduced hours due to reduced staff, but new technology should allow them to be open 24/7, Pacific said. The plan is to always have security in the garages.

“We’re just going to look and see if we need someone and where we need them,” she said.

Danbury will continue to use the ParkMobile app for street parking.

“So many people know him and he’s really accepted all over the country,” Pacific said.

The rates will remain the same, with parking lots being charged $ 1.50 per hour. The permit rate is $ 55 per month.

Downtown life

The Mayor and CityCenter Danbury, the organization that supports the downtown business district, are excited about the new technology.

“This feature will be something that will move Danbury forward,” said Angela Wong, Executive Director of CityCenter.

Life in the city center is slowly returning to normal as residents return to shopping and dining, she said. She doesn’t expect COVID to have a long-term effect on downtown or the parking lot.

“People are very anxious to get back to what they are used to,” said Wong.

The new downtown sidewalks are designed to attract customers and businesses to the downtown area. The first phase of this streetscape project is expected to be completed this month.

“I think it’s working exceptionally well,” said Mayor Joe Cavo. “I have no doubt it will be done in time, if not sooner.”

Pacific said she hopes the effect of COVID on parking will be temporary. Some parking lots started returning to Metro-North station grounds last month, she said.

“People are feeling a little bit comfortable working from home and staying home and shopping from home, but I think it’s going to be short lived,” she said. “I think we want to be in public. We want to get back to normal life, so hopefully things will work out soon. “

© 2021 The News-Times (Danbury, Connecticut). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Calgary’s new platform innovation center promises more than just parking spaces

CALGARY –

The new parking lot in the heart of East Village is a multifunctional space for investors and startup projects to come together and create ideas that will shape the future.

Open in the fall of 2021, the Platform Innovation Center will be a hub dedicated to supporting start-up projects and entrepreneurs at each stage of their career.

This project is more interesting than meets the eye. From the outside, the Innovation Center looks like an ordinary parking lot with a modern surface. Once people can step inside, they will experience how unique this structure is.

This car park is a first of its kind, which means it is not intended to be a car park forever. The idea here is that as the city becomes more pedestrian-friendly through improved public transit, the parking lot can be transformed into a different space depending on the future needs of the city.

This parking lot could become affordable housing, office space or a recreation center if that is what the area needs. This is possible thanks to the construction method which provided for the parking lot to be reassigned later.

The building’s parking lot, which is operated by the Calgary Parking Authority, is already open, but the real treat is coming later this year, officials say.

When the Platform Innovation Center opens in the fall, it will have a pitch stage and community event space on the ground floor for tech startups to showcase their companies.

(Provided/Youtube)

The Innovation Center provides a centralized location for accessing resources, programming, and events to help start-ups successfully grow and develop their ideas.

The city hopes the innovation hub will help connect local innovators who can then drive economic growth and job creation in the city.

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Troy’s Uncle Sam Parking Garage closed indefinitely

TROY – Uncle Sam’s parking garage will be closed indefinitely from Wednesday – the second time in two years the city has closed it.

The 47-year-old garage in downtown Troy was closed due to safety concerns after inspection by the city’s code enforcement and engineering departments. City spokesman John Salka said many people had called to complain about the condition of the parking lot, which is owned by The Bryce Companies, but did not immediately have details of the issues. safety of the structure.

“Obviously, security is the number one concern in the city,” said Salka. “We would not have ordered the garage to be closed if we had not found it inappropriate to be opened based on the inspection.”

The Bryce Companies, which own other downtown buildings such as the Troy Atrium, Quackenbush Building and Frear Building, declined to comment. In an email to clients obtained by The Times Union, a Bryce Companies employee wrote: “No one should be alarmed.

Bryce Companies will employ their own engineer to inspect the building and verify the city’s claims, after which it could potentially reopen.

This is the second time that the garage has been closed since early 2020.


The orderly closure comes more than a year after a technical survey of the garage found it to be structurally damaged and collapsing, recommending it be replaced within the next decade.

On a scale of 1 to 10, Structure Care of Lancaster, Pa., A company specializing in parking garages, gave the garage a rating of 3, or “fair enough.” It’s just above a mediocre rating.

“Uncle Sam’s Parking Garage is an over 40 year old parking structure approaching the end of its life cycle. We have identified several structural issues that require immediate attention and will extend the life of the vehicle. garage ten years or more, but plans should be developed to replace the structure within the next decade, ”warned its November 2019 study.

In December 2019, part of the garage was closed following a fall from a beam. The city has temporarily closed the garage following the report.

The city built the garage in 1974 and then sold it to Bryce in 2010 for $ 2.4 million. Bryce expanded the garage to three stories, adding two more stories to part of the structure. Uncle Sam’s parking garage accounts for about 18% of downtown off-street parking, according to the 2016 City Parking Study.

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For Sale: 450 Parking Spaces On Clearwater Beach For At Least $ 12 Million | Clear water

CLEARWATER – At certain times of the year, finding a single parking spot in Clearwater Beach can be a challenge.

But, for $ 12 million, someone can now buy 450 in a popular business district just off Mandalay Avenue.

In 2014, when the city approved construction of the North Beach seven-level parking lot, officials said a study predicted the city’s 450 spaces at this facility would be profitable.

It didn’t, so on June 17, city council voted to declare its share of the garage surplus and invited bidders to bid, starting at $ 12 million.

The garage was built as part of a public-private partnership with Paradise Group LLC of Safety Harbor, who built the garage on approximately 1 acre of land at 490 Poinsettia St. adjacent to Pelican Walk Plaza. In 2016, the city agreed to buy 450 of the approximately 700 garage spaces for about $ 11.3 million, or about $ 25,000 per space.

These spaces, however, are on levels 3-7 and have not generated the benefits the city hoped for.

“Of course the majority of people when they park they park on the first two floors, so they (Paradise) receive constant income,” parking manager Jeremy Alleshouse told council members in a session. working June 14. “We get sporadic income. “

The pandemic has exacerbated this problem, as revenues did not cover expenses and were in deficit last year.

City staff recommended that the minimum bid required be $ 11.58 million, the city’s total investment in the property.

The city also received two appraisals on its part of the garage, one valuing it at $ 11.16 million and the other at $ 13.24 million.

Therefore, Deputy Mayor Hoyt Hamilton said he would be more comfortable if the minimum bid fell somewhere in between.

“I think we should be able to get $ 12 million without a problem,” he said.

Mayor Frank Hibbard said he did not believe the deal with Paradise was in the city’s best interest and supported either the sale of the spaces or the purchase of the entire structure, which includes around 18,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor.

It might not even be an option, however.

Hamilton said Paradise already has a buyer in place for the rest of the site for around $ 20 million.

“Do we want to spend $ 20 million and own the whole shooting game?” I wouldn’t recommend this, ”he said.

“If we agree to sell ours for $ 12 million, we won’t lose any parking on the beach, but we have $ 12 million in our parking fund which gives us the ability to eventually meet future parking needs.”

Hibbard agreed that the extra money in the city’s parking fund could be used more productively.

Employee parking

There are downsides to selling the spaces, Alleshouse said.

“The big downside to the garage sale is that we sell a lot of monthly beach employee passes which is way below the market,” he said.

In fact, the city sold 436 passes, each for just $ 40 a month.

Hibbard said parking for beach employees was important, but felt the reduced rate was too generous and one reason the city was losing money.

“If you work 160 hours a month and pay a quarter of an hour, I think that’s a little ridiculous,” he said. “I think we are subsidizing too much, but that’s my personal opinion.

He said beach business owners had expressed concerns about the loss of affordable parking for their employees, but Hibbard said he was assured the structure would remain a parking lot and the new owner would continue. to provide parking for employees.

Hamilton, whose family owns the Palm Pavilion, said he understood the concerns and that his establishment was paying $ 20 out of $ 40 for employee parking passes.

“Without employees, you don’t have a business. Without businesses, you have no destinations. So there is a balance here that we have to try to find, ”he said.

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Vancouver plans to sell parking garage back to developer

Vancouver City Council plans to sell a parking garage back to its developer for $ 3.44 million, more than 20 years after the city initially bought the structure to boost the downtown economy.

Councilors heard from Director of Community and Economic Development Chad Eiken during their remote meeting Monday night about the proposed sale of the parking lot next to Columbia Bank at 500 Broadway. The structure would fall to Broadway Investors LLC, its initial developer.

“The garage was bought by the city to catalyze the redevelopment of the lower downtown area. It was in 1999, ”said Eiken.

The purchase of the garage “was one of the city’s many major investments to spur development” in the late 1990s and early 2000s, he added.

According to Eiken, a key part of the 1999 deal was a guarantee that Broadway Investors would retain the exclusive right to buy back the property, depending on the timing and pricing conditions. The business leaders submitted their official request to buy the structure from the city on May 19.

“The garage was not purchased as a district parking asset for the surrounding areas,” Eiken said. “It was always meant to be sold back to the developer.”

While the ivy-covered garage has 233 parking spaces, only 27 are used for short-term public parking. The rest of the spaces are occupied by employees who work in the two buildings adjacent to the structure – Columbia Bank and The Hudson, a three-story office and retail building.

As a condition of the sale, city staff are asking Broadway Investors to maintain 25 parking spaces for short-term customer parking.

Currently, Vancouver operates the parking structure at a loss. Between operation, maintenance, and debt payment, it costs $ 291,000 per year to operate, while it averages $ 258,000 in revenue per year in daily fees and parking passes, for a loss of about $ 33,000 per year. The city is also still paying an outstanding balance related to the original purchase of $ 1.35 million.

Proceeds from the sale – about $ 2.3 million, after Vancouver paid off its remaining debt on the structure – would be donated to the City Parking Fund and used for other parking related projects around Vancouver, Eiken said.

The first garage purchase was a product of the Esther Short Sub-Zone Redevelopment Plan of 1997, which saw the city pour millions of dollars into projects that invigorated the downtown area and would attract employers to the area.

This same plan was the catalyst for Vancouver’s purchase of the Vancouvercenter garage in 2004; sweeping improvements to Esther Short Park; and investments in nearby streets, sidewalks, lighting and utility infrastructure.

Eiken said the then city council achieved what it set out to buy the garage more than two decades ago: he estimates the purchase directly resulted in a private investment of $ 30 million. dollars, because it enabled the construction and staffing of Columbia Bank. and the Hudson.

“This added office workers, residents, retail sales, property taxes – and finally, the garage will be added to the tax roll once it is sold,” Eiken said.

Advisors are expected to vote on the sale at their next meeting on June 28.

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Cut in the looms of Auckland public parking spaces


Auckland

Short-term parking in the CBD is expected to become more expensive, with the expected loss of half of Auckland Transport’s subsidized parking spaces.

On-street parking in central Auckland has been cut by more than half, and plans to keep some short-term parking lots subsidized by the City Council in the redevelopment of the downtown parking lot site are also underway. doubt.

The issue highlights tensions between a council that seeks to promote public transport and make the CBD pedestrian and bike-friendly, and the city’s businesses wanting to preserve easy access for shoppers and diners.

The council-owned downtown parking lot has 1,148 short-term parks, but its redevelopment is planned with the intention of selling it and turning its lower floors into a bus station with a new building at the top.

Auckland Transport’s plan presented to the council’s planning committee calls for retaining between 400 and 600 of the cheapest occasional parking spaces, which it says are intended to support the economic and cultural dynamism of the city center.

However, some councilors are concerned that maintaining short-term parking will run counter to council’s commitment to move away from supporting private vehicles.

Planning documents such as the City Center Masterplan’s Access 4 Everyone transport strategy call for limits on motorized traffic in the CBD and a transition to walking, cycling and public transport.

“My personal view is that maintaining parking lots for single occupant vehicles, even if it is for a short stay, is incompatible with the Masterplan and Access 4 Everyone,” said Councilor Chris Darby, Chairman of the planning committee that heard Auckland Transport’s proposal.

Darby says he finds it hard to see the case for the council offering discounted parking in the CBD when many private companies are already doing so.

“It comes at a cost to Aucklanders,” he said. “Strategically, it is incompatible with these planning documents.”

Waitematā advisor Pippa Coom says she wants to see more information from Auckland Transport showing exactly how her plan matches the board’s emissions targets and budget.

“It’s not about preventing people from entering the city,” she said.

“The question is: is it in the interest of the taxpayer to subsidize parking on prime real estate? “

The proposal is the latest in a long period of council-backed parking abandonment in the CBD.

Auckland Transport’s on-street parking in the city center has grown from 5,000 to 2,460 spaces over the past decade. Meanwhile, the price of longer-term suburban parking has more than doubled over this period to a high of $ 40 per day.

In a statement to Newsroom, Auckland Transport said the loss of downtown parking space would not have a huge impact on businesses.

“AT is not the main provider of car parks in central Auckland. Currently the Downtown car park has 1944 spaces…. less than 4% of city parking.

However, the Heart of the City Downtown Business Association says the loss of Auckland Transport’s cheaper parking spots could result in a loss for local businesses as shoppers choose to go elsewhere.

“These parks are vital for people who come to shop and have fun,” said Heart of the City Executive Director Viv Beck. “It’s more affordable and it makes the place more accessible. Not everyone has access to public transport yet.

Auckland Transport data shows that most people use short-term parking in the city for business, shopping and entertainment. A recent survey suggests that 75 percent of the people parked in the downtown building during off-peak hours were there for entertainment, dining, or shopping.

However, Auckland Transport’s advice suggests that maintaining short-term parking in the building will also continue to attract cars to the area, going against the council’s plans to encourage people to use public transport. common.

The loss of parking lots in the downtown building, along with the removal of on-street parking in favor of walking and cycling, will likely result in higher overall costs for people driving in the downtown area. While some shifts to public transport are likely, Auckland Transport says there is also a risk that people will choose to go elsewhere for shopping and entertainment.

However Coom is not convinced.

“They have to be upfront about what they want,” she said. “If they want income from parking, they have to say it instead of hiding behind it, talk about the commercial and cultural dynamism of the downtown area.”

Another option is to leave the parking lot to the developer who decides to buy the site. This is the option preferred by Coom and Darby.

“Nothing prevents the successful tenderer from providing parking if necessary,” says Darby.

While a decision has yet to be made, Darby doubts the board will force the successful bidder to provide short-term parking as part of a potential deal. Instead, he expects to ask the company to provide parking, micro-freight and cycling infrastructure.

The matter could be settled at a meeting of the planning committee in June.

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Boston planners approved over 11,000 new parking spots in 2020 – StreetsblogMASS

According to year-end statistics compiled by the Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA), Boston planners have approved 55 development projects in 2020 that will build more than 12,000 new homes, 6.5 million square feet of new commercial spaces and enough parking to store up to 11,162 additional cars – and almost all of that new parking lot would be built in transit-accessible neighborhoods within a quarter-mile of an MBTA station.

BPDA 2020 project approvals for mixed-use and residential developments

“TOD” denotes “transit-oriented development” – projects located within a quarter of a mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter train station. Source: BPDA

Purely residential projects Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 20 12 60%
Housing units 1,403 734 52%
Residential SF 1,437,173 714,254 50%
Other SF 112,450 34,587 31%
Parking spaces 660 113 17%
Mixed-use projects (excluding Suffolk Downs) Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 25 19 76%
Housing units 3 794 3 125 82%
Residential SF 3,809,345 3,218,896 84%
Commercial SF 1,831,079 1,819,753 99%
Other SF 739,548 653,732 88%
Parking spaces 3,542 3 267 92%
Suffolk Downs Project (Boston part only)
Total % NEVER
Housing units 7,150 100%
Residential SF 7,310,000 100%
Commercial SF 3,210.00 100%
Other SF 470,000 100%
Parking spaces 6,760 100%

About three-fifths of this new parking lot (up to 6,760 spaces) and nearly two-thirds of the housing (7,150 apartments) would be concentrated in East Boston as part of the Suffolk Downs development, which offers direct access to two stations MBTA Blue Line. . This project is expected to be built in phases over the next decade.

Outside of the Suffolk Downs project, the BPDA has approved 4,402 parking spaces, 5,197 new housing units and 5 million square feet of space for commercial, institutional and other non-residential uses (for context, the huge Partners Health headquarters building adjacent to the Assembly Orange Line station in Somerville contains approximately 825,000 square feet of office space).

Although the BPDA is allowing massive amounts of new parking throughout the city, the parking-to-housing ratio has declined this year from 2019, when the agency approved 4,762 new homes and enough parking for 5,080 cars. .

Related:


Development data from 2019 shows almost all new housing in Boston is built for car owners

Among the 20 purely residential projects approved in 2020, developers would build 1,403 new apartments and 660 new parking spaces, or approximately one parking space for 2 apartments.

But among the subset of 12 apartment projects that would be located within a quarter of a mile of an MBTA rapid transit or commuter train station, the parking ratio was significantly lower: a total of 113 new parking spaces for 734 apartments (0.15 spaces per housing unit).

The vast majority of new developments in Boston are mixed-use, with a mix of residential and commercial space. These projects had higher ratios of parking spaces per apartment, but their garages could also be shared with commercial tenants.

In addition to the Suffolk Downs Master Plan, the BPDA approved 25 other mixed-use projects in 2020, of which residential uses were the main overall component.

These projects (excluding Suffolk Downs) would build approximately 3,023 new homes, 2.6 million square feet of office, retail and other non-residential space, and 3,542 parking spaces.

Boston’s modest drop in parking-to-apartment ratio this year can be attributed to the Metro Planning Commission 2019 “Perfect fit” report, who investigated parking usage in new residential developments in Boston and its suburbs, and found ample evidence that developers built an excessive amount of parking in new residential developments, at the expense of traffic and the affordability of public transportation.

Related:


StreetsblogUSA: apartments with free parking reduce public transport ridership

A handful of projects that the BPDA approved in 2020 avoid all on-site parking, whatever it is: a new mixed-use building proposed for Boylston Street in the Fenway neighborhood, for example, would add 477 new apartments with retail and theater space on the ground floor, without a parking garage.

And in Roxbury, the project Northampton Street Residences (pictured at the top of this article), will replace an above-ground parking lot with a new 6-story building containing 47 affordable homes adjacent to Southwest Corridor Park, just one block from the Massachusetts Ave station. Orange Line.

Most of the BPDA-approved commercial and institutional construction projects that were approved in 2020 will also not build new parking garages.

Last year, the BPDA approved 2.3 million square feet of new construction among 9 non-residential projects, including hotels, offices and laboratory buildings.

According to the BPDA, only two of these projects will include on-site parking: a new television studio WBZ-TV on Soldiers Field Road in Allston, which will include a 140-space parking lot, and a multi-building project in Kenmore Square, which will include a 60-space parking garage.

BPDA 2020 project approvals for commercial and institutional developments

“TOD” designates projects located in neighborhoods oriented towards public transport. Source: BPDA

Purely commercial projects
Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 7 5 71%
Total area 1,610,458 1 445 385 90%
Parking spaces 200 60 30%
Purely institutional projects
Total in TOD % NEVER
Projects 2 2 100%
Total area 688,750 688,750 100%
Parking spaces 0 0 0%
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Parking facilities

Redesigned parking lots in post-COVID-19 Atlanta

By Maxine Hicks and Andrew Much, DLA Piper

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis has profoundly impacted the way we will work, shop and choose to travel by car in the years to come. For example, most of us have now learned to telecommute effectively and have become adept at using home video conferencing. These changes in the way we work and live will have a fundamental impact on Atlanta’s real estate market and will accelerate trends already underway for a reduced need for parking spaces in the city’s core market areas. This article examines the adaptive reuse of parking spaces as the demand for such spaces declines and the trend toward vacant parking spaces accelerates.

The United States has up to two billion parking spaces for approximately 250 million cars. Donald Shoup, a professor in the Department of Urban Planning at UCLA, notes that the total area of ​​parking per car in the United States is now greater than the area of ​​housing per person. Many of these spaces are less likely to be used in the future due to work-from-home trends, e-commerce, increasing urbanization, and the recessionary economic conditions which may make it more difficult for individuals to own, operate and pay to park their vehicle. A number of malls and big-box retailers have already closed or have been significantly affected by changing shopping habits. Planned closures of existing retail, restaurant and hospitality facilities due to current conditions in the coming months are expected to result in additional buildings and associated parking facilities being available for redevelopment. Additionally, ride-sharing services have reduced levels of private car ownership, and a future transition to self-driving vehicles will significantly add to an additional surplus of long-term parking spaces.

Historically, city zoning codes required a minimum number of parking spaces based on property use, contributing to the current parking glut. Atlanta’s zoning code was recently amended to address this issue by limiting (or outright eliminating in some cases) the minimum number of parking spaces and/or instituting parking maximums for certain uses or districts. zoning. The City is also considering parking fees to encourage downtown development and generate revenue for needed infrastructure improvements.

Structured parking lots are generally unsightly and impede urban walking. Such facilities are extremely expensive to develop and maintain, which in some cases can consume up to a third of the total construction costs of the project. Relaxed parking requirements and other regulatory innovations will lead to lower project costs (making future affordable housing projects more economically viable), foster opportunities for innovative project designs, establish more pleasant streetscapes walkable and aesthetic and will create increasingly valuable redevelopment opportunities for developers by converting underutilized housing. spaces to more productive uses.

Parking technologies are already being used to maximize the efficient use of existing facilities, including digital technologies to enable dynamic pricing and the use of sensors and data analytics. Mixed-use projects requiring parking lots use some of these technologies to establish flexible, shared parking regimes. For example, we have already seen car parks developed or otherwise used for sports venues that are not only used for home games, but also serve the needs of nearby retail customers, office tenants and retail tenants. apartments. Such arrangements usually require the thoughtful collaboration of developers, design and engineering teams, as well as lawyers to memorize the arrangement well.

Communities are increasingly converting underutilized parking facilities into valuable assets. Public-private partnerships have succeeded in redeveloping parking lots into complete mixed-use projects such as City Springs in Sandy Springs, much of which has been developed on the former location of a surface parking lot.

Innovative parking projects are underway nationally and internationally, including projects using a flexible design for new terraces through the use of flat floors, higher ceilings and exterior ramps to facilitate their later conversion into usable rental space and the reuse of existing underground garages as “last mile” logistics facilities.

The creative and adaptive reuse of parking lots will remain a key goal for developers and building owners in the years to come. The key for all investors is to stay ahead of these trends and be well positioned for incremental changes as demand for parking spaces declines. There are many opportunities for Atlanta to become a national leader in developing these innovative solutions.

***

Maxine Hicks is location manager for DLA Piper’s real estate practice and global co-chair of infrastructure, construction and transportation. She focuses her practice on real estate development with particular emphasis on large mixed-use and transit-oriented developments, including destinations for stadium, entertainment, hospitality, club and center projects. resort. She is a long-time member of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and a member of ULI’s Community Development Council.

Andrew Much is a lawyer with DLA Piper and focuses his practice on commercial real estate transactions, with an emphasis on the development, acquisition, disposition, leasing, management and financing of complex mixed-use developments, communities planned, transit-oriented, stadium, hospitality, golf, marina, club and resort developments across North America. He is also a member of the Urban Land Institute.

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Parking spaces

Development of downtown Raleigh means fewer parking spaces, garages

Finding a parking spot in downtown Raleigh will become more difficult this year when two garages are demolished for future development.

But the compression should be temporary.

More parking spaces and garages will open in 2021 and 2022, giving the city more parking than it currently has.

Raleigh City Council was briefed on the downtown parking offer during a meeting on Tuesday.

City officials are hoping to add nearby park-and-ride parking – where people can leave their cars and catch a bus downtown – but the timing and location have yet to be determined.

Raleigh should also consider partnerships with businesses and private organizations to fill the parking gap.

There are 8,000 parking garage spaces, 680 surface parking spaces and 1,550 metered spaces, and the city has approximately 60% of these spaces. This gives the downtown area about 500 more parking spaces than is currently needed to meet demand, said Matthew Currier, Raleigh’s parking manager.

The parking lot at The News & Observer’s former home (near Nash Square) holds around 300 cars, and the Alexander Square parking lot (near the capital) holds around 700. Both will be demolished this year, leaving 500 spaces for short of town. of demand, Currier said.

The first phase of the development of Smokey Hollow is expected to open in 2020, which will add approximately 1,000 spaces. But these spaces are closer to Glenwood South and not in the central part of downtown.

Then in 2021, the city should see a surplus of nearly 3,000 parking spaces with the addition of parking lots at 2 Glenwood, Smokey Hollow phase two and 301 Hillsborough.

This surplus increases to more than 7,000 spaces compared to current demand with the addition of the 400H building, the Nexus, 121 Fayetteville and the development on Carbarrus Street.

In the long term, the city may consider selling some of its parking lots or redeveloping properties.

Turning these parking garages into pedestrianized urban developments should be a priority for the city, said Jonathon Melton, board member.

Listen to our daily briefing:

This story was originally published 12 March 2020 5.30 pm.

Raleigh News & Observer Related Articles

Anna Johnson covers Raleigh and Wake County for the News & Observer. She has previously covered city government, crime, and business for newspapers across North Carolina and has received numerous North Carolina Press Association awards, including first place for investigative reporting. She is a 2012 alumnus of Elon University.
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Parking spaces

No Backing Up in Allentown Parking Spots: Readers don’t like the new policy — a lot. ‘It’s ridiculous’

Readers had a lot to say about the Allentown Parking Authority issue $35 tickets to customers returning to city bridge and surface lot parking spots.

The move has blinded some motorists who argue that exiting a parking spot is safer and more efficient, especially in heavy traffic after hockey games and other events at the PPL Center.

City parking enforcement officers have started using license plate recognition equipment. Since Pennsylvania does not require motorists to mount license plates on the front of vehicles, officers cannot scan the plates of vehicles backing into parking spaces.

Here are some of the best Facebook comments:

‘Good way to make you feel welcome’

“When you get back the police can’t scan your plates for us offenders – hence the ticket! Good way to make you feel welcome and comfortable in the town of Allentown.”

The Strata Symphony garage is a challenge

“Having had the opportunity to discuss this issue with a member of the APA Board of Directors, I understand that license plate scanning technology has certain advantages and advantages. That said, I invite the Board APA directors to come to the Strata Symphony garage to try to get into some of the spaces.

“I have a small car and it still requires several sequences of pulling forward and backing up to avoid hitting surrounding columns or vehicles. Also, it’s almost impossible to see when backing up a space so that one is parked next to an SUV or other large vehicle That doesn’t even take into account the mess and safety challenges this policy creates for those leaving crowded garages after an arena event.

Endangering pedestrian safety

“They are endangering the safety of all pedestrians walking towards their vehicles. 5,000 people go out at the same time vs. arrive at different times. Which would you prefer to return to? Preparing for a trial when someone is hit.

A policy no one wants

“Looks like they wasted $30,000 on license plate scanning technology that they didn’t actually need and now have to enforce a policy that no one actually wants.”

People will reconsider their visit

“There are town planning, commercial and development rules. Allentown could be a case study in what happens when you break them all. Parking is one of the first impressions of a site. It should be simple, practical and affordable. The experience must be good.

“People remember parking tickets and will reconsider visiting next time.”

Backtracking after the events will take “all night”

“If you can’t back up, you’ll be sitting there all night trying to back up while all the cars are lined up behind you. Absurd.”

It’s my right to park as I want

“It’s ridiculous. They have no right to tell people that they can’t back their cars to a place.

“If I want to waste everyone’s time by backing a big truck into a small parking spot, it’s my right as an American to do so!”

“Does everything absolutely have to be regulated?

It’s safer to get out of a place

“Tell me why it’s safer for me to try to get out of a place where I can’t see if there’s anything, than to come back when I know there’s nothing behind it me – and I can see what happens when I step back.”

“So it’s safer to back out of your spot, where people might be walking or where you can’t see a car coming?”

No problem in Bethlehem

“You can park as you want in Bethlehem”

Are you heading in the wrong direction?

“Most car parks have sloping parking. If you’re backing up, you’re actually facing the wrong direction to go.

“Just learn to back off better”

“Just learn how to back off better. With most cars equipped with rear cameras, there’s no excuse. I’m sick of traffic backing up and almost getting hit when these maniacs come back to their places.

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Parking spaces

City and MTA fight for parking spaces reserved for residents

An ongoing dispute between the City of Oyster Bay and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority over resident-only parking near Hicksville station does not appear to be resolved any time soon. Officials in Oyster Bay want the MTA to replace all parking spaces in the city that would be displaced by the construction of a new parking garage at the station.

“Hicksville is Long Island’s busiest station, but the MTA hasn’t invested properly in parking for its customers using the station,” city supervisor Joseph Saladino said. “We continue to meet with the MTA to ask them to follow through on their commitment to build new parking lots in Hicksville, just as they have done in Westbury and Mineola.”

Brian Nevin, a city spokesperson, referred to an environmental impact statement for the MTA’s third track project, which dated from 2017. He said the MTA planned to address the situation in the city. parking in Hicksville, but has so far failed. live up to expectations.

“In the statement, they had plans for a garage in Hicksville,” Nevin said. “They made their plans in Westbury and Mineola, but didn’t make it in Hicksville.

He estimated that in the City, nearly 2,000 commuters park illegally or on residential streets because of the lack of parking at the Hicksville station. The station is considered one of the busiest hubs on Long Island.

“The city owns the parking lots and is prepared to let the MTA build a garage on our property, however, they need to replace the resident spaces they are removing,” Nevin said.

The MTA and the City have been discussing for years the construction of a new multi-storey car park at the station. The facility would create more than 1,000 new parking spaces that are currently used as surface parking lots. Current lots require motorists to have a permit issued by the city to park there.

MTA spokesperson Meredith Daniels said a dialogue was still ongoing between the MTA and the city on how best to resolve the issue.

“We continue to work on ways to improve access to stations, including Hicksville, and have been in talks with the city to explore new opportunities,” Daniels said in a statement. “However, this is an ongoing dialogue with no formal plan at this time.”

Nevin said he didn’t want the talks to result in a final loss of resident-only parking.

“The only expectation we have is that if you’re going to build on, say 100 spaces for current residents, we still have those 100 available for residents,” Nevin said.

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Parking spaces

Vancouver will gain 700 parking spaces

Downtown Vancouver is set to gain more than 700 parking spaces over the next three years, in a series of projects that includes corner parking on wide streets and partnerships with private companies to build parking garages.

The city’s parking strategy also includes getting people out of their cars – expanding public transit options, making downtown more walkable, and increasing parking rates.

The plan indicates an inherent tension in creating a parking strategy. How do planners weigh the immediate needs of drivers against the city’s long-term goal of reducing the number of cars?

“It really is a balancing act. We try to ensure that there are enough parking spaces available, convenient and easy to find, but not so much that it interferes with active uses. We don’t want a sea of ​​parking lots that create dead zones,” said Chad Eiken, director of community and economic development.

During a presentation to City Council Monday evening, Parking Manager Steve Kaspan and Eiken presented the city’s six-point strategy to improve parking conditions in downtown Vancouver.

The plan includes maximizing on-street parking, increasing the supply of on- and off-street spaces where possible, increasing monthly and hourly parking rates, encouraging downtown businesses to reducing parking demand, improving visitor wayfinding and working with contractors to build parking structures.

Increase in supply

This summer, some downtown Vancouver streets wide enough to accommodate corner parking spaces will again be striped, replacing them with less efficient parallel parking for a net gain of about 80 spaces.

The change will add 29 parking spaces on West Evergreen Boulevard and 21 on nearby thoroughfares. Another 22 spaces will be added around King Street, and eight more spaces will be added in a short stretch of West 13th Street near Main Street.

Most of these spaces will be for employees who work at nearby businesses rather than buyers or short-term visitors. The work should be completed by the end of the summer.

“This project would definitely help with employee parking demand downtown,” Kaspan said.

A 121-space municipal parking lot, located just west of City Hall, is also scheduled to be completed this summer. The lot would house city employees, who pay $50 a month for permits. A limited number of monthly permit spaces would be open to the general public.

The city is also exploring the possibility of a partnership with the private sector that would turn empty land at 15th and Main streets into a temporary parking lot for use during construction of a new apartment complex at Providence Academy. The construction would displace approximately 176 private parking spaces, and the lot at 15th and Main could accommodate 126 of them.

In the long term, Vancouver envisions large-scale partnerships with private sector companies. A 740-space, seven-storey car park would be seen on Block 7 of The Waterfront Vancouver development, which is slated to open in late 2021.

“Everything is ripe for redevelopment.” said Eiken. “Now that the waterfront has some momentum, studies suggest the time is right to move forward.”

Another proposal, still in its infancy, would build a garage at Terminal 1, owned by the Port of Vancouver, and create more than 900 parking spaces.

In total, Eiken and Kaspan predicted that the city will add 1,067 parking spaces and lose up to 343 over the next few years.

Reduce demand

Beginning January 1, 2020, monthly public parking rates will begin to increase by $5 per year in an effort to bring city surface lot rates in line with private lot rates.

“If we have waiting lists – which we do – then the price is too low,” Kaspan said.

Another solution to reducing downtown parking demand comes in the form of fast electric vans that already contract with companies to transport employees to satellite lots.

The company Rethink Your Drive, or RYD, is launching an app this month and plans to start promoting public use of the service in August. While the company’s fleet of four vehicles would be busy during peak hours, the service would be free and open to the public at noon.

“During the day, as vehicles are available, it would be a free service and they would transport people to where they want to go downtown,” Eiken said.

The parking discussion is both philosophical and practical. While councilors agreed that the growing population of employees, visitors and residents need a place to park their cars, some wondered what prioritizing parking over other land uses would mean for the Vancouver character.

It’s madness, Councilor Ty Stober said, to think of parking as anything other than one of many tools to increase access.

“That’s about it, do I have access to get there?” Parking is one-way,” Stober said.

“I think we’re at a transition point here in the transport system preferences.”

Eiken agreed that the city is at a crossroads. But ultimately people have to get where they’re going, he added.

“We want the parking system to support a livable downtown, an active downtown that is also sustainable. We know that improvements need to be made to mobility and public transit to provide options for people,” Eiken said. “Right now, if you were to ask people how they get to work if they’re not driving, many would struggle to get from their neighborhood to downtown.

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Parking spaces

New St. Armands garage offers hundreds of parking spaces, some still concerned about payment meter

SARASOTA (WWSB) – The new St. Armands parking garage was not only packed with cars Monday morning, but also with dozens of Sarasota city leaders and residents who were there for one thing…to celebrate the new addition. to the region.

“We’re not just trying to bring the city’s idea of ​​improving parking capacity, but also into neighborhoods,” said Mark Lyons, the city’s parking manager.

The garage is located on N. Adams Circle and has over 500 parking spaces. It costs 50 cents an hour. It was opened to the public in February. City officials say it has since made it easier for visitors.

“It turned out to be really nice,” he said.

However, few feel the same. Last week, Sarasota Mayor Liz Alpert received a Facebook message that reads in part:

“Confusing parking payment and not visible enough to notice. Unmarked spaces making it difficult to know which space is being paid for.

This has been forwarded to the parking service. They say they researched and interviewed locals and came to this conclusion:

“The machine we have here today was chosen 80% of the time by the people we interviewed,” Lyons said.

Some local business owners say the garage helps boost business in certain areas of the Circle. For other purposes, they say their customers are more worried about not getting a ticket than enjoying their shopping experience.

“They won’t shop, they say they can’t come back because they don’t want a ticket,” said Just/Because owner Barbara Pugliese.

The city claims to have provided different payment alternatives, including an app. Some business owners say that not all of their customers use it.

“Not everyone wants to do that. Our demographic isn’t using the app as much as it should,” Pugliese said.

According to the parking service, they have made some changes to make it easier to pay at the meter. They say if there is a need in the future, they will continue to perfect it.

Copyright 2019 WWSB. All rights reserved.

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Uncategorized

Vail parking lots are free from April 22

Parking will be free at Vail parking structures starting Monday.
Justin Q. McCarty | Daily Special

VAIL – Free public parking reverts to the Vail Village and Lionshead parking structures starting at 6 a.m. on Monday April 22. This includes free overnight parking until May 24, when a $ 25 charge will be applied to discourage vehicle storage.

The summer parking program will run until October 7 and will include free access to structures during the day for all users as well as free public access to the new red sandstone parking garage on North Frontage Road. As an additional option, overnight parking in the Red Sandstone Garage will be available free of charge for up to 72 hours throughout the summer.

Parking passes issued for the 2018-2019 season, with the exception of Rose passes, will be exempt from overnight charges. Other exemptions include employees who work nights at Vail Village or Lionshead, as well as guests from lodges with limited on-site parking. Current pink pass holders who will be working night shifts during the summer are urged to contact their employer to make arrangements with the city parking pass office to obtain a parking pass for the summer without charge.



Value card holders will be able to use their passes for free daytime access to Vail Village and Lionshead parking lots this summer. If the vehicle is parked in either structure between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m., a fee of $ 25 will be billed to the card. As in previous years, Value card holders will need to bring proof of eligibility to city parking offices in November for recertification.

For more information, call 970-479-2104 before April 19 or visit http://www.vailgov.com/parking.

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Parking spaces

Brunswick Square garage repairs call for hundreds of parking spaces in Saint John

March is moving month for hundreds of downtown Saint John motorists.

Starting next week, a section of the Brunswick Square parking lot will be closed for renovations that are expected to last until the end of October.

Up to 300 drivers who would normally buy monthly licenses will be affected by the closure. However, the garage will remain open for hourly parking.

CBC News spoke to several people heading to their cars after work on Tuesday, where accounts varied as to how and when they were made aware of the disruption.

There is a lot of movement, a lot of momentum, a lot of change.– Ian MacKinnon, Commissioner of Saint John Transit and Parking.

Some drivers only learned on Monday that they had to leave, while others, like Rose Johnston, have known it for several days.

She was told that a spot had been reserved for her at the Peel Plaza parking garage on Carleton Street.

“There is a girl and I in my office who are monthly mechanics,” she said. “And we both got the email probably two weeks ago. It was saying on March 2nd, hand in your card, you can get the new card for Peel. [Plaza]. “

Take risks elsewhere

Johnston, who has parked in Brunswick Square for 13 years, has decided to cancel his pass entirely.

In the past, Johnston said, she was forced out of the aging garage and will now try her luck elsewhere.

Lucky for her, she should have no trouble finding a new parking space.

JD Irving Ltd. recently opened a new parking lot on Elliott Row for its employees, creating 500 vacant spaces in 16 downtown lots.

“There’s a lot of movement, a lot of momentum, a lot of change,” said Ian MacKinnon, Commissioner of Saint John Transit and Parking.

Brunswick Square parking garage set to close for renovation

From March 1, a section of the Brunswick Square parking lot will be closed for renovations that are expected to last until the end of October. 0:30

The parking commission itself lost 380 monthly customers in several batches when the JDI garage portal opened.

MacKinnon said 125 of those cars were parked at Peel Plaza, the commission’s flagship garage.

But weeks after those commuters moved their cars, 140 Brunswick Square drivers are expected to move in on Thursday, taking up any remaining spaces allocated to monthly parking.

MacKinnon said there had also been “numerous” inquiries about space in other commission lots since the Brunswick Square renovations were announced.

About 300 monthly permit holders have been asked to leave the Brunswick Square parking lot to allow for renovations over the next nine months. (SRC)

Another change to the city’s parking scene will come when Irving Oil opens its new parking garage on King Street East.

The garage is intended to complement the new Irving home office building currently under construction near King’s Square.

Many of these office workers are also scattered over many parking lots in the city center.

“These Irving Oil parking lots are not part of the Saint John Parking Commission, but they certainly park in garages in the upscale neighborhood,” MacKinnon said.

“There will be a capacity of around 350 which will become free. So that will have an indirect impact on us.”

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Uncategorized

Permanent suicide fencing will be installed on Ann Arbor parking structures

To deter suicides by jumping or falling from parking structures in Ann Arbor, the Ann Arbor Downtown Development Authority is further committed to building more permanent fencing on the roofs of parking structures in the city. Installation of the fencing began last fall when city officials noticed a pattern of suicide attempts or completed suicides by individuals jumping or falling from garages over the past three years.

Between November 2015 and December 2016, three people died and two were injured after falling or jumping from city parking lots. Further incidents occurred in September and October 2017, when two men fell from parking structures at South Fourth Avenue and East William Street. These deaths were considered suicides.

The project will be funded by fees charged to those who park their vehicles at city structures. The DDA board determined at a meeting last week that bids will be due by Jan. 16 and work should be underway by the end of the month.

City Council Member Kirk Westphal, D-Ward 2, described the importance of having the fence installed in the first place to help deter individuals from ending their lives.

“As council members, our first priority is public safety,” Westphal said. “As an urgent need for public safety, the advice we’ve gotten from mental health experts is that, while not foolproof, this temporary fence was a prudent strategy to help interrupt some people’s resolve. to commit suicide.”

According to Susan Pollay, executive director of the DDA, temporary fencing was installed on the garages when the bid for the project cost $1 million more than expected. Contractor availability was also low during this time, resulting in more expensive estimates. As a result, the DDA Board approved a slice of chain link fencing on the structures rather than more permanent materials.

Pollay said city administrators hope to add fencing at other levels in parking structures, not just rooftops. She also said it was important to install the fences to better meet the needs of Ann Arbor residents.

“Perhaps it’s more important to focus on the needs of people in our community that aren’t being met,” Pollay said.

Some garages, like the Maynard structure, are already fenced. Pollay told the Daily in October that the structures that will be prioritized include the roof of the Fourth and Williams Streets structure – at the top of the list due to its sheer size – followed by the Ann and Ashley Streets structure, the structure of Fourth and Washington, the Maynard Structure, the Liberty Square Structure, and the Forest Avenue Structure. The DDA will also pursue other tactics such as signage and structure management.

After the deaths last September and October, city officials decided to take action on the temporary fencing. Matt Lige, a lieutenant with the Ann Arbor Police Department, was one such official who expressed initial frustration.

“I am frustrated with the volume of deaths in parking lots in the city of Ann Arbor,” he said at the scene of the October fatal fall. “I think it’s safe to say we’re all frustrated.”

The city also installed signage with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s phone number and other information about psychiatric services to deter individuals from committing suicide.

Structures owned by the University of Michigan do not have the same obstacles as structures owned by the city.

In an email interview, Stephen Dolen, the university’s executive director of logistics, transportation and parking, said options are currently being evaluated to implement similar deterrent methods to structures. parking lot belonging to the university.

“The Logistics, Transportation and Parking unit has worked with parking consultants to assess options, review the effectiveness, operational considerations and costs of adding certain types of additional preventative measures and this continues to be a current topic of discussion,” Dolen wrote.

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Uncategorized

Permanent anti-suicide fencing will be installed on Ann Arbor parking structures

To deter suicides by jumping or falling from Ann Arbor parking lots, the Ann Arbor Downtown Development Authority is further committing to building more permanent fences on the roofs of city parking lots. Installation of the fences began last fall when city officials noticed a pattern of attempted or successful suicides by individuals jumping or falling from garages over the past three years.

Between November 2015 and December 2016, three people died and two were injured after falling or jumping from parking lots in the city. Further incidents occurred in September and October 2017, when two men fell from parking lots on South Fourth Avenue and East William Street. These deaths have been classified as suicides.

The project will be financed by fees charged to those who park their vehicles in the structures of the city. The DDA board determined at a meeting last week that bids will be due Jan. 16 and work is expected to be underway by the end of the month.

City council member Kirk Westphal, D-Ward 2, described the importance of installing the fence in the first place to help deter individuals from ending their own lives.

“As board members, our first priority is public safety,” Westphal said. “As an urgent public safety need, the opinion we got from mental health experts is that, while not foolproof, this temporary fence was a prudent strategy to help interrupt some people’s resolve. to commit suicide. “

According to Susan Pollay, executive director of DDA, temporary fences were put up on garages when the bid for the project cost $ 1 million more than expected. The availability of the contractor was also low during this period, which led to more expensive estimates. As a result, the DDA board approved the installation of chain link fencing over structures rather than more permanent materials.

Pollay said city administrators hope to add fencing at other levels in parking structures, not just on rooftops. She also said that it is important to install the fences to better meet the needs of the residents of Ann Arbor.

“Perhaps it’s more important to focus on the needs of people in our community who are not being met,” Pollay said.

Some garages, like the Maynard structure, are already fitted with fences. Pollay told the Daily in October that the structures that will be prioritized include the roof of the Fourth and Williams Street structure – at the top of the list because of its size – followed by the Ann and Ashley Street structure, the Fourth Street structure. and Washington, the Maynard Structure, the Liberty Square Structure and the Forest Avenue Structure. The DDA will also pursue other tactics such as signage and management of structures.

After the deaths last September and October, city officials decided to take action against the temporary fences. Matt Lige, a lieutenant with the Ann Arbor Police Department, was one of those officials who expressed his initial frustration.

“I am frustrated with the volume of deaths in parking lots in the city of Ann Arbor,” he said at the scene of the deadly October fall. “I think it’s safe to say we’re all frustrated.”

The city has also installed signage with the telephone number of the National Lifeline for Suicide Prevention and other information on psychiatric services to deter individuals from committing suicide.

The structures owned by the University of Michigan do not have the same barriers as the structures owned by the city.

In an email interview, Stephen Dolen, the university’s executive director of logistics, transportation and parking, said options are currently being assessed to implement deterrent methods similar to structures. parking lot belonging to the university.

“The Logistics, Transportation and Parking unit worked with parking consultants to assess options, review the efficiency, operational considerations and costs of adding certain types of additional preventative measures and this continues to be a current topic of discussion, ”Dolen wrote.

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Parking spaces

Hundreds of new parking spaces towards the old town

A new parking garage has added more than 300 new parking spaces to Old Town Fort Collins.

Of the 323 parking spaces in the new Firehouse Alley garage between Walnut Street and Jefferson Street, 216 are open to the public. The others are reserved for guests of the adjoining Elizabeth Hotel, which opened this week.

The garage opened to the public on Thursday.

Parking in the new garage is more expensive than in the city’s other two parking lots, but drivers can power the meter with a smartphone app called FC Parking. Parking costs $ 1.50 an hour – 50 cents more per hour than the other two garages in the Old Town – and the first hour is not free, unlike other structures.

The parking spaces in the Firehouse Alley garage have sensors that can monitor when someone is parked there and for how long. Drivers pay in advance at a kiosk and can add time through the parking app.

“It’s really important to us to make parking as easy as possible,” said Craig Dubin, director of communications and administration at Transfort, in a press release.

Related:Fort Collins seeks to silence train horns in Old Town again

The $ 12 million parking structure was paid for through a public-private partnership between the city, the Downtown Development Authority and the hotel.

For people looking to save on parking, there’s good news. The city has made parking free at the three garages in the Old City on Saturdays and Sundays for the rest of the year.

Fort Collins has been working to add additional parking spaces to the downtown area since 2013, when city council approved the parking plan for the downtown and surrounding areas. This plan provided for the addition of 1,500 parking spaces in the old town and the increase in infrastructure for pedestrians and cyclists.

Alicia Stice covers transportation and the latest news for The Coloradoan. Follow her on twitter @AliciaStice.

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect that the parking lot opened on Thursday.

Local:Fort Collins Reduces Old Town Smoking Ban

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Parking spaces

The truth about compact parking lots

STATESBORO, GA (WTOC) – When you drive to Target, Walmart, or even a city parking lot, have you ever wondered how drivers think they can park in a compact parking spot?

The vehicle may not be suitable, but as OMCC’s Don Logana found out, these people may know something we didn’t know. These parking spaces may simply be obsolete.

It turns out that the auto industry, and even the parking industry, is pretty vague on what defines a compact car.

“A Prius is more of a compact car than a Chevrolet Avalanche,” said Kristi Bryant, GSU ​​parking manager.

But, how do you define it?

One thing is for sure: knocks, dents and scratches are going to happen. This is one of the reasons why Georgia Southern University’s director of parking services, Kristi Bryant, says her office struggles with parking regulations. Cars are constantly changing and getting bigger and bigger, and a typical 90-degree compact car space is eight feet wide and 15 feet long. Some are as small as seven to seven and a half feet wide.

“Here at Georgia Southern, we are committed to making spaces at least 8.5 feet wide and new construction nine feet wide,” said Bryant.

Here’s what you probably don’t know. Bryant says parking codes, including compact parking, only apply to public parking. Private parking is not regulated, so older, obsolete spaces will likely remain so, unless there is new construction.

“Most now include compact parking spaces. Most include hybrid spaces as well as a strong push for electric vehicles,” said Bryant.

Georgia Southern spends a pretty penny creating bigger, compact parking spots, and parking spots in general, which is why private companies don’t do stripping or renovations.

“It’s extremely expensive. You’re probably looking at $ 1 million and $ 2 million to completely revamp everything,” Bryant said.

The City of Savannah says it is not aware of any changes in parking regulations and is not making any changes. Bryant says Georgia Southern is private and they are doing it for the welfare of their students and teachers when it comes to parking.

“The level of frustration and the level of security will be increased, and that is what it is,” she said. “Make everyone’s experience more comfortable.

And, if you’re wondering why, an obviously “non” compact car isn’t towed to a local store. This is probably because it is private property and it is up to the store to have the car towed. The City of Savannah will fine vehicles that are in a compact parking space.

Copyright 2015 OMCC. All rights reserved.

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